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Technical Paper
1957-01-01
J. G. LILLARD, T. G. LIPSCOMB
Abstract Increasing public acceptance of power accessories and particulary of factory installed air conditioning units coupled with bigger engines and lower hood lines on the newer automobiles necessitated a reappraisal of the hot fuel handling characteristics of automobiles. Twenty-nine 1956 automobiles, of which nineteen were equipped with factory air conditioning units, representing twelve makes were evaluated for fuel volatility requirements. In 1956 approximately four per cent of all new cars were air conditioned. By 1962 it is expected that about 25 per cent of all new cars will be air conditioned and that one car of every nine on the road will be air conditioned. These figures illustrate the rapid trend to nationwide acceptance of air conditioning in cars of all price ranges rather than the past localized acceptance in high-priced cars. The data obtained in the tests showed that the volatility limits of the cars were reduced on an average of 0.6 lb. RVP upon installation of an air conditioning unit and lowered still another 1.3 lb.
Technical Paper
1957-01-01
P. H. PRETZ
Technical Paper
1957-01-01
D. G. Fowler, V. J. Castrop, C. O. Durbin, E. J. Marville, L. H. Nagler, G. J. Nebel, J. C. Radcliffe
Standard
1956-12-15
This Aeronautical Standard covers the basic type of carbon monoxide detector instrument used to determine toxic concentrations of carbon monoxide by the measurement of heat changes through catalytic oxidation.
Standard
1956-12-15
This Aeronautical Standard covers two basic types of instruments as follows: Type I - Float Instruments, Type II - Capacitance Instruments. To specify minimum requirements for Fuel and Oil Quantity Instruments for use in aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Paragraph 3.3.
Standard
1956-12-01
The purpose of this standard is to establish optimum standards for crew demand and pressure-breathing oxygen mask assemblies for use by crew members in civil aircraft. This standard covers both general type and quick-donning type mask assemblies in the following classes: a. Class A, oronasal, demand b. Class B, oronasal, pressure-demand c. Class C, full face, demand d. Class D, full face, pressure-demand
Standard
1956-12-01
This AIR is intended as a status report on the of E.C.S. to date in dealing with the problem of equipment cooling in present and immediate future civil transport aircraft. Subsequent revisions to this AIR will follow as more information is gathered on this subject.
Magazine
1956-07-01
Standard
1956-03-15
The recommendations of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) for aircraft compartment automatic temperature control systems are primarily intended to be applicable to occupied or unoccupied compartments of civil and military aircraft.
Standard
1956-03-15
Air Condiitioning System - General - Dealing with Design Features. Air Conditioning Equipment - Commercial Passenger - Delaing with features. Applicable only to commercial passenger carrying aircraft. Desirable Design Features - General information for use of those concerned in meeting requirements contained herein.
Technical Paper
1956-01-01
BEN F. McLEOD
The paper on integrated flight systems briefly reviews the growth of flight instruments and automatic flight controls, and points out the need for integrated flight systems. Three manufacturers, namely: Collins, Sperry and Bendix, are producing integrated systems today. Each of these systems is reviewed, with the review centering on instrumentation. The third part of the paper presents airline views on the application of integrated systems and points out installation problems. In conclusion the paper indicates that many changes can be expected in the future as a result of improvements and installation of additional aids.
Technical Paper
1956-01-01
J. de VIENNE
Converging courses and anti-collision manoeuvres by aircraft are studied and the suitability of some form of pictorial display unit which would provide the pilot of an aircraft with adequate reliable information to enable him, with minimum interpretation, to determine readily the need for, and to execute simple yet safe manoeuvres for avoidance of collision.
Standard
1955-07-01
This document is limited to units meeting the definitions of para. 1.3 and covers the following general class of synchros: 26 volt, 400 cycle synchros 115 volt, 400 cycle synchros 115 volt, 60 cycle synchros
Technical Paper
1955-01-01
Max Haack
THIS paper describes an investigation into the best design of seat suspension for tractors having pneumatic tires with a rigid rear axle. Test results show that some of the factors entering into a good tractor supension include: 1. A ratio between the natural frequency of the seat and the natural frequency of the tires of about 0.4 to 0.5. 2. A supplementary seat deflection 1½ times the static seat deflection to avoid bottoming. 3. Use of suspensions having nonlinear characteristics in order to hold seat deflection within practical limits. 4. Adjustable seat-spring action to compensate for the varying weights of drivers.
Technical Paper
1955-01-01
J. W. DUHN
Technical Paper
1955-01-01
GEORGE W. HOOVER
Technical Paper
1955-01-01
J. L. BARTLETT, P. C. SCOFIELD
An auxiliary gas turbine would provide the transport airplane with an energy source to make it self-contained while away from the ramp and without the main engines running. Because of the ground support equipment necessary to service the modern transport airplane while it is on the ramp, there appears to be good reason to take steps to alleviate this ground clutter. The authors believe that the use of an auxiliary gas turbine aboard the airplane would be a step in the right direction to achieve this objective.
Technical Paper
1955-01-01
L. H. SCHREIBER
Standard
1954-12-15
To specify minimum requirements for Electric Tachometers primarily for use in reciprocating engine powered civil transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aeronautical Standard covers magnetic drag tachometers with or without built-in synchroscopes.
Standard
1954-12-15
To specify minimum requirements for Fuel Flowmeters for use primarily in reciprocating engine powered civil transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aeronautical Standard covers two basic types of instruments, or combinations thereof, intended for use in indicating fuel consumption of aircraft engines as follows: TYPE I - Measure rate of flow of fuel used. TYPE II - Totalize amount of fuel consumed or remaining.
Standard
1954-12-15
This Aerospace Standard establishes the essential minimum safe performance standards for fuel, oil and hydraulic pressure instruments primarily for use with reciprocating engine powered transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aerospace Standard covers two basic types of fuel, oil and hydraulic pressure instruments as follows: Type I - Direct Indicating, Type II - Remote Indicating. This Aerospace Standard does not apply to engine mounted torque meter systems.
Standard
1954-12-15
The desired system for aircraft instrument panel and cockpit lighting is one that will furnishlight of adequate intensity and distribution under all conditions of external lighting so that the crew may read instrumentation, placards, check lists, manuals, maps, instrument color coding, distinguish controls, etc., without undue interference with their vision outside of the aircraft.
Standard
1954-12-01
This Aeronautical Standard covers five basic types o fairspeed instruments as follows: Type I - 1 revolution Type II - 1 revolution (unequal scale) Type III - 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 revolutions Type IV - 7 revolutions Type V - 1 3/4 to 2 revolutions
Standard
1954-12-01
This Aerospace Standard establishes essential minimum safe performance standards for Flight Director instruments primarily for use with reciprocating engine powered transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.3. This Aerospace Standard covers Flight Directors for use on aircraft to indicate to the pilot, by visual means, the correct control application for the operation of an aircraft in accordance with a pre-selected flight plan.
Standard
1954-12-01
This Aerospace Standard establishes the minimum sage performance standards for electrical type temperature instruments primarily for use with reciprocating engine powered transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Section 3.4. This Aerospace Standard covers two basic types of temperature instruments as follows: TYPE I Radiometer type, actuated by changes in electrical resistance of a temperature sensing electrical resistance element; the resistance changes being obtained by temperature changes of the temperature sensing resistance element. TYPE II: Millivoltmeter type, operated and actuated by varying E.M.F. output of a thermocouple; the varying E.M.F. input to the instrument being obtained by temperature changes of the temperature sensing thermocouple.
Standard
1954-12-01
This purpose of this recommended practice is to provide the aerospace industry with a standard to which helicopter air conditioning systems may be designed for the civil aircraft industry. These recommendations are written to cover the general requirements for helicopter air conditioning and are sub-divided as follows: (1) Air Conditioning System - Dealing with the general design aspects. (2) Air Conditioning Equipment - Design requirements for satisfactory system function and performance. (3) Air Conditioning System Design Requirements - General information for use of those concerned in meeting requirements contained herein.
Magazine
1954-11-01
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