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2014-04-16
Article
The all-new sports car poses a crucial question: Is it too clever by half? Dr. Andre Ebner, who heads the company’s development of onboard systems, argues very strongly that it is not.
2014-04-16
WIP Standard
J1339
This SAE recommended Practice is intended for use in testing and evaluating the approximate performance of engine cooling fans. This performance would include flow, pressure, and power. This flow and pressure information would then be used to estimate the engine cooling performance. This power consumption would then be used to estimate net engine power per SAE J1349. The procedure also provides a general description of equipment necessary to measure the approximate fan performance. The test conditions in the procedure generally will not match those of the installation for which cooling and fuel consumption information is desired. The performance of a given fan depends on the geometric details of the installation, including the shroud and its clearance. These details should be duplicated in the test setup if accurate performance measurement is expected. The performance at a given air density and speed also depend on the volumetric flow rate, or the pressure rise across the fan, since these two parameters are mutually dependent.
2014-04-14
Standard
ARP1283B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) establishes design guidance and photometric values for adequate cargo compartment and cargo access lighting systems for ground handling. The adoption of a standard set of illuminance values, found appropriate for the performance of the task in specified areas should expedite ground handling.
2014-04-09
Standard
J89_201404
This SAE Recommended Practice encompasses the significant factors which determine the effectiveness of a seat system in limiting spinal injury during vertical impacts between the rider and the snowmobile seat system. The document is intended to provide a tool for the development of safer snowmobile seats. It is recognized that the seat is only a portion of the entire vehicle protective suspension system. It is, however, usually required that the seat serve as added protection to the suspension system, since the latter may "bottom out" during a severe impact. The term "seat" refers to the occupant-supporting system not normally considered part of the vehicle suspension or frame system. In some cases, it may include more than the foam cushion. This document provides the minimum requirements for performance of a general seat system, and a description of specific means of evaluating the shock-absorbing characteristics of foam seat cushions using a specific testing procedure and a companion seat evaluation chart.
2014-04-03
Article
A new occupant-protection technology from TRW Automotive Holdings Corp. has the passenger-seat airbag deploying from the headliner instead of the dashboard. It is being launched on the Citroën C4 Cactus.
2014-04-02
WIP Standard
J51
This SAE Standard covers reinforced hose, or hose assemblies, intended for conducting liquid and gaseous dichlorodifluoromethane (refrigerant 12) in automotive air-conditioning systems. The hose shall be designed to minimize permeation of refrigerant 12 and contamination of the system and to be serviceable over a temperature range of -30 to 120 °C (-22 to 248 °F). Specific construction details are to be agreed upon between user and supplier. NOTE— SAE J2064 is the Standard for refrigerant 134a hose. For refrigerant 134a use, refer to SAE J2064
2014-04-02
WIP Standard
AIR1059D
This document provides guidance concerning the maintenance and serviceability of oxygen cylinders beginning with the quality of oxygen that is required, supplemental oxygen information, handling and cleaning procedures, transfilling and marking of serviced oxygen assemblies. This document attempts to outline in a logical sequence oxygen quality,serviceability and maintenance of oxygen cylinders.
2014-04-01
Article
The 2015 Chrysler 200 midsize sedan's floating center console design with pass-through storage area may have staying power beyond this Chrysler Group-first application.
2014-04-01
Collection
This technical paper collection contains 23 papers covering the latest advancements in climate control.
2014-04-01
Collection
This technical paper collection focusses on state of the art simulation technologies for modeling thermal systems and their application in the development and optimization of vehicle thermal management and fuel economy. The papers included will range from empirical, 1D modeling methods to three dimensional CFD models as well as coupled methods.
2014-04-01
Collection
This technical paper collection focuses on current developments in the fields of vehicle fire science, statistics, risks, assessment and mitigation. Papers addressing vehicle design, live-fire tests and fire investigation issues applicable to traditional, electric and alternatively fueled vehicles are included.
2014-04-01
Collection
Proper thermal management can significantly contribute to overall system energy efficiency. This technical paper collection highlights the latest developments in thermal management energy efficiency.
2014-04-01
Collection
This technical paper collection features components used for thermal management. The papers address design, application and systems related topics.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0971
Zheng Zhong Wang, Youzhong Xu, Kuaichu Fan, Binglin Da
The series of work introduced in this paper is originated from a structural failure of the vehicle A/C (Air-Conditioner) pipe, and when many possible factors having been excluded, the main investigating endeavor is focused on RLD acquisition and analysis, which eventually leads to the successful design improvement. During this process, many important signal collectives, such as micro-strains, accelerations, and engine speed are provided by RLD acquisition in some predefined conditions. Subsequently, these signals are analyzed both in time and frequency domain. Furthermore, order analysis by correlation of acceleration and engine speed is also performed to find a definite reason. As a conclusion, the root cause to the crack is not excitation from the road, but mainly from the engine. Based on this conclusion, structure design is improved and is theoretically proved to be effective by the RLD comparison analysis. And the quantified validation to this work is given by the real road test finally.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0877
Prasad Kumbhar, Ning Li, Peijun Xu, James Yang
In vehicle driving environment, the driver is subjected to the vibrations in horizontal, vertical, and fore-aft directions. The human body is very much sensitive to whole body vibration and this vibration transmission to the body depends upon various factors including road irregularities, vehicle suspension, vehicle dynamics, tires, seat design and the human body's properties. The seat design plays a vital role in the vibration isolation as it is directly in contact with human body. Vibration isolation properties of a seat depend upon its dynamic parameters which include spring stiffness and damping of seat suspension and cushion. In this paper, an optimization-based method is used to determine the optimal seat dynamic parameters for seat suspension, and cushion based on minimizing occupant's body fatigue (occupant body absorbed power). A 14-degree of freedom (DOF) multibody biodynamic human model in 2D is selected from literature to assess three types of seat arrangements. The human model has total mass of 71.32 kg with 5 body segments.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0881
Mitsuru Enomoto, Michiko Kakinuma, Nobuhito Kato, Haruo Ishikawa, Yuichiro Hirose
Abstract Design work for truck suspension systems requires multi-objective optimization using a large number of parameters that cannot be solved in a simple way. This paper proposes a process-based systematization concept for ride comfort design using a set-based design method. A truck was modeled with a minimum of 13 degrees of freedom, and suspension performance under various vehicle speeds, road surface conditions, and load amounts was calculated. The range of design parameters for the suspension, the range of performance requirements, and the optimal values within these ranges were defined based on the knowledge and know-how of experienced design engineers. The final design of the suspension was installed in a prototype truck and evaluated. The performance of the truck satisfied all the objectives and the effectiveness of the set-based design approach was confirmed.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0890
Shuming Chen, Dengzhi Peng, Dengfeng Wang
Abstract Automobile cabin acoustical comfort is one of the main features that may attract customers to purchase a new car. The acoustic cavity mode of the car has an effect on the acoustical comfort. To identify the factors affecting computing accuracy of the acoustic mode, three different element type and six different element size acoustic finite element models of an automobile passenger compartment are developed and experimentally assessed. The three different element type models are meshed in three different ways, tetrahedral elements, hexahedral elements and node coupling tetrahedral and hexahedral elements (tetra-hexahedral elements). The six different element size models are meshed with hexahedral element varies from 50mm to 75mm. Modal analysis test of the passenger car is conducted using loudspeaker excitation to identify the compartment cavity modes. All the acoustic cavity models are coupled with the structure model respectively, the cavity modes are calculated with structural-acoustic coupling model.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1067
Jiri Hvezda
Abstract The paper introduces a recently developed toolset to be implemented into the complex simulation codes for internal combustion engines to treat the calculations dealing with a high-pressure part of the thermodynamic cycle in a four-stroke spark ignition engine. This multi-zone simulating tool works on the basis of a simple quasi-dimensional method reflecting the real combustion chamber geometry and uses a specific approach to describe the species chemical transformation during combustion. Here a standard kinetic scheme is combined adaptively with a flexible method for chemical equilibrium in the cases of abnormally fast chemical reactions to improve the numerical performance of the equation system. Real 3-D combustion chamber geometry is taken into account by means of geometrical characteristics created in advance. A newly generalized tool providing these data is presented here. The new code is also able to work in predictive or inverse mode. The selected results regarding these two algorithms are mentioned at the end.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1029
Ram Iyer, Jin Zhou, Li Lu, Jeffrey Webb, Qaiser Khan
Abstract A CAE simulation methodology was developed to predict the warpage and shape deviation from nominal in finished plastic sub-assemblies that are joined using Infra-Red (IR), hot-plate or vibration welding processes. An automotive glove box bin and door sub-assembly was used to develop the methodology. It was seen that part warpage from injection molding and welding causes warpage in final assembled product which results in gaps and the consequent loss in quality of appearance. The CAE simulation methodology included prediction of the part warpage with residual stress from the injection molding process, use the post-molded shape as an initial part condition for the welding process, and simulation of the welding process itself. The welding process simulation included fixturing of the parts in the welding process, localized heating in the case of an IR welding process, fusion of the parts at the weld locations and thermal creep resulting in long term stress and shape relaxation of the part.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1028
Venkat Pisipati, Srikanth Krishnaraj, Edgar Quinto Campos
Abstract Motor vehicle safety standards are getting to be more demanding with time. For automotive interiors, instrument panel (IP) head impact protection is a key requirement of the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 201. To ensure compliance of this requirement, head impact tests are conducted at 12 and 15 mph for performance verification. Computer simulation has become more prevalent as the primary development tool due to the significant reduction in time and cost that it offers. LS-DYNA is one of the most commonly used non-linear solvers in the automotive industry, particularly for safety related simulations such as the head impact of automotive interiors. LS-DYNA offers a wide variety of material models, and material type 024 (MAT 024, piecewise linear plasticity) is one of the most popular ones [1]. Although it was initially developed for metals, it is commonly used for polymers as well. LS-DYNA also offers several other material models specifically developed to simulate polymers, such as material types 019, 089, 123, to name a few.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1026
Ayse Ademuwagun, Joel Myers
Abstract Coconut shell and torrefied wood are bio-sourced and renewable materials that can be used as fillers in various polymer matrices. Torrefied wood material can be produced from numerous cellulose based materials, such as wood, sunflower hulls, flax shive, hemp and oat hulls. These bio-fillers would replace talc and glass bubbles which are not a renewable resource. Additionally, the implementation of torrefied wood and coconut would reduce the carbon footprint and improve sustainability of Hyundai and Kia vehicles, improving customer perception of our product line. In this study, coconut and torrefied wood filled polypropylene properties are tested for a HVAC Case application.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1098
Sergii Bogomolov, Vit Dolecek, Jan Macek, Antonin Mikulec, Oldrich Vitek
Abstract The mass and overall dimensions of massively downsized engines for very high bmep (up to 35 bar) cannot be estimated by scaling of designs already available. Simulation methods coupling different levels of method profoundness, as 1-D methods, e.g., GT Suite/GT Power with in-house codes for engine mechanical efficiency assessment and preliminary design of boosting devices (a virtual compressor and a turbine), were used together with optimization codes based on genetic algorithms. Simultaneously, the impact of optimum cycle on cranktrain components dimensions (especially cylinder bore spacing), mass and inertia force loads were estimated since the results were systematically stored and analyzed in Design Assistance System DASY, developed by the authors for purposes of early-stage conceptual design. General thermodynamic cycles were defined by limiting parameters (bmep, burning duration, engine speed and turbocharger efficiency only). The unprejudiced assessment was based on variability of any other engine design feature.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1025
Mohammed K Billal, Vinothkumar Subramani, Mohan Rao, Tim Potok
Abstract An automotive cockpit module is a complex assembly, which consists of components and sub-systems. The critical systems in the cockpit module are the instrument panel (IP), the floor console, and door trim assemblies, which consist of many plastic trims. Stiffness is one of the most important parameters for the plastic trims' design, and it should be optimum to meet all the three functional requirements of safety, vibration and durability. This paper presents how the CAE application and various other techniques are used efficiently to predict the stiffness, and the strength of automotive cockpit systems, which will reduce the product development cycle time and cost. The implicit solver is used for the most of the stiffness analysis, and the explicit techniques are used in highly non-linear situations. This paper also shows the correlations of the CAE results and the physical test results, which will give more confidence in product design and reduce the cost of prototype testing.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1103
Sebastian Salbrechter, Markus Krenn, Gerhard Pirker, Andreas Wimmer, Michael Nöst
Abstract Optimization of engine warm-up behavior has traditionally made use of experimental investigations. However, thermal engine models are a more cost-effective alternative and allow evaluation of the fuel saving potential of thermal management measures in different driving cycles. To simulate the thermal behavior of engines in general and engine warm-up in particular, knowledge of heat distribution throughout all engine components is essential. To this end, gas-side heat transfer inside the combustion chamber and in the exhaust port must be modeled as accurately as possible. Up to now, map-based models have been used to simulate heat transfer and fuel consumption; these two values are calculated as a function of engine speed and load. To extend the scope of these models, it is increasingly desirable to calculate gas-side heat transfer and fuel consumption as a function of engine operating parameters in order to evaluate different ECU databases. This paper describes the creation of a parameter-based heat transfer model using a statistical approach.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1055
Ashok Mache, Anindya Deb, G.S. Venkatesh
Abstract Natural fiber-based composites such as jute-polyester composites have the potential to be more cost-effective and environment-friendly substitutes for glass fiber-reinforced composites which are commonly found in many applications. In an earlier study (Mache and Deb [1]), jute-polyester composite tubes of circular and square cross-sections were shown to perform competitively under axial impact loading conditions when compared to similar components made of bidirectional E-glass fiber mats and thermo-setting polyester resin. For jute-reinforced plastic panels to be feasible solutions for automotive interior trim panels, laminates made of such materials should have adequate perforation resistance. In the current study, a systematic characterization of jute-polyester and glass-polyester composite laminates made by compression molding is at first carried out under quasi-static tensile, compressive and flexural loading conditions. Low velocity impact perforation tests at speeds of around 4 m/s are then performed in an instrumented drop-weight testing device on square plates extracted from the same laminates.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1036
Egon Moos
Abstract In today's vehicles underbody parts are absolutely necessary to reach a certain performance level regarding fuel saving, corrosion protection, driving performance and exterior as well as interior noise. With the constant demand for additional parts, which means additional weight on the car, lightweight materials have come more and more into the focus of development work. LWRT (low weight reinforced thermoplastic) is the acronym for this material group. The ongoing success of such materials in underbody applications that compared to compact materials such as GMT (glass mat reinforced thermoplastic) is the weight saving of up to 50 %, or in other words, with LWRT you can cover twice as much surface then with GMT. The production process is compression molding, but with low pressure because LWRT-material needs only partial compact areas, most regions of these parts can have a density even below 0.5 g/cm3. Another advantage coming with the process is the possibility to use multi-cavity tools, so a high volume production becomes very economical.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0451
Kathleen Ku, Michael Tschirhart
Abstract Displays that support complex graphics in driver information (DI) systems allow for the presentation of detailed visual data by employing a range of static (fixed image) and/or dynamic (moving image) design approaches. Such displays are gaining market share across a wide range of mainstream vehicles as the availability and cost of such technologies improves. Although a range of 2D, rendered 3D, and 3D imaging (or stereoscopic) information displays have been demonstrated throughout the automotive industry in recent years, there is limited empirical research examining consumer preference of the respective approaches or their influence on driving related tasks. The vehicle environment is known to be a demanding context for efficiently displaying information to the driver. Research in 3D [1, 2] reveals some of the factors that influence its acceptance and effective use, but there is limited research on the effects of 3D-related design elements when used in a driver-vehicle interface.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0426
Jeff D. Colwell
Abstract Results from a full-scale vehicle burn test involving a 1998 compact passenger car were used to evaluate vehicle fire dynamics and how burn patterns produced during the fire correlated with important characteristics of the fire, such as the area of origin. After the fire was initiated at the air filter in the engine compartment, the fire spread locally and, once the temperature near the origin reached about 750°C, the temperature at all but one location within the engine compartment began to increase. These temperatures continued to increase for the next 6 minutes and then a temperature gradient began to develop in the passenger compartment between the ceiling and the floor. About 5 minutes after the engine compartment became fully involved, the ceiling temperature reached about 590°C and flame spread within the passenger compartment increased. Over the next 4 minutes, the passenger compartment also became fully involved. The fire then spread to the trunk and the rear wheels before self-extinguishing.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0443
Michael Tschirhart, Kathleen Ku
Abstract The vehicle environment is known to be a demanding context for efficiently displaying information to the driver. Research in typography reveals some factors that influence reading performance measures, but there is limited research on the influence of typographic design elements in a driver-vehicle interface on user performance with a simulated driver task. Participants in these studies completed a set of vehicle infotainment tasks that involved a text-based item search in a custom-designed interface that employed a family of Helvetica Neue fonts, in a static environment and a driving simulator environment. Analysis of the data from the two studies reveals a modest but statistically significant effect of font on certain driving-related task performance measures. In both studies, fonts with intermediate values of character width and line thickness were associated with the best performance on a simulated driving task. The results of this study suggest that using typefaces with intermediate values of certain intrinsic design factors may serve as a simple and effective means of improving vehicle user interfaces.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0713
Guangning(Gary) Gao
Abstract Distance to empty (DTE) estimation is an important factor to electric vehicle (EV) applications due to its limited driving range. The DTE calculation is based on available energy of the battery and power usage by the powertrain components (e.g. electric motor) and climate control components (e.g. PTC heater and electric AC compressor). The conventional way of estimating the DTE is to treat the power consumed by the climate control system the same as the power by the powertrain for either instantaneous or rolling average estimation. The analysis in this study shows that the power consumption by the climate control system should be estimated based on the current ambient conditions and driver's input instead of using the recorded data from the past driving cycles. The climate control should also be considered separately from the powertrain in power usage rolling average calculation, which results in improvements in DTE estimation especially for extreme hot and cold conditions. Additionally, the climate control power consumption shows unique characteristics during the initial period of cabin climate control.
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