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Viewing 91 to 120 of 9794
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gursaran D. Mathur
Abstract Experimental studies have been conducted to determine the energy stored in vehicle's Cockpit Module (CPM) at high ambient and at high solar heat loads for a MY2012 production vehicle. Detailed analysis has been done in this paper to show the influence of energy stored in various components (e.g., Instrument panel, HVAC system, heat exchanger, wire harness, etc.) contained within the CPM unit. Experiments were conducted to show the amount of energy stored at high ambient and solar conditions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Huize Li, Predrag Hrnjak
Abstract The effect of lubricant on distribution is investigated by relating the flow regime in the horizontal inlet header and the corresponding infrared image of the evaporator. Visualization of the flow regime is performed by high-speed camera. R134a is used as the refrigerant with PAG 46 as lubricant, forming foam in all flow regimes. Quantitative information including foam location, foam layer thickness is obtained using a matlab-based video processing program. Oil circulation rate effect on flow regime is analyzed quantitatively.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kamalesh Bhambare, Junya Fukuyama, Jaehoon Han, Kosuke Masuzawa, Akihiro Iwanaga, Steven Patterson
Abstract The climate inside a vehicle cabin is affected by the performance of the vehicle HVAC system, the thermal characteristics of the vehicle structure and the components, as well as the external environmental conditions. Due to the complex interactions among these various factors, the flow field and the temperature distribution can be very complicated. The need for a fully three-dimensional transient analysis is increasing in order to provide sufficiently detailed information that can be used to improve the vehicle design. In this study, a numerical simulation methodology to predict the local climate conditions in a passenger vehicle cabin is presented. The convective heat transfer from both the exterior and the interior of the cabin were calculated by three dimensional CFD simulations using a Lattice-Boltzmann method based flow solver. The conduction and the radiation effects including the solar loading were solved using a finite-difference based radiation-conduction thermal solver.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kesav Kumar Sridharan, Ravish Masti, Ravi Kumar, Jiancheng Xin, Wendong Wang, Henry Kong
Abstract In hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and full electric vehicles (EVs), efficient electrical power management with proper supply of power at the required voltage levels is essential. A DC (Direct Current)-DC converter is one of the key electrical units in a HEV/EV. The DC-DC converter dealt in the present work is intended to create the DC voltages necessary to power the accessories. The electronic circuit in this DC-DC converter consists of high power devices like Metal-Oxide Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), inductors, transformers, etc. mounted on a printed circuit board (PCB). The DC-DC converter interacts with a high voltage battery pack and supplies a low voltage power to the accessory battery. Due to this power handling operation, the devices in the convertor experience high temperatures. The temperature rise of the devices beyond the permissible limits could be detrimental to an efficient and safe operation of the converter. This paper deals with a robust and optimal thermal design of an air-cooled DC-DC Converter in order that the temperature (primary design parameter) of each of the devices is at a minimum and below the corresponding permissible limit of the device.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yang Zou, Huize Li, Predrag Hrnjak
Abstract Lubricant in compressor usually flows out with refrigerant. Thus, it is evitable for lubricant to be present in the heat exchanger, which significantly affects the heat exchanger performance. This paper is to investigate the effects of PAG oil on R134a distribution in the microchannel heat exchanger (MCHX) with vertical headers and to provide a tool to model R134a (with oil) distribution and its effects on MCHX capacity. The flow configuration in MCHX under the heat pump mode of the reversible system is mimicked in the experimental facility: refrigerant-oil mixture is fed into the test header from the bottom pass and exits through the top pass. It is found that a small amount of oil (OCR=0.5%) worsen the distribution. But further increasing OCR to 2.5% and 4.7%, the distribution becomes better. However, in a multi-pass microchannel heat exchanger model (considering oil effects), though the distribution is better and the capacity is closer to the uniform distribution case, the MCHX capacity decreases with respect to OCR because oil affects the heat transfer and pressure drop in the microchannel heat exchanger.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mingyu Wang, Debashis Ghosh, Edward Wolfe, Kuo-huey Chen, Jeffrey Bozeman
Abstract Traditional vehicle air conditioning systems are designed to cool the entire cabin to provide passenger comfort. Localized cooling, on the other hand, focuses on keeping the passenger comfortable by creating a micro climate around the passenger. Such a system also easily adapts to the number of passengers in the car and enables zonal control. The net impact of the localized cooling is that equivalent comfort can be achieved at reduced HVAC energy consumption rate. The present paper reports on a vehicle implementation of localized cooling using Thermoelectric Devices and the resulting energy saving.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ruidong Yan, Jun-ye Shi, Han Qing, Jiangping Chen, Ji Song
Abstract Two phase flow mal-distribution in inlet header of the parallel flow evaporator will cause performance degradation, partial frosting and comfortableness problems. In order to solve these issues in heat pump system of electric vehicles, four types of small diameter tube and fin heat exchangers with different flow passage were designed and experimental measured in heat pump system of electric vehicles. The experimental results showed that in terms of performance, the small diameter tube and fin heat exchanger can reach even exceed the micro-channel heat exchanger on capacity and COP in heating model. Compared with micro-channel, the tube and fin heat exchanger with 4 inlets and 4 outlets can increase capacity from 2010W to 2689W, and increase COP from 2.6 to 2.8. However the frost/defrost experimental results showed that there was a decrease on the capacity of micro-channel heat exchanger after several frost/defrost periods. For the small diameter tube and fin heat exchangers, the condensate water was easier to be drained, thus partial pressure difference and heat exchange capacity would recover to the initial value eventually.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mark Zima, Mingyu Wang, Prasad Kadle, Joe Bona
Abstract Variable displacement compressors have proven to be more energy efficient than the equivalent compressor with fixed displacement for mobile A/C applications. Variable displacement compressors de-stroke rather than cycle to prevent the evaporator from freezing. Cycling an internally controlled variable compressor is counter intuitive, yet results in a 15-20% reduction in the energy used by the compressor as demonstrated by tests on multiple vehicle applications. Externally controlled variable compressors have the highest energy efficiency and extending cycling to these compressors during cool temperatures reduces the compressor energy consumption by 10%.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiaojie Lin, Hoseong Lee, Yunho Hwang, Reinhard Radermacher, Jungho Kwon, Chunkyu Kwon
Abstract In this paper, the application of the separate sensible and latent cooling (SSLC) technology to the mobile air conditioning (MAC) system was investigated. Conventional MAC systems utilize a low evaporating temperature to cool down the cabin air temperature and to remove moisture from humid air. In order to remove the moisture, the supply air temperature has to be below the dew point temperature of the cabin air. Therefore, a reheating process is necessary to increase the air temperature to an appropriate and comfortable level. However, energy is wasted in this reheating process, which results in the reduction of the fuel efficiency. Since the SSLC technology can provide an appropriate solution to these issues of conventional systems, it is proposed to apply the SSLC technology to the MAC system, which can eventually reduce the fuel consumption of the MAC system. In the proposed SSLC MAC system, the desiccant wheel is dedicated to handle most of latent load while the vapor compression cycle handles the remaining latent load and sensible load.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jae Yeon Kim, Yong Nam Ahn, Shim Rok, Su Whan Kim, Wan Je Cho, Jy Choi, Hyun Keun Shin, Sang Ok Lee
Abstract In order to improve the fuel consumption ratio of the vehicle, a great deal of research is being carried out to improve air-conditioning efficiency. Increasing the efficiency of the condenser is directly connected to the power consumption of the compressor. This paper describes an experimental method of using an additional water-cooled condenser to reduce power consumption and decrease discharge pressure of the air-conditioning system. First, the principle of a combined cooling (water + air) method was evaluated theoretically. Next, experimental proof was conducted with the additional water-cooled condenser. The shape and structure is similar to the plate type of the transmission oil cooler used in a radiator. Through a number of tests, it was found that it is possible is to reduce power consumption of compressor by decreasing discharge pressure.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Guangning(Gary) Gao
Abstract Distance to empty (DTE) estimation is an important factor to electric vehicle (EV) applications due to its limited driving range. The DTE calculation is based on available energy of the battery and power usage by the powertrain components (e.g. electric motor) and climate control components (e.g. PTC heater and electric AC compressor). The conventional way of estimating the DTE is to treat the power consumed by the climate control system the same as the power by the powertrain for either instantaneous or rolling average estimation. The analysis in this study shows that the power consumption by the climate control system should be estimated based on the current ambient conditions and driver's input instead of using the recorded data from the past driving cycles. The climate control should also be considered separately from the powertrain in power usage rolling average calculation, which results in improvements in DTE estimation especially for extreme hot and cold conditions. Additionally, the climate control power consumption shows unique characteristics during the initial period of cabin climate control.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Md Abdul Quaiyum, Mohammed Ismail, Amir Fartaj
Abstract Channel diameter is one of the most important parameters of a heat exchanger especially for a highly viscous fluid-flow. Narrow channel heat exchangers are believed to have better energy efficiency due to elevated heat transfer characteristics. Heat transfer and Fluid-flow behaviors of Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) have been experimentally investigated in a closed loop integrated thermal wind tunnel test facility using wavy finned Minichannel Heat Exchanger (MICHX). The experiment was conducted by varying the ATF Reynolds number from 3 to 30. The flow friction factors in minichannel were evaluated. For a fully developed laminar flow the friction factors were evaluated considering fluid viscosity effects due to temperature variation. The flow correlated with a Poiseuille equation while friction factors were analyzed considering constant property ratio. However, it showed different correlation when considered variable property ratio. A numerical analysis on friction factor for single serpentine MICHX did not follow the Poiseulle law for both cases of constant property ratio and variable property ratio.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Chao Ding, Zhibao Xu, Yunqing Zhang, Qiming Tao
Abstract Vehicle Thermal Management System (VTMS) is a cross-cutting technology that directly or indirectly affects engine performance, fuel economy, safety and reliability, driver/passenger comfort, emissions. This paper presents a novel methodology to investigate VTMS based on Modelica language. A detailed VTMS platform including engine cooling system, lubrication system, powertrain system, intake and exhaust system, HVAC system is built, which can predict the steady and transient operating conditions. Comparisons made between the measured and calculated results show good correlation and approve the forecast capability for VTMS. Through the platform a sensitivity analysis is presented for basic design variables and provides the foundation for the design and matching of VTMS. Modelica simulation language, which can be efficiently used to investigate multi-domain problems, was used to model and simulate VTMS.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Betty Belhassein, David Chalet, Pascal Chesse, Guillaume Alix, Romain Lebas
Abstract Emission regulations have become increasingly stringent in recent years. Current regulations need the development of a new worldwide driving cycle which gives greater weight to the pollutants emitted during transient phases or cold starts. Powertrains contain a large number of components such as multistage turbocharger systems; exhaust gas recirculation, after-treatment devices and sometimes an electric motor. In this context, 0D predictive models of heat transfer in the exhaust line, calibrated with experimental data, are particularly interesting. Many investigations are related to the development of precise control laws in order to optimize the light-off of after-treatment elements during the engine starting phase. A better understanding of the thermal phenomena occurring in the exhaust line is necessary. To study the heat transfer in the exhaust line of a Diesel engine during transient conditions, the temperature in the exhaust line must be known precisely. The experimental methodology followed by the authors contains three steps: first, temperature and pressure drops are made on a pulse generator to characterize properly each thermocouple (four different diameters).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Venkat Pisipati, Srikanth Krishnaraj, Edgar Quinto Campos
Abstract Motor vehicle safety standards are getting to be more demanding with time. For automotive interiors, instrument panel (IP) head impact protection is a key requirement of the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 201. To ensure compliance of this requirement, head impact tests are conducted at 12 and 15 mph for performance verification. Computer simulation has become more prevalent as the primary development tool due to the significant reduction in time and cost that it offers. LS-DYNA is one of the most commonly used non-linear solvers in the automotive industry, particularly for safety related simulations such as the head impact of automotive interiors. LS-DYNA offers a wide variety of material models, and material type 024 (MAT 024, piecewise linear plasticity) is one of the most popular ones [1]. Although it was initially developed for metals, it is commonly used for polymers as well. LS-DYNA also offers several other material models specifically developed to simulate polymers, such as material types 019, 089, 123, to name a few.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ayse Ademuwagun, Joel Myers
Abstract Coconut shell and torrefied wood are bio-sourced and renewable materials that can be used as fillers in various polymer matrices. Torrefied wood material can be produced from numerous cellulose based materials, such as wood, sunflower hulls, flax shive, hemp and oat hulls. These bio-fillers would replace talc and glass bubbles which are not a renewable resource. Additionally, the implementation of torrefied wood and coconut would reduce the carbon footprint and improve sustainability of Hyundai and Kia vehicles, improving customer perception of our product line. In this study, coconut and torrefied wood filled polypropylene properties are tested for a HVAC Case application.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mohammed K Billal, Vinothkumar Subramani, Mohan Rao, Tim Potok
Abstract An automotive cockpit module is a complex assembly, which consists of components and sub-systems. The critical systems in the cockpit module are the instrument panel (IP), the floor console, and door trim assemblies, which consist of many plastic trims. Stiffness is one of the most important parameters for the plastic trims' design, and it should be optimum to meet all the three functional requirements of safety, vibration and durability. This paper presents how the CAE application and various other techniques are used efficiently to predict the stiffness, and the strength of automotive cockpit systems, which will reduce the product development cycle time and cost. The implicit solver is used for the most of the stiffness analysis, and the explicit techniques are used in highly non-linear situations. This paper also shows the correlations of the CAE results and the physical test results, which will give more confidence in product design and reduce the cost of prototype testing.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ram Iyer, Jin Zhou, Li Lu, Jeffrey Webb, Qaiser Khan
Abstract A CAE simulation methodology was developed to predict the warpage and shape deviation from nominal in finished plastic sub-assemblies that are joined using Infra-Red (IR), hot-plate or vibration welding processes. An automotive glove box bin and door sub-assembly was used to develop the methodology. It was seen that part warpage from injection molding and welding causes warpage in final assembled product which results in gaps and the consequent loss in quality of appearance. The CAE simulation methodology included prediction of the part warpage with residual stress from the injection molding process, use the post-molded shape as an initial part condition for the welding process, and simulation of the welding process itself. The welding process simulation included fixturing of the parts in the welding process, localized heating in the case of an IR welding process, fusion of the parts at the weld locations and thermal creep resulting in long term stress and shape relaxation of the part.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ashok Mache, Anindya Deb, G.S. Venkatesh
Abstract Natural fiber-based composites such as jute-polyester composites have the potential to be more cost-effective and environment-friendly substitutes for glass fiber-reinforced composites which are commonly found in many applications. In an earlier study (Mache and Deb [1]), jute-polyester composite tubes of circular and square cross-sections were shown to perform competitively under axial impact loading conditions when compared to similar components made of bidirectional E-glass fiber mats and thermo-setting polyester resin. For jute-reinforced plastic panels to be feasible solutions for automotive interior trim panels, laminates made of such materials should have adequate perforation resistance. In the current study, a systematic characterization of jute-polyester and glass-polyester composite laminates made by compression molding is at first carried out under quasi-static tensile, compressive and flexural loading conditions. Low velocity impact perforation tests at speeds of around 4 m/s are then performed in an instrumented drop-weight testing device on square plates extracted from the same laminates.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sergii Bogomolov, Vit Dolecek, Jan Macek, Antonin Mikulec, Oldrich Vitek
Abstract The mass and overall dimensions of massively downsized engines for very high bmep (up to 35 bar) cannot be estimated by scaling of designs already available. Simulation methods coupling different levels of method profoundness, as 1-D methods, e.g., GT Suite/GT Power with in-house codes for engine mechanical efficiency assessment and preliminary design of boosting devices (a virtual compressor and a turbine), were used together with optimization codes based on genetic algorithms. Simultaneously, the impact of optimum cycle on cranktrain components dimensions (especially cylinder bore spacing), mass and inertia force loads were estimated since the results were systematically stored and analyzed in Design Assistance System DASY, developed by the authors for purposes of early-stage conceptual design. General thermodynamic cycles were defined by limiting parameters (bmep, burning duration, engine speed and turbocharger efficiency only). The unprejudiced assessment was based on variability of any other engine design feature.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Noboru Uchida, Akira Fukunaga, Hideaki Osada, Kazuaki Shimada
Abstract Heat loss reduction could be one of the most promising methods of thermal efficiency improvement for modern diesel engines. However, it is difficult to fully transform the available energy derived from a reduction of in-cylinder heat loss into shaft work, but it is rather more readily converted into higher exhaust heat loss. It may therefore be favorable to increase the effective expansion ratio of the engine, thereby maximizing the brake work, by transforming more of the enthalpy otherwise remaining at exhaust valve opening (EVO) into work. In general, the geometric compression ratio of a piston cylinder arrangement has to increase in order to achieve a higher expansion ratio, which is equal to a higher thermodynamic compression ratio. It is still necessary to overcome constraints on peak cylinder pressure, and other drawbacks, before applying higher expansion ratios to current high-boost, high brake mean effective pressure (BMEP), and high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) diesel engines.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Essam F. Abo-Serie, Mohamed Sherif, Dario Pompei, Adrian Gaylard
Abstract A potentially important, but inadequately studied, source of passengers' exposure to pollutants when a road vehicle is stationary, with an idling engine, results from the ingestion of a vehicle's own exhaust into the passenger compartment through the HVAC intake. We developed and applied a method to determine the fraction of a vehicle's exhaust entering the cabin by this route. Further the influence of three parameters: ambient tail-wind speed, vehicle ground clearance and tail pipe angle, is assessed. The study applies Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulation to the distribution of exhaust gasses around a vehicle motorized with a 2.2 liter Diesel engine. The simulation employs efficient meshing techniques and realistic loading conditions to develop a general knowledge of the distribution of the gasses in order to inform engineering design. The results show that increasing tail-wind velocity, tail-pipe angle and ground clearance reduces the presence of CO and NO at the HVAC intake.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Alaa El-Sharkawy
Abstract Computational tools have been extensively applied to predict component temperatures before an actual vehicle is built for testing [1, 2, 3, 4, and 5]. This approach provides an estimate of component temperatures during a specific driving condition. The predicted component temperature is compared against acceptable temperature limits. If violations of the temperature limits are predicted, corrective actions will be applied. These corrective actions may include adding heat shields to the heat source or to the receiving components. Therefore, design changes are implemented based on the simulation results. Sensitivity analysis is the formal technique of determining most influential parameters in a system that affects its performance. Uncertainty analysis is the process of evaluating the deviation of the design from its intended design target. In the case of thermal protection, uncertainty analysis is applied in order to determine the variation of the calculated component temperature around its nominal value.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kristian Haehndel, Anthony Jefferies, Markus Schlipf, Torsten Frank, Frieder Christel, Sylvester Abanteriba
Abstract At the rear of the vehicle an end acoustic silencer is attached to the exhaust system. This is primarily to reduce noise emissions for the benefit of passengers and bystanders. Due to the location of the end acoustic silencer conventional thermal protection methods (heat shields) through experimental means can not only be difficult to incorporate but also can be an inefficient and costly experience. Hence simulation methods may improve the development process by introducing methods of optimization in early phase vehicle design. A previous publication (Part 1) described a methodology of improving the surface temperatures prediction of general exhaust configurations. It was found in this initial study that simulation results for silencer configurations exhibited significant discrepancies in comparison to experimental data. This was mainly due to the inability to represent complex fluid flows through the components of the silencer, which was greatly simplified in the simulation models and software utilised.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gianluca Montenegro, Augusto Della Torre, Angelo Onorati, Dalia Broggi, Gerd Schlager, Christian Benatzky
Abstract This work proposes a focus on the simulation of a rotative volumetric expander via a CFD code. A customized application of OpenFOAMĀ® has been developed to handle the particular motion of the calculation grid. The model uses a mesh to mesh interpolation technique, switching from a calculation grid to the new one on the basis of mesh quality considerations performed on the fly. This particular approach allows to account for the presence of leakages occurring between the stator and blade tips and also occurring at the top and bottom of the vanes. The fluid considered is the refrigerant R245fa, whose particular properties have been determined resorting to the NIST database. Experimental data, measured at different conditions of mass flow and fluid temperature, are compared to calculation results. Moreover, the CFD analysis has allowed the estimation of the influence of the leakage mass flow occurring at the tip of the vanes on the overall machine performances.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shi-Ing Chang, Iman Goldasteh, Salamah Maaita, Gursaran Mathur
Abstract The performance of an automobile engine depends on the adequate heat rejection through the radiator assembly. Despite of the existence of well-known theoretical models for various heat transfer applications, design of heat exchanger devices demands tremendous experimental work and effort. This study concerns the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to analyze the heat transfer and fluid flow in finned tube heat exchangers which are widely used in automotive industries. Here, two different types of the finned tube heat exchangers were studied using the Star-CCM+ commercial CFD package. Because of the symmetric nature of the geometry, only a single fin was considered in simulations. Two different designs of finned tube heat exchanger were considered in the analysis and major attention was given to the fin configurations, louvers number and louvers angle. Although the contact surface of the fin to the coolant tube is different, the thermal performance was not affected under present steady state analysis.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jiazhen Ling, Magnus Eisele, Hongtao Qiao, Vikrant Aute, Yunho Hwang, Reinhard Radermacher
Abstract As a potential replacement to traditional automotive R134a direct expansion (DX) systems, a secondary-loop system allows for the usage of flammable but low-GWP refrigerants such as propane (R290). However, as the secondary-loop system has an additional layer of thermal resistance, the cycle's transient behavior and cabin thermal comfort during pull-down and various driving cycles may be different from traditional DX systems. This paper presents a Modelica-based model to simulate both steady-state and transient operation of automotive secondary-loop systems. The model includes a lumped cabin component and a secondary-loop automotive air-conditioning system component. The air-conditioning system component consists of a condenser, a compressor, an expansion device, a coolant plate type heat exchanger, a coolant to air heat exchanger and a coolant pump. The developed model was validated against both steady-state and transient experimental data for an R290 secondary-loop system. The steady-state comparison demonstrates a 7.5% deviation of air-side COP compared to the experimental data.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael Fritz, Frank Gauterin, Justus Wessling
Abstract Steadily rising energy prices and increasingly strict emissions legislation enforce the development of measures that increase efficiency of modern vehicles. An important contribution towards more efficient vehicles is the introduction of measures regarding auxiliary units. These measures increase the gross efficiency of a vehicle and therefore also the vehicle's range. Among the auxiliary power units of a vehicle like a long-haul truck, the refrigerant compressor generally consumes the biggest amount of energy. Therefore, it is reasonable to focus efficiency-increasing efforts on optimizing the A/C system. An important tool used in the development of optimization approaches is the simulation of the relevant systems. This allows a cost-optimized evaluation of the optimization approaches and also lets the engineer compare multiple variations of these approaches within a short period of time. For a significant evaluation of the potentials to be expected by implementation of different measures and variations optimizing the A/C system, it is necessary to simulate these under several climatic conditions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vinod Kumar Srinivasa, Renjith S, Biswadip Shome
Abstract Increasing demands on engine power to meet increased load carrying capacity and adherence to emission norms have necessitated the need to improve thermal management system of the vehicle. The efficiency of the vehicle cooling system strongly depends on the fan and fan-shroud design and, designing an optimum fan and fan-shroud has been a challenge for the designer. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques are being increasingly used to perform virtual tests to predict and optimize the performance of fan and fan-shroud assembly. However, these CFD based optimization are mostly based on a single performance parameter. In addition, the sequential choice of input parameters in such optimization exercise leads to a large number of CFD simulations that are required to optimize the performance over the complete range of design and operating envelope. As a result, the optimization is carried out over a limited range of design and operating envelope only. In this paper, a Design of Experiments (DoE) based CFD approach has been used to optimize the fan and fan-shroud design of a cooling pack system.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Fabien Rabeau, Sebastien Magand
Abstract Thermal management is a key issue to minimize fuel consumption while dealing with pollutant emissions. It paves the way for developing new methods and tools in order to assess the effects of warm up phase with different drivetrains architectures and to define the most suitable solution to manage oil and coolant temperatures. DEVICE (Downsized hybrid Diesel Engine for Very low fuel ConsumptIon and CO2 Emissions) project consists in designing hybrid powertrain to cut off significantly CO2 emissions. It combines a 2-cylinder engine with an electric motor and a 7-gear dual clutch transmission. Hybridization and downsizing offer a great improvement of fuel economy and it is valuable to study their effects on thermal management. Hence, a dedicated AMESim platform is developed to model the fluids temperatures as well as the energy balance changes due to the powertrain architecture. After using a 4-cylinder reference engine to validate the model, the warm up phase (comparing hot and cold start NEDC) leads to a 12% fuel consumption penalty with DEVICE powertrain.
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