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Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Armin Traussnig, Heinz Petutschnig, Andreas Ennemoser, Michael Stolz, Mauro Tizianel
Abstract In order to meet current and future emission and CO2 targets, an efficient vehicle thermal management system is one of the key factors in conventional as well as in electrified powertrains. Furthermore the increasing number of vehicle configurations leads to a high variability and degrees of freedom in possible system designs and the control thereof, which can only be handled by a comprehensive tool chain of vehicle system simulation and a generic control system architecture. The required model must comprise all relevant systems of the vehicle (control functionality, cooling system, lubrication system, engine, drive train, HV components etc.). For proper prediction with respect to energy consumption all interactions and interdependencies of those systems have to be taken into consideration, i.e. all energy fluxes (mechanical, hydraulically, electrical, thermal) have to be exchanged among the system boundaries accordingly. However, it is very important that the level of detail of the VTMS model fits to the current phase of the vehicle development process.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Chengyu Zhang, Ge-Qun Shu, Hua Tian, Haiqiao Wei, Guopeng Yu, Youcai Liang
Abstract This paper presents a model system TEG-DORC that employs thermoelectric generator (TEG) as a topping cycle integrated with a dual-loop organic Rankine bottoming cycle (DORC) to recover exhaust heat of internal combustion engine (ICE). The thermodynamic performance of TEG-DORC system is analyzed based on the first and second law of thermodynamics when system net output power Wnet, thermal efficiency ηth, exergy efficiency ηe and volumetric expansion ratio are chosen as objective functions. The model has many parameters that affect combined system performance such as TEG scale, evaporation pressure of high temperature ORC loop (HT loop) Pevp,HT, condensation temperature of HT loop Tcond,HT. It is suggested that HT loop has a vital influence on system performance. The results show that TEG-DORC system can significantly improve system performance, and system net output power gets maximum (30.69kW) when Tcond,HT is 370K and Pevp,HT is 4MPa, accordingly, the absolute effective thermal efficiency increases by 5.2%.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hai Wu, Wen Chen, Meng-Feng Li, Xinlei Wang
Abstract A hot and cold water mixing process with a steam condenser and a chilled water heat exchanger is set up for an engine EGR fouling test. The test rig has water recycled in the loop of a pump, heat exchangers, a three-way mixing valve, and a test EGR unit. The target unit temperature is controlled by a heating, cooling and mixing process with individual valves regulating the flow-rate of saturated steam, chilled water and mixing ratio. The challenges in control design are the dead-time, interaction, nonlinearity and multivariable characteristics of heat exchangers, plus the flow recycle in the system. A systems method is applied to extract a simple linear model for control design. The method avoids the nonlinearity and interaction among different temperatures at inlet, outlet and flow-rate. The test data proves the effectiveness of systems analysis and modeling methodology. As a result, the first-order linear model facilitates the controller design. The simulation studies with internal recycle processes produced promising results.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Manuel Lorenz, Dusan Fiala, Markus Spinnler, Thomas Sattelmayer
Abstract Cabin heating and cooling loads of modern vehicles, notably electrically driven, represent a major portion of the overall vehicle energy consumption. Various concepts to reduce these loads have thus been proposed but quantitative experimental analysis or numerical predictions are scarcely available. Conventional 1D or zonal cabin models do not account adequately for strongly inhomogeneous cabin climate conditions. In this paper a new cabin model is presented, which delivers both temporally and spatially resolved data. The model uses a dynamic coupling algorithm including a CFD simulation of the cabin airflow, a model of the cabin structure and the detailed passenger Fiala Physiological Comfort (FPC) model. The coupling not only includes heat transport between the cabin air and the surrounding surfaces, but also considers important interactions with the occupants, including e.g. the release of moisture into the cabin air by respiration and sweating predicted by the Fiala Physiological Comfort model and the heat exchange between occupant body parts and solid surfaces by radiation and conduction.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
B. Vasanth, Jose Bright, Pavan Reddy, Sathish Kumar S, Murali Govindarajalu
Abstract In an Automotive air conditioning system, the air flow distribution in the cabin from the HVAC (Heating, ventilation and air conditioning), ducts and outlets is evaluated by the velocity achieved at driver and passenger mannequin aim points. Multiple simulation iterations are being carried out before finalizing the design of HVAC panel duct and outlets until the target velocity is achieved. In this paper, a parametric modeling of the HVAC outlet is done which includes primary and secondary vane creation using CATIA. Java macro files are created for simulation runs in STAR CCM+. ISIGHT is used as an interface tool between CATIA and STARCCM+. The vane limits of outlet and the target velocity to be achieved at mannequin aim points are defined as the boundary conditions for the analysis. Based on the optimization technique and the number of iterations defined in ISIGHT, the vane angle model gets updated automatically in CATIA followed by the simulation runs in STARCCM+. Based on the results vane angle will get updated and the iterations continues automatically till the target velocity is met at the aim points.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mitsuru Enomoto, Michiko Kakinuma, Nobuhito Kato, Haruo Ishikawa, Yuichiro Hirose
Abstract Design work for truck suspension systems requires multi-objective optimization using a large number of parameters that cannot be solved in a simple way. This paper proposes a process-based systematization concept for ride comfort design using a set-based design method. A truck was modeled with a minimum of 13 degrees of freedom, and suspension performance under various vehicle speeds, road surface conditions, and load amounts was calculated. The range of design parameters for the suspension, the range of performance requirements, and the optimal values within these ranges were defined based on the knowledge and know-how of experienced design engineers. The final design of the suspension was installed in a prototype truck and evaluated. The performance of the truck satisfied all the objectives and the effectiveness of the set-based design approach was confirmed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jiri Hvezda
Abstract The paper introduces a recently developed toolset to be implemented into the complex simulation codes for internal combustion engines to treat the calculations dealing with a high-pressure part of the thermodynamic cycle in a four-stroke spark ignition engine. This multi-zone simulating tool works on the basis of a simple quasi-dimensional method reflecting the real combustion chamber geometry and uses a specific approach to describe the species chemical transformation during combustion. Here a standard kinetic scheme is combined adaptively with a flexible method for chemical equilibrium in the cases of abnormally fast chemical reactions to improve the numerical performance of the equation system. Real 3-D combustion chamber geometry is taken into account by means of geometrical characteristics created in advance. A newly generalized tool providing these data is presented here. The new code is also able to work in predictive or inverse mode. The selected results regarding these two algorithms are mentioned at the end.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Namwook Kim, Aymeric Rousseau, Daeheung Lee, Henning Lohse-Busch
Abstract This paper introduces control strategy analysis and performance degradation for the 2010 Toyota Prius under different thermal conditions. The goal was to understand, in as much detail as possible, the impact of thermal conditions on component and vehicle performances by analyzing a number of test data obtained under different thermal conditions in the Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF) at Argonne National Laboratory. A previous study analyzed the control behavior and performance under a normal ambient temperature; thus the first step in this study was to focus on the impact when the ambient temperature is cold or hot. Based on the analyzed results, thermal component models were developed in which the vehicle controller in the simulation was designed to mimic the control behavior when temperatures of the components are cold or hot. Further, the performance degradation of the components was applied to the mathematical models based on analysis of the test data. All the thermal component models were integrated into a vehicle system with the redesigned supervisory controller, and the vehicle model was validated with the test data.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Abhijit Nitin Khare, Henning Lohse-Busch, Douglas Nelson
Abstract Ambient temperature plays an important role in the operational behavior of a vehicle. Temperature variances from 20 F to 72 F to 95 F produce different operation from different HEVs, as prescribed by their respective energy management strategies. The extra variable of Climate Control causes these behaviors to change again. There have been studies conducted on the differences in operational behavior of conventional vehicles as against HEVs, with and without climate control. Lohse-Bush et al conclude that operational behavior of conventional vehicles is much more robust as compared to HEVs and that the effect of ambient temperature is felt more prominently in HEVs (1). However, HEVs cover a broad range of powertrain architectures, climate control systems, vehicle weights etc.The objective of this paper is to examine three different HEVs under three different temperature conditions, both with or without climate control, and come up with observations and trends on their energy usage and operational behavior.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Egon Moos
Abstract In today's vehicles underbody parts are absolutely necessary to reach a certain performance level regarding fuel saving, corrosion protection, driving performance and exterior as well as interior noise. With the constant demand for additional parts, which means additional weight on the car, lightweight materials have come more and more into the focus of development work. LWRT (low weight reinforced thermoplastic) is the acronym for this material group. The ongoing success of such materials in underbody applications that compared to compact materials such as GMT (glass mat reinforced thermoplastic) is the weight saving of up to 50 %, or in other words, with LWRT you can cover twice as much surface then with GMT. The production process is compression molding, but with low pressure because LWRT-material needs only partial compact areas, most regions of these parts can have a density even below 0.5 g/cm3. Another advantage coming with the process is the possibility to use multi-cavity tools, so a high volume production becomes very economical.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nicolas F. Ponchaut, Francesco Colella, Ryan Spray, Quinn Horn
Abstract The emergence of Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) as a viable means of transportation has been coincident with the development of lithium-ion battery technology and electronics that have enabled the storage and use of large amounts of energy that were previously only possible with internal combustion engines. However, the safety aspects of using these large energy storage battery packs are a significant challenge to address. For example an unintentional sudden release of energy, such as through a thermal runaway event, is a common concern. Developing thermal management systems for upset conditions in battery packs requires a clear understanding of the heat generation mechanisms and kinetics associated with the failures of Li-ion batteries. Although every effort is made to avoid thermal runaway situations, there can still be upset and unforeseen instances where a cell or a pack would reach a sufficiently high temperature to initiate exothermic reaction(s) that often are initially slow to develop.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Alessandro Naddeo, Nicola Cappetti, Orlando Ippolito
Abstract General comfort may be defined as the “level of well-being” perceived by humans in a working environment. The state-of-the-art about evaluation of comfort/discomfort shows the need for an objective method to evaluate the “effect in the internal body” and “perceived effects” in main systems of comfort perception. In the early phases of automotive design, the seating and dashboard command can be virtually prototyped, and, using Digital Human Modeling (DHM) software, several kinds of interactions can me modeled to evaluate the ergonomics and comfort of designed solutions. Several studies demonstrated that DHM approaches are favorable in virtual reachability and usability tests as well as in macro-ergonomics evaluations, but they appear insufficient in terms of evaluating comfort. Comfort level is extremely difficult to detect and measure; in fact, it is affected by individual perceptions and always depends on the biomechanical, physiological, and psychological state of the tester during task execution.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Saiful Bari, Shekh Rubaiyat
Abstract The heat from the exhaust gas of diesel engines can be an important heat source to provide additional power using a separate Rankine Cycle (RC) or an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC). Water is the best working fluid for this type of applications in terms of efficiency of the RC system, availability and environmental friendliness. However, for small engines and also at part load operations, the exhaust gas temperature is not sufficient enough to heat the steam to be in superheated zone, which after expansion in the turbine needs to be in superheated zone. Ammonia was found to be an alternate working fluid for these types of applications which can run at low exhaust temperatures. Computer simulation was carried out with an optimized heat exchanger to estimate additional power with water and ammonia as the working fluids. ANSYS 14.0 CFX software was used for the simulation. It was found that at full load 23.7% and 10.9% additional power were achieved by using water and ammonia as the working fluids respectively.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dimitrios Angelos Mitakos, Christopher Blomberg, Yuri M. Wright, Peter Obrecht, Bruno Schneider, Konstantinos Boulouchos
Abstract The heat release of the low temperature reactions (LTR or cool-flame) under Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion has been quantified for five candidate fuels in an optically accessible Rapid Compression Expansion Machine (RCEM). Two technical fuels (Naphthas) and three primary reference fuels (PRF), (n-heptane, PRF25 and PRF50) were examined. The Cetane Numbers (CN) of the fuels range from 35 to 56. Variation of the operating parameters has been performed, in regard to initial charge temperature of 383, 408, and 433K, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate of 0%, 25%, and 50%, and equivalence ratio of 0.29, 0.38, 0.4, 0.53, 0.57, and 0.8. Pressure indication measurements, OH-chemiluminescence imaging, and passive spectroscopy were simultaneously implemented. In our previous work, an empirical, three-stage, Arrhenius-type ignition delay model, parameterized on shock tube data, was found to be applicable also in a transient, engine-relevant environment. The pressure rise due to cool-flame heat release, which is crucial for the induction of main ignition, was included in the experimental pressure traces that have been used.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tetsu Yamada, Shouji Adachi, Koichi Nakata, Takashi Kurauchi, Isao Takagi
From the time the first Hybrid Vehicle (HV) was launched, 17 years have past, and HV vehicles have boosted the global CO2 reduction trend. In order to maximize their merit, many HV engines focused on the best fuel consumption value namely thermal efficiency. This was because HV systems can control the operating area of engine and get merit. However, considering climate change and energy issues, it is important to focus conventional vehicle as well as HV vehicle progress. The Atkinson cycle with a high compression ratio is the typical approach that HV engines use to enhance thermal efficiency. However, the drawback of the high compression ratio is a reduction of engine torque. Thermal efficiency at low load areas is relatively more important with conventional engines than with HV engines and how to overcome these issues is significantly important with conventional engines. The engines which have technologies contributing to lower the vehicle fuel economy are described as ESTEC (Economy with Superior Thermal Efficient Combustion) engines.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Se Jin Park, Seung Nam Min, Murali Subramaniyam, Dong-Hoon Lee, Heeran Lee, Dong Gyun Kim
Abstract Seating comfort is one of the most important indicators of the performance of automotive seats. The objective and subjective evaluation of seating comfort plays an important role in the development of seating systems. Objective methods are primarily based on evaluating the influence of vibrations on the driver's seat and assessing the seat pressure ratio. The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the comfort of two car seats (sedan and compact) by comparing a subjective technique with an objective technique like body pressure ratio for a sample of 12 subjects. The results show that the pressure ratio for IT (ischial tuberosity) and L4/L5 were significantly greater for the seat of a compact car than the seat of a sedan car. The subjective comfort was significantly greater for the seat of the sedan car and females than the seat of the compact car and males, respectively. The combination of valid objective measures with subjective ratings of comfort and discomfort may give information of use to seat designers.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Scott Allen Ziolek
Abstract Seat comfort is an important factor in the development of a vehicle; however, comfort can be measured in many ways. Many aspects of the experimental design such as the duration of the drive test, the questions asked, and the make-up of the test subjects are known to influence comfort results. This paper provides the background methodology and results of a Seat comfort study aimed at assessing long-term driving seat comfort.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Se Jin Park, Seung Nam Min, Murali Subramaniyam, Heeran Lee, Dong Gyun Kim, Cheol Pyo Hong
Abstract Vibration is both a source of discomfort and a possible risk to human health. There have been numerous studies and knowledge exists regarding the vibrational behavior of vehicle seats on adult human occupants. Children are more and more becoming regular passengers in the vehicle. However, very little knowledge available regarding the vibrational behavior of child safety seats for children. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the vibrations in three different baby car seats and to compare these to the vibrations at the interface between the driver and the automobile seat. The test was performed on the National road at the average speed of 70 km/h and acceleration levels were recorded for about 350 Sec (5.83 min). One male driver considered as an adult occupant and a dummy having a mass of 9 kg was representing one year old baby. Four accelerometers were used to measure the vibration. All measured accelerations were relative to the vertical direction. Vibration Analysis Toolset (VATS) was used for time domain analysis.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Brian Pinkelman
Abstract Experience tells us that one can develop a technically comfortable seat where the seat fits and supports the occupant. The pressure distribution is optimized and the seat and packaging are such that a good posture is attainable by many. The dynamic characteristics of the seat and the vehicle are technically good. Despite all this the customer is not satisfied. Despite it being a technically comfortable seat, it does meet the customers' expectations and/or priorities and thus the comfort provided is lacking. This paper seeks to explore that gap between the seat and the user by modeling comfort using techniques similar to those found in the social sciences where models often focus on user or individual behavior. The model is built upon but diverges from the Cobb Douglas consumer utility model found in economics. It is presented as theory and presents a very different perspective on comfort. The model should be used not as a replacement but a complement to the more traditional technical models of comfort that model the seat.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Prasad Kumbhar, Ning Li, Peijun Xu, James Yang
In vehicle driving environment, the driver is subjected to the vibrations in horizontal, vertical, and fore-aft directions. The human body is very much sensitive to whole body vibration and this vibration transmission to the body depends upon various factors including road irregularities, vehicle suspension, vehicle dynamics, tires, seat design and the human body's properties. The seat design plays a vital role in the vibration isolation as it is directly in contact with human body. Vibration isolation properties of a seat depend upon its dynamic parameters which include spring stiffness and damping of seat suspension and cushion. In this paper, an optimization-based method is used to determine the optimal seat dynamic parameters for seat suspension, and cushion based on minimizing occupant's body fatigue (occupant body absorbed power). A 14-degree of freedom (DOF) multibody biodynamic human model in 2D is selected from literature to assess three types of seat arrangements. The human model has total mass of 71.32 kg with 5 body segments.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection focusses on state of the art simulation technologies for modeling thermal systems and their application in the development and optimization of vehicle thermal management and fuel economy. The papers included will range from empirical, 1D modeling methods to three dimensional CFD models as well as coupled methods.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection contains 23 papers covering the latest advancements in climate control.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection features components used for thermal management. The papers address design, application and systems related topics.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection focuses on current developments in the fields of vehicle fire science, statistics, risks, assessment and mitigation. Papers addressing vehicle design, live-fire tests and fire investigation issues applicable to traditional, electric and alternatively fueled vehicles are included.
Collection
2014-04-01
Proper thermal management can significantly contribute to overall system energy efficiency. This technical paper collection highlights the latest developments in thermal management energy efficiency.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sandip Pawar, Upender Rao Gade, Atish Dixit, Suresh Babu Tadigadapa, Sambhaji Jaybhay
Abstract The objective of the work presented in this paper is to provide an overall CFD evaluation and optimization study of cabin climate control of air-conditioned (AC) city buses. Providing passengers with a comfortable experience is one of the focal point of any bus manufacturer. However, detailed evaluation through testing alone is difficult and not possible during vehicle development. With increasing travel needs and continuous focus on improving passenger experience, CFD supplemented by testing plays an important role in assessing the cabin comfort. The focus of the study is to evaluate the effect of size, shape and number of free-flow and overhead vents on flow distribution inside the cabin. Numerical simulations were carried out using a commercially available CFD code, Fluent®. Realizable k - ε RANS turbulence model was used to model turbulence. Airflow results from numerical simulation were compared with the testing results to evaluate the reliability. Qualitative parameters such as mean Age of Air (AOA), Broadband Noise model, and Human Thermal Comfort Module (PMV/PPD) were used to gain deeper insight into the problem.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tomoya Ishii, Tomohiro Sudo, Masanori Morikawa, Daisuke Nagahata
Abstract General analysis methods which are known as Transfer Path Analysis and Air borne Source Quantification have been extended to estimate forces of an air conditioner's parts and also clarify the path from air conditioner system. These results show noise transfer path to be improved. Originally, the existing methods are known to require considerable amount of time for the cause of complicated measurement to get analysis results. In the work of this paper, required measurement is simplified, and time reduction of 50% is achieved without critical decrease in analysis accuracy.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jugurtha Benouali, Christophe Petitjean, Isabelle Citti, Regis Beauvis, Laurent Delaforge
Abstract The development of Electrical and Hybrid cars led to the introduction of reversible heat pump systems in order to reduce the energy consumption and increase the car autonomy during the Zero Emission Mode. One of the most important components in the heat pump system, is the evaporator condenser that “pumps the heat” from the ambient air. Moreover, this heat exchanger has to work in both modes: A/C (condenser mode) and heat pump (evaporator mode). This paper will explain the main steps of the development of this heat exchanger: circuiting (refrigerant side) in order to improve the homogeneity and the performances fins (air side) in order to reduce icing impact. We will also present system tests results that illustrate the impact of those evolutions on loop performances (heating capacity and COP).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Charles Sprouse III, Christopher Depcik
Abstract Significant progress towards reducing diesel engine fuel consumption and emissions is possible through the simultaneous Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) and Particulate Matter (PM) filtration in a novel device described here as a Diesel Particulate Filter Heat Exchanger (DPFHX). This original device concept is based on the shell-and-tube heat exchanger geometry, where enlarged tubes contain DPF cores, allowing waste heat recovery from engine exhaust and allowing further energy capture from the exothermic PM regeneration event. The heat transferred to the working fluid on the shell side of the DPFHX becomes available for use in a secondary power cycle, which is an increasingly attractive method of boosting powertrain efficiency due to fuel savings of around 10 to 15%. Moreover, these fuel savings are proportional to the associated emissions reduction after a short warm-up period, with startup emissions relatively unchanged when implementing a WHR system. Due to the absence of prior DPFHX research and the unique heat transfer process present, this effort describes construction of a prototype DPFHX and subsequent WHR experiments in a single cylinder diesel engine test cell with a comparison between heat exchanger performance with and without DPF cores installed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sebastian Salbrechter, Markus Krenn, Gerhard Pirker, Andreas Wimmer, Michael Nöst
Abstract Optimization of engine warm-up behavior has traditionally made use of experimental investigations. However, thermal engine models are a more cost-effective alternative and allow evaluation of the fuel saving potential of thermal management measures in different driving cycles. To simulate the thermal behavior of engines in general and engine warm-up in particular, knowledge of heat distribution throughout all engine components is essential. To this end, gas-side heat transfer inside the combustion chamber and in the exhaust port must be modeled as accurately as possible. Up to now, map-based models have been used to simulate heat transfer and fuel consumption; these two values are calculated as a function of engine speed and load. To extend the scope of these models, it is increasingly desirable to calculate gas-side heat transfer and fuel consumption as a function of engine operating parameters in order to evaluate different ECU databases. This paper describes the creation of a parameter-based heat transfer model using a statistical approach.
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