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2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2838
Dharmar Ganesh
In-vehicle displays such as an instrument cluster in a vehicle provide vital information to the user. The information in terms of displays and tell-tales needs to be perceived by the user with minimal glance during driving. Drivers must recognize the condition of the vehicle and the state of its surroundings through primarily visual means. Drivers then process this in the brain, draw on their memory to identify problem situations, decide on a plan of action and execute it in order to avoid an accident. There are visual hindrances seen in real world scenario such as obscuration, reflection and glare on the instrument cluster which prevents the vital information flow from vehicle to the driver. In order to ensure safety while driving, the instrument cluster or driver displays should be placed in an optimized location. This paper deals with how to achieve a visual hindrance free cluster position in a vehicle to protect the important information flow from the vehicle to the driver.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2869
Sumit Sharma, Sandeep sharma, Umashanker Gupta, Ravi Joshi, shailesh pawar
Buses are one of the main and favorite sources of public transit in India. Thousands of people die or injure severely every year due to Bus accidents. Passenger injury in Bus accidents can be due to high stiff seat structures. Most of the occupants seated in the second row or further back were injured by hitting the seat back in the row in front of them. AIS023 (AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY STANDARDS) is one of the several mandatory standards from CMVR (CENTRAL MOTOR VEHICLES RULES) to ensure the safety during crash. As per AIS-023 passenger seat of bus should not cause injury because of high stiffness, on the other hand seat should also be able to carry the passenger force during accidents. With this mechanism AIS023 specifies minimum and maximum range deformations of seat back to minimize the passenger injury. This study includes the FE (Finite Element) analysis and design of Bus seat as per AIS023 test setup with LS-Dyna explicit tool.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2873
Sumit Sharma, Sandeep sharma, Sanjay Tiwari, Umashanker Gupta
Years ago the main purpose of heavy duty truck is to carrying the loads, in the current scenario cabin comfort and safety is also equally important. With the improved infrastructure quality the average speed of these types of vehicle has also been increased. With the higher average speed, the chances of getting crash have also been increased. In order to provide safety to the driver, all the safety parameters should be considered in advance at the time of design and development of cabin. Sufficient survival space must be present at the time of crash. In order to provide optimum ride comfort, fully suspended cab was designed. The main aim of this study is to develop detailed 3D finite element (FE) model of fully suspended heavy duty truck cabin with detailed suspensions system and simulate crash test scenario presented in regulation ECE-R29 using LS-Dyna explicit solver.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2888
Devadatta Mukutmoni, Tristan Donley, Jaehoon Han, Karthik Mahadevan Muthuraman, P. David Campbell, Tom Mertz
Design and evaluation of construction equipments and vehicles constitute a very important but expensive and time consuming part of the engineering process. This is especially so because of the large number of variants and the relatively small production volume of each variant leading to large costs of engineering and design of vehicles as a proportion of total sales. A simulation based methodology could potentially reduce the cost and time of the entire design process. In this study, we look into an alternative simulation based approach to the design process. However, given the enormity of the task, we limit the scope of this investigation to design evaluation and improvement for thermal considerations only. In particular, thermal evaluation of the electronic control units are looked into.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2420
Henry A. Catherino
The heat generation rate of a lithium ion cell was estimated using a reversible heat generation rate equation. Because the equation is based on the energy conservation law, the influence of kinetically slow processes should be considered. In this analysis, the influence of kinetically slow processes is present but it is small within the domain of the test measurements. This approximation can be of significant usefulness for modeling the thermal response of single cells and multi-cell batteries.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2418
Ricardo Gandolfi, Luiz Ribeiro, Jorge Oliveira, Kleber Paiva, Marcia Mantelli
Due to the increasing power density of onboard electrical and electronic equipments and heat dissipation in civil and military aircraft, more efficient ways of transferring heat and new cooling techniques are a necessity. A passive heat transfer prototype was developed and experimentally evaluated in laboratory, at flight and ground tests in an Embraer ERJ-170 test aircraft. The passive heat transfer device consists of a loop-thermosyphon with two condensers and a common evaporator, using water as the heat transfer working fluid. An electrical resistance and a variable power source were used to dissipate heat inside the evaporator, simulating heat transfer from an onboard electronics bay. The fuselage/external air stream and the air flow inside an air conditioning system duct were used as heat sinks. Prior to flight tests, laboratory tests were conducted simulating ground and flight operations.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2416
Charles E. Oberly, Michelle Bash, Benjamin R. Razidlo, Travis E. Michalak, Fernando Rodriguez
An IPTMS hardware facility has been established in the laboratories of the Aerospace Systems Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Paterson Air Force Base. This hardware capability was established to assess the integration issues and analyze the transient behavior of a high power Electrical Power System (EPS) couple virtually to a Thermal Management System (TMS). The system incorporates the use of dynamic electrical load, engine emulation, energy storage, and emulated thermal loads operated to investigate dynamics under step load conditions. Hardware architecture and control options for the IPTMS are discussed.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2415
Kyle Shimmin, Greg Russell, Robert A. Reuter, Steven Iden
A reduced order dynamic aircraft model has been created for the purpose of enabling constructive simulation studies involving integrated electrical power and thermal management subsystems using Multidisciplinary Design Optimization methods. Previous higher-order models that have been used for this purpose have the drawbacks of much higher development time, along with much higher execution times in the simulation studies. The new formulation allows for climbs, accelerations and turns without incurring computationally expensive stability considerations; a dynamic inversion control law provides tracking of user-specified mission data. To assess the trade-off of improved run-time performance against model capability, the reduced order formulation is compared to a traditional six degree-of-freedom model of the same air vehicle. Thrust command comparisons against the higher fidelity model are shown to be excellent.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2582
Andre Silva, Nayeff Najjar, Shalabh Gupta, Paul D'Orlando, Rhonda Walthall
The main function of the Environmental Control System (ECS) is to deliver thermal control and cabin pressurization of the air for the comfort and safety of crew members and the passengers on-board. The Heat Exchanger of the ECS is the critical component that ensures healthy system operation and maintains this key function. The heat exchanger mainly exhibits the failure known as fouling, which is the accumulation of clogging due to contamination. For safe and efficient operation of the ECS under the complex environments of aerospace systems, it is necessary to develop the capability to diagnose degradation of system components in the early phase of fault evolution. Periodic maintenance of these components without knowledge of their remaining useful life estimates causes significant financial expenses for the airliners and unnecessary interruption of aircraft operation.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2545
Reza Ahmadi, Oliver Marquardt, Marc Riedlinger, Reinhard Reichel
An aircraft’s cabin has to cope with frequent cabin layout rearrangements as well as technical and functional modifications during its operational lifecycle, in order to stay aligned with business demands and technological progress. Additionally the cabin faces extensive customizations during its production, to underline the corporate design of airlines and improve passenger perception. Such changes in the cabin induce major modifications in the cabin management system (CMS).Therefore it is inevitable for CMS to be highly changeable and offer an easy and agile change process. Today’s CMS solutions face this challenge with configurable system architectures. Such architectures normally offer a vast change domain, but also need time consuming and error-prone change processes. The generation of a complete CMS configuration can even last more than 100 days.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2561
Fernando Stancato, Sandro Conceicao, Ramon Papa, Luis Santos
Nowadays CFD analysis including virtual manikins is vastly applied to evaluate thermal comfort inside different working environments, such as buildings cars and aircrafts. Inside aircraft cabins, added to the numerical challenges due to geometrical complexity, the available subjective responses used to judge occupant local thermal comfort are usually based on buildings and cars experiments. In the present paper however, it is applied an aircraft based subjective responses to evaluate thermal comfort which was specifically developed using regional jet mock-up experiments. The evaluation for the two approaches will be compared providing insight of the main differences.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2419
Naoki Seki, Noriko Morioka, Hidefumi Saito, Hitoshi Oyori
This paper describes the concept of air/fuel integrated thermal management system, which employs VCS (Vapor Cycle System) for the refrigeration unit of ECS (Environment Control System) and exchange the heat between VCS refrigerant and the fuel into the engine, and present feasibility study to apply the concept to the future all electric aircraft system. The key component of the aircraft thermal management system is ECS. The heat generated in the aircraft is transferred to ECS heat exchanger by the recirculation of the cabin air and exhausted into the ram air. While some of the aircrafts employ the fluid heat transfer loop, the transferred heat is exhausted into the ram air as ever. The usage of ram air for the cooling will increase the ram drag and the fuel consumption, thus, less usage of ram air is preferable. Another source for heat exhaust is the fuel.
2015-07-28
Standard
AS8055A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) specifies minimum performance standards for airborne binocular Head-Up Displays (HUDs) in fixed wing (14 CFR part 23, 25) aircraft; while this document is also applicable to rotorcraft (14 CFR part 27, 29) additional performance standards may be required for rotorcraft. This aerospace standard covers basic display standards, but does not include specific application requirements. Specific applications can include flight instrumentation, navigation, engine and system status, alerting, surveillance, communication, terrain awareness, weather, enhanced vision, synthetic vision and other displays. This document covers criteria for conformal and non-conformal HUD systems that are intended for use in the flight deck by the pilot or copilot. Display minimum performance characteristics are specified for standard and other environmental conditions for the purpose of product qualification.
2015-07-23
Article
Based in Frankfurt, Pierre Juan manages sales and technical teams across 19 countries as the Global Automotive Vice President at Styrolution. The company describes itself as the leading global styrenics supplier. He discusses the future of plastics in the automotive industry, including opportunities and challenges.
2015-07-22
WIP Standard
ARP1088C
This ARP is intended to cover the warning, caution and advisory indicating system required for commercial and military aerospace vehicles. The purpose of this ARP is to recommend certain basic considerations which the design engineer should observe when designing a visual warning indicating system. It is recognized that many types of warning indicators and systems are available for the designer to use. This ARP does not recommend any specific system but outlines design and installation requirements.
2015-07-17
Standard
ARP5526D
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) documents a common understanding of terms, compliance issues and design criteria to facilitate certification of seat installations specific to Part 25 aircraft. This ARP provides general guidance for seats to be installed in Part 23 aircraft and Parts 27 and 29 rotorcraft and does not specify specific designs or design methods for such certification.
2015-07-13
Standard
ARP1796B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) discusses design philosophy, system and equipment requirements, installation environment and design considerations for military and commercial aircraft systems within the Air Transport Association (ATA) ATA 100 specification, Chapter 36, Pneumatic. This ATA system/chapter covers equipment used to deliver compressed air from a power source to connecting points for other systems such as air conditioning, pressurization, ice protection, cross-engine starting, air turbine motors, air driven hydraulic pumps, on board oxygen generating systems (OBOGS), on board inert gas generating systems (OBIGGS), and other pneumatic demands.
2015-07-08
Standard
J3030_201507
The purpose of this SAE Standard is to establish the specific minimum equipment requirements for recovery/recycling/recharge equipment intended for use with both R-1234yf and R-134a in a common refrigerant circuit that has been directly removed from, and is intended for reuse in, mobile air-conditioning (A/C) systems. This document does not apply to equipment used for R-1234yf and R-134a having a common enclosure with separate circuits for each refrigerant, although some amount of separate circuitry for each refrigerant could be used.
2015-07-01
Article
The system, to be offered on nearly all Ford SUVs globally by 2020, uses real-time video from 1-megapixel wide-angle-lens cameras mounted in the vehicle’s grill and lift gate to help drivers see around corners.
2015-07-01
Article
Its programs include driver brain wave analysis, heart and respiration monitoring, safer autonomous driving, and added driver support.
2015-07-01
Standard
J1726_201507
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test methods and criteria for evaluating the internal cleanliness and air leakage for engine charge air coolers. This SAE Recommended Practice also provides nomenclature and terminology in common use for engine charge air coolers, related charge air cooling system components, and charge air cooling system operational performance parameters.
2015-06-30
Article
Off-highway machine mounting systems, especially the cab mounting system, significantly affect the operator comfort in the cab by providing enough damping for a good ride and isolating the structure-borne forces from traveling into the cab.
2015-06-30
Standard
J3062_201506
The Scope of SAE J3062 covers hose intended for containing and circulating lubricant, liquid and gaseous R134a and/or R-1234yf refrigerant in automotive air-conditioning systems. The hose shall be designed to minimize permeation of the refrigerant, contamination of the system, and to be functional over a temperature range of -30 to 125 °C. Specific construction details are to be agreed upon between the user and supplier. Requirements for the hose used in coupled automotive refrigerant air-conditioning assemblies had been included in SAE J2064. SAE J3062 separates requirements for the hose used in these assemblies into its own standard. SAE J2064 also provides the necessary values used in SAE J2727 Mobile Air-Conditioning System Refrigerant Emission charts for R-134a and R-1234yf. Mobile air-conditioning system refrigerant emissions rates are established in SAE J2727 Emission charts and are important.
2015-06-23
Article
Elektrobit releases an easier-to-use toolkit that enables development of multimodal user interfaces with advanced graphics, plus voice-, touch-, and gesture-based commands, for sophisticated human-machine interface (HMI) systems.
2015-06-23
WIP Standard
J2889/1
This SAE Standard is derived from SAE J2805 and specifies an engineering method for measuring the sound emitted by M and N category road vehicles at standstill and low speed operating conditions.. The specifications reproduce the level of sound which is generated by the principal vehicle sound sources consistent with stationary and low speed vehicle operating conditions relevant for pedestrian safety. The method is designed to meet the requirements of simplicity as far as they are consistent with reproducibility of results under the operating conditions of the vehicle. The test method requires an acoustic environment which is only obtained in an extensive open space or in special designed indoor facilities replicating the conditions of an extensive open space. Such conditions usually exist during: Measurements of vehicles for regulatory certification. Measurements at the manufacturing stage. Measurements at official testing stations.
2015-06-19
Standard
J860_201506
This SAE Standard is used to determine the mass per unit area, in grams per square meter, of materials used for trimming automobile interiors.
2015-06-18
Article
Passenger Experience automates cabin completion processes with essential intelligent “building blocks” capturing rules, regulations, and manufacturing knowledge to automate cabin interior design, development, and delivery.
2015-06-18
Standard
J2364_201506
This document applies to both Original Equipment Manufacturer and aftermarket route-guidance and navigation system functions for passenger vehicles. It establishes two alternative procedures, a static method and an interrupted vision method, for determining which navigation and route guidance functions should be accessible to the driver while the vehicle is in motion. These methods apply only to the presentation of visual information and the use of manual control inputs to accomplish a navigation or route guidance task. The document does not apply to visual monitoring tasks which do not require a manual control input, such as route following. Voice-activated controls or passenger operation of controls are also excluded. There are currently no compelling data that would support the extension of this document to in-vehicle systems other than navigation systems.
2015-06-16
WIP Standard
J3103
The test procedure included in this document are used to determine a benchmark SgRP for Class A vehicles where design intent information is unknown.
2015-06-16
WIP Standard
J2678
This document provides the rationale used by the Navigation Function Accessibility Subcommittee (the Subcommittee) for the development and content of a SAE J2364 Recommended Practice: Navigation and Route Guidance Function Accessibility While Driving. It provides both the reasoning for the overall recommended practice as well as each of its elements.
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