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Viewing 151 to 180 of 10372
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0564
Pengfei Lu, Chris Brace, Bo Hu
Abstract The turbo-compounding has been extensively researched as a mean of improving the overall thermal efficiency of the internal combustion engine. Many of the studies aiming to optimize the turbo-compounding system lead to the unified conclusion that this approach is more suitable for the operation under constant high load condition, while it has little effect on improving the fuel economy under low load conditions. Besides, in a traditional series turbo-compounding engine, the increased back pressure unavoidably results in a serious parasitic load to the system by increasing the resistance to the scavenging process. In order to improve this situation, a novel turbo-compounding arrangement has been proposed, in which the turbocharger was replaced by a continuously variable transmission (CVT) coupled supercharger (CVT superchargedr) to supply sufficient air mass flow rate to the engine at lower engine speeds.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0450
Somnath Sen, Paulson Parayil
Abstract In order to ensure a comfortable space inside the cabin, it is very essential to design an efficient heating ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) system which can deliver uniform temperature distribution at the exit. There are several factors which impact on uniformity of temperature distribution. Airflow distribution is one of the key parameter in deciding the effectiveness of temperature distribution. Kinematics links and linkage system typically termed as ‘mechanism’ is one of the critical sub-systems which greatly affects the airflow distribution. It is not the temperature uniformity but also the HVAC temperature linearity also depends on airflow distribution. Hence the design of mechanism is incomparably of paramount importance to achieve the desired level of airflow distribution at HVAC exit. The present paper describes the design methodology of automotive HVAC mechanism system.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0480
Weiguo Zhang, Mark Likich, Mac Lynch, John White
Abstract The noise radiated from the snorkel of an air induction system (AIS) can be a major noise source to the vehicle interior noise. This noise source is typically quantified as the snorkel volume velocity which is directly related to vehicle interior noise through the vehicle noise transfer function. It is important to predict the snorkel volume velocity robustly at the early design stage for the AIS development. Design For Six Sigma (DFSS) is an engineering approach that supports the new product development process. The IDDOV (Identify-Define-Develop-Optimize-Verify) method is a DFSS approach which can be used for creating innovative, low cost and trouble free products on significant short schedules. In this paper, an IDD project which is one type of DFSS project using IDDOV method is presented on developing a robust simulation process to predict the AIS snorkel volume velocity. First, the IDDOV method is overviewed and the innovative tools in each phase of IDDOV are introduced.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0525
Sameer Srivastava, Sandeep Raina, Kapil Kumar Pandey, Arnab Sandilya, Shankar Bose, Kumar Vivek
Abstract The aim of the research was to explore and establish aspects that affect ageing of non-woven fabrics used in automobiles. One of the most vulnerable parts in a vehicle, at the behest of the customer, is the Floor Carpet. Original Equipment manufacturers are continually binging at doable options for providing low cost carpets that are functionally and aesthetically durable throughout the vehicle life. [1] Car interiors, especially carpet, must remain in impeccable condition to uphold a good resale value. Targeting the analysis of causes that affect ageing of non-woven fabric material will form the core study of the literature to follow. The establishment of which shall ascertain some viable solutions to augment quality of the contemporary non-woven automotive carpet.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0512
Chae-Hwan Hong
Polylactide (PLA), which is one of the most important biocompatible polyesters that are derived from annually renewable biomass such as corn and sugar beets, has attracted much attention for automotive parts application. The manufacturing method of PLA is the ring-opening polymerization of the dimeric cyclic ester of lactic acid, lactide. For the PLA composites including stereocomplexed with L- and D-PLA, we developed the unit processes such as fermentation, separation, lactide conversion, and polymerization. We investigated D-lactic acid fermentation with a view to obtaining the strains capable of producing D-lactic acid, and through catalyst screening test for polycondensation and depolymerization reactions, we got a new method which shortens the whole reaction time of lactide synthesis step. Poly(d-lactide) is obtained from the ring-opening polymerization of d-lactide. Also we investigated several catalysts and polymerization conditions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1295
Atsushi Itoh, ZongGuang Wang, Toshikazu Nosaka, Keita Wada
Abstract Without engine noise, the cabin of an electric vehicle is quiet, but on the other hand, it becomes easy to perceive refrigerant-induced noise in the automotive air-conditioning (A/C) system. When determining the A/C system at the design stage, it is crucial to verify whether refrigerant-induced noise occurs in the system or not before the real A/C systems are made. If refrigerant-induced noise almost never occurs during the design stage, it is difficult to evaluate by vehicle testing at the development stage. This paper presents a 1D modeling methodology for the assessment of refrigerant-induced noise such as self-excitation noise generated by pressure pulsation through the thermal expansion valve (TXV). The GT-SUITE commercial code was used to develop a refrigerant cycle model consisting of a compressor, condenser, evaporator, TXV and the connecting pipe network.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0823
Jason Miwa, Darius Mehta, Chad Koci
Abstract Increasingly stringent emissions regulations require that modern diesel aftertreatment systems must warm up and begin controlling emissions shortly after startup. While several new aftertreatment technologies have been introduced that focus on lowering the aftertreatment activation temperature, the engine system still needs to provide thermal energy to the exhaust for cold start. A study was conducted to evaluate several engine technologies that focus on improving the thermal energy that the engine system provides to the aftertreatment system while minimizing the impact on fuel economy and emissions. Studies were conducted on a modern common rail 3L diesel engine with a custom dual loop EGR system. The engine was calibrated for low engine-out NOx using various combustion strategies depending on the speed/load operating condition.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0641
Thomas De Cuyper, Sam Bracke, Jolien Lavens, Stijn Broekaert, Kam Chana, Michel De Paepe, Sebastian Verhelst
Abstract To optimize internal combustion engines (ICEs), a good understanding of engine operation is essential. The heat transfer from the working gases to the combustion chamber walls plays an important role, not only for the performance, but also for the emissions of the engine. Besides, thermal management of ICEs is becoming more and more important as an additional tool for optimizing efficiency and emission aftertreatment. In contrast little is known about the convective heat transfer inside the combustion chamber due to the complexity of the working processes. Heat transfer measurements inside the combustion chamber pose a challenge in instrumentation due to the harsh environment. Additionally, the heat loss in a spark ignition (SI) engine shows a high temporal and spatial variation. This poses certain requirements on the heat flux sensor. In this paper we examine the heat transfer in a production SI ICE through the use of Thin Film Gauge (TFG) heat flux sensors.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0646
Pablo Olmeda, Jaime Martin, Antonio Garcia, Diego Blanco, Alok Warey, Vicent Domenech
Abstract Regulated emissions and fuel consumption are the main constraints affecting internal combustion engine (ICE) design. Over the years, many techniques have been used with the aim of meeting these limitations. In particular, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) has proved to be an invaluable solution to reduce NOx emissions in Diesel engines, becoming a widely used technique in production engines. However, its application has a direct effect on fuel consumption due to both the changes in the in-cylinder processes, affecting indicated efficiency, and also on the air management. An analysis, based on the engine Global Energy Balance, is presented to thoroughly assess the behavior of a HSDI Diesel engine under variable EGR conditions at different operating points. The tests have been carried out keeping constant the conditions at the IVC and the combustion centering.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0647
Azmi Osman, M. Khairul Arif Muhammad Yusof, Mohammad Rafi
Abstract Additional fuel consumption reduction during the NEDC test cycle and real life driving can be effectively achieved by quickly raising the temperatures of the powertrain’s parts, oils and coolant closer to the optimal operating temperatures. In particular, the engine cooling system today must play a bigger role in the overall thermal management of the powertrain’s fluids and metals during warm-up, idle and severe operating conditions. In responding to these additional requirements, the previously proposed cost effective split cooling system has been further evolved to expedite the powertrain’s warming up process without compromising the overall heat rejection performance during severe operating conditions. In achieving these warming and cooling functions, the coolant flow rate in the cylinder head is almost stagnant when the single thermostat is closed and at its maximum when the thermostat is fully opened.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0652
Ravi Ranjan, Lakshmaiah Brahmasani, Parvej Khan
Abstract This paper reports a study on Charge air cooler effectiveness, Air intake pressure drop, Acceleration Performance and Rise over ambient temperature of a utility vehicle for different layouts of Inter cooler, radiator, condenser and fan module in order to finalize an efficient Power train cooling system layout. The main objective is effective utilization of front end opening area, eliminating inter cooler heat load on the radiator, so that radiator size, fan size and fan motor wattage can be optimized to achieve desired cooling performance requirements with the cooling system (CRFM) module. Effect of the intercooler effectiveness, Intake pressure drop, Vehicle acceleration performance and Rise over ambient temperature are studied and both the advantages and disadvantages of the proposals are discussed to finalize the better position of inter-cooler along with other engine cooling components.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0654
Lakshmaiah Brahmasani, Sarangapani K, Samson Solomon, Parvej Khan
Abstract The paper presents the development of a proposed rear powertrain cooling system of a minivan. The packaging of cooling system is finalized such that the radiator faces towards the rear of the vehicle bumper which is opposite to the conventional rear cooling system (i.e. radiator faces towards the front of the vehicle). In the small minivan, the space ahead of the engine is used as a floor for passenger foot. Due to these space constraints, the cooling system has no choice, but to move rear of the vehicle and above the departure plane to meet packaging requirements. Furthermore, in the conventional rear cooling system, in front of the radiator, there is engine and exhaust system, which heats up the air going to the radiator and reduces radiator cooling performance. Thus the cooling system is placed such that the radiator faces the rear bumper to draw in cooler air.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0648
Sinan Eroglu, Ipek Duman, Alp Ergenc, Rıfat Yanarocak
Abstract The exhaust manifold bridges the gap between the engine structure and the hot-end after-treatment system, the burned in-cylinder gases are disposed through the manifold. The automotive exhaust manifolds are designed and developed for providing a smooth flow with low/least back pressure and must be able to withstand extreme heating under very high temperatures and cooling under low temperatures. The paper presents a theoretical study aiming to investigate the feasibility of three different CAE approaches and techniques used for the simulation of exhaust manifold fluid flow and the accompanying thermal distribution. The main difficulty emanates from the pulsating nature of fluid flow inside the engine exhaust manifold. To verify the outcome of each solution experimental measurements of the manifold temperatures have been performed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0651
Masaki Harada, Takashi Yasuda, Shota Terachi, Sergio Pujols, Jason R. Spenny
Abstract Due to the recent trend emphasizing on environmental friendly, engine supercharger downsizing technology has been under development globally. In this report, the technical knowledge for high performance and high quality water-cooled CAC development is provided. For higher cooling performance, the optimum fin and tube core matrix water-cooled CAC, delivering best performance and quality have been developed. For higher reliability against thermal stress, the detail specifications of water-cooled CAC based on the transient analysis and the simulation technology have been established.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0657
T Sethuramalingam, Chandrakant Parmar, Sashikant Tiwari
Abstract DFSS is a disciplined problem prevention approach which helps in achieving the most optimum design solution and provides improved and cost effective quality products. This paper presents the implementation of DFSS method to design a distinctive cooling system where engine is mounted in the rear and radiator is mounted in the front of the car. In automobile design, a rear-engine design layout places the engine at the rear of the vehicle. This layout is mainly found in small, entry level cars and light commercial vehicles chosen for three reasons - packaging, traction, and ease of manufacturing. In conventional Passenger cars, a radiator is located close to the engine for simple packaging and efficient thermal management. This paper is about designing a distinctive cooling system of a car having rear mounted engine and front mounted radiator.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0655
Farid Bahiraei, Amir Fartaj, Gholm-Abbas Nazri
In this work, a pseudo three-dimensional coupled thermal-electrochemical model is established to estimate the heat generation and temperature profiles of a lithium ion battery as functions of the state of the discharge. Then, this model is used to investigate the effectiveness of active and passive thermal management systems. The active cooling system utilizes cooling plate and water as the working fluid while the passive cooling system incorporates a phase change material (PCM). The thermal effects of coolant flow rate examined using a computational fluid dynamics model. In the passive cooling system, Paraffin wax used as a heat dissipation source to control battery temperature rise. The effect of module size and battery spacing is studied to find the optimal weight of PCM required. The results show that although the active cooling system has the capability to reduce the peak temperatures, it leads to a large temperature difference over the battery module.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0664
Ahmed E. Hassaneen, Wael I. A. Aly, Gamal Bedair, Mohammed Abdussalam
Abstract The thermal performance of an ammonia-water-hydrogen absorption refrigeration system using the waste exhaust gases of an internal combustion diesel engine as energy source was investigated experimentally. An automotive engine was tested in a bench test dynamometer, with the absorption refrigeration system adapted to the exhaust pipe via a heat exchanger. The engine was tested for different torques (15 N.m, 30 N.m, and 45 N.m). The exhaust gas flow to the heat exchanger built on the generator was controlled manually using two control valves. The refrigerator reached a steady state temperature between 10 and 14.5°C about 3.5 hours after system start up, depending on engine load. The maximum coefficient of performance was 0.10 obtained for the controlled exhaust mass flow case at torque 30 Nm after 3hrs from system startup.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1211
Hua Tian, WeiGuang Wang, Ge-Qun Shu, Xingyu Liang, Haiqiao Wei
Abstract Power lithium-ion battery is the core component of electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs). Thermal management at different operating conditions affects the life, security and stability of lithium-ion battery pack. In this paper, a one-dimensional, multiscale, electrochemical-thermal coupled model was applied and perfected for a flat-plate-battery pack. The model is capable of predicting thermal and electrochemical behaviors of battery. To provide more guidance for the selection of thermal management, temperature evolutions and distributions in the battery pack at various ambient temperatures, discharge rates and thermal radiation coefficients were simulated based on six types of thermal management (adiabatic, natural convection, air cooling, liquid cooling, phase change material cooling, isothermal).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1204
Dongchang Pan, Sichuan Xu, Chunjing Lin, Guofeng Chang
Abstract As one of the most crucial components in electric vehicles, power batteries generate abundant heat during charging and discharging processes. Thermal management system (TMS), which is designed to keep the battery cells within an optimum temperature range and to maintain an even temperature distribution from cell to cell, is vital for the high efficiency, long calendar life and reliable safety of these power batteries. With the desirable features of low system complexity, light weight, high energy efficiency and good battery thermal uniformity, thermal management using composite phase change materials (PCMs) has drawn great attention in the past fifteen years. In the hope of supplying helpful guidelines for the design of the PCM-based TMSs, this work begins with the summarization of the most commonly applied heat transfer enhancement methods (i.e., the use of thermally conductive particles, metal fin, expanded graphite matrix and metal foam) for PCMs by different researchers.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1238
Paul Karoshi, Karin Tieber, Christopher Kneissl, Georg Peneder, Harald Kraus, Martin Hofstetter, Jurgen Fabian, Martin Ackerl
Abstract In hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), the operation strategy strongly influences the available system power, as well as local exhaust emissions. Predictive operation strategies rely on knowledge of future traction-force demands. This predicted information can be used to balance the battery’s state of charge or the engine’s thermal system in their legal operation limits and can reduce peak loads. Assuming the air and rolling drag-coefficient to be constant, the desired vehicle velocity, vehicle-mass and longitudinal driving resistances determine the vehicle’s traction-force demand. In this paper, a novel methodology, combining a history-based prediction algorithm for estimating future traction-force demands with the parameter identification of road grade angle and vehicle mass, is proposed. It is solely based on a route-history database and internal vehicle data, available on its on-board communication and measuring systems.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0213
Andrea Alessandro Piovano, Laura Maria Lorefice, Giuseppe Scantamburlo
Abstract The aim of this work has been to develop an advanced methodology to model the car cabin cool down test. It has been decided to focus the attention on the fluid dynamics and thermal dynamics aspects of the phenomenon, trying to catch the correct heat transfer between the outside environment and the internal cabin with a thermal tool, together with an internal flows CFD simulation. To start with, an experimental cool down test was conducted in the FCA Italy climatic wind tunnel on a L0 segment vehicle, to get the correlation data and the boundary conditions required for the simulation: panel ducts air transient temperatures, wind tunnel air temperature and velocity, solar array load. The simulation was divided into two steps: steady state soak with a finite difference based thermal solver and transient cool down, coupling the thermal solver with a CFD one. In particular an advanced CFD/thermal coupled approach has been applied, using STAR-CCM+® and TAITherm® tools.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1355
Jeffrey R. Hodgkins, Walter Brophy, Thomas Gaydosh, Norimasa Kobayashi, Hiroo Yamaoka
Abstract Current vehicle acoustic performance prediction methods, CAE (computer aided engineering) or physical testing, have some difficulty predicting interior sound in the mid-frequency range (300 to 1000 Hz). It is in this frequency range where the overall acoustic performance becomes sensitive to not only the contributions of structure-borne sources, which can be studied using traditional finite element analysis (FEA) methods, but also the contribution of airborne noise sources which increase proportional to frequency. It is in this higher frequency range (>1000 Hz) that physical testing and statistical CAE methods are traditionally used for performance studies. This paper will discuss a study that was undertaken to test the capability of a finite element modeling method that can accurately simulate air-borne noise phenomena in the mid-frequency range.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0258
Jason Aaron Lustbader, Bidzina Kekelia, Jeff Tomerlin, Cory J. Kreutzer, Skip Yeakel, Steven Adelman, Zhiming Luo, John Zehme
Abstract Annual fuel use for sleeper cab truck rest period idling is estimated at 667 million gallons in the United States, or 6.8% of long-haul truck fuel use. Truck idling during a rest period represents zero freight efficiency and is largely done to supply accessory power for climate conditioning of the cab. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s CoolCab project aims to reduce heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) loads and resulting fuel use from rest period idling by working closely with industry to design efficient long-haul truck thermal management systems while maintaining occupant comfort. Enhancing the thermal performance of cab/sleepers will enable smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective idle reduction solutions. In addition, if the fuel savings provide a one- to three-year payback period, fleet owners will be economically motivated to incorporate them.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0261
Lili Feng, Predrag Hrnjak
Abstract This paper presents a simulation model for a reversible air conditioning and heat pump system for electric vehicles. The system contains a variable speed compressor, three microchannel heat exchangers, an accumulator, and two electronic expansion valves. Heat exchangers are solved by discretizing into cells. Compressor and accumulator models are developed by fitting data with physical insights. Expansion valves are modeled by isenthalpic processes. System performance is calculated by connecting all parts in the same way as the physical system and solved iteratively. The model is reasonably validated against experimental data from a separate experimental study. Future improvement is needed to take into account maldistribution in outdoor heat exchanger working as an evaporator in HP mode. Charge retention in components also requires further study.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1304
Tadayoshi Fukushima, Hitoshi Takagi, Toshio Enomoto, Hiroyuki Sawada, Tomoyuki Kaneda
Abstract Interior noise caused by exterior air flow, or wind noise, is one of the noise-and-vibration phenomena for which a systematic simulation method has been desired for enabling their prediction. One of the main difficulties in simulating wind noise is that, unlike most other noises from the engine or road input, wind noise has not one but two different types of sources, namely, convective and acoustic ones. Therefore, in order to synthesize the interior sound pressure level (SPL), the body sensitivities (interior SPL/outer source level) for both types of sources have to be considered. In particular, sensitivity to the convective input has not been well understood, and hence it has not been determined. Moreover, the high-frequency nature of wind noise (e.g., the main energy range extends up to 4000 Hz) has limited the effective application of CAE for determining body sensitivities, for example, from the side window glass to the occupants’ ears.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0238
Gang Liu, Zheng Zhao, Hao Guan, Yaqi Liu, Chunhui Zhang, Dingwei Gao, Wuming Zhou, Juergen Knauf
Abstract Reducing fuel consumption is a major challenge for vehicle, especially for SUV. Cooling loss is about 30% in total energy loss under NEDC (New European Driving Cycle) cycle. It is necessary to optimize vehicle thermal management system to improve fuel economy. Otherwise, rapid warm-up is beneficial for friction reduction and passenger comfort in cold-start. Vehicle thermal behavior is influenced by cooling system layout, new technology and control strategy. Thermal management simulation is effective to show the energy flow and fuel consumption under the influence of new technology under NEDC cycle. So 1D thermal management simulation model is created, including vehicle, cooling system, lubrication system and detailed engine model with all friction components. And the interrelations between all the components are considered in the model.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0236
Forrest Jehlik, Eric Rask, Michael Duoba
Abstract It is widely understood that cold ambient temperatures negatively impact vehicle system efficiency. This is due to a combination of factors: increased friction (engine oil, transmission, and driveline viscous effects), cold start enrichment, heat transfer, and air density variations. Although the science of quantifying steady-state vehicle component efficiency is mature, transient component efficiencies over dynamic ambient real-world conditions is less understood and quantified. This work characterizes wheel assembly efficiencies of a conventional and electric vehicle over a wide range of ambient conditions. For this work, the wheel assembly is defined as the tire side axle spline, spline housing, bearings, brakes, and tires. Dynamometer testing over hot and cold ambient temperatures was conducted with a conventional and electric vehicle instrumented to determine the output energy losses of the wheel assembly in proportion to the input energy of the half-shafts.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0243
Jingwei Zhu, Stefan Elbel
Abstract Expansion work recovery by two-phase ejector is known to be beneficial to vapor compression cycle performance. However, one of the biggest challenges with ejector vapor compression cycles is that the ejector cycle performance is sensitive to working condition changes which are common in automotive applications. Different working conditions require different ejector geometries to achieve maximum performance. Slightly different geometries may result in substantially different COPs under the same conditions. The ejector motive nozzle throat diameter (motive nozzle restrictiveness) is one of the key parameters that can significantly affect ejector cycle COP. This paper presents a new two-phase nozzle restrictiveness control mechanism which is possibly applicable to two-phase ejectors used in vapor compression cycles.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0233
Masayoshi Mori, Manabu Matsumoto, Makoto Ohtani
Abstract The practical application of heat recovery using thermoelectrics requires the realization of reasonable cost effectiveness. Therefore, a thermoelectric generator (TEG) structure that can compatibly increase efficiency and reduce cost was investigated with the aim of enhancing cost effectiveness. To increase efficiency, a method of using a vacuum space structure to reduce the TEG size was investigated to enable installation just after the close-coupled catalyzer, which is subject to many space restrictions. It was found that by making it possible to use high temperature exhaust heat, power generation efficiency can be increased to approximately twice that of the typical under floor installation. In addition, coupled simulation of heat transfer and power generation using FEM, 1D cost effectiveness simulations, and bench tests were performed with the aim of reducing cost.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0262
Matthew A. Jeffers, Larry Chaney, John P. Rugh
Abstract When operated, the cabin climate control system is the largest auxiliary load on a vehicle. This load has significant impact on fuel economy for conventional and hybrid vehicles, and it drastically reduces the driving range of all-electric vehicles (EVs). Heating is even more detrimental to EV range than cooling because no engine waste heat is available. Reducing the thermal loads on the vehicle climate control system will extend driving range and increase the market penetration of EVs. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have evaluated strategies for vehicle climate control load reduction with special attention toward grid-connected electric vehicles. Outdoor vehicle thermal testing and computational modeling were used to assess potential strategies for improved thermal management and to evaluate the effectiveness of thermal load reduction technologies. A human physiology model was also used to evaluate the impact on occupant thermal comfort.
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