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Viewing 91 to 120 of 10344
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0182
Harish Kumar Gangwar, Ankur Sharma, S.B. Pathak, VIvek Dwivedi, Amit Nigam
Abstract Ever tightening emission limits and constant pressure for increasing engine power are resulting in increased engine operating temperature. This coupled with continuous drive for fuel economy improvement because of the stiff competition are forcing OEMs to explore alternative cooling solutions resulting in less power take off and quick response as cooling requirement shoots up. Aim of this paper is to analyze the relative benefits of incorporating a new cooling fan drive system concept over conventional viscous fan driven cooling system with step-less variable speed control independent of engine speed variation. Hydraulic fan drive system control fan rpm based on the fluid temperature as compared to air temperature in viscous coupling fan drive system. HFD system provides quick response when increase in coolant temperature is observed. HFD system in this way provide more control on fan rpm.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0178
Feng Zhou, Ercan Dede, Shailesh Joshi
Abstract Rankine cycle (RC) is a thermodynamic cycle that converts thermal energy into mechanical work, which is commonly found in thermal power generation plants. Recently, there are many studies focusing on applying Rankine cycle to recover low-grade waste heat. On-road vehicles, which convert around one third of the fuel energy into useful mechanical energy for propulsion, are moving energy conversion systems that generate considerable waste heat. It was found from many research studies that Rankine cycle has a great potential to be applied to harvest waste heat from automobiles. However, different from other low-grade waste heat sources, vehicles have limited space for the RC system integration and the waste heat is relatively unstable. In the current paper, the efforts in the past few decades related to applying RC to on-road vehicles, specifically passenger cars, are reviewed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0203
Yadong Deng, Chunhua Liu, Panqi Chu
Abstract In order to make full use of engine exhaust heat, the thermoelectric module been used to contribute to thermoelectric power generation in the automotive. At present, the thermoelectric generators (TEGs) have been developing with continuously advances in thermoelectric technology. And almost all of the existing thermoelectric technologies are adding a gas tank to the vehicle exhaust system which increases the exhaust back pressure and occupying excessive space of the vehicle chassis. In this study, a new TEG integrated with a front silencer muffler (FMTEG) is proposed. The muffler is reshaped as the heat exchanger which has a hexagon cross-section. The water tank and clamping mechanism have been redesigned for the new heat exchanger. The FMTEG system’s dimensions are small that can well meet the installation requirements and has a good compatibility with the vehicle exhaust system.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0201
Armin Traussnig, Wilko Jansen, Heinz Petutschnig, Sepp Steiner, Petra Gruen
Abstract In order to meet current and future emission and CO2 targets, an efficient vehicle thermal management system is one of the key factors in conventional as well as in electrified powertrains. Global vehicle simulation is already a well-established tool to support the vehicle development process. In contrast to conventional vehicles, electrified powertrains offer an additional challenge to the thermal conditioning: the durability of E-components is not only influenced by temperature peaks but also by the duration and amplitude of temperature swings as well as temperature gradients within the components during their lifetime. Keeping all components always at the preferred lowest temperature level to avoid ageing under any conditions (driving, parking, etc.) will result in very high energy consumption which is in contradiction to the efficiency targets.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0198
Sudhi Uppuluri, Hemant R. Khalane, Yogesh Umbarkar, Ajay Naiknaware
Abstract Vehicle development teams find it challenging to predict what their Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) module performance will be for cold ambient (∼ -20 deg. C) test cycles such as defrost and cabin warm-up before the car is built. This uncertainty in predictions comes from varying engine heat rejection to coolant due to cold cylinder wall temperatures, calibration changes and degraded performance of various components within the cooling system such as the coolant pump owing to higher viscosity of the coolant. Measuring engine heat rejection at cold ambient is extremely difficult as the engine warms up as soon as it is fired. Multiple measurement points require long lead time to soak to the cold target temperature. It is a common practice to adjust engine calibration parameters to warm up coolant as fast as possible for an adequate defrost and cabin warm-up performance.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0199
Bin Xu, Xiaobing Liu, John Shutty, Paul Anschel, Simona Onori, Zoran Filipi, Mark Hoffman
Abstract This paper presents an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system model for heavy-duty diesel (HDD) applications. The dynamic, physics-based model includes: heat exchangers for parallel exhaust and EGR circuits, compressible vapor working fluid, distribution and flow control valves, a high pressure pump, and a reservoir. A finite volume method is used to model the evaporator, and a pressure drop model is included to improve the accuracy of predictions. Experimental results obtained on a prototype ORC system are used for model calibration and validation. Comparison of predicted and measured values under steady-state conditions is pursued first, followed by the analysis of selected transient events. Validation reveals the model’s ability to track real-world temperature and pressure dynamics of the ORC system.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0193
Shoichi Imahigashi, Masaharu Sakai, Etsuro Yoshino, Yasushi Mitsuishi
Abstract In recent years, the spread of eco-car has led to the demand for adaptation to low heat source, high efficiency and low noise in vehicle air conditioner. On the other hand, larger interior space of vehicle to assure passenger comfort is demanded, so that the car air-conditioner is required to be smaller. Therefore, we adopted 2-layer HVAC for the air conditioner which can respond to a low heat source. At the same time we have developed the compact high-efficiency 2-layer blower fan for HVAC in order to enable the 2-layer HVAC to be mounted on eco-car with smaller space than conventional HVAC. Generally, because axial flow velocity increases resulting from downsizing of the blower, the ununiform velocity distribution in the axial direction and the turbulent flow between fan blades occurs. It causes the efficiency decrease. To satisfy both downsizing and high-efficiency of the 2-layer blower, we have developed new technologies which can make the flow uniform between fan blades.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0191
Gursaran D. Mathur
Water drainage characteristics of an evaporator changes with the age of the vehicle. This is due to the fact that with time, a part of the hydrophilic coating washes off with the moisture that condenses over the evaporator core from the air-stream. Hence, the effectiveness of the evaporator for water drainage deteriorates with the age of the vehicle. At this condition more water is retained in the evaporator as the contact angle increases. Author has conducted experiments with evaporators from multiple vehicles from different OEMs. These evaporators were analyzed to determine the effectiveness of the hydrophilic coating as a function of time or vehicle age. This is the first paper in the open literature that deals with the vehicle mileage or vehicle age with the evaporator plate contact angle and surface coating of an evaporator.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0192
Alaa El-Sharkawy, Ahmed Uddin
Abstract Engine mount is one of the temperature sensitive components in the vehicle under-hood. Due to increasing requirements for improved fuel economy, the under-hood thermal management has become very challenging in recent years. In order to study the effects of material thermal degradation on engine mount performance and durability; it is required to estimate the temperature of engine mount rubber during various driving conditions. The effect of temperature on physical properties of natural rubber can then be evaluated and the life of engine mount can be estimated. In this paper, a bench test is conducted where the engine mount is exposed to a step change in the environment around it, and the temperature of the rubber section is recorded at several points till a steady state temperature is reached. A time response curve is generated, from which a time constant is determined.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0188
Elankathiravan Mathivanan, Liping Liu
In the present work, the effect of various nanofluids on convective heat transfer performance in an automotive radiator was analyzed based on measured nanofluid properties. Al2O3, TiC, SiC, MWNT (multi-walled nanotube) and SiO2 nanoparticles ranging between 1 and 100 nm in size were dispersed in distilled water to form nanofluids. An ultrasonic generator was used to provide uniform particle dispersion in the fluid and keep the mixture stable for a long period of time. The impact of various particle types and their volume concentration on fluid properties such as density, thermal conductivity and viscosity were experimentally analyzed. It is observed that the nanofluid properties increased with the increase in particle volume concentration. TiO2 nanofluids were observed to show the highest increase in density (2.6% higher than the base fluid at a 1% vol. concentration) and also the largest enhancement in thermal conductivity (7.5% augmentation at 1% concentration).
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0189
Alaa El-Sharkawy, Ahmed Uddin
Abstract A heat pipe is a self-operating device which is capable of transferring large amounts of heat with a minimum temperature differences between the hot end (evaporator) and the cold end (condenser). However, a limited number of research work or analysis [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9] has been reported in automotive industry on the applications of heat pipes in power train cooling. The advantage of a heat pipe heat exchanger is the possibility to use a more compact and lighter radiator. In addition, the proposed radiator is expected to be more robust as it is less sensitive to variations in ambient temperatures. In this paper, a proposed design for an automotive heat exchanger is investigated. The proposed design is evaluated through thermal simulation of heat pipes using various design parameters. The analysis addresses the ability of the heat exchanger to maintain engine coolant temperature at acceptable limits under different loading conditions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0187
Zizhen Yu, Gangfeng Tan, Tianming He, Xuexun Guo, MengYing Yang, Shengguang Xiong
Abstract With the improvement of occupants’ awareness on the driving safety, hydraulic retarder applications increase quickly. The traditional hydraulic retarder, on the one hand, exhausts the waste heat of transmission oil by the engine cooling system; on the other hand, the engine power should be consumed to drive the water pump and the engine cooling fan for maintaining the normal operation of the auxiliary braking system. In this study, the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) instead of the traditional hydraulic retarder water-cooling system is applied to achieve the effective temperature control of the hydraulic retarder, while the waste heat of transmission oil could be recovered for saving vehicle energy consumption.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0548
Estefanía Hervas-Blasco, Emilio Navarro-Peris, José Corberan, Alex Rinaldi
Abstract Nowadays, more than 50% of the fuel energy is lost in CNG Engines. While efforts to increase their efficiency have been focused mainly on the improvement of the combustion process, the combustion chamber and the reduction of friction losses, heat losses still remain the most important inefficient factor. A global strategy in which several energy recovery strategies are implemented could lead to engine improvements up to 15%. Therefore, the development of accurate models to size and predict the performance of the integrated components as well as to define an optimized control strategy is crucial. In this contribution, a model to analyze the potential of a new powertrain based on the electrification of the main auxiliaries, the integration of a kinetic energy recovery system and the exhaust gases heat recovery through a thermoelectric generator and a turbo-component is presented.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0564
Pengfei Lu, Chris Brace, Bo Hu
Abstract The turbo-compounding has been extensively researched as a mean of improving the overall thermal efficiency of the internal combustion engine. Many of the studies aiming to optimize the turbo-compounding system lead to the unified conclusion that this approach is more suitable for the operation under constant high load condition, while it has little effect on improving the fuel economy under low load conditions. Besides, in a traditional series turbo-compounding engine, the increased back pressure unavoidably results in a serious parasitic load to the system by increasing the resistance to the scavenging process. In order to improve this situation, a novel turbo-compounding arrangement has been proposed, in which the turbocharger was replaced by a continuously variable transmission (CVT) coupled supercharger (CVT superchargedr) to supply sufficient air mass flow rate to the engine at lower engine speeds.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0512
Chae-Hwan Hong
Polylactide (PLA), which is one of the most important biocompatible polyesters that are derived from annually renewable biomass such as corn and sugar beets, has attracted much attention for automotive parts application. The manufacturing method of PLA is the ring-opening polymerization of the dimeric cyclic ester of lactic acid, lactide. For the PLA composites including stereocomplexed with L- and D-PLA, we developed the unit processes such as fermentation, separation, lactide conversion, and polymerization. We investigated D-lactic acid fermentation with a view to obtaining the strains capable of producing D-lactic acid, and through catalyst screening test for polycondensation and depolymerization reactions, we got a new method which shortens the whole reaction time of lactide synthesis step. Poly(d-lactide) is obtained from the ring-opening polymerization of d-lactide. Also we investigated several catalysts and polymerization conditions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0521
Ronald S. Grossman
Abstract The lightweighting of auto components is a crucial strategy for OEMs to achieve increasingly challenging CAFÉ requirements. Research from MIT has found that every 10% reduction in passenger vehicle weight reduces fuel consumption by about 7%. Since fuel economy requirements have already increased by 18% from MY 2012 to 2017, the weight savings strategies that are easiest to implement have largely been exhausted. Seating is the largest interior component by weight, but the foam is often overlooked from lightweighting consideration due to the perception that higher weight, higher density seating is an important aspect of the vehicle’s comfort. It has become almost a truism that the physical properties associated with seating comfort -- load bearing, resilience, durability - are directly related to foam density. A new auxiliary blowing agent known chemically as HFO 1233zd(E) is commercially available as Solstice® LBA.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0524
Venkat Pisipati, Srikanth Krishnaraj, Amy McGuckin Webb, Pavankumar Reddy Kandukuri
Abstract The Automotive industry’s use of digital technology such as Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) to perform virtual validation has progressed to effectively replace a large percentage of physical validation. This is primarily due to the increased accuracy and cost/time efficiencies that virtual validation offers compared to conventional physical prototyping and testing. With product development (PD) cycles becoming more compressed, CAE has assumed a more significant role in early, advanced design and structural evaluation. One of the areas where CAE is widely employed is in development of the Instrument Panel (IP) commonly referred to as the dashboard. For the purposes of this study, the term IP represents the plastic/polymer structure only, and not the full IP sub-system. The IP sub-system includes the structural member, the Cross Car Beam (CCB) assembly and all the IP mounted modules.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0523
Lauren Abro
Abstract North American customer perception of Quality has changed over time and has shifted from Quality, Dependability, and Reliability (QDR) to Interior Sensory Quality (ISQ). ISQ is defined as the harmony of characteristics that combine to make an emotional connection to the vehicles’ interior. Vehicles need to correctly appeal to customers emotional side through providing class-leading ISQ. Hypotheses for specific interior areas were developed in order to identify key ISQ strengths, weaknesses, and preferences. These hypotheses were then tested at customer clinics held across the country. The key goals were to understand customer judgment of ISQ execution, understand customer ISQ priority, and understand customer preference of detailed component areas.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1443
Nazan Aksan, Lauren Sager, Sarah Hacker, Benjamin Lester, Jeffrey Dawson, Matthew Rizzo
Abstract We examined relative effectiveness of heads-up visual displays for lane departure warning (LDW) 39 younger to middle aged drivers (25-50, mean = 35 years) and 37 older drivers (66-87, mean = 77 years). The LDW included yellow “advisory” visuals in the center screen when the driver started drifting toward the adjacent lane. The visuals turned into red “imminent” when the tires overlapped with the lane markers. The LDW was turned off if the driver activated the turn signal. The visuals could be easily segregated from the background scene, making them salient but not disruptive to the driver’s forward field of view. The visuals were placed adjacent to the left and right lane markers in the lower half of the center screen.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1444
Shayne McConomy, Johnell Brooks, Paul Venhovens, Yubin Xi, Patrick Rosopa, John DesJardins, Kevin Kopera, Kathy Lococo
Abstract The research objective was to measure and understand the preferred seat position of older drivers and younger drivers within their personal vehicles to influence recommended practices and meet the increased safety needs of all drivers. Improper selection of driver’s seat position may impact safety during a crash event and affect one’s capacity to see the roadway and reach the vehicle’s controls, such as steering wheel, accelerator, brake, clutch, and gear selector lever. Because of the stature changes associated with ageing and the fact that stature is normally distributed for both males and females, it was hypothesized that the SAE J4004 linear regression would be improved with the inclusion of gender and age terms that would provide a more accurate model to predict the seat track position of older drivers. Participants included 97 older drivers over the age of 60 and 20 younger drivers between the ages of 30 to 39.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1437
Giorgio Previati, Massimiliano Gobbi, Giampiero Mastinu
Abstract The paper is focused on both the subjective and the objective ride comfort evaluation of farm tractors. The experimental measurement of the relevant accelerations occurring at the tractor body, at the cabin and at the seat was performed on a number of different farm tractors. A subjective rating of the ride comfort level was performed by considering five different drivers. The comfort index was computed according with ISO 2631 and other standards. The acceleration of the seated subject was computed by means of a proper mechanical model of a farm tractor and derived at different positions on the subject body. It turned out that the acceleration of the lower torso was particularly relevant for establishing a matching between the subjective perception and the objective measurement and computation. A number of indices have been derived from the measured data which are able to correlate the subjective driver feeling with the measured accelerations.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1436
K. Han Kim, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, Matthew Reed
Abstract Automotive seats are commonly described by one-dimensional measurements, including those documented in SAE J2732. However, 1-D measurements provide minimal information on seat shape. The goal of this work was to develop a statistical framework to analyze and model the surface shapes of seats by using techniques similar to those that have been used for modeling human body shapes. The 3-D contour of twelve driver seats of a pickup truck and sedans were scanned and aligned, and 408 landmarks were identified using a semi-automatic process. A template mesh of 18,306 vertices was morphed to match the scan at the landmark positions, and the remaining nodes were automatically adjusted to match the scanned surface. A principal component (PC) analysis was performed on the resulting homologous meshes. Each seat was uniquely represented by a set of PC scores; 10 PC scores explained 95% of the total variance. This new shape description has many applications.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1433
Gregory Schaupp, Julia Seeanner, Casey Jenkins, Joseph Manganelli, Sarah Hennessy, Constance Truesdail, Lindsay Swift, Paul Venhovens, Johnell Brooks
Abstract The ability to independently transfer into and out of a vehicle is essential for many wheelchair users to achieve driving independence. This paper presents the results of an exploratory study that investigated the transfer strategies of wheelchair users who drive from their driver’s seat and not from their wheelchair. The goal of this study was to identify typical ingress and egress motions as well as “touch points” of wheelchair users transferring into and out of the driver’s seat. While motion databases exist for the ingress and egress of able-bodied drivers, this study provides insight on drivers with physical disabilities. Twenty-five YouTube videos of wheelchair users who transferred into and out of their own sedans were analyzed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1432
Alexander Siefert
Abstract Predicting the vibration comfort is a difficult challenge in seat design. There is a broad range of requirements as the load cases strongly vary, representing different excitation levels, e.g. cobblestones or California roads. Another demand is the driver expectation, which is different for a pickup and a sports car. There are several approaches for assessing the vibrations of occupants while driving. One approach is the evaluation of comfort by integral quantities like the SEAT value, taking into account a weighting based on the human body sensitivity. Another approach is the dimension of perception developed by BMW, which is similar to psychoacoustics as the frequency range is separated with respect to occurring vibration phenomena. The seat transmissibility is in the focus of all activities. In the frequency range it defines the relation between the input at the seat slides and the output at the interface of human body and trim.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1370
Vali Farahani, Salamah Maaita, Aditya Jayanthi
Abstract During the course of automobile Instrument Panel (IP) design development, the occupant head impact CAE simulation on IP are routinely performed to validate FMVSS201 requirements. Based on FMVSS201 requirements, the potential head impact zones on the IP are first identified. Then, the head impact zones are used to locate the various target points that must be impacted on IP. Once the critical target locations on IP are chosen, there are several computational steps that are required to calculate impact angles and head form (HF) center of rotation in reference to target points. Then, CAE engineer performs a repetitive process that involves positioning each individual HF with proper impact angle, assigning initial velocity to HF, and defining surface contacts within the finite element model (FEM). To simplify these lengthy manual steps, a commercially available software HyperMesh® CAE software tool is used to automate these steps.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1429
Jangwoon Park, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, K. Han Kim, Monica Jones, Byoung-Keon Park, Matthew Reed
Abstract This paper reports on the development and validation of an automated seat-dimension extraction system that can efficiently and reliably measure SAE J2732 (2008) seat dimensions from 3D seat scan data. The automated dimension-extraction process consists of four phases: (1) import 3D seat scan data along with seat reference information such as H-point location, back and cushion angles, (2) calculate centerline and lateral cross-section lines on the imported 3D seat scan data, (3) identify landmarks on the centerline and cross-section lines based on the SAE J2732 definitions, and (4) measure seat-dimensions using the identified landmarks. To validate the automated seat measurements, manually measured dimensions in a computer-aided-design (CAD) environment and automatically extracted ones in the current system were compared in terms of mean discrepancy and intra- and inter-observer standard deviations (SD).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1417
Toshinao Fukui, Kazuhiko Nakamoto, Hiroyuki Satake
Abstract The use of a head-up display (HUD) system has become popular recently, as it can provide feedback information at a position easily seen by the driver. However, the outline of the HUD bezel often reflects on the windshield of a HUD equipped vehicle. This phenomenon occurs when the sun is at a high position and reflects off the top of the instrument panel and the front view is dark. For this reason, it can occur when driving on asphalt paved roads, causing annoyance to the driver. Under fixed environmental conditions, the vehicle based factors that influence the annoyance caused by reflected boundary lines are the position of the reflection, line thickness, and the contrast of the reflected boundary line. These can be represented by the conspicuity of a striped pattern (contrast sensitivity function). In previous research in 1991, M. S. Banks et al. studied a contrast sensitivity function that included the factors stated above.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1416
Rambabu Radakrishnan, Ganesh Dharmar, Mohanraj Balakrishnan, Sarath Padattil
Abstract Infotainment screens have become critical interface between occupant and Vehicle. Historical development of In-vehicle infotainment (IVI) has shown us the growth of interface size and usability is tremendously increased. The basic small segmented displays of past decades have transformed into large touch screen interface [1]. Earlier small screen interfaces had minimal information and less driver assist functions. It was mainly entertainment based information, which does not require much attention from driver. But recently it has changed from glancing the screen to seeing the screen, due to increased driver assist functions like GPS navigation etc. The amount of information displayed is also increased tremendously [2]. This scenario demands that the infotainment screen positioning inside the vehicle should be free from any visual obscuration, reflection and direct illumination on the infotainment screen due to ambient lighting.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1295
Atsushi Itoh, ZongGuang Wang, Toshikazu Nosaka, Keita Wada
Abstract Without engine noise, the cabin of an electric vehicle is quiet, but on the other hand, it becomes easy to perceive refrigerant-induced noise in the automotive air-conditioning (A/C) system. When determining the A/C system at the design stage, it is crucial to verify whether refrigerant-induced noise occurs in the system or not before the real A/C systems are made. If refrigerant-induced noise almost never occurs during the design stage, it is difficult to evaluate by vehicle testing at the development stage. This paper presents a 1D modeling methodology for the assessment of refrigerant-induced noise such as self-excitation noise generated by pressure pulsation through the thermal expansion valve (TXV). The GT-SUITE commercial code was used to develop a refrigerant cycle model consisting of a compressor, condenser, evaporator, TXV and the connecting pipe network.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1311
Tsuyoshi Kanuma, Katsumi Endo, Fumiaki Maruoka, Hiroshi Iijima, Makoto Kawamura, Keisuke Nakazawa, Eiki Yanagawa
Abstract 1 The vane-type rotary compressor of a heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system (HVAC system) is simple and compact but may emit noise due to the collision between the vanes and the cylinder wall. Several studies have been conducted on this chattering noise, with a focus on the noise associated with the compressor revolution speed, temperature, suction pressure, and exhaust pressure. However, such investigations are not sufficient to reveal the behavior of the vane movement in its entirety. To minimize the chattering noise, the details of the mechanism of such vane-operating noise must be investigated by analyzing the behavior of the vanes as a function of time. The vanes move according to the balance between the front and rear pressures. This report describes a novel visualization technique with which to monitor the motion of a vane under given operating conditions. In addition, a method of measuring the pressure affecting the movement of the vanes is discussed.
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