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Viewing 9601 to 9630 of 10341
1977-02-28
Technical Paper
770276
Paul J. Cornell
Many electronic display technologies are being considered for use in instrument cluster applications. One electronic display technology, planar gas discharge (PGD), has had good field experience in over 30,000 automotive applications since 1972. PGD's advantages and limitations are discussed in the context of the requirements imposed by the automotive environments.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770274
George W. Smith, Michael Kaplit, Daniel B. Hayden
An instrument panel cluster consisting of five twisted nematic liquid crystal displays has been installed and tested in a 1975 Chevrolet Monte Carlo. The displays are: warning indicators, speedometer, clock/odometer, fuel gauge, and transmission indicator (PRNDL). Four modes of operation for the warning indicators have been evaluated: transmissive, color transmissive, reflective, and color transreflective. The remaining displays all operate in the reflective mode. A heater system allows operation over a -40°C to +80°C temperature range.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770275
Raymond A. West
Vacuum Fluorescent Displays are available applications in the automotive industry. The most common applications are numerical displays for Clocks, Radios, CB Radios, Speedometers and Gauges. There are also analog displays available for speedometers and gauges, and alphanumeric displays for message centers.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770271
John A. Siegel
The need for automobile displays and the severe requirements placed upon them are examined. A review of the recent advances in numeric, bar graph, hybrid bar graph, pointer bar graph, and dot matrix displays is presented. Pertinent operational constraints and practical limitations are discussed. The variety of connection techniques available is discussed. A method for calculating brightness and dimming range of a typical panel is presented with a detailed example.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770272
Raymond E. Brown
A product design for a seven segment numeric display is discussed. This design has been shown to meet the basic performance and environmental requirements for the automotive industry.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770705
James E. Thompson
The phenomenal sales growth of enclosure equipped two-wheel-drive (2WD) tractors demonstrates that comfort and convenience are very marketable features. The operator comfort of the enclosure has created an appetite for corresponding ride quality. Although the operator is subjected to acceleration in all three orthogonal directions; traditionally, tractor suspensions have isolated vibration only in the vertical direction. Measurements reveal that isolation of longitudinal acceleration provides the best compliment to the vertical suspension on 2WD tractors. John Deere has developed a ride comfort package which provides the first bidirectional suspension offered on a 2WD tractor.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770161
Robert W. Miller
A new level of electronic building blocks for automotive system design is evolving. These circuits will perform specific functions with high accuracy, low cost, and a minimum of external components. This paper describes a unique frequency to voltage converter designed for the specific interface problems found in automotive systems. The concept of a building block device requires that a function be performed in the same way as it can be mathematically defined. This device is free of the typical compromises associated with adapting conventional F-V converters to automotive requirements. It interfaces directly with magnetic pickups and its output is directly proportional to frequency even as the frequency goes to zero. Two specific application areas are explored. The need for an electronic speedometer/tachometer for better reliability and easier instrument panel design calls for a ripple-free low frequency F-V or F-I converter.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770247
Stefan Habsburg, Lorna Middendorf
Evaluations of 20 seating environments were conducted using rating scales, subjective probabilities, and adjective check lists with a representative driver population to develop reliable indices of psychological seating comfort. Concurrent measurable physiologic variations were also recorded to determine relationship patterns. Primary psychological descriptors were identified for each seating environment. Subjective data was compared with physiological data and SAE seat dimensioning findings. Multivariate canonical correlation analyses of 32 variables are reported, as are subjective profiles for each seating environment.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770248
Edmund J. Glassford
A relationship of selected hemodynamic functions to subjective's seating comfort evaluations has been observed. Studies were conducted using rating scales, subjective probabilities, adjective check lists and concurrent measures of hemodynamics variations with a representative driver population to develop reliable psychophysiological indices of comfort. Thirty-two variables constituted the data bank subjected to multivariate canonical correlation analyses. Subjective data were composed with physiological data and SAE Seat dimensions. Significant relationships among subjective and physiologic measures were found.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770253
Eleri M. Whitham, Michael J. Griffin
Two experiments have been conducted to assess a method of measuring the whole-body vertical vibration experienced by persons seated on soft seats. The method utilises a transducer mount located between the seat and the body. Comfort contours obtained on hard flat seats are shown to be applicable to measurements made within a firm bar or plate placed on a cushion beneath the ischial tuberosities of a seated subject. However, since some mounts alter seat transmissibility a firm plate (SIT-BAR) contoured to cause seat compression similar to that produced by the buttocks is recommended for some applications.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770250
Currell L. Pattie, Richard L. Gray
The concept of a semi-reclining driver's seat for an advanced tank is based primarily on the need to provide a low tank silhouette in order to decrease the probability of enemy detection, and to present as small a target as possible. An initial seat field test was performed with four Army and nine Chrysler tank drivers. The test data indicated that the seat configuration provided a satisfactory compromise between silhouette and driver comfort. A supplementary laboratory experiment indicated improvement in comfort-discomfort ratings and favorable reactions to the overall driver's station as a function of increased legroom. Rigorous operational evaluations using experienced Army armor personnel reaffirmed the validity of the seat concept.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770249
John H. Varterasian, Richard R. Thompson
The dynamic characteristics of seated humans were measured in a laboratory environment. The seat/occupant system was excited vertically with random vibration. Relevant transfer functions were computed using real time acceleration signals fed to a Fourier Analyzer. The transfer functions describe the seat response, the human response, and the combined response in the frequency range from 2 to 20 Hz. Of possible significance in ride quality studies are the natural modes of vibration which were identified; these include a 3.0 Hz “head-nod” mode, a 3.9 Hz seat vertical mode, a 5.6 Hz human response mode, and a seat “back-slap” mode occurring at 11 Hz.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770252
Chester W. Klann
As part of a continuing Ford Motor Company program to improve the seating packages of production cars, a simplified in-plant method was developed to check seating variations in production vehicles. The method also provided information helpful in determining causal factors when any irregularities were found. Equipment necessary for checking was designed to be easily transported to any site.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770021
S.R. Orfeo, D.F. Harnish, H. Magid
The status of the fluorocarbon-ozone depletion theory is reviewed from the standpoint of both theoretical calculation and experimental observation. It is found that the mass balance calculated for chlorine species in the stratosphere is not in satisfactory agreement with direct observations. The general uncertainties of the calculation together with these discrepancies from observation appears to justify the National Academy of Sciences' recommendations for continued study. The technical program of the fluorocarbon industry related to this problem is briefly discussed, as is Allied Chemical's efforts to identify alternate fluorocarbon materials.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770973
Allan G. Piersol, Peter E. Rentz
Two series of experiments were conducted to reduce the uncertainties concerning the Space Shuttle payload bay acoustic environment. Tests using a one-fifth scale model showed large changes in level below 125 Hz with the introduction of typical payloads. The changes were associated with particular acoustic modal behavior and were sensitive to the type of acoustic excitation. Another series of experiments evaluated the noise reduction of the first orbiter vehicle (OV-101). The results showed consistently greater noise reduction for grazing excitation than for diffuse excitation. The results were extrapolated to OV-102 using mass law relations and acceleration measurements.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770267
E. Belohoubek, J. Cusack, J. Risko, J. Rosen
An experimental, non-cooperative automotive radar has been developed for collision mitigation and automatic headway control. The FM/CW radar is interfaced with a microcomputer to aid in the elimination of false alarms and handle the braking, warning, and headway control algorithms. A single-line, self-scan plasma display together with a series of sensors is also interfaced with the on-board computer to provide normal driving related information and warning messages in case of malfunctions in the car.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770245
Anders Hallén
This paper describes and presents the results of a test to establish the comfortable hand control reach capability of Swedish drivers while sitting in their normal driving position. The comfortable hand control reach and the maximum restrained reach as described by ISO/SAE are compared. Also described is the way the test subjects adjusted the fully adjustable driver's seat to preferred seat position.
1977-01-01
Standard
AS8005
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) applies to all temperature instruments used in aircraft applications and environments. The word ""instruments"" as used in the Standard encompasses only the display device and does not include the temperature sensors. Examples of the types of instruments covered are as follows: 1.1 temperature instruments using a resistance temperature detector for temperature sensing; 1.2 temperature instruments using a thermocouple for temperature sensing; 1.3 temperature instruments using an averaging thermocouple harness for temperature sensing; 1.4 temperature instruments receiving an input from a signal conditioning unit; 1.5 temperature instruments receiving an input from another temperature instrument; and 1.6 temperature instruments receiving an input from other temperature sensing devices.
1976-10-01
Standard
J1163_197610
This SAE standard specifies a method and the device for use in determining the position of the Seat Index Point (SIP) for any kind of seat. This SAE document provides a uniform method for defining the location of the SIP in relation to some fixing point on the seat.
1976-07-01
Standard
J287_197607
This recommended practice describes boundaries of hand control locations that can be reached by a percentage of different driver populations in passenger cars, multi-purpose passenger vehicles, and light trucks (Class A vehicles). This practice is not applicable to heavy trucks (Class B vehicles).
1976-06-01
Standard
J1148_197606
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to outline basic nomenclature and terminology in common use for engine charge air coolers, related charge air cooling system components, and charge air operating and performance parameters. An engine charge air cooler is a heat exchanger used to cool the charge air of an internal combustion engine after it has been compressed by an exhaust gas driven turbocharger, an engine driven turbocharger, or a mechanically or electrically driven blower. The use of a charge air cooler allows increased engine horsepower output, and may reduce emission levels and improve fuel economy through a more complete combustion due to the increased air density available. Typical cooling media includes the engine's coolant, ambient air, or an external water or coolant source.
1976-06-01
Standard
J576D_197606
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test methods and requirements to evaluate the suitability of plastic materials intended for optical applications in motor vehicles. The tests are intended to determine physical and optical characteristics of the material only. Performance expectations of finished assemblies, including plastic components, are to be based on tests for lighting devices, as specified in SAE Standards and Recommended Practices for motor vehicle lighting equipment. Field experience has shown that plastic materials meeting the requirements of this document and molded in accordance with good molding practices will produce durable lighting devices.
1976-05-01
Standard
AIR1277
This document contains information on the cooling of modern airborne electronics, emphasizing the use of a heat exchange surface which separates coolant and components. It supplements the information contained in AIR64 for the draw through method and in AIR728 for high Mach Number aircraft. Report contents include basic methods, characteristics of coolants, application inside and outside of the "black box" use of thermostatic controls to improve reliability and system design. Characteristics of typical cooling components are treated sufficiently to permit selection and to estimate size and weight.
1976-04-01
Standard
J1129_197604
The purpose of this Information Report is to establish minimum performance levels in the operator's environment for heated, ventilated, and air- conditioned construction and industrial equipment cabs. Also established are heating and air-conditioning test procedures for determining operator environment temperature, humidity, and pressurization. Note: The subject of noise is not treated in this information Report. This Information Report establishes the minimum performance levels in the operator's environment: Minimum cab pressurization and ventilation levels under all conditions of heating, air conditioning, and ventilation. Maximum humidity and minimum temperature differential under air conditioning operation. minimum temperature differential under heater operation. The report also establishes uniform test procedures for determining minimum performance levels, as defined under 2.1.1- 2.1.3, under Heater and Air conditioner operation.
1976-04-01
Standard
J89A_197604
This SAE Recommended Practice encompasses the significant factors which determine the effectiveness of a seat system in limiting spinal injury during vertical impacts between the rider and the snowmobile seat system. The document is intended to provide a tool for the development of safer snowmobile seats. It is recognized that the seat is only a portion of the entire vehicle protective suspension system. It is, however, usually required that the seat serve as added protection to the suspension system, since the latter may "bottom out" during a severe impact. The term "seat" refers to the occupant-supporting system not normally considered part of the vehicle suspension or frame system. In some cases, it may include more than the foam cushion.
1976-02-15
Standard
ARP998A
This ARP is intended to make recommendations for flight crew and cabin attendant restraint systems in aircraft. A properly designed crew restraint system will avoid injury or debilitation during a survivable crash and enable post crash assistance to occupants and escape from the aircraft. Consideration is given to existing requirements of the FAA and to the recommendations of aircraft operators and those involved in the manufacture or use of restraining devices. Crew member safety is the primary objective, with appropriate provisions for crew comfort taken into consideration. The criteria established herein are designed to standardize restraining systems without hindering the development of new, improved systems.
1976-02-01
Technical Paper
760727
William A. Ashe
This paper describes the development of a mechanical test apparatus for measuring the dynamic response of flexible foams after extended stress relaxation. Additional items discussed are creep, pocketing and fight back.
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