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1966-06-01
Standard
J954_196606
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to provide uniform tolerances for dimensions of urethane materials used for motor vehicle seating. Table 1 describes these tolerances as related to slab and molded applications.
1966-06-01
Standard
AS428
This standard establishes the essential minimum safe performance standards for exhaust gas temperature instruments primarily for use with turbine powered, subsonic aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in paragraph 3.3 et seq. The exhaust gas temperature instruments covered by this standard are of the electrical servonull balance type, actuated by varying emf output of one or more parallel connected Chromel-Alumel thermocouples.
1966-05-01
Standard
J953_196605
The scope of this SAE Recommended Practice is to establish uniform test procedures for passenger cars, to determine whether the system is defined as a defroster or defogger, and to establish minimum performance requirements for each system. A defroster for purposes of this practice is a system which will remove moisture and/or frost from the interior surface of the backlight at -18 °C. A defogger is a system which will remove moisture and/or fog from the interior surface of the backlight at 4 °C. The test procedure is intended to simulate actual conditions by utilizing either a cold room with an appropriate device to introduce air flow over the backlight or a sufficiently large wind tunnel with ambient temperature control. The test procedure and the minimum performance requirements are based on currently available engineering data.
1966-04-01
Standard
AIR512
This document covers the general recommendations for cabin lighting in order to provide satisfactory illumination for, but not limited to: a. Boarding and deplaning b. Movement about the cabin c. Reading d. Use of lavatories e. Use of work areas f. Exiting under emergency conditions g. Using stowage compartments, coat rooms, and closets h. Using interior stairways and elevators (lifts)
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660797
Bernard C. Hilton
British medical and road safety research teams have revealed the need for improvement in vehicle seating designs to eliminate serious injuries and deaths arising from car occupant movement and ejection during impact. The paper describes the main requirements of safety seating and the result of three years development work in Britain to produce effective seats and mountings of low cost, capable of being fitted into conventional vehicles and of coping with forward loads of over 30 G. It is estimated that the adoption of such seats would increase the vehicle cost by less than 2%.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660207
Arthur E. Miller
The importance of oxygen in our environment is briefly reviewed, and a number of potential future developments which might result in radically different oxygen storage and distribution systems in aircraft are described and discussed.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660154
J. B. Beltz, A. K. Watt, J. H. Diener, W. A. Weidman, R. J. Schultz, J. R. Doidge, D. P. Marquis
This five part paper discusses in detail the development of a car -- a new breed -- The Toronado. The desire to create a better automobile, one from which both driver and passenger would receive maximum benefit, prompted the original concept. The exploratory design study, undertaken by many Oldsmobile departments, was unfettered by commitment to traditional arrangement. This led to the development of a vehicle employing front wheel drive with all the power components designed into a single unit forward of the passenger compartment. Among the advantages of the unitized powerplant approach are maximum passenger space, a nearly vibration-free ride, and exceptional directional stability.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660208
G. R. Whitnah, R. D. Mills
In recent years, vapor-cycle cooling systems have been used widely on airliners and are currently offered on some business aircraft. Several aircraft manufacturers are now studying the incorporation of vapor-cycle systems in their new business. In an independent research and development program, the Applied Science Division of Litton Systems, Inc. has developed a vapor-cycle air conditioning system designed to the requirements of this class of aircraft. Minimum power consumption consistent with reasonable weight and volume is considered extremely important. Compatibility with ventilation or pressurization systems is also an important design consideration. Test results are given for a range of operating speeds.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660209
L. B. Clay
A general discussion of the problems involved in introducing air conditioning in small executive aircraft. The discussion includes: (1) early studies and hardware for “add on” package units, (2) system selection studies for small pressurized turbine powered aircraft, (3) system design including structural changes required, (4) testing, development and service experience on the Beech King Air cooling system and (5) other applications and possible future development trends.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660451
Vaino J. Vehko, William E. Ruhland
To meet the demands of increasing payload size and weight, and to fill the large payload gap between the Saturn IB and Saturn V, a number of methods of uprating the Saturn IB have been studied by NASA and Chrysler Corp. of providing increased payload capability is discussed in this paper. Four 120 in. United Technology Center UA-1205 solid propellant motors, originally developed for the Air Force Titan III program, are clustered around the S-IB first stage of the Saturn IB launch vehicle. These four solid propellant motors provide the total thrust for liftoff of the vehicle, with S-IB stage ignition occurring just prior to burnout and separation of the solid propellant motors. The term “Zero Stage” is applied to this added stage.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660672
Gordon N. Davison
The large difference between the total numbers of manned and unmanned spacecraft and their respective missions is discussed. The environmental and functional requirements having different effects on the two spacecraft types are described. The materials characteristics involved in those requirements and the resulting typical configurations are reviewed. It is concluded that vibration and pressurized gas containment have the outstanding influence on spacecraft structural systems. It is noted that new structural factors of safety have not been derived on the basis of any rational consideration of the design conditions for stability or pressure critical structure.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660749
Wilhelm Bosch
A new laboratory technique is described which permits visual display and easy evaluation of the discharge characteristics of any given fuel injection pump at random nozzle back-pressure. In contrast to former fuel rate indication devices, the instrumentation is basically simple and lends itself to accurate calibration. Discussed are the basic underlying theory, the dimensional requirements for the measuring apparatus proper, and practical and theoretical applications of the new method on fuel injection systems. In conformance with the original dissertation, metric dimensions are used throughout.
1966-01-01
Magazine
1965-11-01
Standard
AIR847
The purpose of this information report is to provide minimum design criteria for oxygen equipment to be used on commercial transport aircraft which fly above 45,000 ft. To separate these requirements from those for spaceplanes, the maximum flight altitude for aircraft defined by this report is limited to the maximum altitude obtainable by aircraft using air-breathing engines.
1965-11-01
Standard
AIR910
The purpose of this report is to provide information on ozone and its control in high altitude aircraft environmental systems. Sources of this information are listed in the selected bibliography appearing at the end of this report, to which references are made throughout.
1965-10-20
Technical Paper
650958
ROGER P. DANIEL, L. M. PATRICK
1965-10-01
Standard
AS452A
The purpose of this standard is to establish optimum standards for crew demand and pressure-breathing oxygen mask assemblies for use by crew members in civil aircraft. This standard covers both general type and quick-donning type mask assemblies in the following classes: a. Class A, oronasal, demand b. Class B, oronasal, pressure-demand c. Class C, full face, demand d. Class D, full face, pressure-demand
1965-10-01
Standard
ARP881
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) lists the lamps in Table 1 that are recommended for the type of service indicated. This list is not intended as a catalog and does not include many types that are now in use. This specification is not applicable to Solid State Lighting Lamp Assemblies (Based LED lamps). It does, however, reflect current practice.
1965-09-01
Magazine
1965-08-01
Standard
AS406
This standard establishes the essential minimum safe performance requirements for flight director instruments, primarily for use with turbine-powered transport aircraft, the operation of which may subject the instruments to the environmental conditions specified in paragraph 3.3. This standard covers flight directors for use on aircraft to indicate to the pilot, by visual means, the correct control application for the operation of an aircraft in accordance with a preselected flight plan.
1965-07-30
Standard
AIR805A
The purpose of this information report is to present factors which affect the design and development of jet blast windshield rain removal systems for commercial transport aircraft. A satisfactory analytical approach to the design of these systems has not yet been developed. Although detailed performance data are available for some test configurations, rain removal systems will generally be unique to specific aircraft. This, then, requires a preliminary design for the system based on available empirical data to be followed with an extensive laboratory development program.
1965-06-01
Standard
ARP798
The purpose of this document is to recommend to the designer the various criteria, and to familiarize him with techniques, associated with white incandescent lighted aerospace instruments. This recommended practice covers the general requirements and test procedures recommended for use with white incandescent integrally lighted instruments. Its use should provide uniformity of illumination from instrument to instrument and legibility under daylight operation. An appendix is provided to familiarize the designer with some of the techniques used to obtain uniformity of color and illumination in various types of instruments.
1965-05-01
Standard
ARP712
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides minimum standards and environmental design requirement recommendations for lighting and control in galley areas. It also addresses electrical shock hazard in galley areas. The purpose of this recommended practice is to provide minimum standards for the illumination of galleys (buffets) and for the location of lighting controls within the galley area of passenger transport aircraft.
1965-05-01
Magazine
1965-04-20
Standard
ARP750
The purpose of this Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is to provide design criteria that will lead to seat designs which provide maximum safety for air transportation passengers. It is not the purpose of this ARP to specify design methods or specific designs to be followed in the accomplishment of the stated objectives.
1965-04-01
Standard
AIR806
The report presents air conditioning data for aircraft cargo which is affected by temperature, humidity, ventilation rate and atmospheric pressure. The major emphasis is on conditioning of perishable products and warm-blooded animals. The report also covers topics peculiar to cargo aircraft or which are related to the handling of cargo. The purpose of this Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide design information related to the air conditioning of cargo transported by commercial and military aircraft. Affected cargo includes perishable products, live animals and hazardous materials.
1965-03-25
Standard
AIR825
No scope available.
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650463
F. G. Olsen
ABSTRACT
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650077
H. P. Bullard
Natural gas burning engines, both large and small, are being applied to an increasing number of installations where operating cost considerations show an advantage over purchased electric power. Air conditioning and refrigeration applications account for a large percentage of these installations. This paper reviews the consideration given to the development and application of a series of engines intended specifically for this type of service. The overall objective has been to reduce the cost of power by providing efficient operation, long service life, and unattended operation which fits the maintenance pattern of the other equipment in the installation.
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