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Technical Paper
1958-01-01
A. A. HERSHFIELD
Technical Paper
1958-01-01
Robert F. McLean
The fundamental factors underlying automobile styling are discussed. Three basic elements are: what a vehicle is for--the task, its performance, and its cost. The body designer must provide for comfort and safety of passengers, and must accommodate chassis components, fuel, and luggage. These must be arranged to take on form expressing nature of vehicle. Examples of this process are discussed.
Technical Paper
1958-01-01
J. A. BELAIRE
Technical Paper
1958-01-01
Vince Reynolds
Technical Paper
1958-01-01
F. D. RANDALL
Standard
1957-11-15
These recommendations cover the mechanical and electrical installation and installation test procedures for automatic pilots of the type normally used in transport type aircraft. The material in the ARP does not supercede any airworthines requirement in the Civil Air Regulations.
Standard
1957-08-15
This document describes the engineering requirements for the assembly and installation of tube couplings used on aircraft fuel and pneumatic systems. In case of conflict between this document and an engineering drawing, the provisions of the engineering drawing shall prevail.
Magazine
1957-06-01
Technical Paper
1957-01-01
BERNARD L. MESSINGER
Technical Paper
1957-01-01
J. G. LILLARD, T. G. LIPSCOMB
Abstract Increasing public acceptance of power accessories and particulary of factory installed air conditioning units coupled with bigger engines and lower hood lines on the newer automobiles necessitated a reappraisal of the hot fuel handling characteristics of automobiles. Twenty-nine 1956 automobiles, of which nineteen were equipped with factory air conditioning units, representing twelve makes were evaluated for fuel volatility requirements. In 1956 approximately four per cent of all new cars were air conditioned. By 1962 it is expected that about 25 per cent of all new cars will be air conditioned and that one car of every nine on the road will be air conditioned. These figures illustrate the rapid trend to nationwide acceptance of air conditioning in cars of all price ranges rather than the past localized acceptance in high-priced cars. The data obtained in the tests showed that the volatility limits of the cars were reduced on an average of 0.6 lb. RVP upon installation of an air conditioning unit and lowered still another 1.3 lb.
Technical Paper
1957-01-01
P. H. PRETZ
Technical Paper
1957-01-01
D. G. Fowler, V. J. Castrop, C. O. Durbin, E. J. Marville, L. H. Nagler, G. J. Nebel, J. C. Radcliffe
Standard
1956-12-15
This Aeronautical Standard covers the basic type of carbon monoxide detector instrument used to determine toxic concentrations of carbon monoxide by the measurement of heat changes through catalytic oxidation.
Standard
1956-12-15
This Aeronautical Standard covers two basic types of instruments as follows: Type I - Float Instruments, Type II - Capacitance Instruments. To specify minimum requirements for Fuel and Oil Quantity Instruments for use in aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in Paragraph 3.3.
Standard
1956-12-01
The purpose of this standard is to establish optimum standards for crew demand and pressure-breathing oxygen mask assemblies for use by crew members in civil aircraft. This standard covers both general type and quick-donning type mask assemblies in the following classes: a. Class A, oronasal, demand b. Class B, oronasal, pressure-demand c. Class C, full face, demand d. Class D, full face, pressure-demand
Standard
1956-12-01
This AIR is intended as a status report on the of E.C.S. to date in dealing with the problem of equipment cooling in present and immediate future civil transport aircraft. Subsequent revisions to this AIR will follow as more information is gathered on this subject.
Magazine
1956-07-01
Standard
1956-03-15
The recommendations of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) for aircraft compartment automatic temperature control systems are primarily intended to be applicable to occupied or unoccupied compartments of civil and military aircraft.
Standard
1956-03-15
Air Condiitioning System - General - Dealing with Design Features. Air Conditioning Equipment - Commercial Passenger - Delaing with features. Applicable only to commercial passenger carrying aircraft. Desirable Design Features - General information for use of those concerned in meeting requirements contained herein.
Technical Paper
1956-01-01
BEN F. McLEOD
The paper on integrated flight systems briefly reviews the growth of flight instruments and automatic flight controls, and points out the need for integrated flight systems. Three manufacturers, namely: Collins, Sperry and Bendix, are producing integrated systems today. Each of these systems is reviewed, with the review centering on instrumentation. The third part of the paper presents airline views on the application of integrated systems and points out installation problems. In conclusion the paper indicates that many changes can be expected in the future as a result of improvements and installation of additional aids.
Technical Paper
1956-01-01
J. de VIENNE
Converging courses and anti-collision manoeuvres by aircraft are studied and the suitability of some form of pictorial display unit which would provide the pilot of an aircraft with adequate reliable information to enable him, with minimum interpretation, to determine readily the need for, and to execute simple yet safe manoeuvres for avoidance of collision.
Viewing 9601 to 9630 of 9821

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