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2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1694
Jun Li, Predrag Hrnjak
Abstract This paper presents results of the visualization of the separation in the vertical header of the automotive condenser. A prototype of a heat exchanger was made that has inlet in the middle of the header, with 21 microchannel tubes as the first pass. In the second header liquid separates and leaves through 4 microchannel tubes beneath while mostly vapor leaves through 11 microchannel tubes on the top as another exit. That way the 2nd pass has liquid below first pass and vapor above it. R134a was used in the tests. Mass flow at the inlet to the header was in the range 8.4 - 30 g/s (mass flux of 54 kg/m2·s-193 kg/m2·s) and quality at the inlet to second header was varied over a range of 0.05 to 0.25, to see their impact on the separation of two-phase flow inside the transparent header. Visualization was performed to better understand and define the physical parameters that dominate the separation phenomena.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1695
Satoki Tada, Takahiro Nagai, Naoki Shioda, Hirofumi Fujiu, Shunji Kumagai, Hideaki Abe, Yukihiro Isoda, Yoshikazu Shinohara
Abstract As an appropriate material for automotive thermoelectric generators, which directly convert waste heat of exhaust gas into electricity, we have developed Mg2(Si1-xSnx) thermoelectric materials with high thermoelectric performance. The performance is evaluated with the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT), and the ZT has been improved through the development of the fabrication process and the investigation of the optimum composition and dopant element. A novel liquid-solid reaction synthesis method incorporating hotpressing for the sample fabrication was effective in reducing the thermal conductivity. The n-type Mg2(Si0.50Sn0.50) doped with Sb attained a high ZT of 1.1 at 620 K. The p-type Mg2(Si0.25Sn0.75) doped with Li and Ag simultaneously achieved a ZT of 0.3 at 600 K. The effective maximum power of n-type thermoelectric element and that of p-type were calculated with the thermoelectromotive force and the mean resistivity.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1692
Walter Ferraris, Fausto Di Sciullo, Carloandrea Malvicino, Francesco Vestrelli, Fabrizio Beltramelli, Giancarlo Gotta
Abstract Automotive world is rapidly changing driven by the CO2 emission regulations [1], [2] worldwide asking for a dramatic fuel consumption reduction. The on board thermal management has a relevant role influencing the front vehicle design and sizing to assure the right heat rejection capacity and being crucial to guarantee the on board system efficiency and reliability. In this context the dual level cooling system with water cooled charge air cooling is a clear trend leading to a new generation of systems [3, 4]. This paper describes a compact solution to effectively implement a dual cooling loop system with water cooled charge air cooler and water cooled condenser on small/subcompact cars giving the opportunity to integrate additional modules (e.g. in case of hybrid powertrain) to the secondary loop.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1705
Miguel Hurtado, Amine Taleb-Bendiab, Julien Moizard, Patrice M. Reilhac, Heinz Mattern
Abstract Current market trend indicates an increased interest in replacing mirrors by camera monitor systems (CMS) to reduce CO2 emissions and to improve visibility of surrounding environment to the driver. A CMS is an advanced system composed of an electronic imager, a display, and an intelligent electronic control unit intended to provide at least the same level of functionality of legally prescribed mirrors. A CMS must also take into consideration several factors in the designed system to satisfy an overall system magnification and system resolution. Some factors pertain to the camera, and display inside the cockpit, but some other are related to the physical constraints of the human operator, i.e. visual acuity, height, etc. In this paper, we demonstrate that there exists a fundamental nonlinear equation for a given CMS encompassing factors that influence the performance of the system.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1708
Tibor Kiss, Jason Lustbader, Daniel Leighton
Abstract Electric vehicles (EVs) need highly optimized thermal management systems to improve range. Climate control can reduce vehicle efficiency and range by more than 50%. Due to the relative shortage of waste heat, heating the passenger cabin in EVs is difficult. Cabin cooling can take a high portion of the energy available in the battery. Compared to internal combustion engine-driven vehicles, different heating methods and more efficient cooling methods are needed, which can make EV thermal management systems more complex. More complex systems typically allow various alternative modes of operation that can be selected based on driving and ambient conditions. A good system simulation tool can greatly reduce the time and expense for developing these complex systems. A simulation model should also be able to efficiently co-simulate with vehicle simulation programs, and should be applicable for evaluating various control algorithms.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1709
Daniel Leighton
Abstract Electric drive vehicles (EDVs) have complex thermal management requirements not present in conventional vehicles. In addition to cabin conditioning, the energy storage system (ESS) and power electronics and electric motor (PEEM) subsystems also require thermal management. Many current-generation EDVs utilize separate cooling systems, adding both weight and volume, and lack abundant waste heat from an engine for cabin heating. Some use battery energy to heat the cabin via electrical resistance heating, which can result in vehicle range reductions of 50% under cold ambient conditions. These thermal challenges present an opportunity for integrated vehicle thermal management technologies that reduce weight and volume and increase cabin heating efficiency. Bench testing was conducted to evaluate a combined fluid loop technology that unifies the cabin air-conditioning and heating, ESS thermal management, and PEEM cooling into a single liquid coolant-based system.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1711
Christian Hainzlmaier, Alejandro S. Regueiro, Marvin Lappe
Abstract Hybrid and Electric Vehicles have a heat deficit due to frequent operation of the engine in high efficiency regions or during pure electric driving where the engine as a heat source is not available. Especially for the conditioning of the cabin, additional heat sources are necessary to ensure comfort & safety. In order to maximize the electric driving range, and improve fuel efficiency, it is important to combine a fast, efficient and safe generation of heat, with a minimum drain from the traction battery. Webasto went about this challenge and developed the new High Voltage Heater (HVH) based on a new and patented heat layer technology. This paper explains the design concept and results of the novel clean sheet research and development approach taken to achieve the project goals.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1710
Xinran Tao, Kan Zhou, Andrej Ivanco, John R. Wagner, Heath Hofmann, Zoran Filipi
Abstract The components in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) powertrain include the battery pack, an internal combustion engine, and the electric machines such as motors and possibly a generator. These components generate a considerable amount of heat during driving cycles. A robust thermal management system with advanced controller, designed for temperature tracking, is required for vehicle safety and energy efficiency. In this study, a hybridized mid-size truck for military application is investigated. The paper examines the integration of advanced control algorithms to the cooling system featuring an electric-mechanical compressor, coolant pump and radiator fans. Mathematical models are developed to numerically describe the thermal behavior of these powertrain elements. A series of controllers are designed to effectively manage the battery pack, electric motors, and the internal combustion engine temperatures.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1713
Manfred Klaus Kirschning, Frank Reußwig
Abstract Different heat shielding unilayer materials already in practical use and multilayer materials, consisting of a compound of E-glass fabric laminated with aluminum foil and different high temperature felts, are compared with regards to the difference between the external and internal surface temperature ΔT as a function of the external surface temperature. Beside that the general difference between the two standard methods convection heat measurement and radiant heat measurement is shown. Especially it is evaluated whether the radiant heat measurement method is suitable to make a general statement for classification of heat shielding materials.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1712
Ram Vijayagopal, Aymeric Rousseau
Abstract Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) can be used for a variety of applications in automobiles. There is a lot of interest in using them for waste heat recovery from a fuel economy point of view. This paper examines the potential of TEGs to provide cost-effective improvements in the fuel economy of conventional vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Simulation analysis is used to quantify fuel economy benefits. The paper explains how a TEG is used in a vehicle and explores the idea of improving the TEG design by introducing a thermal reservoir in the TEG model to improve the waste heat recovery. An effort is made to identify the technological and economic barriers (and their thresholds) that could prevent TEGs from becoming an acceptable means of waste heat recovery in automobiles.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1623
Ivan Arsie, Rocco Di Leo, Stefano Falco, Cesare Pianese, Matteo De Cesare
Abstract International regulations continuously restrict the standards for the exhaust emissions from automotive engines. In order to comply with these requirements, innovative control and diagnosis systems are needed. In this scenario the application of methodologies based on the in-cylinder pressure measurement finds widespread applications. Indeed, almost all engine thermodynamic variables useful for either control or diagnosis can be derived from the in-cylinder pressure. Apart for improving the control accuracy, the availability of the in-cylinder pressure signal might also allow reducing the number of existing sensors on-board, thus lowering the equipment costs and the engine wiring complexity. The paper focuses on the detection of the engine thermal state, which is fundamental to achieve suitable control of engine combustion and after-treatment devices.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1610
Xiaomeng Shen, Gangfeng Tan, Quan Zhou, Zhongjie Yang, Min Hua
Abstract The Organic Rankine Cycle System is an effective approach for recovering the engine exhaust thermal energy. The physical characteristic of the Rankine fluid is the key factor for the capacity and the stability of the expander power output. In the research, the influences of the evaporator organic medium state and flow rate on the expander power output are fully analyzed for the sufficient utilization of the waste thermal energy. Firstly, the exhaust characteristics of the diesel engine were processed by the data of the bench test. Then, the integral mathematical model of the Organic Rankine Cycle was built. Based on the comparison for the 2-zone and 3-zone evaporator, the influence for expander output are analyzed especially emphasis on the factors of engine working condition, the flow rate, temperature and state of Rankine fluid.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1611
Wei Liu, Gangfeng Tan, Xuexun Guo, Jiafan Li, Yuanqi Gao, Wei Li
Abstract The hydraulic retarder is the most stabilized auxiliary braking system [1-2] of heavy-duty vehicles. When the hydraulic retarder is working during auxiliary braking, all of the braking energy is transferred into the thermal energy of the transmission medium of the working wheel. Theoretically, the residual heat-sinking capability of the engine could be used to cool down the transmission medium of the hydraulic retarder, in order to ensure the proper functioning of the hydraulic retarder. Never the less, the hydraulic retarder is always placed at the tailing head of the gearbox, far from the engine, long cooling circuits, which increases the risky leakage risk of the transmission medium. What's more, the development trend of heavy load and high speed vehicle directs the significant increase in the thermal load of the hydraulic retarder, which even higher than the engine power.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1608
Davide Di Battista, Marco Mauriello, Roberto Cipollone
Abstract A smart way to reduce CO2 emission in transportation sector is to recover energy usually wasted and re-use it for engine and vehicle needs. ORC plant on exhaust gas of ICE is really interesting, but it has a significant impact on the exhaust line and vehicle's weight. The backpressure realized in the exhaust and the weight gain, in fact, produce a specific fuel consumption increase as well as an increase in the propulsion power: both terms could vanish the energy recovered. The paper discusses the effects of the pressure losses produced by an ORC plant mounted on the exhaust line of an IVECO F1C test bench engine. The interactions produced on the turbocharged engine have been experimentally investigated: the presence of an IGV turbocharger makes the effect of the backpressure not straightforward to be predicted and needed a full experimental testing of the group in order to understand its reaction and the net effect in terms of specific fuel consumption.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1609
Roberto Monforte, Francesco Lovuolo, Matteo Rostagno, Riccardo Seccardini, Teron Matton
Abstract Following the development of new technologies in Vehicle Thermal Management aiming to both enhancing the MAC System efficiency and reducing the thermal load to be managed, a prediction tool based on the AMEsim platform was developed at Advanced PD EMEA. This tool is dedicated to predict the effect of the implementation of sensors monitoring both the relative humidity and the carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration (taking into account passengers' generated moisture and CO2). This model implemented with the usual comfort inputs (CO2 and RH acceptable ranges) considers the system variables influencing the comfort and predicts the increase of both RH and CO2 concentration in the cabin compartment in any driving cycle depending on the number of occupants.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1606
Saroj Pradhan, Arvind Thiruvengadam, Pragalath Thiruvengadam, Marc C. Besch, Daniel Carder
Heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engines are the primary propulsion source for most heavy-duty vehicle freight movement and have been equipped with an array of aftertreatment devices to comply with more stringent emissions regulations. In light of concerns about the transportation sector's influence on climate change, legislators are introducing requirements calling for significant reductions in fuel consumption and thereby, greenhouse gas (GHG) emission over the coming decades. Advanced engine concepts and technologies will be needed to boost engine efficiencies. However, increasing the engine's efficiency may result in a reduction in thermal energy of the exhaust gas, thus contributing to lower exhaust temperature, potentially affecting aftertreatment activity, and consequently rate of regulated pollutants. This study investigates the possible utilization of waste heat recovered from a HDD engine as a means to offset fuel penalty incurred during thermal management of SCR system.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1607
Chuen-Sen Lin, Vamshi Avadhanula, Vamsi Mokkapati, Daisy Huang, Brent Sheets
This paper presents test results of a 50 kW Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system and proposed guidelines for how to effectively apply this system to the rural Alaska power industry. In rural Alaska, approximately 180 villages rely on off-grid diesel generators for power. Most of the generators have capacities of about 1 MW or less. In general, the average operation efficiencies are noticeably less than 40%, with the rest of the fuel energy becoming heat. If the heat is not applied for useful application, it is called waste heat. Most of the wasted heat is contained in engine exhaust and jacket fluid and eventually dissipates into the environment. For rural Alaska, waste heat for heating is most effective; in many cases, waste heat for power may be needed due to a variety of reasons. Many rural Alaskan villages are reluctant to apply exhaust heat recovery due to concerns about corrosion and soot accumulation in the exhaust system and their effect on emissions.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1663
Prafulla P Ghare, Hemant Khalane, Udaysingh Wakhure, Tushar Khobragade, Sandip Chaudhari, Atul Jahirabadkar
Abstract As one of the most complicated parts of an internal combustion Engine, cylinder head is directly exposed to high combustion pressures and temperatures. Cooling must be provided for the heated surfaces to avoid overheating. However over-cooling will cause lower overall efficiency and high emission. Therefore, an optimal design of the cooling system is required to maintain trouble-free operation of engine. For single cylinder naturally aspirated Compression Ignition (CI) engines, on account of space restrictions, designing of cooling jacket is very critical. Engineers invest a large amount of time and serious effort to optimize the flow through engine cooling jacket with limited detailed information of conducting flow and heat transfer. This paper therefore, investigates cooling performance of a single cylinder 510cc production diesel engine.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1660
Jose Ramon Serrano, Francisco Jose Arnau, Jaime Martin, Manuel Hernandez, Benoit Lombard
Abstract This paper presents an experimental analysis on the effect of thermal insulation of engine internal walls on the performance and emissions of a heavy-duty diesel engine. Some parts of the engine, like pistons, cylinder head and exhaust manifold were thermally insulated from gas contact side in order to reduce heat losses through the walls. Each component has been analyzed, independently, and in combination with others. The results have been compared with that of the original engine configuration. The analysis focuses on NOx and, smoke emissions along with brake specific fuel consumption. In order to take advantage of the engine insulation, an optimization of the air management and injection settings was finally performed, which provided the best combination for each engine configuration.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1661
Anthony Levillain, Pascale Brassart, Béatrice Patte-Rouland
Abstract New directives and increasing competition push OEMs to get better performances (engine power increase), along with mass and size reduction (consumption). These evolutions lead to an increase of the thermal solicitations undergo by the clutches whereas their weight must be decreased, as it is one of the main influent factor on CO2 emissions. As the compactness is even more reduced for a Double Dry Clutch (DDC), this issue is critical. In order to improve the thermal behavior of the DDC, a CFD study has been performed. The present paper will introduce the first results obtained with a validated CFD model. The computations are performed on a DDC where the air flow around the rotating parts, along with the convection and the conduction of all solid parts are modeled. Then four different cases are used to evaluate the impact of holes on the air flow path and on the thermal behavior of the different parts of the system.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1656
Lisa Henriksson, Peter Gullberg, Erik Dahl, Lennart Lofdahl
Abstract This article presents Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations fo one period of a louvered fin, for a crossflow compact finned heat exchanger, where the incoming airflow was inclined relative to its core. Four inclinations were investigated: 90°, which was when the air flowed perpendicular to the heat exchanger, 60°, 30° and 10° angles relative to the vertical plane. The study included three heat exchanger designs, where two of them had symmetrical louvered fins and a thickness of 19mm and 52mm. The third had a thickness of 19mm and had the louvers angled in one direction. All heat exchangers have been simulated when the airflow entered both from above and below relative to the horizontal plane. Simulations have also been carried out when the airflow entered from the side, illustrating the heat exchanger to be angled relative to the vertical axis. Two air speeds have been investigated for each configuration, where the results were compared to experimental data.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1658
Xi Luo, Xin Yu, Marcis Jansons
Abstract As engine efficiency targets continue to rise, additional improvements must consider reduction of heat transfer losses. The development of advanced heat transfer models and realistic boundary conditions for simulation based engine design both require accurate in-cylinder wall temperature measurements. A novel dual wavelength infrared diagnostic has been developed to measure in-cylinder surface temperatures with high temporal resolution. The diagnostic has the capability to measure low amplitude, high frequency temperature variations, such as those occurring during the gas exchange process. The dual wavelength ratio method has the benefit of correcting for background scattering reflections and the emission from the optical window itself. The assumption that background effects are relatively constant during an engine cycle is shown to be valid over a range of intake conditions during motoring.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1652
Yukikatsu Ozaki, Keisuke Sekiya
Abstract This research developed a new measurement technology for thermal analysis of the heat radiation from a hybrid transaxle case surface to the air and improved the heat radiation performance. This heat flux measurement technology provides the method to measure heat flux without wiring of sensors. The method does not have effects of wiring on the temperature field and the flow field unlike the conventional methods. Therefore, multipoint measurement of heat flux on the case surface was enabled, and the distribution of heat flux was quantified. To measure heat flux, thermal resistances made of plastic plates were attached to the case surface and the infrared thermography was used for the temperature measurement. The preliminary examination was performed to confirm the accuracy of the thermal evaluation through heat flux measurement. The oil in the transaxle was heated and the amount of heat radiation from the case surface was measured.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1651
Francisco Payri, Jaime Martin, Antonio Garcia, Ricardo Carreño
Abstract In recent years, the spread use of after-treatment systems together with the growing awareness about the climate change is leading to an increase in the importance of the efficiency over other criteria during the design of internal combustion engines. In this sense, it has been demonstrated that performing an energy balance is a suitable methodology to assess the potential of different injection or air management strategies, to reduce consumption as well as determining the more relevant energy terms that could be improved. In this work, an experimental energy balance with the corresponding comprehensive analysis is presented. The main objective is the identification of how the energy is split, considering internal and external balances. For this purpose, some parametric studies varying the coolant temperature, the intake air temperature and the start of the injection timing have been performed. The results quantify the effect of each parametrical study on engine efficiency.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1653
Kenji Matsumoto, Hironori Harada, Hiroyoshi Taniguchi, Naoki Ito
Abstract Car engine piston cooling is an important technology for improving the compression ratio and suppressing the deformation of pistons. It is well known that thermal conductivity improves dramatically through the use of heat pipes in computers and air conditioners. However, the heat pipes in general use have not been used for the cooling of engines because the flow of gas and liquid is disturbed by vibration and the thermal conductivity becomes excessively low. We therefore developed an original heat pipe and conducted an experiment to determine its heat transfer coefficient using a high-speed reciprocation testing apparatus. Although the test was based on a single heat pipe unit, we succeeded in improving the heat transfer coefficient during high-speed reciprocation by a factor of 1.6 compared to the heat transfer coefficient at standstill. This report describes the observed characteristics and the method of verification.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1654
Billy G. Holland, Thomas L. McKinley, Bill R. Storkman
Abstract Cooled EGR continues to be a key technology to meet emission regulations, with EGR coolers performing a critical role in the EGR system. Designing EGR coolers that reliably manage thermal loads is a challenge with thermal fatigue being a top concern. The ability to estimate EGR cooler thermal fatigue life early in the product design and validation cycle allows for robust designs that meet engine component reliability requirements and customer expectations. This paper describes a process to create an EGR cooler thermal fatigue life model. Components which make up the EGR cooler have differing thermal responses, consequently conjugate transient CFD must be used to accurately model metal temperatures during heating and cooling cycles. Those metal temperatures are then imported into FEA software for structural analysis. Results from both the CFD and FEA are then used in a simplified numerical model to estimate the virtual strain of the EGR cooler.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1649
Kenji Matsumoto, Atsushi Takahashi, Tsutomu Inoue
Abstract In our preceding report [1], we showed that the thermal conductivity of a heat pipe dramatically improves during high-speed reciprocation. However, this cooling method has rarely been applied to car engine pistons because the thermal conductivity of commercially available heat pipes does not increase easily even if the pipe is subjected to high-speed reciprocation. In consideration of the data from our preceding report, we decided to investigate heat pipe designs for car engine pistons, propose an optimum design, and conduct thermal analysis of the design. As a result, we found that it is possible to transport heat from the central piston head area, where cooling is most needed, to the piston skirt area, suggesting the possibility of efficient cooling.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1650
Azmi Osman, Mohd Asmu'i Hussin, Shaiful Fadzil Zainal Abidin
Abstract The drive to reduce CO2 and fuel consumption from passenger cars requires improvements from various subsystems. In particular, the ever growing importance of effective and efficient thermal management will no doubt benefit the quest for more efficient vehicle. While many established automakers have decided to increase the sophistications of the engine cooling circuits through electronics, the increase in complexity and costs are still not desirable especially for A and B passenger car segments. With this in mind, simple mechanical based cooling systems with enhanced functionalities are in high demand. To meet such demand, a simplified engine split cooling circuit previously proposed, simulated and reported seems to be promising. To further verify the indicated advantages, a prototype unit was built and physically tested using a dynamometer with motoring capability.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1605
Hee Sang Park
Abstract Electric powered vehicles rely on electric heater to heat the cabin of the vehicle. These heaters consume electric energy from the battery and cause depletion of the vehicle's range by 20∼40%. In order to extend the range of electric vehicles, we need to increase the efficiency of HVAC. EV has waste heat but the heat power is much lesser than internal combustion engine and heat source is separated physically. In order to utilize waste heat to achieve better efficiency, heat collection, heat insulation, pre-heating are necessary. Based on the new concept system, we examined the effects of fuel efficiency
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1604
Tianwei (Thomas) Wang, John R. Wagner
Abstract Smart thermal management systems can positively impact the performance, fuel economy, and reliability of internal combustion engines. Advanced cooling systems typically feature multiple computer controlled actuators - a three way smart valve, a variable speed pump, and a variable speed electric radiator fan(s). To investigate the contributions of these electro-mechanical devices, a scale multifunction test bench was constructed which integrated these actuators, accompanying system sensors, and a controllable engine thermal load with real time data acquisition and control hardware/software. This paper presents a series of experimental studies that focus on the engine's thermal transient response to various actuators input control combinations. The test results established a basis for several key operating conclusions.
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