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Viewing 9601 to 9630 of 10329
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770249
John H. Varterasian, Richard R. Thompson
The dynamic characteristics of seated humans were measured in a laboratory environment. The seat/occupant system was excited vertically with random vibration. Relevant transfer functions were computed using real time acceleration signals fed to a Fourier Analyzer. The transfer functions describe the seat response, the human response, and the combined response in the frequency range from 2 to 20 Hz. Of possible significance in ride quality studies are the natural modes of vibration which were identified; these include a 3.0 Hz “head-nod” mode, a 3.9 Hz seat vertical mode, a 5.6 Hz human response mode, and a seat “back-slap” mode occurring at 11 Hz.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770252
Chester W. Klann
As part of a continuing Ford Motor Company program to improve the seating packages of production cars, a simplified in-plant method was developed to check seating variations in production vehicles. The method also provided information helpful in determining causal factors when any irregularities were found. Equipment necessary for checking was designed to be easily transported to any site.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770021
S.R. Orfeo, D.F. Harnish, H. Magid
The status of the fluorocarbon-ozone depletion theory is reviewed from the standpoint of both theoretical calculation and experimental observation. It is found that the mass balance calculated for chlorine species in the stratosphere is not in satisfactory agreement with direct observations. The general uncertainties of the calculation together with these discrepancies from observation appears to justify the National Academy of Sciences' recommendations for continued study. The technical program of the fluorocarbon industry related to this problem is briefly discussed, as is Allied Chemical's efforts to identify alternate fluorocarbon materials.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770973
Allan G. Piersol, Peter E. Rentz
Two series of experiments were conducted to reduce the uncertainties concerning the Space Shuttle payload bay acoustic environment. Tests using a one-fifth scale model showed large changes in level below 125 Hz with the introduction of typical payloads. The changes were associated with particular acoustic modal behavior and were sensitive to the type of acoustic excitation. Another series of experiments evaluated the noise reduction of the first orbiter vehicle (OV-101). The results showed consistently greater noise reduction for grazing excitation than for diffuse excitation. The results were extrapolated to OV-102 using mass law relations and acceleration measurements.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770267
E. Belohoubek, J. Cusack, J. Risko, J. Rosen
An experimental, non-cooperative automotive radar has been developed for collision mitigation and automatic headway control. The FM/CW radar is interfaced with a microcomputer to aid in the elimination of false alarms and handle the braking, warning, and headway control algorithms. A single-line, self-scan plasma display together with a series of sensors is also interfaced with the on-board computer to provide normal driving related information and warning messages in case of malfunctions in the car.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770245
Anders Hallén
This paper describes and presents the results of a test to establish the comfortable hand control reach capability of Swedish drivers while sitting in their normal driving position. The comfortable hand control reach and the maximum restrained reach as described by ISO/SAE are compared. Also described is the way the test subjects adjusted the fully adjustable driver's seat to preferred seat position.
1977-01-01
Standard
AS8005
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) applies to all temperature instruments used in aircraft applications and environments. The word ""instruments"" as used in the Standard encompasses only the display device and does not include the temperature sensors. Examples of the types of instruments covered are as follows: 1.1 temperature instruments using a resistance temperature detector for temperature sensing; 1.2 temperature instruments using a thermocouple for temperature sensing; 1.3 temperature instruments using an averaging thermocouple harness for temperature sensing; 1.4 temperature instruments receiving an input from a signal conditioning unit; 1.5 temperature instruments receiving an input from another temperature instrument; and 1.6 temperature instruments receiving an input from other temperature sensing devices.
1976-10-01
Standard
J1163_197610
This SAE standard specifies a method and the device for use in determining the position of the Seat Index Point (SIP) for any kind of seat. This SAE document provides a uniform method for defining the location of the SIP in relation to some fixing point on the seat.
1976-07-01
Standard
J287_197607
This recommended practice describes boundaries of hand control locations that can be reached by a percentage of different driver populations in passenger cars, multi-purpose passenger vehicles, and light trucks (Class A vehicles). This practice is not applicable to heavy trucks (Class B vehicles).
1976-06-01
Standard
J1148_197606
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to outline basic nomenclature and terminology in common use for engine charge air coolers, related charge air cooling system components, and charge air operating and performance parameters. An engine charge air cooler is a heat exchanger used to cool the charge air of an internal combustion engine after it has been compressed by an exhaust gas driven turbocharger, an engine driven turbocharger, or a mechanically or electrically driven blower. The use of a charge air cooler allows increased engine horsepower output, and may reduce emission levels and improve fuel economy through a more complete combustion due to the increased air density available. Typical cooling media includes the engine's coolant, ambient air, or an external water or coolant source.
1976-06-01
Standard
J576D_197606
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test methods and requirements to evaluate the suitability of plastic materials intended for optical applications in motor vehicles. The tests are intended to determine physical and optical characteristics of the material only. Performance expectations of finished assemblies, including plastic components, are to be based on tests for lighting devices, as specified in SAE Standards and Recommended Practices for motor vehicle lighting equipment. Field experience has shown that plastic materials meeting the requirements of this document and molded in accordance with good molding practices will produce durable lighting devices.
1976-05-01
Standard
AIR1277
This document contains information on the cooling of modern airborne electronics, emphasizing the use of a heat exchange surface which separates coolant and components. It supplements the information contained in AIR64 for the draw through method and in AIR728 for high Mach Number aircraft. Report contents include basic methods, characteristics of coolants, application inside and outside of the "black box" use of thermostatic controls to improve reliability and system design. Characteristics of typical cooling components are treated sufficiently to permit selection and to estimate size and weight.
1976-04-01
Standard
J1129_197604
The purpose of this Information Report is to establish minimum performance levels in the operator's environment for heated, ventilated, and air- conditioned construction and industrial equipment cabs. Also established are heating and air-conditioning test procedures for determining operator environment temperature, humidity, and pressurization. Note: The subject of noise is not treated in this information Report. This Information Report establishes the minimum performance levels in the operator's environment: Minimum cab pressurization and ventilation levels under all conditions of heating, air conditioning, and ventilation. Maximum humidity and minimum temperature differential under air conditioning operation. minimum temperature differential under heater operation. The report also establishes uniform test procedures for determining minimum performance levels, as defined under 2.1.1- 2.1.3, under Heater and Air conditioner operation.
1976-04-01
Standard
J89A_197604
This SAE Recommended Practice encompasses the significant factors which determine the effectiveness of a seat system in limiting spinal injury during vertical impacts between the rider and the snowmobile seat system. The document is intended to provide a tool for the development of safer snowmobile seats. It is recognized that the seat is only a portion of the entire vehicle protective suspension system. It is, however, usually required that the seat serve as added protection to the suspension system, since the latter may "bottom out" during a severe impact. The term "seat" refers to the occupant-supporting system not normally considered part of the vehicle suspension or frame system. In some cases, it may include more than the foam cushion.
1976-02-15
Standard
ARP998A
This ARP is intended to make recommendations for flight crew and cabin attendant restraint systems in aircraft. A properly designed crew restraint system will avoid injury or debilitation during a survivable crash and enable post crash assistance to occupants and escape from the aircraft. Consideration is given to existing requirements of the FAA and to the recommendations of aircraft operators and those involved in the manufacture or use of restraining devices. Crew member safety is the primary objective, with appropriate provisions for crew comfort taken into consideration. The criteria established herein are designed to standardize restraining systems without hindering the development of new, improved systems.
1976-02-01
Technical Paper
760727
William A. Ashe
This paper describes the development of a mechanical test apparatus for measuring the dynamic response of flexible foams after extended stress relaxation. Additional items discussed are creep, pocketing and fight back.
1976-02-01
Technical Paper
760725
William A. Ashe
This paper describes an in-depth study of the roller shear fatigue tester as a useful apparatus for measuring fatigue properties of flexible urethane foams. Included in the study was the effect of foam thickness, foam density, and the number of flex cycles.
1976-02-01
Technical Paper
760522
R. L. Skovholt
This paper discusses an Advance Electronic Display System (ADADS), built by General Electric, which is representative of the level of present technology which could be utilized to meet an Advanced Integrated Modular Instrumentation System (AIMIS) functional requirements. ADEDS involves very flexible equipment utilizing programmable display processing and generating hardware which is capable of driving multiple displays simultaneously.
1976-02-01
Technical Paper
760094
Robert B. Hood
Silicon Pressure Sensors are discussed in the context of their information translation role. The technology's capabilities in bridging the gap between typical measured phenomena and their associated control systems are explored. A ‘theory of operation’ overview reviews the silicon diaphragm's mechanical characteristics, piezoresistance, and compensation circuit design. Other sections deal with the manufacturing sequence and probable future product modifications. A summary evaluates the design's qualities in terms of fourteen weighting factors.
1976-02-01
Technical Paper
760083
Frank S. Irlinger
Every pneumatic tire needs a means for inflating, deflating, and gauging. The tire valve serves this purpose well if its functional characteristics match those of any given application. This paper highlights essential valve basics, briefly indicates the different characteristics of passenger and truck valves, and suggests minimum guidelines for proper valve selection. Ever increasing tire sizes and operating costs demand faster inflation and deflation times. The new super large bore valves for off-highway vehicles meet these requirements. An understanding of the valve's interrelationship with the rim, wheel and tire assembly will enable the designer to apply the safest and most cost effective valve.
1976-02-01
Technical Paper
760517
A. D. Shah
The integrated engine inlet thermal anti-icing and environmental control system (TAI/ECS) for subsonic transport airplanes was conceived primarily for the efficient use of available energy and minimum engine bleed air extraction. The concept employs the engine inlet leading edge as the heat exchanger to provide ice protection for the engine inlet surfaces and to cool bleed air for the environmental control system. The results of a study conducted for a typical wide-body airplane using high bypass ratio engines show that the system concept will result in potential improvements in airplane operation and engine maintenance.
1976-02-01
Technical Paper
760902
L. B. Buss
Environmental control systems for helicopters are desirable to increase comfort, promote cooling of electronic gear, and enhance pilot effectiveness. An optimized design is important to minimize weight, power extraction, and operating costs. This paper discusses a unique type of small, lightweight air cycle environmental control unit that has been developed specifically for helicopters. In comparison to other units, it offers the advantages of a lower power penalty, lower fuel energy and maintenance requirements, and increased reliability.
1976-02-01
Technical Paper
760184
Joseph A. Wolf, Donald J. Nefske, Larry J. Howell
The objective of this paper is to give illustrative solutions for the types of combined structural and acoustic problems which arise in the finite element analysis of the automobile passenger compartment and to review related methodology. Analysis implementation using the NASTRAN (NASA STRuctural ANalysis) computer program is discussed briefly, including the use of modal compartment wall models and forced boundary conditions. The model is a two dimensional one, assuming a uniform pressure field in the cross-body direction. This simplification appears to be adequate for the frequency range of interest (20 to 80 Hz).
1976-02-01
Technical Paper
762035
S. A. Lippmann
There can be no control over environmental pollution without methods for measuring how the environment is being affected by mankind. Consequently, when traffic noise was identified in 1964 by communities as an important form of pollution, it became necessary to measure the amounts of noise present and to assign relative importances to various sources in vehicular traffic. Truck tires were identified as being significant contributors and engineers from the tire and truck manufacturing industries acting under the auspices of the SAE set about to develop a test procedure that satisfied the immediate need - to initiate control over truck tire noise. This paper is a review of the outcome of that effort by one who participated in the earlier work on the testing standard. How well the method works, and how well it serves to meet the objectives now on the horizon are the preliminary topics of this discussion.
1976-02-01
Technical Paper
760930
Robert Dunn
The influence of the increasing complexity of the commercial transport operating environment is cited as the reason for applying advanced display technology to new aircraft design. Principal factors are the fuel crisis, sensitivity of the environmental noise, and the need for increased traffic capacity. Industry-wide development programs for fully configured flight decks, as well as specific subsystems, are reviewed.
1976-02-01
Standard
AS1046A
This standard is intended to apply to portable compressed gaseous oxygen equipment. When properly configured, this equipment is used either for the administration of supplemental oxygen, first aid oxygen or smoke protection to one or more occupants of either private or commercial transport aircraft.
1976-01-15
Standard
ARP1270
These recommendations cover the basic criteria for the design of aircraft cabin presurization control systems as follows: 1. To ensure aircraft safety 2. Physiology and limits which govern maximum permissible pressure time relations as related to aircraft passenger comfort. 3. General pressurization control system performance requirements design to satisfy (2). 4. Technical considerations relevant to satisfying (3).
1976-01-15
Standard
ARP1320
This ARP covers a procedure to be used in the determination of 0.05 to 0.3 ppm of chlorine in oxygen from any type of generator used for emergency or other life-support systems. The methyl orange method described can be considered as a referee technique. Instrumental analysis is also given in Section 8. This ARP describes a method for rapid and reliable measurement of chlorine in oxygen from a solid chemical oxygen generator. The method of sampling and analysis used in this procedure is adequate to encompass the range of interest relevant to the 0.3 ppm limit set for chlorine in oxygen. The test is sufficiently flexible to make the determination during a part of or for the first 60 s after activation, since this is the usual time during which chlorine may be found in the oxygen being generated.
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