Display:

Results

Viewing 9601 to 9630 of 10387
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790052
Brian Dellande
The advances being made in the liquid crystal technology are now enabling the liquid crystal display (LCD) to be used in the hostile environment of the automobile. The liquid crystal technology advances, combined with their known qualities, aesthetics, and ever-increasing potential, make them a candidate for the display technology of the near future. This paper reviews the current “state-of-the-art” of LCD's and discusses how electronics may be used to solve many of the practical problems of integrating LCD's into instrumentation systems. This paper concentrates on the practical issues that must be addressed when considering the LCD technology for automobiles.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790122
Frederick H. Rohles, Stan B. Wallis
From 1973 to 1977 a series of laboratory tests involving almost 3000 people were conducted to determine the factors that contribute to the thermal comfort of automobile passengers while using air conditioning under summer heat loads. Four studies will be reviewed. In the first study, 2200 subjects were exposed for 45 min. to an environment of 110°F/40% in a 1973 Ford Vehicle buck for the purpose of evaluating the effects of the register size, the air flow rate and the discharge air temperature on comfort. The results showed that while the register size does not affect the time to reach a comfortable condition, the time to reach comfort in the front seat varies from 4 minutes with an air flow of 400 cfm (50°F discharge air at 10 minutes) to 18 minutes with 150 cfm (60°F discharge air); in the rear seat, the corresponding times were 8.5 and 39 minutes.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790779
James W. Jewett
“Off the Road” vehicle fire losses are increasing each year. Larger units and increasing usage of electronics and high pressure-high temperature hydraulics combined with accumulations of combustible material increase their vulnerability to fires. Fire suppression systems offered by Deere and most other major manufacturers, are now available for these types of vehicles and have proven their capabilities to reduce fire losses as shown in a recent study on skidder fires.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790124
C. J. McLachlan
Designing a climate control system for a new highway tractor is a multi-phase project. This paper outlines the process and the various challenges each step presented, starting with outside temperatures and going through zone controls, register placement, system design, heat transfer components and testing. From the different steps emerged a multiple heater/evaporator system with performance superior to existing designs. The system has three sets of controls which provide a means of regulating the temperature in the driver, passenger and sleeper areas of the cab. The paper also describes the various packaging concepts investigated, how the choice of vacuum as a power medium for the controls was selected and briefly outlines the testing conducted on the new design.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790072
Thomas G. Molnar, Don M. Rodwell
A reduction in death and injury rates of child vehicle occupants is being experienced in Australia by a unique child restraint device which is compatible with all motor vehicles. Basic parameters, product development and extensive dynamic sled test programs are explained. Concluding with the achieved benefits which include excellent crash performance, simplicity, versatility and public acceptance of a totally new concept.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
791068
John P. Patrick, Arun K. Trikha
Modern transport airplanes use precooled engine bleed air as a source for cabin pressurization, air conditioning, engine cowl and wing deicing, cross-engine starting, air-driven hydraulic pumps and other pneumatic demands. The Boeing Model 767 airplane air supply system consists of separate sets of equipment for each of the airplane's two engines and a remotely located built-in-test equipment (BITE) module. Each set of equipment independently regulates the pressure and temperature of the extracted engine bleed air. The normal control functions are completely pneumatic, not relying on electrical signals or interconnecting wires to provide their control or protective features. Electrical signals are used only for failure conditions using latching-type shutoff solenoids and for the BITE provisions. The digital BITE module monitors inputs from dedicated BITE elements throughout the system on a time-shared basis to isolate 95% of all failures to the LRU (line replaceable unit) level.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
791002
Gert Rüter, Heinrich Hontschik
Abstract Because of the larger manipulation distances and the frequently installed vibration-absorbing seats (with extra vibration damping), restraint systems in commercial vehicles must meet other requirements than those in passenger cars; it was found that integrated seat/belt systems (belt anchorage incorporated in the seat) are required. Five different types of integrated seat/belt systems were evaluated in frontal crash experiments at an impact speed of 35 km/h, using dummies in a truck cab on the catapult unit. The results were compared with those obtained with conventional three-point belts and with unrestrained dummies. The experimental results showed that when the dummy was unrestrained or protected only by a lap belt (even if integrated) the upper load limits used as protection criteria were far exceeded because of the heavy impact on the steering wheel; this did not apply to three-point belt systems.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790050
Derrick M. Kuzak, Mark S. Guimond
The ambient light levels incident on electronic displays located in the instrument panel can be sufficiently bright to impair their readability, unless optical filtering techniques are employed. The aim of this study was to develop the experimental procedures and associated instrumentation to objectively and quantitatively measure the readability of a given electronic display - optical filter combination. Readability was quantified through the two criteria of recognition accuracy and response time. The effects of display parameters such as character size, luminance, and background color on the accuracy and response time data, and subsequent filter choice, were evaluated.
1978-10-01
Standard
AS8018
This AS covers subsonic and supersonic Mach meter instruments which, when connected to sources of static (Ps), and total (Pt), or impact (Pt-Ps), pressure provide indication of Mach number. These instruments are known as Type A. This AS also covers servo-operated repeater or digital display instruments which indicate Mach number when connected to the appropriate electrical output of a Mach transducer of Air Data Computer. These instruments are known as Type B. This Aerospace Standard (AS) specifies the minimum safe performance standards for Mach Meter instruments primarily intended for use in aircraft under standard and environmental conditions.
1978-10-01
Standard
AS8016
This AS covers vertical velocity instruments which display the rate of change of pressure altitude of an aircraft, as follows: type A - direct reading, self-contained, pressure actuated; type B - electrically or electronically operated, self-contained, pressure actuated; and type C - electrically or electronically operated, input from a remote pressure sensor. The range of operation of the instrument and the altitude range when applicable shall be as marked on the instrument face or nameplate. This Aerospace Standard (AS) establishes the minimum performance standards for vertical velocity instruments for aircraft use.
1978-10-01
Standard
AIR1358
This AIR indicates those dimensions,d eemed critical by the manufacturer, which are required to be adhered to so that proper mating of the disconnect hose fitting with the correct disconnect be accomplished. The dimensions are critical, but not necessarily complete, in defining these fittings since there are other criteria which must also be met.
1978-10-01
Standard
J814C_197810
1.1 This SAE Information Report is a source of information concerning the basic properties of engine coolants which are satisfactory for use in internal combustion engines. Engine coolant concentrate (antifreeze) must provide adequate corrosion protection, lower the freezing point, and raise the boiling point of the engine coolant. For additional information on engine coolants see ASTM D 3306 and ASTM D 4985. 1.2 The values presented describe desirable basic properties. The results from laboratory tests are not conclusive, and it should be recognized that the final selection of satisfactory coolants can be proven only after a series of performance tests in vehicles. 1.3 The document describes in general the necessary maintenance procedures for all engine coolants to insure proper performance as well as special requirements for coolants for heavy-duty engines. 1.4 This document does not cover maintenance of engine cooling system component parts.
1978-07-01
Standard
AIR806A
The report presents air conditioning data for aircraft cargo which is affected by temperature, humidity, ventilation rate and atmospheric pressure. The major emphasis is on conditioning of perishable products and warm-blooded animals. The report also covers topics peculiar to cargo aircraft or which are related to the handling of cargo. The purpose of this Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide design information related to the air conditioning of cargo transported by commercial and military aircraft. Affected cargo includes perishable products, live animals and hazardous materials.
1978-06-01
Standard
J1225_197806
The purpose of this report is to record the activities and recommendations of the Ride Meter Task Force assigned by the chairman of the SAE Joint Seating Subcommittee to determine availability of instrumentation to measure operator ride on mobile equipment. The desired characteristics of the meter included relatively low cost, easy to operate, highly portable, and sufficiently rugged to withstand the vibration levels encountered on agricultural or construction machines. It is recognized that a ride meter type instrument with a single numerical output provides only approximate indication of ride vibration quality, but is useful for general field evaluation or overall ride comparisons. A narrow band analysis of the vibration frequency spectrum is recommended for more accurate and complete results.
1978-05-01
Standard
ARP147C
This ARP provides the definition of terms commonly used in aircraft environmental control system (ECS) design and analysis. Many of the terms may be used as guidelines for establishing standard ECS nomenclature. Some general thermodynamic terms are included that are frequently used in ECS analysis, but this document is not meant to be an inclusive list of such terms.
1978-05-01
Standard
J369A_197805
This SAE Standard pertains to automotive vehicles and off-road, self-propelled work machines used in construction, general purpose industrial, agriculture, forestry, and specialized mining machinery. This standard does not address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this document to establish safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Fire testing is inherently hazardous. Adequate safeguards for personnel and property shall be employed when conducting this test.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780123
John Marley
Some methods are suggested for organizing simple automotive sensor and actuator elements to minimize wires and use the analytical capability of the program of instructions stored within the memory of the electronic controller to extract information or manipulate the actuators. An information exchange system between microcomputer control units is described which allows trading of information. In this way, no sensors need be duplicated and each microcomputer serves as a single concentrator which permits sending a large group of facts from one part of the vehicle to another using only a few wires.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780045
R. W. Shimanek
Electronic tuning and frequency synthesis techniques have made possible the combination of an eight-track tape player, digital clock and AM/FM/Stereo/Signal-Seeking automobile radio in a 2700 cm3 package. Phase-locked-loop circuitry, varactor tuning, and calculator logic replace the conventional mechanical tuner and provide all its functions. In addition to reducing receiver weight, this tuning technique assures extreme tuning accuracy and frequency stability.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780474
L. John Koutsky
A suspension seat has been developed for earthmoving and other off-highway vehicles, following specific guidelines established by the manufacturers of such vehicles. A wide range of adjustments is provided to properly position the operator relative to the various vehicle controls. Several new ideas are employed, such as a fore-aft slide with self-cleaning rollers, a mechanical suspension spring system which provides air spring characteristics, and a seat/suspension package which will meet the SAE recommended practice for seat belt attachment strength without the need for additional tether belts.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780403
John Carr, Arthur Ginn
Ethylene/acrylic elastomers are new candidate materials for challenging automotive sealing problem areas. They promise attractive blends of thermal stability, oil and weather resistance, mechanical properties and low temperature performance for service formerly restricted to the more expensive high temperature silicone and fluorocarbon elastomers. Our preliminary research and development on specific automotive sealing applications has produced data that enables us to position ethylene/acrylic elastomers in relationship with the other commercial seal materials. Revealed are the results of our chemical, material and ongoing field testing programs which are helping us predict the future of ethylene/acrylic elastomers as viable solutions to critical sealing problems.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780727
Richard J. Garrity
The Model 4-210 Field Boss is the latest articulated four-wheel drive tractor to be manufactured by the White Farm Equipment Company. A major objective in its design was to incorporate the improved features of White's new large two-wheel drive tractors by using as many common components as possible. The paper discusses how this was achieved and presents an overall description of the tractor.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780766
E. T. Hinds, G. P. Blair
Previous publications from The Queen's University of Belfast have described the unsteady gas flow through a naturally aspirated two-cycle engine and the most recent of these have detailed the scavenge process, the combustion model and muffler design. It is thus now possible to predict the unsteady gas flow behaviour through and the performance and noise characteristics in this type of engine with a good degree of accuracy. This paper describes a mathematical model which has been formulated to simulate the action of the two-cycle engine fitted with a reed valve due to the unsteady gas dynamic behaviour in the inlet tract and makes comparisons with measurements. A complete simulation on the computer of a two-cycle engine fitted with a reed intake valve is thus now possible.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
781034
Gary L. McGavin
Essential facilities are those buildings whose functions are required for the welfare of the public after an earthquake. They include hospitals, communication centers, police and fire stations. A considerable amount of attention has been paid to these facilities to assure that they are structurally competent. Very little significance has been placed on the nonstructural equipment necessary for them to continue operation after an earthquake. This paper describes the operational system and seismic category approach that can be used by the design team to assess the relative worth with respect to overall facility operation of the nonstructural equipment. The various methods of seismic qualification such as shake table testing, complex analysis, simple analysis and engineering judgment are also discussed for nonstructural equipment.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780300
W. E. Cooke, T. E. Wright, J. A. Hirschfield
A non-corrosive flux for brazing aluminum has been developed. Use of the flux for furnace brazing is described. The characteristics of heat exchangers brazed by the process are presented. The results show considerable promise for economical and reliable use of the process in brazing automotive heat exchangers.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780001
Kenneth Cuffe
This paper reviews the elements necessary to design and develop integrated air conditioning and heating systems for trucks. Included is discussion of the pertinent sub-systems: dash mounted air handling components, air distribution system, operator controls, refrigeration circuit, electrical system and vacuum system. Also reviewed are the physiological factor involved in heating and air conditioning.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780421
Leslie D. Montgomery, Edmund J. Glassford
Impedance Plethysmography was used to measure the perfusion changes and venous clearance in the lower leg, knee, thigh and buttock that was produced by operation of a pulsating seat cushion that may reduce the detrimental hemodynamic effects of prolonged driving. The grouped mean indices of arterial perfusion increased significantly (P < 0.05), in all segments studied, following a 5 minute activation of the seat cushion. The cushion assisted venous clearance in all segments of the leg during each inflation cycle. This device may be desirable to reduce fatigue and increase performance during prolonged driving.
1978-02-01
Technical Paper
780172
T. Uchiyamada, T. Kunieda
This paper deals with high frequency noise in the passenger compartment which are caused by transmitted engine noise. For the purpose of noise reduction, several evaluation methods are developed. For the evaluation of a body transmission loss, a combination of a reverberant room and an anechoic room is used. The noise absorption of the compartment is evaluated under the concept of the saturated sound pressure level. And sufficient standard samples are measured to support the noise reduction development.
1978-02-01
Standard
AS8007
This AS defines instruments which use inputs of static and pitot pressure equal to those which are utilized to establish the pressure altitude and speed of that aircraft. These pressures are applied to the instrument ports to provide means for generation of an aural warning whenever the aircraft reaches or exceeds the maximum operating limit speed. This Over Speed Warning Instrument function may be incorporated as part of an Air Data Computer, or an Air Speed Indicator, or an Air Speed/Mach Number Indicator, or other instruments. In those cases where the Over Speed Warning Instrument is part of another instrument, the standards contained herein apply only to the Over Speed Warning Instrument function.
Viewing 9601 to 9630 of 10387

Filter