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Technical Paper
1955-01-01
Max Haack
THIS paper describes an investigation into the best design of seat suspension for tractors having pneumatic tires with a rigid rear axle. Test results show that some of the factors entering into a good tractor supension include: 1. A ratio between the natural frequency of the seat and the natural frequency of the tires of about 0.4 to 0.5. 2. A supplementary seat deflection 1½ times the static seat deflection to avoid bottoming. 3. Use of suspensions having nonlinear characteristics in order to hold seat deflection within practical limits. 4. Adjustable seat-spring action to compensate for the varying weights of drivers.
Standard
1954-12-15
The desired system for aircraft instrument panel and cockpit lighting is one that will furnishlight of adequate intensity and distribution under all conditions of external lighting so that the crew may read instrumentation, placards, check lists, manuals, maps, instrument color coding, distinguish controls, etc., without undue interference with their vision outside of the aircraft.
Standard
1954-12-15
To specify minimum requirements for Electric Tachometers primarily for use in reciprocating engine powered civil transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aeronautical Standard covers magnetic drag tachometers with or without built-in synchroscopes.
Standard
1954-12-15
To specify minimum requirements for Fuel Flowmeters for use primarily in reciprocating engine powered civil transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aeronautical Standard covers two basic types of instruments, or combinations thereof, intended for use in indicating fuel consumption of aircraft engines as follows: TYPE I - Measure rate of flow of fuel used. TYPE II - Totalize amount of fuel consumed or remaining.
Standard
1954-12-15
This Aerospace Standard establishes the essential minimum safe performance standards for fuel, oil and hydraulic pressure instruments primarily for use with reciprocating engine powered transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aerospace Standard covers two basic types of fuel, oil and hydraulic pressure instruments as follows: Type I - Direct Indicating, Type II - Remote Indicating. This Aerospace Standard does not apply to engine mounted torque meter systems.
Standard
1954-12-01
This Aerospace Standard establishes the minimum sage performance standards for electrical type temperature instruments primarily for use with reciprocating engine powered transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.4. This Aerospace Standard covers two basic types of temperature instruments as follows: TYPE I Radiometer type, actuated by changes in electrical resistance of a temperature sensing electrical resistance element; the resistance changes being obtained by temperature changes of the temperature sensing resistance element. TYPE II: Millivoltmeter type, operated and actuated by varying E.M.F. output of a thermocouple; the varying E.M.F. input to the instrument being obtained by temperature changes of the temperature sensing thermocouple.
Standard
1954-12-01
This Aerospace Standard establishes essential minimum safe performance standards for Flight Director instruments primarily for use with reciprocating engine powered transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aerospace Standard covers Flight Directors for use on aircraft to indicate to the pilot, by visual means, the correct control application for the operation of an aircraft in accordance with a pre-selected flight plan.
Standard
1954-12-01
This Aeronautical Standard covers five basic types o fairspeed instruments as follows: Type I - 1 revolution Type II - 1 revolution (unequal scale) Type III - 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 revolutions Type IV - 7 revolutions Type V - 1 3/4 to 2 revolutions
Standard
1954-12-01
This purpose of this recommended practice is to provide the aerospace industry with a standard to which helicopter air conditioning systems may be designed for the civil aircraft industry. These recommendations are written to cover the general requirements for helicopter air conditioning and are sub-divided as follows: (1) Air Conditioning System - Dealing with the general design aspects. (2) Air Conditioning Equipment - Design requirements for satisfactory system function and performance. (3) Air Conditioning System Design Requirements - General information for use of those concerned in meeting requirements contained herein.
Magazine
1954-11-01
Magazine
1954-10-01
Magazine
1954-04-01
Technical Paper
1954-01-01
CHARLES PERRY, A. F. BULLARD, O. E. E. ANDERSON
Technical Paper
1954-01-01
D. C. PERKINS, A. D. BAKER
Technical Paper
1954-01-01
GEORGE R. DESI, CYRUS F. WOOD
Technical Paper
1954-01-01
F.C. Matthaei
THE universal positioning seat track is said to be the answer to the problem of providing suitable automotive seating for practically all drivers. It allows each driver to adjust the car seat to the position that best satisfies him. The author points out that providing these adjustments gives a number of advantages, such as: 1. The visibility of the driver can be at a maximum. 2. Each driver of a car can adjust the seat to suit his own individual size-and taste. 3. Less driver fatigue.
Magazine
1953-10-01
Magazine
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
L. L. KUEMPEL
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
M. W. BAKER, D. C. McCoy
Technical Paper
1953-01-01
J. H. ACHILICH
Magazine
1952-09-01
Standard
1952-08-15
INTRODUCTION This report is intended to encourage more effort to be directed toWard improving the pilot's visibility from the cockpit of transport type aircraft wih the ultimate objective of improving safety. In the preparation of this Aeronautical Information Report, consideration Was given to pilot surveys made by the Civil Aeronautics Administration, studies made by manufacturers, and a review of the cockpit visibility provided in present day transport aircraf`t. It is recognized that a rigid specification is undesirable and may restrict development and utilization of initiative. For this reason the report is in general terms and offered as a guide.
Viewing 9601 to 9630 of 9786

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