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2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1416
Rambabu Radakrishnan, Ganesh Dharmar, Mohanraj Balakrishnan, Sarath Padattil
Abstract Infotainment screens have become critical interface between occupant and Vehicle. Historical development of In-vehicle infotainment (IVI) has shown us the growth of interface size and usability is tremendously increased. The basic small segmented displays of past decades have transformed into large touch screen interface [1]. Earlier small screen interfaces had minimal information and less driver assist functions. It was mainly entertainment based information, which does not require much attention from driver. But recently it has changed from glancing the screen to seeing the screen, due to increased driver assist functions like GPS navigation etc. The amount of information displayed is also increased tremendously [2]. This scenario demands that the infotainment screen positioning inside the vehicle should be free from any visual obscuration, reflection and direct illumination on the infotainment screen due to ambient lighting.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1443
Nazan Aksan, Lauren Sager, Sarah Hacker, Benjamin Lester, Jeffrey Dawson, Matthew Rizzo
Abstract We examined relative effectiveness of heads-up visual displays for lane departure warning (LDW) 39 younger to middle aged drivers (25-50, mean = 35 years) and 37 older drivers (66-87, mean = 77 years). The LDW included yellow “advisory” visuals in the center screen when the driver started drifting toward the adjacent lane. The visuals turned into red “imminent” when the tires overlapped with the lane markers. The LDW was turned off if the driver activated the turn signal. The visuals could be easily segregated from the background scene, making them salient but not disruptive to the driver’s forward field of view. The visuals were placed adjacent to the left and right lane markers in the lower half of the center screen.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1444
Shayne McConomy, Johnell Brooks, Paul Venhovens, Yubin Xi, Patrick Rosopa, John DesJardins, Kevin Kopera, Kathy Lococo
Abstract The research objective was to measure and understand the preferred seat position of older drivers and younger drivers within their personal vehicles to influence recommended practices and meet the increased safety needs of all drivers. Improper selection of driver’s seat position may impact safety during a crash event and affect one’s capacity to see the roadway and reach the vehicle’s controls, such as steering wheel, accelerator, brake, clutch, and gear selector lever. Because of the stature changes associated with ageing and the fact that stature is normally distributed for both males and females, it was hypothesized that the SAE J4004 linear regression would be improved with the inclusion of gender and age terms that would provide a more accurate model to predict the seat track position of older drivers. Participants included 97 older drivers over the age of 60 and 20 younger drivers between the ages of 30 to 39.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1436
K. Han Kim, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, Matthew Reed
Abstract Automotive seats are commonly described by one-dimensional measurements, including those documented in SAE J2732. However, 1-D measurements provide minimal information on seat shape. The goal of this work was to develop a statistical framework to analyze and model the surface shapes of seats by using techniques similar to those that have been used for modeling human body shapes. The 3-D contour of twelve driver seats of a pickup truck and sedans were scanned and aligned, and 408 landmarks were identified using a semi-automatic process. A template mesh of 18,306 vertices was morphed to match the scan at the landmark positions, and the remaining nodes were automatically adjusted to match the scanned surface. A principal component (PC) analysis was performed on the resulting homologous meshes. Each seat was uniquely represented by a set of PC scores; 10 PC scores explained 95% of the total variance. This new shape description has many applications.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1437
Giorgio Previati, Massimiliano Gobbi, Giampiero Mastinu
Abstract The paper is focused on both the subjective and the objective ride comfort evaluation of farm tractors. The experimental measurement of the relevant accelerations occurring at the tractor body, at the cabin and at the seat was performed on a number of different farm tractors. A subjective rating of the ride comfort level was performed by considering five different drivers. The comfort index was computed according with ISO 2631 and other standards. The acceleration of the seated subject was computed by means of a proper mechanical model of a farm tractor and derived at different positions on the subject body. It turned out that the acceleration of the lower torso was particularly relevant for establishing a matching between the subjective perception and the objective measurement and computation. A number of indices have been derived from the measured data which are able to correlate the subjective driver feeling with the measured accelerations.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1438
Alexander Siefert
Abstract The objective evaluation of occupant comfort is a complex task where numerous aspects such as posture, pressure distribution, internal tissue loads, handling of steering wheel or gear shift have to be taken into consideration. Currently the standard evaluation procedures are hardware tests with human subjects, who are sensitive to all these aspects. However, the reproducibility of subjective tests for the comparison of design variants is a questionable issue and the costs for each test cycle with new prototypes are very high. As an alternative, numerical approaches using human body models such as AnyBody [1], CASIMIR [2] or RAMSIS [3] are applied. Here the issue of reproducibility does not exist and only little effort is required to investigate new setups. However, the disadvantage is that each approach focuses only on one specific aspect of occupant comfort, while in reality the emotions of the occupant are always a combination of all impressions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1429
Jangwoon Park, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, K. Han Kim, Monica Jones, Byoung-Keon Park, Matthew Reed
Abstract This paper reports on the development and validation of an automated seat-dimension extraction system that can efficiently and reliably measure SAE J2732 (2008) seat dimensions from 3D seat scan data. The automated dimension-extraction process consists of four phases: (1) import 3D seat scan data along with seat reference information such as H-point location, back and cushion angles, (2) calculate centerline and lateral cross-section lines on the imported 3D seat scan data, (3) identify landmarks on the centerline and cross-section lines based on the SAE J2732 definitions, and (4) measure seat-dimensions using the identified landmarks. To validate the automated seat measurements, manually measured dimensions in a computer-aided-design (CAD) environment and automatically extracted ones in the current system were compared in terms of mean discrepancy and intra- and inter-observer standard deviations (SD).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1430
Se Jin Park, Murali Subramaniyam, Seoung Eun Kim, Tae Hyun Kim, Hee Su Sin, Dong Hag Seo, Hyu Hyeong Nam, Jeong Cheol Lee
Abstract Seating comfort is associated with the various factors, and one of the principal components of a vehicle environment which can affect passenger’s comfort is vibration. The seat design plays a vital role in the vibration isolation. In recent years, automotive seat designers are paying more attention for the improvement of seat cushion properties. This paper provides information about a new automotive seat concept that use double-wall 3D air-mat in cushion along with foam cushion in the seat cushion system. To test the developed seat on vibration isolation characteristics, seating comfort, and ride quality experiments have been performed. This research is divided into two parts. At first, the newly developed seat tested on the motion simulator. In study 2, road tests were performed on the national highway. Two tri-axial accelerometers were used to measure acceleration at the foot and hip in two different seats (seat with and without double-wall 3D air-mat).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1431
Subramanian Premananth, Ganesh Dharmar, Hareesh Krishnan, Riyaz Mohammed
Abstract Virtual assessment of an occupant postural ergonomics has become an essential part of vehicle development process. To design vehicle for different market is one of the primary reason for manufacturers using digital tools to address the specific needs of the target market including cultural background, road and traffic conditions. RAMSIS is a widely used software for creating digital human models (DHM) of different target population which allows manufacturers to assess design with unique customer requirements in product design. Defining these requirements with RAMSIS human module helped development team to accurately define occupant targets such as occupant space, visibility and reachability etc. Occupant behavior and usage scenario are factors which are unique to target market and they influence the occupant posture and usage pattern inside the vehicle.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1432
Alexander Siefert
Abstract Predicting the vibration comfort is a difficult challenge in seat design. There is a broad range of requirements as the load cases strongly vary, representing different excitation levels, e.g. cobblestones or California roads. Another demand is the driver expectation, which is different for a pickup and a sports car. There are several approaches for assessing the vibrations of occupants while driving. One approach is the evaluation of comfort by integral quantities like the SEAT value, taking into account a weighting based on the human body sensitivity. Another approach is the dimension of perception developed by BMW, which is similar to psychoacoustics as the frequency range is separated with respect to occurring vibration phenomena. The seat transmissibility is in the focus of all activities. In the frequency range it defines the relation between the input at the seat slides and the output at the interface of human body and trim.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1433
Gregory Schaupp, Julia Seeanner, Casey Jenkins, Joseph Manganelli, Sarah Hennessy, Constance Truesdail, Lindsay Swift, Paul Venhovens, Johnell Brooks
Abstract The ability to independently transfer into and out of a vehicle is essential for many wheelchair users to achieve driving independence. This paper presents the results of an exploratory study that investigated the transfer strategies of wheelchair users who drive from their driver’s seat and not from their wheelchair. The goal of this study was to identify typical ingress and egress motions as well as “touch points” of wheelchair users transferring into and out of the driver’s seat. While motion databases exist for the ingress and egress of able-bodied drivers, this study provides insight on drivers with physical disabilities. Twenty-five YouTube videos of wheelchair users who transferred into and out of their own sedans were analyzed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1336
Hee Sang Park
Abstract Headliner module system implies that all components, including fasteners that are attached to the headliner substrate panel prior to vehicle assembly installation. The headliner substrate becomes an installation fixture which facilitates the assembly process. Since headliner module is an integration of many separate components into one more complex assembly, prior to vehicle assembly, a number of additional requirements must be considered. Many of these requirements are driven by the factors like shipping, handling and installation of a large panel with various componentry mounted for temporary installation retention or permanent retention. Substrate should be tough but, on the contrary it should be soft enough for the curtain airbag deployment. Tough substrate interferes with airbag deployment. Detachable reinforcement will enhance shipping and handling process. After installation, reinforcement can be detached from headliner module which will keep the substrate soft.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0892
Oliver P. Taylor, Richard Pearson, Richard Stone
Abstract Most major regional automotive markets have stringent legislative targets for vehicle greenhouse gas emissions or fuel economy enforced by fiscal penalties. Large improvements in vehicle efficiency on mandated test cycles have already taken place in some markets through the widespread adoption of technologies such as downsizing or dieselisation. There is now increased focus on approaches which give smaller, but significant incremental efficiency benefits, such as reducing parasitic losses due to engine friction. The reduction in tail pipe CO2 emissions through the reduction of engine friction using lubricants has been reported by many authors. However, opportunities also exist to reduce the lubricant viscosity during warm up by the thermal management of the lubricant mass.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0181
Yasuki Hirota, Ryuichi Iwata, Takafumi Yamauchi, Manabu Orihashi, Masaki Morita
Abstract In order to reduce the energy consumption of the automotive air conditioning system, adsorption heat pump (AHP) system is one of the key technologies. We have been developing compact AHP system utilizing the exhaust heat from the engine coolant system (80-100 °C), which can meet the requirements in the automotive application. However, AHP systems have not been practically used in automotive applications because of its low volumetric power density of the adsorber. The volumetric power density of the adsorber is proportional to sorption rate, packing density and latent heat. In general, the sorption rate is determined by mass transfer resistance in primary particle of an adsorbent and heat and mass transfer resistance in packed bed. In order to improve the volumetric power density of the adsorber, it is necessary to increase the production of the sorption rate and the packing density.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0180
Montassar Khammassi, Thierry Marimbordes, Judicael Aubry, Bertrand Barbedette, Mickael Cormerais, Cherif Larouci, Quentin Frossard
Abstract In order to cope with new regulations and find a better compromise between fuel consumption, pollutant emissions and comfort, thermal management technologies are getting more complex. This is especially true when it requires replacing a basic passive solution with a mechatronic system. A new Active Cooling Thermal-management (ACT) valve concept has been developed to specifically replace wax thermostat while keeping the same packaging and cost range and bringing closed loop temperature control, fast response time and precision. This new module is manufactured by assembling injected thermoplastic components. By essence it leads to dimension tolerances, deformation and wear over its life. Those uncertainties and deviations have to be taken into account when the nominal part is designed to ensure part efficiency till the end of its life.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0182
Harish Kumar Gangwar, Ankur Sharma, S.B. Pathak, VIvek Dwivedi, Amit Nigam
Abstract Ever tightening emission limits and constant pressure for increasing engine power are resulting in increased engine operating temperature. This coupled with continuous drive for fuel economy improvement because of the stiff competition are forcing OEMs to explore alternative cooling solutions resulting in less power take off and quick response as cooling requirement shoots up. Aim of this paper is to analyze the relative benefits of incorporating a new cooling fan drive system concept over conventional viscous fan driven cooling system with step-less variable speed control independent of engine speed variation. Hydraulic fan drive system control fan rpm based on the fluid temperature as compared to air temperature in viscous coupling fan drive system. HFD system provides quick response when increase in coolant temperature is observed. HFD system in this way provide more control on fan rpm.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0179
Meisam Mehravaran, Aurélien Levasseur, Yi Zhang, Manuel Henner
Abstract In this article, the behavior of a typical air-to-air heat exchanger (intercooler) during the thermal shock test has been recorded during which the heat exchanger is exposed to very high temperature gradients. Different CAE models have been built that have different levels of details and the sensitivity of the results to the details has been studied. Finally a comparison have been made between the results of the CAE/CFD model and the experimental data and the correlation study shows that in spite of being simple, the dual stream is very accurate and correlates pretty well with test data. Including all design details in the CAE model will not necessarily improve the accuracy of the model while adding up to the computational cost.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0198
Sudhi Uppuluri, Hemant R. Khalane, Yogesh Umbarkar, Ajay Naiknaware
Abstract Vehicle development teams find it challenging to predict what their Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) module performance will be for cold ambient (∼ -20 deg. C) test cycles such as defrost and cabin warm-up before the car is built. This uncertainty in predictions comes from varying engine heat rejection to coolant due to cold cylinder wall temperatures, calibration changes and degraded performance of various components within the cooling system such as the coolant pump owing to higher viscosity of the coolant. Measuring engine heat rejection at cold ambient is extremely difficult as the engine warms up as soon as it is fired. Multiple measurement points require long lead time to soak to the cold target temperature. It is a common practice to adjust engine calibration parameters to warm up coolant as fast as possible for an adequate defrost and cabin warm-up performance.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0199
Bin Xu, Xiaobing Liu, John Shutty, Paul Anschel, Simona Onori, Zoran Filipi, Mark Hoffman
Abstract This paper presents an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system model for heavy-duty diesel (HDD) applications. The dynamic, physics-based model includes: heat exchangers for parallel exhaust and EGR circuits, compressible vapor working fluid, distribution and flow control valves, a high pressure pump, and a reservoir. A finite volume method is used to model the evaporator, and a pressure drop model is included to improve the accuracy of predictions. Experimental results obtained on a prototype ORC system are used for model calibration and validation. Comparison of predicted and measured values under steady-state conditions is pursued first, followed by the analysis of selected transient events. Validation reveals the model’s ability to track real-world temperature and pressure dynamics of the ORC system.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0200
Chunhui Zhang, Mesbah Uddin, Xu Song, Chen Fu, Lee Foster
Abstract The radiator is the key component of a vehicle’s cooling system. The cooling effectiveness of a radiator largely depends on the flow of fresh air through it. Thus, at high vehicle speeds, the mass flow rate and flow-distribution or flow-uniformity over the radiator surface are the major operating parameters influencing the performance of a radiator. Additionally, the mass of air coming from the front grille plays an important role on the total drag of the vehicle. This paper presents computational studies aiming at improving simultaneously the efficiency of a radiator and reducing the total drag of the vehicle; this is achieved using passive aerodynamic devices that alter the flow pattern approaching the radiator. The vehicle model considered is a Hyundai Veloster and all analyses were carried out using a commercial CFD code Star-CCM+ version 10.04 by CD-adapco.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0201
Armin Traussnig, Wilko Jansen, Heinz Petutschnig, Sepp Steiner, Petra Gruen
Abstract In order to meet current and future emission and CO2 targets, an efficient vehicle thermal management system is one of the key factors in conventional as well as in electrified powertrains. Global vehicle simulation is already a well-established tool to support the vehicle development process. In contrast to conventional vehicles, electrified powertrains offer an additional challenge to the thermal conditioning: the durability of E-components is not only influenced by temperature peaks but also by the duration and amplitude of temperature swings as well as temperature gradients within the components during their lifetime. Keeping all components always at the preferred lowest temperature level to avoid ageing under any conditions (driving, parking, etc.) will result in very high energy consumption which is in contradiction to the efficiency targets.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0193
Shoichi Imahigashi, Masaharu Sakai, Etsuro Yoshino, Yasushi Mitsuishi
Abstract In recent years, the spread of eco-car has led to the demand for adaptation to low heat source, high efficiency and low noise in vehicle air conditioner. On the other hand, larger interior space of vehicle to assure passenger comfort is demanded, so that the car air-conditioner is required to be smaller. Therefore, we adopted 2-layer HVAC for the air conditioner which can respond to a low heat source. At the same time we have developed the compact high-efficiency 2-layer blower fan for HVAC in order to enable the 2-layer HVAC to be mounted on eco-car with smaller space than conventional HVAC. Generally, because axial flow velocity increases resulting from downsizing of the blower, the ununiform velocity distribution in the axial direction and the turbulent flow between fan blades occurs. It causes the efficiency decrease. To satisfy both downsizing and high-efficiency of the 2-layer blower, we have developed new technologies which can make the flow uniform between fan blades.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0188
Elankathiravan Mathivanan, Liping Liu
In the present work, the effect of various nanofluids on convective heat transfer performance in an automotive radiator was analyzed based on measured nanofluid properties. Al2O3, TiC, SiC, MWNT (multi-walled nanotube) and SiO2 nanoparticles ranging between 1 and 100 nm in size were dispersed in distilled water to form nanofluids. An ultrasonic generator was used to provide uniform particle dispersion in the fluid and keep the mixture stable for a long period of time. The impact of various particle types and their volume concentration on fluid properties such as density, thermal conductivity and viscosity were experimentally analyzed. It is observed that the nanofluid properties increased with the increase in particle volume concentration. TiO2 nanofluids were observed to show the highest increase in density (2.6% higher than the base fluid at a 1% vol. concentration) and also the largest enhancement in thermal conductivity (7.5% augmentation at 1% concentration).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0184
Toshio Murata, Tadashi Nakagawa, Hisashi Nishino, Kazunari Matsuura
In order to speed up engine coolant warm-up, the exhaust heat recirculation system collects and reuses the heat from exhaust gases by utilizing the heat exchanger. The conventional system improves actual fuel economy at the scene of the engine restart in winter season only. The heat recirculation system becomes more effective at the low outside temperature because it takes longer time to warm up engine coolant. However, the heat recirculation system becomes less effective at the high outside temperature because it takes shorter time to warm up engine coolant. Therefore, the new exhaust heat recirculation system is developed, which adopted as follows: 1) a fin-type heat exchanger in order to enhance exhaust recirculation efficiency 2) a thinner heat exchanger component and smaller amount of engine coolant capacity in the heat exchanger in order to reduce the heat mass As a result, the actual fuel economy is more improved in winter season.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0185
Yangjie Ji, Jiaqi Wang, Yingxiao Xu, Ziang Liu, Yongchi Zhou, Jiawei Li
Abstract As an auxiliary braking device of heavy-duty vehicle, eddy current retarder can reduce the brake failure due to the high temperature of the main brake. Nevertheless, the eddy current retarder will generate high temperature locally during the working process of it, leading to the decline of the brake power. The study on the heating characteristics of eddy current retarder is advantageous to the layout and parameter design of the liquid cooling channel of the retarder body and prolong the effective time of the auxiliary brake. In this research, a new kind of integrated eddy current retarder has been established. The thermal-magnetic coupling characteristics are studied and the laws of variation in torque output of auxiliary brake affected by the body temperature of retarder are analyzed. The boundary conditions are provided for the construction of the cooling channel. Firstly, the distribution of magnetic field and the characteristics of eddy current are simulated.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0187
Zizhen Yu, Gangfeng Tan, Tianming He, Xuexun Guo, MengYing Yang, Shengguang Xiong
Abstract With the improvement of occupants’ awareness on the driving safety, hydraulic retarder applications increase quickly. The traditional hydraulic retarder, on the one hand, exhausts the waste heat of transmission oil by the engine cooling system; on the other hand, the engine power should be consumed to drive the water pump and the engine cooling fan for maintaining the normal operation of the auxiliary braking system. In this study, the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) instead of the traditional hydraulic retarder water-cooling system is applied to achieve the effective temperature control of the hydraulic retarder, while the waste heat of transmission oil could be recovered for saving vehicle energy consumption.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0217
Somnath Sen, Mayur Selokar, Diwakar Nisad, Kamal Kishore
Abstract Adequate visibility through the vehicle windshield over the entire driving period is of paramount practical significance. Thin water film (fog) that forms on the windshield mainly during the winter season would reduce and disturb the driver’s visibility. This water film originates from condensing water vapor on inside surface of the windshield due to low outside temperatures. Primary source of this vapor is the passenger’s breath, which condenses on the windshield. Hot and dry air which impinges at certain velocity and angle relative to the windshield helps to remove the thin water film (defogging) and hence improves driver’s visibility. Hence a well-designed demisting device will help to eliminate this fog layer within very short span of time and brings an accepted level of visibility. An attempt is made here to design and develop a demisting device for a commercial vehicle with the help of numerical and analytical approach and later on validated with experimental results.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0214
Kaushal Kumar Jha, Ravi Ranjan, Parvej Khan, Lakshmaiah Brahmasani
Abstract For the thermal management of an automobile, the induced airflow becomes necessary to enable the sufficient heat transfer with ambient. In this way, the components work within the designed temperature limit. It is the engine-cooling fan that enables the induced airflow. There are two types of engine-cooling fan, one that is driven by engine itself and the other one is electrically driven. Due to ease in handling, reduced power consumption, improved emission condition, electrically operated fan is becoming increasingly popular compared to engine driven fan. The prime mover for electric engine cooling fan is DC motor. Malfunction of DC motor due to overheating will lead to engine over heat, Poor HVAC performance, overheating of other critical components in engine bay. Based upon the real world driving condition, 1D transient thermal model of engine cooling fan motor is developed. This transient model is able to predict the temperature of rotor and casing with and without holes.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0212
Paras Kaushal, Satishchandra C. Wani
Abstract TeamIndus is the only Indian participant in the Google Lunar X Prize (GLXP). GLXP, also referred to as Moon 2.0, is an inducement prize space competition organized by the X Prize Foundation, and sponsored by Google. The mission objective is to soft land a rover on moon, travel 500 meters and transmit HD videos and images to Earth. Team Indus’s strategy is to design and realize a lunar lander that will deliver a rover on to the surface of the moon which will accomplish GLXP mission objectives. The mission configuration comprises of four phases- Earth orbits, moon orbits, descent and surface operations. The lander during its interplanetary journey from earth to moon is exposed to different thermal loads viz. solar load, earth IR and albedo, moon IR and albedo, cold space at 4K and eclipse periods. The lander is also exposed to high temperatures of thruster nozzle during orbital transfer maneuvers.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0210
Taku Matsuda, Yuji Kobayashi, Itsuhei Kohri, Hideaki Nagano, ZongGuang Wang, Saneaki Akieda
Abstract Recently, the evaluation of the thermal environment of an engine compartment has become more difficult because of the increased employment and installation of turbochargers. This paper proposes a new prediction model of the momentum source for the turbine of a turbocharger, which is applicable to three-dimensional thermal fluid analyses of vehicle exhaust systems during the actual vehicle development phase. Taking the computational cost into account, the fluid force given by the turbine blades is imitated by adding an external source term to the Navier-Stokes equations corresponding to the optional domain without the computational grids of the actual blades. The mass flow rate through the turbine, blade angle, and number of blade revolutions are used as input data, and then the source is calculated to satisfy the law of the conservation of angular momentum.
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