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2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1607
Chuen-Sen Lin, Vamshi Avadhanula, Vamsi Mokkapati, Daisy Huang, Brent Sheets
This paper presents test results of a 50 kW Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system and proposed guidelines for how to effectively apply this system to the rural Alaska power industry. In rural Alaska, approximately 180 villages rely on off-grid diesel generators for power. Most of the generators have capacities of about 1 MW or less. In general, the average operation efficiencies are noticeably less than 40%, with the rest of the fuel energy becoming heat. If the heat is not applied for useful application, it is called waste heat. Most of the wasted heat is contained in engine exhaust and jacket fluid and eventually dissipates into the environment. For rural Alaska, waste heat for heating is most effective; in many cases, waste heat for power may be needed due to a variety of reasons. Many rural Alaskan villages are reluctant to apply exhaust heat recovery due to concerns about corrosion and soot accumulation in the exhaust system and their effect on emissions.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1608
Davide Di Battista, Marco Mauriello, Roberto Cipollone
Abstract A smart way to reduce CO2 emission in transportation sector is to recover energy usually wasted and re-use it for engine and vehicle needs. ORC plant on exhaust gas of ICE is really interesting, but it has a significant impact on the exhaust line and vehicle's weight. The backpressure realized in the exhaust and the weight gain, in fact, produce a specific fuel consumption increase as well as an increase in the propulsion power: both terms could vanish the energy recovered. The paper discusses the effects of the pressure losses produced by an ORC plant mounted on the exhaust line of an IVECO F1C test bench engine. The interactions produced on the turbocharged engine have been experimentally investigated: the presence of an IGV turbocharger makes the effect of the backpressure not straightforward to be predicted and needed a full experimental testing of the group in order to understand its reaction and the net effect in terms of specific fuel consumption.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0147
Matthew J. Pitts, Elvir Hasedžić, Lee Skrypchuk, Alex Attridge, Mark Williams
Abstract The advent of 3D displays offers Human-Machine Interface (HMI) designers and engineers new opportunities to shape the user's experience of information within the vehicle. However, the application of 3D displays to the in-vehicle environment introduces a number of new parameters that must be carefully considered in order to optimise the user experience. In addition, there is potential for 3D displays to increase driver inattention, either through diverting the driver's attention away from the road or by increasing the time taken to assimilate information. Manufacturers must therefore take great care in establishing the ‘do’s and ‘don’t's of 3D interface design for the automotive context, providing a sound basis upon which HMI designers can innovate. This paper describes the approach and findings of a three-part investigation into the use of 3D displays in the instrument cluster of a road car, the overall aim of which was to define the boundaries of the 3D HMI design space.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0149
Can Wang, Gangfeng Tan, Xuexun Guo, Zhewen Tian, Zhanwei Tian, Jiafan Li
Abstract In summer, when vehicle parks in direct sunlight, the closed cabin temperature would rise sharply, which affects the occupants step-in-car comfort Solar powered vehicle parking ventilation system adopts the solar energy to drive the original ventilator. Thus, the cabin temperature could be dramatically decreased and the riding comfort could be also improved. This research analyzed the modified crew cabin thermal transfer model. Then the performance of the solar powered ventilation system is analyzed and optimized combined with the power supply characteristics of the photovoltaic element. The storage and reuse of the solar power is achieved on condition that the cabin temperature could be steadily controlled. The research shows that, the internal temperature is mainly affected by the solar radiation intensity and the environment temperature.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0169
Kazuyuki Nakata, Maya Seki, Ryoichi Nishikawa, Soju Matsumoto, Shinichiro Murakami, Yukio Yoshino
Abstract Instrument clusters that display all information on a TFT-LCD screen, also known as reconfigurable instrument clusters, have become the new trend in automotive interiors. DENSO mass-produced the world's first reconfigurable instrument cluster in 2008. To satisfy customer requirements, large quantities of resources were required. Coupled with an iterative process due to requirement changes, development costs became very high. Reducing development costs was vital in order to expand the reconfigurable instrument cluster product line. A new artist-centric HMI (human machine interface) software development workflow is proposed to reduce the development effort by introducing a data converter and real-time 3D rendering engine in our earlier paper. Our goal is to realize an environment with little programming during development by utilizing a tool chain to automate the majority of the programmer's tasks.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0476
Hyunkwon Jo, Youngseung Kim, Hyunchul Lee, Hyunmin Park, Suckin Song
Abstract Carmakers have tried to lower the vehicle weight for raising fuel efficiency. This trend involves a trade-off with the vehicle stiffness. In automobile interior parts, the thickness has needed to be decreased for the weight reduction but this makes the stiffness worse. A new approach for improving the stiffness due to the weight reduction is required and various optimization methods at early development stage have been introduced currently. However, it is difficult to apply optimization for the interior parts since many interior parts' structures generally depend on the design. But as studying the structure in detail, we discovered some factors that affect the performance without depending on design. The door trim is selected for optimization item because it has many characteristics of automobile interior parts. In our case study, the factors that improve the performance of door trim without changing design are considered as fastener position and flange rib layout.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0505
Miguel Angel Reyes Belmonte, Colin D. Copeland, Drummond Hislop, George Hopkins, Adrian Schmieder, Scott Bredda, Sam Akehurst
Abstract Pressure and temperature levels within a modern internal combustion engine cylinder have been pushing to the limits of traditional materials and design. These operative conditions are due to the stringent emission and fuel economy standards that are forcing automotive engineers to develop engines with much higher power densities. Thus, downsized, turbocharged engines are an important technology to meet the future demands on transport efficiency. It is well known that within downsized turbocharged gasoline engines, thermal management becomes a vital issue for durability and combustion stability. In order to contribute to the understanding of engine thermal management, a conjugate heat transfer analysis of a downsized gasoline piston engine has been performed. The intent was to study the design possibilities afforded by the use of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) additive manufacturing process.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0331
Sina Shojaei, Simon Robinson, Chris Chatham, Andrew McGordon, James Marco
Abstract Among the auxiliary systems on electric and hybrid electric vehicles the electric air conditioning (eAC) system causes the largest load on the high voltage battery and can significantly impact the energy efficiency and performance of the vehicle. New methods are being investigated for effective management of air conditioning loads through their integration into vehicle level energy management strategies. For this purpose, a fully integrated vehicle model is developed for a commercially available hybrid vehicle and used to develop energy management algorithms. In this paper, details of the eAC model of this vehicle are discussed, including steady state component validation against rig data. Also results of simulating the cabin pull-down are included.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0330
Iman Goldasteh, Shi-Ing Chang, Salamah Maaita, Gursaran Mathur
Abstract Proper flow distribution on the windshield and side windows is critical for adequate visibility while driving. Fog or ice which forms on the windshield is the main reason of invisibility and leads to major safety issue. It has been shown that proper clear visibility for the windshield could be obtained with a better flow pattern and uniform flow distribution in the defrost mode of the automobile heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system. In this study, a three dimensional numerical model of a car cabin with full HVAC system was developed using Star-CCM+, a commercial CFD package. The Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) approach with the realizable two-layer k-ε turbulence model was employed for simulating the airflow field on the windshield for the defrost mode. The HVAC unit, ducts and defroster grille were included in the analysis in detail and the air distribution on the windshield was studied.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0329
Mark Hepokoski, Allen Curran, Richard Burke, John Rugh, Larry Chaney, Clay Maranville
Abstract Reliable assessment of occupant thermal comfort can be difficult to obtain within automotive environments, especially under transient and asymmetric heating and cooling scenarios. Evaluation of HVAC system performance in terms of comfort commonly requires human subject testing, which may involve multiple repetitions, as well as multiple test subjects. Instrumentation (typically comprised of an array of temperature sensors) is usually only sparsely applied across the human body, significantly reducing the spatial resolution of available test data. Further, since comfort is highly subjective in nature, a single test protocol can yield a wide variation in results which can only be overcome by increasing the number of test replications and subjects. In light of these difficulties, various types of manikins are finding use in automotive testing scenarios.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0328
Wilko Jansen, Joe Amodeo, Sam Wakelam, Kamalesh Bhambare
Abstract The level of infotainment in today's vehicles and the customer expectation of the functionality imply a significant effort is required on thermal management of the systems, to guarantee their full operation under all operating conditions. The worst case thermal conditions the system will get exposed to are caused by solar loading on the cabin or heat up as a result of cabin heating. Simulation of a solar load driven case will be discussed in this paper. The long soak conditions during these tests result in the modelling requirement for long natural convection periods. This is creating a challenge for the conventional CFD simulations in turnaround time. New simulation methodology has resulted in significant speed up enabling these fully transient simulations in a reasonable turnaround time to enable programme support. A two phase approach to simulating this problem is proposed in this paper.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0327
Elizabeth M. Patterson, Iman Goldasteh, Salamah Maaita
Abstract Recent progress in computer-aided engineering (CAE) has made it possible to model complex interdisciplinary multiphysics analyses. This paper investigated the sequential coupled thermal-structural analysis by examining the associated thermal stresses under simulated operational conditions close to the real situation. An evaluation of exhaust muffler strain due to thermal stresses was made by coupling Star-CCM+ CFD software and ABAQUS FEM structural analysis software. The study was made to evaluate discovered muffler durability test failure and to develop a countermeasure design. Failure of the muffler internal pipe was discovered after heat cycle durability testing. The internal pipe had broken into two pieces. In the first step, CFD analysis was done by thermo-flow simulation to determine the resulting heat distribution on the muffler assembly when subjected to the prescribed peak duty cycle temperature.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0326
Takuya Yamaguchi, Yuzo Aoyagi, Noboru Uchida, Akira Fukunaga, Masayuki Kobayashi, Takayuki Adachi, Munemasa Hashimoto
Abstract In heavy duty diesel engines, the waste heat recovery has attracted much attention as one of the technologies to improve fuel economy further. In this study, the available energy of the waste heat from a high boosted 6-cylinder heavy duty diesel engine which is equipped with a high pressure loop EGR system (HPL-EGR system) and low pressure loop EGR system (LPL-EGR system) was evaluated based on the second law of thermodynamics. The maximum potential of the waste heat recovery for improvement in brake thermal efficiency and the effect of the Rankine combined cycle on fuel economy were estimated for each single-stage turbocharging system (single-stage system) and 2-stage turbocharging system (2-stage system).
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0351
Jason A. Lustbader, Cory Kreutzer, Steven Adelman, Skip Yeakel, John Zehme
Abstract Annual fuel use for long-haul truck rest period idling is estimated at 667 million gallons in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory's CoolCab project aims to reduce heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) loads and resulting fuel use from rest period idling by working closely with industry to design efficient long-haul truck climate control systems while maintaining occupant comfort. Enhancing the thermal performance of cab/sleepers will enable smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective idle reduction solutions. In order for candidate idle reduction technologies to be implemented at the original equipment manufacturer and fleet level, their effectiveness must be quantified. To address this need, a number of promising candidate technologies were evaluated through experimentation and modeling to determine their effectiveness in reducing rest period HVAC loads.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0352
Kuo-Huey Chen, Jeffrey Bozeman, Mingyu Wang, Debashis Ghosh, Edward Wolfe, Sourav Chowdhury
Abstract The present paper reports on a study of the HVAC energy usage for an EREV (extended range electric vehicle) implementation of a localized cooling/heating system. Components in the localized system use thermoelectric (TE) devices to target the occupant's chest, face, lap and foot areas. A novel contact TE seat was integrated into the system. Human subject comfort rides and a thermal manikin in the tunnel were used to establish equivalent comfort for the baseline and localized system. The tunnel test results indicate that, with the localized system, HVAC energy savings of 37% are achieved for cooling conditions (ambient conditions greater than 10 °C) and 38% for heating conditions (ambient conditions less than 10 °C), respectively based on an annualized ambient and vehicle occupancy weighted method. The driving range extension for an electric vehicle was also estimated based on the HVAC energy saving.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0350
Zhi Li, Gangfeng Tan, Jing Cai, Zhongjie Yang, YiRui Wang, Haobo Xu
Abstract The vehicle engine exhaust wastes heat. For the conventional scheme, the hot-end of the thermoelectric module is connected with the exhaust pipe, while the cold-end is cooled through the vehicle engine cooling cycle. The variation of vehicle engine operating conditions brings the instability of the hot-end temperature, which affects the power generation performance of thermoelectric materials and increases the damage risk to the thermoelectric materials caused by the high temperature. This research adopts the heat transfer oil circulation as the intermediate fluid to absorb the dynamic heat flux of the vehicle engine exhaust so as to release the heat steadily to the hot-end of the thermoelectric module. The thermal characteristics of the target diesel vehicle engine exhaust gas are evaluated based on the experimental data firstly.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0347
Logesh Shankar Somasundaram, S Sriraman, Rakesh Verma
The paper aims at numerically modeling the flow and thermal processes occurring in an agricultural tractor using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and determines the comfort level of the tractor operator during working condition. The motive of the investigation is to develop and demonstrate capabilities of CFD as an automotive analysis tool. The work describes a methodology that significantly stream lines the process of thermal flow taking place in a tractor by utilizing state-of-the art computer simulation of air flow and heat transfer. The numerical investigation carried out with a three-dimensional geometry of the vehicle assembly and the measurements were taken from the vehicle. The geometry created with Pro/Engineer formed the domain for the automatically generating discretized grid contained the majority of the main components within the underhood environment.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0348
Chuqi Su, Meng Xu, Naiqiang Tong, Yulian Chen
Abstract The potential for automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generator (TEG) has been increasing with continuously advances in thermoelectric technology. In this paper, the thermal deformation of the TEG system is studied on the basis of the surface temperature distribution of the heat exchanger. The simulation result shows that thermoelectric modules (TMs) on different positions have different thermal performance which can significantly influence the power generation efficiency of the system. Meanwhile, in terms of the working performance of TMs, the clamping mechanism is considered to have some effects on both the cold side and the hot side of TEG. Following the simulation, bench tests are carried out to confirm the reasonability of the simulation results.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0344
Yingchao Zhang, Weijiang Meng, Tao Chen, Yong Hao, Wei Ding
Abstract It is known that the automobile cabin thermal comfort, could keep the driver and passengers feel better which has a great effect on traffic safety. In this paper, to the FAW truck cab, we did some researches about automobile cabin thermal comfort. Our plan is to calculate the air flow distribution and the temperature in steady and transient state when there is warm or cool air flow. The heating and cooling experiment methods standard of cabin are based on the national standard and the automobile industry standard of China. Then the numerical simulation process becomes very important. So we used the commercial CFD code- STAR-CCM+ for study in this paper. Firstly, Geometry Clean up. Secondly, Wrap and Remesh, we chose the internal surface at the wrap surface of cabin and air conditioning pipes, then we remesh the surface. Thirdly, generate the volume mesh which is polyhedral mesh, and the number of the volume mesh is 9.4 millions.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0342
Forrest Jehlik, Eric Wood, Jeffrey Gonder, Sean Lopp
Abstract It is widely understood that cold ambient temperatures increase vehicle fuel consumption due to heat transfer losses, increased friction (increased viscosity lubricants), and enrichment strategies (accelerated catalyst heating). However, relatively little effort has been dedicated to thoroughly quantifying these impacts across a large set of real world drive cycle data and ambient conditions. This work leverages experimental dynamometer vehicle data collected under various drive cycles and ambient conditions to develop a simplified modeling framework for quantifying thermal effects on vehicle energy consumption. These models are applied over a wide array of real-world usage profiles and typical meteorological data to develop estimates of in-use fuel economy. The paper concludes with a discussion of how this integrated testing/modeling approach may be applied to quantify real-world, off-cycle fuel economy benefits of various technologies.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0346
Lei Dongxu, Minli Bai, Jizu Lv, Peng Wang, Chengzhi Hu, Yuyan Wang
Abstract Due to the latent heat of vaporization, the efficiency of boiling heat transfer is several times and even dozens of times higher than that of the convection heat transfer. With the improvement of power density of the engine, there are more requirements for engine cooling system design. It has been confirmed that the subcooled boiling did exist in the engine cooling. If boiling heat transfer can be reasonablely used, we can achieve the objective of enhancing heat transfer without changing the existing structure. In this paper, in order to quantitatively research the subcooled boiling in the engine, we simulated the subcooled boiling in the analog channel with the Euler multiphase model, found the importance of the turbulent dispersion. In additon, we explored the applicability of existing models to subcooled boiling, and compared the results with the experiment.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0340
Jan Eller, Thomas Binner, Heinrich Reister, Nils Widdecke, Jochen Wiedemann
Abstract Collective life-cycle data is needed when developing components like elastomer suspension mounts. Life-time prediction is only possible using thermal load frequency distributions. In addition to current extreme load cases, the Idle Load Case is examined at Mercedes-Benz Car Group as a collective load case for Vehicle Thermal Management (VTM) numerical simulations in early development stages. It combines validation opportunities for HVAC, cooling and transmission requirements in hot-country-type ambient conditions. Experiments in climatic wind tunnels and coupled 3D CFD and heat transfer simulations of the Idle Load Case have been performed. Measurements show steady conditions at the end of the load case. Decoupling of the torque converter, changes in ambient temperature and the technical implementation of a wind barrier for still air conditions exhibit influence on component-level results. Solar load, however, does not significantly change the examined component temperatures.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0341
Georg Rauch, Johannes Lutz, Martin Werner, Sagar Gurwara, Peter Steinberg
Abstract This paper introduces an innovative approach, named synergetic 1D-3D-Coupling, by using synergy effects of 1D and 3D simulation in order to bring down modeling and simulation efforts. At the same time the methodology sustains the spatial resolution of a 3D model. This goal is reached by reducing the 3D fluid side with its time consuming continuity, momentum, energy and turbulence equations to a simple but precise 1D model. Because of the solid structure staying three dimensional, heat flux direction and spatial resolution have 3D accuracy but short calculation times due to the simple heat diffusion equation to be solved. The 1D model is represented by an automatically generated equation system which is capable of considering transient effects. The energy transfer between 1D fluid model and 3D structure model is realized through a neutral 1D-3D-coupling program and the application of the fluid element specific Nusselt correlations.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0337
Blago B. Minovski, Lennart Lofdahl, Peter Gullberg
Abstract The current work investigates a method in 1D modeling of cooling systems including discretized cooling package with non-uniform boundary conditions. In a stacked cooling package the heat transfer through each heat exchanger depends on the mass flows and temperature fields. These are a result of complex three-dimensional phenomena, which take place in the under-hood and are highly non-uniform. A typical approach in 1D simulations is to assume these to be uniform, which reduces the authenticity of the simulation and calls for additional calibrations, normally done with input from test measurements. The presented work employs 3D CFD simulations of complete vehicle in STAR-CCM+ to perform a comprehensive study of mass-flow and thermal distribution over the inlet of the cooling package of a Volvo FM commercial vehicle in several steady-state operating points.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0727
Udayakumar Rajamanickam, Anshul Singhal, Miller Jothi
Abstract This paper aims at Fiber Reinforced Panel or FRP mold and panel manufacturing of body panel and driver seat for a Formula Society of Automotive Engineers or FSAE racecar. The competition involves designing a Formula 1 type car that lays the standards for a high performance-racing car [1]. This calls for a high Power: Weight ratio. The rules of the competition ensure a mandatory use of an air restrictor with an engine of a maximum capacity of 600cc to reduce the power of the engines [2]. Hence, to compensate for the loss of power the target now shifts to minimizing the car's weight without compromising the strength. The body panel and driver's seat are two most valuable parts as the first adds elegance and aerodynamics to the car while the latter makes it comfortable for the driver to drive the car under high lateral load shifts. Weight reduction in this area is easier as strength is not the dominating factor.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0717
Anindya Deb, G S Venkatesh, Ashok Mache
Abstract The usage of lightweight materials such as plastics and their derivatives continues to increase in automobiles driven by the urgency for weight reduction. For structural performance, body components such as A-pillar or B-pillar trim, instrument panel, etc. have to meet various requirements including resistance to penetration and energy absorption capability under impact indentation. A range of plain and reinforced thermoplastics and thermosetting plastics has been considered in the present study in the form of plates which are subject to low velocity perforation in a drop-weight impact testing set-up with a rigid cylindrical indenter fitted to a tup. The tested plates are made of polypropylene (PP), nanoclay-reinforced PP of various percentages of nanoclay content, wood-PP composites of different volume fractions of wood fiber, a jute-polyester composite, and a hybrid jute-polyester reinforced with steel.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0733
Nichole Verwys, Jesse Fritcher, Thomas DeMass
Abstract Dark, high gloss decorative finishes (i.e. piano black) are gaining increased application and demand in vehicle interiors; due to interior stylists' desire for this look. One significant concern with this trend is that scratches, and other appearance related defects such as orange peel (waviness), are more apparent to the customer. To address this issue, a highly scratch-resistant 2K clearcoat formulation was developed to minimize visible surface scratches, while also yielding minimal orange peel and exceptional DOI (distinctness of image); all while being applied using typical application techniques in the part finishing market. This output was accomplished by first benchmarking the consumer electronics market for appearance and scratch resistance, and then setting targets through that research.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0661
Jianwang Shao, Xian Wu, Na Wei, Ding Wang, Guoming Deng, Ming Xu
Abstract An increasing demand for vehicle noise control has been proposed and at the same time, vehicle weight and fuel economy have become critical for the automotive industry. The methodology of statistical energy analysis (SEA) is used to balance both light weight and high noise insulation performance. In this paper, the vehicle dash and floor sound package systems, which are two of the major paths for vehicle interior noise, are studied and optimized by CAE and testing technology. Two types of sound packages which are the conventional insulation system and the lightweight one are chosen for the vehicle dash and floor system. The vehicle dash and floor systems are modeled by SEA and the transmission loss (TL) of the dash and floor system is analyzed, respectively. Several influence factors of the TL are also analyzed, such as sound package coverage, the leaks, etc.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1334
Shreyas Shingavi, Pankaj Bhirud, Abhishek Ranjan
Abstract Safety and Comfort are the core requirements of the automotive seating systems. Number of the occupants, determines type of the seating system requirement. The second row seat often needs to fold and slide, to allow the passenger to enter inside the car. Folding second row seat will also allow accommodating larger length cargo. The over folding of seat is controlled by hard stop mechanism. The hard stop mechanism generally consists of the seat arm stopper at back seat and hard stop located at base of the seat. These stoppers will limit the further motion of back seat. The folding speed of back seat is governed by various factors e.g. adjacent seat foam/structure friction, location, structural mass of seat etc. The scope of the paper is to evaluate various folding speeds of the back seat. Its effects are evaluated for the stresses and fatigue life of the hard stop components.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1230
Ahmed Imtiaz Uddin, Jerry Ku
Abstract It is well known that thermal management is a key factor in design and performance analysis of Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery, which is widely adopted for hybrid and electric vehicles. In this paper, an air cooled battery thermal management system design has been proposed and analyzed for mild hybrid vehicle application. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using CD-adapco's STAR-CCM+ solver and Battery Simulation Module (BMS) application to predict the temperature distribution within a module comprised of twelve 40Ah Superior Lithium Polymer Battery (SLPB) cells connected in series. The cells are cooled by air through aluminum cooling plate sandwiched in-between every pair of cells. The cooling plate has extended the cooling surface area exposed to cooling air flow. Cell level electrical and thermal simulation results were validated against experimental measurements.
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