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Viewing 9601 to 9630 of 10365
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780727
Richard J. Garrity
The Model 4-210 Field Boss is the latest articulated four-wheel drive tractor to be manufactured by the White Farm Equipment Company. A major objective in its design was to incorporate the improved features of White's new large two-wheel drive tractors by using as many common components as possible. The paper discusses how this was achieved and presents an overall description of the tractor.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780766
E. T. Hinds, G. P. Blair
Previous publications from The Queen's University of Belfast have described the unsteady gas flow through a naturally aspirated two-cycle engine and the most recent of these have detailed the scavenge process, the combustion model and muffler design. It is thus now possible to predict the unsteady gas flow behaviour through and the performance and noise characteristics in this type of engine with a good degree of accuracy. This paper describes a mathematical model which has been formulated to simulate the action of the two-cycle engine fitted with a reed valve due to the unsteady gas dynamic behaviour in the inlet tract and makes comparisons with measurements. A complete simulation on the computer of a two-cycle engine fitted with a reed intake valve is thus now possible.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
781034
Gary L. McGavin
Essential facilities are those buildings whose functions are required for the welfare of the public after an earthquake. They include hospitals, communication centers, police and fire stations. A considerable amount of attention has been paid to these facilities to assure that they are structurally competent. Very little significance has been placed on the nonstructural equipment necessary for them to continue operation after an earthquake. This paper describes the operational system and seismic category approach that can be used by the design team to assess the relative worth with respect to overall facility operation of the nonstructural equipment. The various methods of seismic qualification such as shake table testing, complex analysis, simple analysis and engineering judgment are also discussed for nonstructural equipment.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780300
W. E. Cooke, T. E. Wright, J. A. Hirschfield
A non-corrosive flux for brazing aluminum has been developed. Use of the flux for furnace brazing is described. The characteristics of heat exchangers brazed by the process are presented. The results show considerable promise for economical and reliable use of the process in brazing automotive heat exchangers.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780001
Kenneth Cuffe
This paper reviews the elements necessary to design and develop integrated air conditioning and heating systems for trucks. Included is discussion of the pertinent sub-systems: dash mounted air handling components, air distribution system, operator controls, refrigeration circuit, electrical system and vacuum system. Also reviewed are the physiological factor involved in heating and air conditioning.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780421
Leslie D. Montgomery, Edmund J. Glassford
Impedance Plethysmography was used to measure the perfusion changes and venous clearance in the lower leg, knee, thigh and buttock that was produced by operation of a pulsating seat cushion that may reduce the detrimental hemodynamic effects of prolonged driving. The grouped mean indices of arterial perfusion increased significantly (P < 0.05), in all segments studied, following a 5 minute activation of the seat cushion. The cushion assisted venous clearance in all segments of the leg during each inflation cycle. This device may be desirable to reduce fatigue and increase performance during prolonged driving.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780172
T. Uchiyamada, T. Kunieda
This paper deals with high frequency noise in the passenger compartment which are caused by transmitted engine noise. For the purpose of noise reduction, several evaluation methods are developed. For the evaluation of a body transmission loss, a combination of a reverberant room and an anechoic room is used. The noise absorption of the compartment is evaluated under the concept of the saturated sound pressure level. And sufficient standard samples are measured to support the noise reduction development.
1978-02-01
Standard
AS8007
This AS defines instruments which use inputs of static and pitot pressure equal to those which are utilized to establish the pressure altitude and speed of that aircraft. These pressures are applied to the instrument ports to provide means for generation of an aural warning whenever the aircraft reaches or exceeds the maximum operating limit speed. This Over Speed Warning Instrument function may be incorporated as part of an Air Data Computer, or an Air Speed Indicator, or an Air Speed/Mach Number Indicator, or other instruments. In those cases where the Over Speed Warning Instrument is part of another instrument, the standards contained herein apply only to the Over Speed Warning Instrument function.
1978-01-31
Standard
ARP767A
This ARP provides design guidelines based on currently available information for the impact safety design of the cabin occupant environment.
1978-01-01
Technical Paper
785127
N. Petrescu, M. Tofan
Presently utilized flexible suspension systems for motor vehicle seats are characterized by: - positions of minimum potential around which small oscillations are produced. - distinct spectrum values. The dynamic response of these systems is of a type where transmissibility in displacement approaches sub-unity only in the area of over-resonance for f1> fo √ 2. Excitation frequencies of motor vehicles reach into the area f< f1, the decrease of the effective frequency fo being constructively limited by the travel of the seat. A dynamic suspension proposed by the authors would realize a reduction in the effective frequency approaching zero.
1978-01-01
Technical Paper
785032
Karl Kurz
The paper examines the mathematical hypothesis which forms the basis of calculation of noise-levels in passenger compartments. Without such means of theoretical evaluation, determination of noise-levels can only be accomplished by measurements of actual model prototypes. The equation on which this calculation of noise-levels is based was formulated from measurements of passenger compartment noise and related variables. The quantities which define the noise-level include the noise-emitting surfaces, the emission factor, the transmission function which describes the coupling connection between noise source and the body, the noise-damping characteristic of the wall separating the engine and passenger compartments, and the absorption capacity of the passenger compartment. Further investigations are required for improved methods of determining some of these variables. The equation is shown to be essentially correct for calculation of total noise levels.
1978-01-01
Technical Paper
785043
Jana Tupova, Klaus Rompe
The strength of passenger seats and seat mounts are usually evaluated on the basis of personal vehicle tests. In particular, the backrest, its mounting, and the seat mounting are subjected to horizontal forces and evaluated. None of these tests, however, accounts directly for forces exerted by unbelted passengers thrown from behind into the rear of the backrests. The purpose of the paper was to investigate the validity of the testing procedure for commercial vehicles. Result were based on deceleration and rebound tests with dummies. The tests showed that none of the passenger seats or their mountings was damaged by the deceleration of its own mass. However, all test seats were deformed by dummies striking them from behind under simulated collision conditions. Seat mountings remained undamage, though.
1977-10-01
Standard
AIR1392
This document is intended to give general instructions and directions for personnel performing maintenance and modification work on Oxygen Systems.
1977-09-01
Standard
J1139_197709
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to present design recommendations for the direction-of-motion of hand controls found in passenger vehicles, multipurpose vehicles, and trucks. These recommendations are based on recent and past human factors research and are important considerations in the design of control layouts.
1977-09-01
Standard
J1138_197709
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to describe design criteria pertaining to the location and labeling of hand controls necessary to or frequently used during the operation of passenger cars, MPV, and trucks 10,000 GVW and under. The results of SAE human factors research have strongly influenced these recommendations, specifically in the areas of driver reach, control-locating performance, and control location expectancies. Deviations from this recommended practice should be made only after careful study of the various SAE publications on these subjects, as referenced here and in SAE J1139 (September, 1977), Supplemental Information-Driver Hand Controls Location for Passenger Cars, MPV's and Trucks (10,000 GVW and Under).
1977-08-01
Standard
AIR1266
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) outlines concepts for the design and use of fault isolation equipment that have general application. The specific focus is on fault isolation of environmental control systems (ECS) in commercial transports. Presented are general fault isolation purposes, design principles, and demonstration of compliance criteria. These are followed by three design examples to aid in understanding the design principles. Future trends in built-in-test-equipment (BITE) design are discussed, some of which represent concepts already being implemented on new equipment.
1977-08-01
Standard
AS8010
This document defines the minimum degree of purity and maximum levels of certain deleterious impurities allowable for aviator's breathing oxygen at the point of manufacture or generation. It covers gaseous, liquid, and chemically generated oxygen, and oxygen supplied by in situ concentration and in situ electrolysis. Different limits are established for oxygen from different sources, in recognition of differences in the ways the oxygen is stored, dispensed, and utilized, taking into account the safety of the user. These limits are not intended to specifically reflect upon the relative capabilities or merits of various technologies. Procurement documents may specify more stringent limits, where required for specific applications. Medical oxygen is not covered by this standard. In the United States, medical oxygen is a prescription drug
1977-07-01
Standard
J548D_197707
ABSTRACT
1977-06-01
Standard
ARP881A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) lists the lamps in Table 1 that are recommended for the type of service indicated. This list is not intended as a catalog and does not include many types that are now in use. This specification is not applicable to Solid State Lighting Lamp Assemblies (Based LED lamps). It does, however, reflect current practice.
1977-02-28
Technical Paper
770276
Paul J. Cornell
Many electronic display technologies are being considered for use in instrument cluster applications. One electronic display technology, planar gas discharge (PGD), has had good field experience in over 30,000 automotive applications since 1972. PGD's advantages and limitations are discussed in the context of the requirements imposed by the automotive environments.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770274
George W. Smith, Michael Kaplit, Daniel B. Hayden
An instrument panel cluster consisting of five twisted nematic liquid crystal displays has been installed and tested in a 1975 Chevrolet Monte Carlo. The displays are: warning indicators, speedometer, clock/odometer, fuel gauge, and transmission indicator (PRNDL). Four modes of operation for the warning indicators have been evaluated: transmissive, color transmissive, reflective, and color transreflective. The remaining displays all operate in the reflective mode. A heater system allows operation over a -40°C to +80°C temperature range.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770275
Raymond A. West
Vacuum Fluorescent Displays are available applications in the automotive industry. The most common applications are numerical displays for Clocks, Radios, CB Radios, Speedometers and Gauges. There are also analog displays available for speedometers and gauges, and alphanumeric displays for message centers.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770271
John A. Siegel
The need for automobile displays and the severe requirements placed upon them are examined. A review of the recent advances in numeric, bar graph, hybrid bar graph, pointer bar graph, and dot matrix displays is presented. Pertinent operational constraints and practical limitations are discussed. The variety of connection techniques available is discussed. A method for calculating brightness and dimming range of a typical panel is presented with a detailed example.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770272
Raymond E. Brown
A product design for a seven segment numeric display is discussed. This design has been shown to meet the basic performance and environmental requirements for the automotive industry.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770161
Robert W. Miller
A new level of electronic building blocks for automotive system design is evolving. These circuits will perform specific functions with high accuracy, low cost, and a minimum of external components. This paper describes a unique frequency to voltage converter designed for the specific interface problems found in automotive systems. The concept of a building block device requires that a function be performed in the same way as it can be mathematically defined. This device is free of the typical compromises associated with adapting conventional F-V converters to automotive requirements. It interfaces directly with magnetic pickups and its output is directly proportional to frequency even as the frequency goes to zero. Two specific application areas are explored. The need for an electronic speedometer/tachometer for better reliability and easier instrument panel design calls for a ripple-free low frequency F-V or F-I converter.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770247
Stefan Habsburg, Lorna Middendorf
Evaluations of 20 seating environments were conducted using rating scales, subjective probabilities, and adjective check lists with a representative driver population to develop reliable indices of psychological seating comfort. Concurrent measurable physiologic variations were also recorded to determine relationship patterns. Primary psychological descriptors were identified for each seating environment. Subjective data was compared with physiological data and SAE seat dimensioning findings. Multivariate canonical correlation analyses of 32 variables are reported, as are subjective profiles for each seating environment.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770248
Edmund J. Glassford
A relationship of selected hemodynamic functions to subjective's seating comfort evaluations has been observed. Studies were conducted using rating scales, subjective probabilities, adjective check lists and concurrent measures of hemodynamics variations with a representative driver population to develop reliable psychophysiological indices of comfort. Thirty-two variables constituted the data bank subjected to multivariate canonical correlation analyses. Subjective data were composed with physiological data and SAE Seat dimensions. Significant relationships among subjective and physiologic measures were found.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770253
Eleri M. Whitham, Michael J. Griffin
Two experiments have been conducted to assess a method of measuring the whole-body vertical vibration experienced by persons seated on soft seats. The method utilises a transducer mount located between the seat and the body. Comfort contours obtained on hard flat seats are shown to be applicable to measurements made within a firm bar or plate placed on a cushion beneath the ischial tuberosities of a seated subject. However, since some mounts alter seat transmissibility a firm plate (SIT-BAR) contoured to cause seat compression similar to that produced by the buttocks is recommended for some applications.
1977-02-01
Technical Paper
770250
Currell L. Pattie, Richard L. Gray
The concept of a semi-reclining driver's seat for an advanced tank is based primarily on the need to provide a low tank silhouette in order to decrease the probability of enemy detection, and to present as small a target as possible. An initial seat field test was performed with four Army and nine Chrysler tank drivers. The test data indicated that the seat configuration provided a satisfactory compromise between silhouette and driver comfort. A supplementary laboratory experiment indicated improvement in comfort-discomfort ratings and favorable reactions to the overall driver's station as a function of increased legroom. Rigorous operational evaluations using experienced Army armor personnel reaffirmed the validity of the seat concept.
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