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Article
2014-04-03
A new occupant-protection technology from TRW Automotive Holdings Corp. has the passenger-seat airbag deploying from the headliner instead of the dashboard. It is being launched on the Citroën C4 Cactus.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This document provides guidance concerning the maintenance and serviceability of oxygen cylinders beginning with the quality of oxygen that is required, supplemental oxygen information, handling and cleaning procedures, transfilling and marking of serviced oxygen assemblies. This document attempts to outline in a logical sequence oxygen quality,serviceability and maintenance of oxygen cylinders.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This SAE Standard covers reinforced hose, or hose assemblies, intended for conducting liquid and gaseous dichlorodifluoromethane (refrigerant 12) in automotive air-conditioning systems. The hose shall be designed to minimize permeation of refrigerant 12 and contamination of the system and to be serviceable over a temperature range of -30 to 120 °C (-22 to 248 °F). Specific construction details are to be agreed upon between user and supplier. NOTE— SAE J2064 is the Standard for refrigerant 134a hose. For refrigerant 134a use, refer to SAE J2064
Article
2014-04-01
The 2015 Chrysler 200 midsize sedan's floating center console design with pass-through storage area may have staying power beyond this Chrysler Group-first application.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Namwook Kim, Aymeric Rousseau, Daeheung Lee, Henning Lohse-Busch
Abstract This paper introduces control strategy analysis and performance degradation for the 2010 Toyota Prius under different thermal conditions. The goal was to understand, in as much detail as possible, the impact of thermal conditions on component and vehicle performances by analyzing a number of test data obtained under different thermal conditions in the Advanced Powertrain Research Facility (APRF) at Argonne National Laboratory. A previous study analyzed the control behavior and performance under a normal ambient temperature; thus the first step in this study was to focus on the impact when the ambient temperature is cold or hot. Based on the analyzed results, thermal component models were developed in which the vehicle controller in the simulation was designed to mimic the control behavior when temperatures of the components are cold or hot. Further, the performance degradation of the components was applied to the mathematical models based on analysis of the test data. All the thermal component models were integrated into a vehicle system with the redesigned supervisory controller, and the vehicle model was validated with the test data.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mirko Schulze, Rashad Mustafa, Benjamin Tilch, Peter Eilts, Ferit Küçükay
Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are facing increased challenges of optimizing the energy flow through a vehicle system, to enhance both the fuel economy and emissions. Energy management of HEVs is a difficult task due to complexity of total system, considering the electrical, mechanical and thermal behavior. Innovative thermal management is one of the solutions for reaching these targets. In this paper, the potential of thermal management for a parallel HEV with a baseline control strategy under different driving cycles and ambient temperatures is presented. The focus of the investigations is on reducing fuel consumption and increasing comfort for passengers. In the first part of this paper, the developed HEV-model including the validation with measurements is presented. In the second part, the combined thermal management measures, for example the recuperation of exhaust-gas energy, engine compartment encapsulation and the effect on the target functions are discussed. Simulation results show potential of reduction fuel consumption together with increasing the comfort for the passenger cabin.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Abhijit Nitin Khare, Henning Lohse-Busch, Douglas Nelson
Abstract Ambient temperature plays an important role in the operational behavior of a vehicle. Temperature variances from 20 F to 72 F to 95 F produce different operation from different HEVs, as prescribed by their respective energy management strategies. The extra variable of Climate Control causes these behaviors to change again. There have been studies conducted on the differences in operational behavior of conventional vehicles as against HEVs, with and without climate control. Lohse-Bush et al conclude that operational behavior of conventional vehicles is much more robust as compared to HEVs and that the effect of ambient temperature is felt more prominently in HEVs (1). However, HEVs cover a broad range of powertrain architectures, climate control systems, vehicle weights etc.The objective of this paper is to examine three different HEVs under three different temperature conditions, both with or without climate control, and come up with observations and trends on their energy usage and operational behavior.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vincent Laurent, Christophe Then, Gerhard Silber
Comfort is a main factor in customer's decision when buying a car. The seat plays a very important role, as it is the interface between occupant and vehicle. Pressure distribution is today's most common approach to characterize seat comfort, but it shows limitations. Analysis of human inter-tissue stress tends to be relevant for an objective comfort assessment. This paper presents the construction and validation of a CAE human model, based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans and in-vivo tests data. Correlation between objective criteria and subjective evaluation will be investigated, comfort performance of a real seat will be predicted.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Matthew Klein, Shijie Tong, Jae Wan Park
Abstract Optimizing the hardware design and control strategies of thermal management systems (TMS) in battery packs using large format pouch cells is a difficult but important problem due to the limited understanding of how internal temperature distributions impact the performance and lifetime of the pack. Understanding these impacts is difficult due to the greatly varying length and time scales between the coupled phenomena, causing the need for complex and computationally expensive models. Here, an experimental investigation is performed in which a set of fixed one-dimensional temperature distributions are applied across the face of a Nickel-Cobalt-Manganese (NCM) cathode lithium ion pouch cell in order to study the performance impacts. Effects on the open circuit voltage (OCV), Ohmic resistance, bulk discharge and charge resistance and instantaneous power are investigated. It is observed that temperature gradients have a negative impact on the bulk performance by lowering the OCV and also increasing the bulk discharge resistance.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vijay Somandepalli, Kevin Marr, Quinn Horn
As lithium-ion cells and systems become larger and more ubiquitous in automotive applications, fire and explosion hazards that are rare or non-existent in smaller systems may exist in these larger systems. One potential hazard can occur when flammable gases emitted from a lithium-ion cell failure accumulate in or around automobiles and are ignited by electrical activity or by the cells themselves and result in a fire or explosion. In some instances, the safety aspects related to fires and explosions protection of electric vehicles and hybrid vehicles using these large energy storage battery packs are a significant challenge to address. This paper describes and characterizes the combustion and explosion hazards that can occur when a lithium ion battery pack fails and goes into thermal runaway in an enclosed space. Metrics such as gas composition, maximum overpressure, rate of pressure rise, and flammability limits are described. This information can be helpful to battery and pack designers, vehicle designers, first responders and emergency personnel in developing strategies to mitigate and prevent explosion hazards from the use of battery packs in automobiles and other fields where large battery packs are used.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ehsan Samadani, Roydon Fraser, Michael Fowler
Abstract Despite significant progress toward application of Li-ion batteries in electric vehicles, there are still major concerns about the range of electric vehicles and battery life. Depending on the climate of the region where the vehicle is in use, auxiliary loads could also play a significant role on the battery performance and durability. In this paper, the effect of air conditioning (AC) load on the electric range and Li-ion battery life is evaluated. For this purpose, a thermodynamic model for the vehicle cabin is developed and integrated to a battery model. The thermodynamic model takes the ambient conditions, solar load, and the vehicle drive cycle as inputs and calculates the instantaneous cabin temperature and humidity. The battery model, which represents a Li-on battery pack installed on a fully electrified Ford Escape 2009, consists of a voltage source in series with a lump resistance, a thermal sub-model, and a degradation sub-model to predict the battery capacity fade. At an initial cabin temperature and a desired set point, the model is capable of predicting the required cooling load and its corresponding required battery power as well as reductions in the vehicle range and battery state of health (SOH).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xuan Wang, Ge-Qun Shu, Hua Tian, Youcai Liang, Xiangxiang Wang
Abstract Currently, the thermal efficiency of vessel diesels only reaches 48∼51%, and the rest energy is rejected to the environment in forms of exhaust, cooling water, engine oil and so on. Meanwhile, energy is required when generating electricity and fresh water that are necessary for vessels. A system that combines the ORC thermal electric generation system with the single-effect evaporating desalination system simultaneously driven by waste heat of charge air is proposed. The research object was 12S90ME-C9.2 diesel engine produced by MAN corp., and a calculation model of the system is built by MATLAB. The variation of the output power, the thermal efficiency and the freshwater production with some operational parameters of the combined system are calculated and analyzed. On the other hand, under the condition of an assumed freshwater production 110.3t/d, the variation of the charge air temperature at the outlet of the desalination evaporator with some operational parameters of the system is studied in the paper.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Youcai Liang, Gequn Shu, Hua Tian, Haiqiao Wei, Xingyu Liang, Mingru Zhao
Abstract Cogeneration system has become a valuable alternative approach for cascade waste heat recovery (WHR). In this paper, a novel electricity-cooling cogeneration system (ECCS) based on organic Rankine cycle-absorption refrigeration cycle (ORC-ARC) combined system is proposed to recover the waste heat of marine engine. ORC was adopted in the higher temperature cycle, in which alternatives D4, MDM and MM were selected as the working fluids. An ARC was adopted in the lower temperature cycle to recover the heat of the working fluid at the regenerator outlet in ORC. It aims to satisfy refrigeration requirement aboard ship, in which a binary solution of ammonia-water is used as the working pairs. Electricity output, cooling capacity, total exergy output, primary energy ratio (PER) and exergy efficiency are chosen as the objective functions. The results show that the additional cooling capacity is up to 10.9 MW, and such an ECCS has improved the exergy efficiency by 51% compared to the basic ORC.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mengjia Cao, Idan Kovent, Jerry Ku
Abstract Hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) is one of the most highly pursued technologies for improving energy efficiency while reducing harmful emissions. Thermal modeling and control play an ever increasing role with HEV design and development for achieving the objective of improving efficiency, and as a result of additional thermal loading from electric powertrain components such as electric motor, motor controller and battery pack. Furthermore, the inherent dual powertrains require the design and analysis of not only the optimal operating temperatures but also control and energy management strategies to optimize the dynamic interactions among various components. This paper presents a complete development process and simulation results for an efficient modeling approach with integrated control strategy for the thermal management of plug-in HEV in parallel-through-the road (PTTR) architecture using a flexible-fuel engine running E85 and a battery pack as the energy storage system (ESS). While the main motivation for the work is to deliver a design for the Department of Energy's EcoCAR2 Plugging in to the Future Competition, yet the framework and methodologies should be useful for any typical hybrid powertrain thermal and control development.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kevin L. Snyder, Jerry Ku
Abstract The Wayne State University (WSU) EcoCAR2 student team is investigating powertrain optimizations as a part of their participation in the EcoCAR2 design competition for the conversion of a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu into a plug-in hybrid. EcoCAR2 is the current three-year Department of Energy (DoE) Advanced Vehicle Technical Competition (AVTC) for 15 select university student teams competing on designing, building, and then optimizing their Plug-In Hybrid conversions of GM donated vehicles. WSU's powertrain design provides for approximately 56-64 km (35-40 miles) of electric driving before the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) powertrain is needed. When the ICE is started, the ICE traditionally goes through a cold start with the engine, transmission, and final drive all at ambient temperature. The ICE powertrain components are most efficient when warmed up to their normal operating temperature, typically around 90-100 °C. There are now some conventional vehicles currently available that employ active warm-up to recover waste heat from hot engine coolant to more quickly heat up the transmission fluid for reduced parasitic losses to improve fuel economy by approximately 2%. [1] [2] The WSU student team is investigating the improvements to fuel consumption (FC) of the ICE powertrain operation in the team's plug-in hybrid through pre-heating the ICE powertrain components before the engine is started.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xueyu Zhang, Andrej Ivanco, Xinran Tao, John Wagner, Zoran Filipi
This paper investigates the impact of battery cooling ancillary losses on fuel economy, and optimal control strategy for a series hybrid electric truck with consideration of cooling losses. Battery thermal model and its refrigeration-based cooling system are integrated into vehicle model, and the parasitic power consumption from cooling auxiliaries is considered in power management problem. Two supervisory control strategies are compared. First, a rule-based control strategy is coupled with a thermal management strategy; it controls power system and cooling system separately. The second is optimal control strategy developed using Dynamic Programming; it optimizes power flow with consideration of both propulsion and cooling requirement. The result shows that battery cooling consumption could cause fuel economy loss as high as 5%. When dynamic programming coordinates control of the powertrain and the cooling system in an optimal way, the fuel consumption penalty due to cooling losses is reduced to 3.7%, and battery duty cycle becomes milder.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Scott Peck, Aditya Velivelli, Wilko Jansen
Integration of advanced battery systems into the next generation of hybrid and electric vehicles will require significant design, analysis, and test efforts. One major design issue is the thermal management of the battery pack. Analysis tools are being developed that can assist in the development of battery pack thermal design and system integration. However, the breadth of thermal design issues that must be addressed requires that there are a variety of analysis tools to address them efficiently and effectively. A set of battery modeling tools has been implemented in the thermal modeling software code PowerTHERM. These tools are coupled thermal-electric models of battery behavior during current charge and discharge. In this paper we describe the three models in terms of the physics they capture, and their input data requirements. We discuss where the capabilities and limitations of each model best align with the different issues needed to be addressed by analysis. Model outputs are compared with measured data for various analysis scenarios, including simulation of constant current charge/discharge, and response to charge/discharge profiles derived from a standard drive cycle, for both single cell and multi-cell pack configurations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lijun Zhang, Hongzheng Cheng, Kun Diao, Cheng Ruan
To accurately and efficiently predict the temperature fields inside a lithium-ion battery is key technology for the enhancement of battery thermal management and the improvement of battery performances. The dimensional analysis method is applied to derive similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients of battery interior temperature fields, based on the governing partial differential equations describing the three dimensional transient temperature field. To verify the correctness of similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients, 3D finite element models of battery temperature field are established with a prototype and scale model, on the assumption that the battery cell has single-layer structure and multi-layers structure separately. The simulation results show that the similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients are correct. The calculation efficiency is checked to be much more efficient compared with FEM model based on the original cell structure in aspect of amount of resources occupied.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ehsan Samadani, Leo Gimenez, William Scott, Siamak Farhad, Michael Fowler, Roydon Fraser
Abstract In electrified vehicle applications, the heat generated of lithium-ion (Li-ion) cells may significantly affect the vehicle range and state of health (SOH) of the pack. Therefore, a major design task is creation of a battery thermal management system with suitable control and cooling strategies. To this end, the thermal behavior of Li-ion cells at various temperatures and operating conditions should be quantified. In this paper, two different commercial pouch cells for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are studied through comprehensive thermal performance tests. This study employs a fractional factorial design of experiments to reduce the number of tests required to characterize the behavior of fresh cells while minimizing the effects of ageing. At each test point, the effects of ambient temperature and charge/discharge rate on several types of cell efficiencies and surface heat generation is evaluated. A statistical thermal ramp rate model is suggested which enables fast and accurate determination of cell surface temperature and heat generation where the vehicle is started from cold or warm environments at a range of constant currents over the entire state of charge (SOC) range.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Saeed Asgari, Xiao Hu, Michael Tsuk, Shailendra Kaushik
The thermal behavior of a fluid-cooled battery can be modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Depending on the size and complexity of the battery module and the available computing hardware, the simulation can take days or weeks to run. This work introduces a reduced-order model that combines proper orthogonal decomposition, capturing the variation of the temperature field in the spatial domain, and linear time-invariant system techniques exploiting the linear relationship between the resulting proper orthogonal decomposition coefficients and the uniform heat source considered here as the input to the system. After completing an initial CFD run to establish the reduction, the reduced-order model runs much faster than the CFD model. This work will focus on thermal modeling of a single prismatic battery cell with one adjacent cooling channel. The extension to the multiple input multiple output case such as a battery module will be discussed in another paper.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiao Hu, Scott Stanton
Abstract Due to growing interest in hybrid and electric vehicles, li-ion battery modeling is receiving a lot of attention from designers and researchers. This paper presents a complete model for a li-ion battery pack. It starts from the Newman electrochemistry model to create the battery performance curves. Such information is then used for cell level battery equivalent circuit model (ECM) parameter identification. 28 cell ECMs are connected to create the module ECM. Four module ECMs are connected through a busbar model to create the pack ECM. The busbar model is a reduced order model (ROM) extracted from electromagnetic finite element analysis (FEA) results, taking into account the parasitic effects. Battery thermal performance is simulated first by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Then, a thermal linear and time-invariant (LTI) ROM is created out of CFD solution. The thermal LTI ROM is then two-way coupled with the battery pack ECM to form a complete battery pack model. Thanks to the ROM technology, such a battery pack model can finish a complete charge discharge cycle within seconds of simulation time.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Changxin Wang, Deguang Fang, Fuxiang Guo
Abstract To find out the main excitation sources of a bus floor's vibration, modal analysis and spectral analysis were respectively performed in the paper. First we tested the vibration modal of the bus's floor under the full-load condition, and the first ten natural frequencies and vibration modes were obtained for the source identification of the bus floor's vibration. Second the vibration characteristic of the bus floor was measured in an on-road experiment. The acceleration sensors were arranged on the bus's floor and the possible excitation sources of the bus, which includes engine mounting system, driveline system, exhaust system, and wheels. Then the on-road experiment was carefully conducted on a highway under the four kinds of test condition: in-situ acceleration, uniform velocity (90km/h, 100km/h, 110km/h, 120km/h), uniform acceleration with top gear, and stall sliding condition with neutral gear. After that, by performing order tracking analysis and spectral analysis, the 1st order rotation frequency of the driveline and the 2nd order frequency of engine were identified to be the main cause of bus floor's vibration.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ravi Kiran Cheni, Chetan Prakash Jain, Revathy Muthiah, Srikanth Gomatam
Abstract Automotive OEMs quest for vehicle body light weighting, increase in Fuel efficiency along with significant cut in the emissions pose significant challenges. Apart from the effect on vehicle handling, the reduction of vehicle weight also results in additional general requirements for acoustic measures as it is an important aspect that contributes to the comfort and the sound quality image of the vehicle, thus posing a unique challenge to body designers and NVH experts. Due to these conflicting objectives, accurate identification along with knowledge of the transfer paths of vibrations and noise in the vehicle is needed to facilitate measures for booming noise dampening and vehicle structure vibration amplitude. This paper focuses on the application of a unique design and development of vehicle body structure anti-vibration dynamic damper (DD), unique in its aspect in controlling booming noise generated at a specific RPM range. Design methodology follows the concept of Mass-damper system on vehicle body or engine structure where panel with multi-degree of freedom vibrating at medium level frequency is transferred to damper which is vibrating at same resonant frequency in 180° opposite phase.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tomoya Ishii, Tomohiro Sudo, Masanori Morikawa, Daisuke Nagahata
Abstract General analysis methods which are known as Transfer Path Analysis and Air borne Source Quantification have been extended to estimate forces of an air conditioner's parts and also clarify the path from air conditioner system. These results show noise transfer path to be improved. Originally, the existing methods are known to require considerable amount of time for the cause of complicated measurement to get analysis results. In the work of this paper, required measurement is simplified, and time reduction of 50% is achieved without critical decrease in analysis accuracy.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sung Young Shin, Sang Dong Lee, Bong Chul Go
Abstract In terms of the responsive quality of cars, reducing the vibration of car seats is very important, as this vibration is transmitted directly to the driver. Here, a sensitivity analysis method was used to reasonably reduce the vibration of car seats at minimal cost. A laboratory test was conducted under two excitation conditions: first, vibration in idle state; second, random vibration not exceeding 100 Hz. To determine the reliability of the laboratory test, the actual vibration in idle state was simulated in a multi-axial simulation table for the idle excitation environment of cars that are sensitive to even the smallest changes in the environment. The frequencies of interest were selected by adding the sums of frequency response functions measured at the 24 nodal points of interest under the two excitation conditions. Sensitivity factors were derived at the 24 nodal points of interest and a design modification plan with relatively large sensitivity factors was suggested to reinforce the overall rigidity of the part modules containing the points of interest.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ludwig Brabetz, Mohamed Ayeb
For the prevention of technical risks and the optimum design of an electrical distribution system, considerable efforts have been made to implement thermal models of wires, bundles, and electromechanical components in order to improve thermal analysis. Unfortunately, in most cases, important input parameters such as the position of a wire within a bundle or the profiles of the currents are unknown. This leads to the use of worst-case scenarios, frequently providing unrealistic results and uneconomic over-dimensioning. The proposed approach is based on the thermal simulation of a large number of randomly-generated bundle configurations for given profiles of currents. Thus one gets a temperature distribution, allowing a much more precise analysis compared to a simple worst-case calculation. By applying the same method to various current profiles, one gets temperature distributions for each wire as a function of a normalized total bundle current. The finding is that statistics allow a very good thermal assessment despite unknown bundle configurations and current profiles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael Tschirhart, Kathleen Ku
Abstract The vehicle environment is known to be a demanding context for efficiently displaying information to the driver. Research in typography reveals some factors that influence reading performance measures, but there is limited research on the influence of typographic design elements in a driver-vehicle interface on user performance with a simulated driver task. Participants in these studies completed a set of vehicle infotainment tasks that involved a text-based item search in a custom-designed interface that employed a family of Helvetica Neue fonts, in a static environment and a driving simulator environment. Analysis of the data from the two studies reveals a modest but statistically significant effect of font on certain driving-related task performance measures. In both studies, fonts with intermediate values of character width and line thickness were associated with the best performance on a simulated driving task. The results of this study suggest that using typefaces with intermediate values of certain intrinsic design factors may serve as a simple and effective means of improving vehicle user interfaces.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jeff D. Colwell
Abstract Results from a full-scale vehicle burn test involving a 1998 compact passenger car were used to evaluate vehicle fire dynamics and how burn patterns produced during the fire correlated with important characteristics of the fire, such as the area of origin. After the fire was initiated at the air filter in the engine compartment, the fire spread locally and, once the temperature near the origin reached about 750°C, the temperature at all but one location within the engine compartment began to increase. These temperatures continued to increase for the next 6 minutes and then a temperature gradient began to develop in the passenger compartment between the ceiling and the floor. About 5 minutes after the engine compartment became fully involved, the ceiling temperature reached about 590°C and flame spread within the passenger compartment increased. Over the next 4 minutes, the passenger compartment also became fully involved. The fire then spread to the trunk and the rear wheels before self-extinguishing.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kesav Kumar Sridharan, Ravish Masti, Ravi Kumar, Jiancheng Xin, Wendong Wang, Henry Kong
Abstract In hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and full electric vehicles (EVs), efficient electrical power management with proper supply of power at the required voltage levels is essential. A DC (Direct Current)-DC converter is one of the key electrical units in a HEV/EV. The DC-DC converter dealt in the present work is intended to create the DC voltages necessary to power the accessories. The electronic circuit in this DC-DC converter consists of high power devices like Metal-Oxide Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), inductors, transformers, etc. mounted on a printed circuit board (PCB). The DC-DC converter interacts with a high voltage battery pack and supplies a low voltage power to the accessory battery. Due to this power handling operation, the devices in the convertor experience high temperatures. The temperature rise of the devices beyond the permissible limits could be detrimental to an efficient and safe operation of the converter. This paper deals with a robust and optimal thermal design of an air-cooled DC-DC Converter in order that the temperature (primary design parameter) of each of the devices is at a minimum and below the corresponding permissible limit of the device.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kamalesh Bhambare, Junya Fukuyama, Jaehoon Han, Kosuke Masuzawa, Akihiro Iwanaga, Steven Patterson
Abstract The climate inside a vehicle cabin is affected by the performance of the vehicle HVAC system, the thermal characteristics of the vehicle structure and the components, as well as the external environmental conditions. Due to the complex interactions among these various factors, the flow field and the temperature distribution can be very complicated. The need for a fully three-dimensional transient analysis is increasing in order to provide sufficiently detailed information that can be used to improve the vehicle design. In this study, a numerical simulation methodology to predict the local climate conditions in a passenger vehicle cabin is presented. The convective heat transfer from both the exterior and the interior of the cabin were calculated by three dimensional CFD simulations using a Lattice-Boltzmann method based flow solver. The conduction and the radiation effects including the solar loading were solved using a finite-difference based radiation-conduction thermal solver.
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