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Viewing 1 to 30 of 7604
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2303
Katherine Tao, Alan Parrett, David Nielubowicz
Abstract The headliner system in a vehicle is an important element in vehicle noise control. In order to predict the performance of the headliner, it is necessary to develop an understanding of the substrate performance, the effect of air gaps, and the contribution from any acoustic pads in the system. Current Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) models for predicting absorption performance of acoustic absorbers are based on material Biot properties. However, the resources for material Biot property testing are limited and cost is high. In this paper, modeling parameters for the headliner substrate are identified from a set of standard absorption measurements on substrates, using curve fitting and optimization techniques. The parameters are then used together with thickness/design information in a SEA model to predict the vehicle headliner system absorption performance.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2339
Márcio Calçada, Alan Parrett
Abstract Sound absorption materials can be key elements for mass-efficient vehicle noise control. They are utilized at multiple locations in the interior and one of the most important areas is the roof. At this location, the acoustic treatment typically comprises a headliner and an air gap up to the body sheet metal. The acoustic performance requirement for such a vehicle subsystem is normally a sound absorption curve. Based on headliner geometry and construction, the sound absorption curve shape can be adjusted to increase absorption in certain frequency ranges. In this paper an overall acoustic metric is developed to relate design parameters to an absorption curve shape which results in improved in-vehicle performance. This metric is based on sound absorption coefficient and articulation index. Johnson-Champoux-Allard equivalent fluid model and diffuse field equations are used. The results are validated using impedance tube measurements.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2210
Quan Wan
Abstract Five parameters are often used in acoustic modeling of porous absorption material, which are air flow resistivity σ, porosity φ, tortuosity α∞, viscous and thermal characteristic lengths Λ and Λ′. These parameters are not easy to be directly tested, especially the latter three parameters. One software capable of identifying inversely these parameters from impedance tube test results becomes increasingly popular. However, its detail stability analysis is rarely reported till now. This paper studies its stability on those porous fiber materials generally applied in vehicle interior trim, such as PET fiber, shoddy, PP/PET mixed fiber. Some conclusions are obtained. (1) The identification of α∞, Λ and Λ′ is always stable when σ and φ are assumed in advance.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2249
Saad Bennouna, Said Naji, Olivier Cheriaux, Solene Moreau, Boureima Ouedraogo, Jean Michel Ville
Abstract Passengers' thermal comfort inside a car cabin is mainly provided by the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) module. Air provided by HVAC is blown via a blower, passing through different components: flaps, thermal exchangers, ducts… and then distributed to car cabin areas. Interaction between airflow and HVAC components generates noises that emerge in car cabin. Due to this fact, noise is naturally created and its level is linked to flow rate. Valeo is aiming, though CEVAS project, to develop a prediction tool which will provide HVAC spectrum and sound quality data. This tool will be based, in particular, on aeroacoustic measurements using 2N-ports model and Particle Image Velocimetry methods to provide characteristics of HVAC components.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2235
Arnaud Caillet, Denis Blanchet
Abstract The need in the automotive industry to understand the physical behavior of trims used in a vehicle is high. The PEM (poro-elastic method) was developed to permit an explicit representation of the trims in the FEM full vehicle models and to give tools to diagnose the effect of the trims and test design changes (porous material property, geometry, etc.,). During the last decade, the evolution of software and hardware has allowed the creation of models with highly detailed trim description (porous material using Biot parameters, plastic trims, etc.,). These models can provide good correlation up to 400Hz compared to measurements in contrast to classical NSM (Non Structural Mass) methodology which shows limitations.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2266
Andrzej Pietrzyk
Abstract Several of the exterior noise sources existing around a vehicle can cause airborne noise issues at relatively low frequencies. SEA, traditionally used for airborne sound issues is not suitable for the frequency range of interest. Finite Element analysis has been used. Handling of the non-reflecting condition on the outer boundary of the exterior cavity is an issue. Recently, advances have been made in several commercially available codes, which made the analysis practical. Including the poro-elastic material model for foam-based carpets is also becoming practically possible. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the practical applications of those new developments against test data, and to estimate the feasibility of using these procedures in the vehicle development projects. Measurements were carried out in a new semi-anechoic chamber at Volvo Cars.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2271
Yong Du Jun, Bong Hyun Park, Kang Seok Seo, Tae Hyun Kim, Myoung Jae Chae
Abstract Modern automotive seats require improvements in their design, safety, comfort including sitting and riding comfort. Among those, seat comfort is known to be difficult to evaluate because the comfort is a human feeling. As an approach to evaluate the human comfort in an objective manner, an objective measure is proposed for seat riding comfort evaluation under low frequency vibratory conditions which represents typical roll and pitch motions of driving motor vehicles. The related feeling due to this low frequency vehicle motion is termed ‘hold feeling’ because the seated body may tend to deviate from the defined seating position under such vehicle motion input. Dynamic pressure measurements have been conducted in the frequency range up to 1.0 Hz to monitor the interface pressure change behavior of the seat-subject body.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2273
Curtis Jones, Zhengyu Liu, Suhas Venkatappa, James Hurd
Abstract This paper presents the methodology of predicting vehicle level automotive air-handling system air-rush noise sound quality (SQ) using the sub-system level measurement. Measurement setup in both vehicle level and sub-system levels are described. To assess the air-rush noise SQ, both 1/3 octave band sound pressure level (SPL) and overall Zwicker's loudness are used. The “Sound Quality Correlation Functions (SQCF)” between sub-system level and vehicle level are developed for the specified climate control modes and vehicle segment defined by J.D. Power & Associates, while the Zwicker's loudness is calculated using the un-weighted predicted 1/3 octave band SPL. The predicting models are demonstrated in very good agreement with the measured data. The methodology is applied to the development of sub-system SQ requirement for upfront delivery of the optimum design to meet global customer satisfaction
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2276
Zhengyu Liu, Donald Wozniak, Manfred Koberstein, Curtis Jones, Jan Xu, Suhas Venkatappa
Abstract Refrigerant flow-induced gurgling noise is perceived in automotive refrigerant systems. In this study, the condition of the gurgling generation is investigated at the vehicle level and the fundamental root cause is identified as the two-phase refrigerant flow entering the TXV for system equipped with variable displacement compressors. By conducting literature reviews, the acoustic characteristics of the flow patterns and the parameters affecting the flow regimes in horizontal and vertical tubes are summarized. Then the gurgling mechanism is explained as the intermittent flow is developed at the evaporator inlet. In the end, the improved and feasible design for avoiding the intermittent flow (slug, plug or churn flow) or minimizing its formation is proposed and verified in refrigerant subsystem (RSS) level. Finally, the guidelines for the attenuation and suppression of the gurgle are provided.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2275
Manfred Koberstein, Zhengyu Liu, Curtis Jones, Suhas Venkatappa
Abstract In the thermal expansion valve (TXV) refrigerant system, transient high-pitched whistle around 6.18 kHz is often perceived following air-conditioning (A/C) compressor engagements when driving at higher vehicle speed or during vehicle acceleration, especially when system equipped with the high-efficiency compressor or variable displacement compressor. The objectives of this paper are to conduct the noise source identification, investigate the key factors affecting the whistle excitation, and understand the mechanism of the whistle generation. The mechanism is hypothesized that the whistle is generated from the flow/acoustic excitation of the turbulent flow past the shallow cavity, reinforced by the acoustic/structural coupling between the tube structural and the transverse acoustic modes, and then transmitted to evaporator. To verify the mechanism, the transverse acoustic mode frequency is calculated and it is coincided to the one from measurement.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2323
Abdelhakim Aissaoui, Ravindra S Tupake, Vilas Bijwe, Mohammed Meskine, Franck Perot, Alain Belanger, Rohit J Vaidya
For the automotive industry, acoustic comfort is of increasing importance. The market and customer expectation make the HVAC system noise quality a question to be addressed as early as possible in the vehicle development process. On one hand, the so-called traditional sources of annoyance such as engine, road-tires contact, exhaust systems and wind-noise have been significantly reduced for most traditional combustion engine vehicles. On the other hand, considered in the past as secondary noise sources, HVAC systems become the main sources for hybrid and electric and Stop-start vehicles. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of a CFD/CAA approach based on the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) to predict HVAC system noise including real and complex ducts, registers, mixing unit and blower geometries.
2015-05-01
Journal Article
2015-01-9017
Johannes Wurm, Matthias Fitl, Michael Gumpesberger, Esa Väisänen, Christoph Hochenauer
Abstract Nowadays, investigating underhood airflow by using numerical simulation is a standard task in the development process of passenger cars and commercial vehicles. Numerous publications exist which deal with simulating the airflow through the engine compartment of road vehicles. However, hardly anything can be found which deals with off-road vehicles and nothing exists which focuses on snowmobiles. In the presented paper the airflow and the thermal conditions inside the engine compartment of a snowmobile are investigated by the usage of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as well as experimental methods. Field tests at arctic conditions have been conducted on a serial snowmobile to measure temperatures inside the compartment and to gain realistic boundary conditions for the numerical simulation. Thermocouples (type K) were attached under the hood to measure exhaust, air, coolant and surface temperatures of several components at previously defined load cases.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1705
Miguel Hurtado, Amine Taleb-Bendiab, Julien Moizard, Patrice M. Reilhac, Heinz Mattern
Abstract Current market trend indicates an increased interest in replacing mirrors by camera monitor systems (CMS) to reduce CO2 emissions and to improve visibility of surrounding environment to the driver. A CMS is an advanced system composed of an electronic imager, a display, and an intelligent electronic control unit intended to provide at least the same level of functionality of legally prescribed mirrors. A CMS must also take into consideration several factors in the designed system to satisfy an overall system magnification and system resolution. Some factors pertain to the camera, and display inside the cockpit, but some other are related to the physical constraints of the human operator, i.e. visual acuity, height, etc. In this paper, we demonstrate that there exists a fundamental nonlinear equation for a given CMS encompassing factors that influence the performance of the system.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1710
Xinran Tao, Kan Zhou, Andrej Ivanco, John R. Wagner, Heath Hofmann, Zoran Filipi
Abstract The components in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) powertrain include the battery pack, an internal combustion engine, and the electric machines such as motors and possibly a generator. These components generate a considerable amount of heat during driving cycles. A robust thermal management system with advanced controller, designed for temperature tracking, is required for vehicle safety and energy efficiency. In this study, a hybridized mid-size truck for military application is investigated. The paper examines the integration of advanced control algorithms to the cooling system featuring an electric-mechanical compressor, coolant pump and radiator fans. Mathematical models are developed to numerically describe the thermal behavior of these powertrain elements. A series of controllers are designed to effectively manage the battery pack, electric motors, and the internal combustion engine temperatures.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1708
Tibor Kiss, Jason Lustbader, Daniel Leighton
Abstract Electric vehicles (EVs) need highly optimized thermal management systems to improve range. Climate control can reduce vehicle efficiency and range by more than 50%. Due to the relative shortage of waste heat, heating the passenger cabin in EVs is difficult. Cabin cooling can take a high portion of the energy available in the battery. Compared to internal combustion engine-driven vehicles, different heating methods and more efficient cooling methods are needed, which can make EV thermal management systems more complex. More complex systems typically allow various alternative modes of operation that can be selected based on driving and ambient conditions. A good system simulation tool can greatly reduce the time and expense for developing these complex systems. A simulation model should also be able to efficiently co-simulate with vehicle simulation programs, and should be applicable for evaluating various control algorithms.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1713
Manfred Klaus Kirschning, Frank Reußwig
Abstract Different heat shielding unilayer materials already in practical use and multilayer materials, consisting of a compound of E-glass fabric laminated with aluminum foil and different high temperature felts, are compared with regards to the difference between the external and internal surface temperature ΔT as a function of the external surface temperature. Beside that the general difference between the two standard methods convection heat measurement and radiant heat measurement is shown. Especially it is evaluated whether the radiant heat measurement method is suitable to make a general statement for classification of heat shielding materials.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1711
Christian Hainzlmaier, Alejandro S. Regueiro, Marvin Lappe
Abstract Hybrid and Electric Vehicles have a heat deficit due to frequent operation of the engine in high efficiency regions or during pure electric driving where the engine as a heat source is not available. Especially for the conditioning of the cabin, additional heat sources are necessary to ensure comfort & safety. In order to maximize the electric driving range, and improve fuel efficiency, it is important to combine a fast, efficient and safe generation of heat, with a minimum drain from the traction battery. Webasto went about this challenge and developed the new High Voltage Heater (HVH) based on a new and patented heat layer technology. This paper explains the design concept and results of the novel clean sheet research and development approach taken to achieve the project goals.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1695
Satoki Tada, Takahiro Nagai, Naoki Shioda, Hirofumi Fujiu, Shunji Kumagai, Hideaki Abe, Yukihiro Isoda, Yoshikazu Shinohara
Abstract As an appropriate material for automotive thermoelectric generators, which directly convert waste heat of exhaust gas into electricity, we have developed Mg2(Si1-xSnx) thermoelectric materials with high thermoelectric performance. The performance is evaluated with the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT), and the ZT has been improved through the development of the fabrication process and the investigation of the optimum composition and dopant element. A novel liquid-solid reaction synthesis method incorporating hotpressing for the sample fabrication was effective in reducing the thermal conductivity. The n-type Mg2(Si0.50Sn0.50) doped with Sb attained a high ZT of 1.1 at 620 K. The p-type Mg2(Si0.25Sn0.75) doped with Li and Ag simultaneously achieved a ZT of 0.3 at 600 K. The effective maximum power of n-type thermoelectric element and that of p-type were calculated with the thermoelectromotive force and the mean resistivity.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1692
Walter Ferraris, Fausto Di Sciullo, Carloandrea Malvicino, Francesco Vestrelli, Fabrizio Beltramelli, Giancarlo Gotta
Abstract Automotive world is rapidly changing driven by the CO2 emission regulations [1], [2] worldwide asking for a dramatic fuel consumption reduction. The on board thermal management has a relevant role influencing the front vehicle design and sizing to assure the right heat rejection capacity and being crucial to guarantee the on board system efficiency and reliability. In this context the dual level cooling system with water cooled charge air cooling is a clear trend leading to a new generation of systems [3, 4]. This paper describes a compact solution to effectively implement a dual cooling loop system with water cooled charge air cooler and water cooled condenser on small/subcompact cars giving the opportunity to integrate additional modules (e.g. in case of hybrid powertrain) to the secondary loop.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1694
Jun Li, Predrag Hrnjak
Abstract This paper presents results of the visualization of the separation in the vertical header of the automotive condenser. A prototype of a heat exchanger was made that has inlet in the middle of the header, with 21 microchannel tubes as the first pass. In the second header liquid separates and leaves through 4 microchannel tubes beneath while mostly vapor leaves through 11 microchannel tubes on the top as another exit. That way the 2nd pass has liquid below first pass and vapor above it. R134a was used in the tests. Mass flow at the inlet to the header was in the range 8.4 - 30 g/s (mass flux of 54 kg/m2·s-193 kg/m2·s) and quality at the inlet to second header was varied over a range of 0.05 to 0.25, to see their impact on the separation of two-phase flow inside the transparent header. Visualization was performed to better understand and define the physical parameters that dominate the separation phenomena.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0254
Chunjing Lin, Sichuan Xu, Zhao Li, Guofeng Chang
Abstract A passive thermal management system (TMS) using composite phase change material (PCM) for large-capacity, rectangular lithium-ion batteries is designed. A battery module consisting of six Li-ion cells connected in series was investigated as a basic unit. The passive TMS for the module has three configurations according to the contact area between cells and the composite PCM, i.e., surrounding, front-contacted and side-contacted schemes. Firstly, heat generation rate of the battery cell was calculated using the Bernardi equation based on experimentally measured heat source terms (i.e. the internal resistance and the entropy coefficient). Physical and thermal properties such as density, phase change temperature, latent heat and thermal conductivity of the composite PCM were also obtained by experimental methods. Thereafter, thermal response of the battery modules with the three TMS configurations was simulated using 3D finite element analysis (FEA) modeling in ANSYS Fluent.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0248
Hiroyasu Baba, Koji Kawasaki, Hideomi Kawachi
Abstract We have developed Li-ion battery heating system which is direct resistance heating for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEV) and electric vehicles (EV) by use of an inverter and a motor. One relay is added between a positive terminal of Li-ion battery and one-phase (e.g. U-phase) of a three-phase motor. When additional relay is turned on, the motor coils, IGBTs (Insulated-gate bipolar transistor) and diodes in the inverter and a smoothing capacitor for the inverter constitute buck-boost DC to DC converter. IGBTs are controlled to repeat charging and discharging between the battery and the smoothing capacitor. We made a system prototype and examined battery heating capability. And also we optimized charging and discharging frequency from impedance and current to improve heat generation. This method can increase battery temperature from −20 degrees C to 0 degrees C in 5 minutes and can extend EV driving range.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0372
Rupesh Sonu Kakade
Abstract The vehicle air-conditioning system has significant impact on fuel economy and range of electric vehicles. Improving the fuel economy of vehicles therefore demand for energy efficient climate control systems. Also the emissions regulations motivate the reduced use of fuel for vehicle's cabin climate control. Solar heat gain of the passenger compartment by greenhouse effect is generally treated as the peak thermal load of the climate control system. Although the use of advanced glazing is considered first to reduce solar heat gain other means such as ventilation of parked car and recirculation of cabin air also have impetus for reducing the climate control loads.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0369
Rupesh Sonu Kakade
Abstract In addition to the thermal comfort of the vehicle occupants, their safety by ensuring adequate visibility is an objective of the automotive climate control system. An integrated dew point and glass temperature sensor is widely used among several other technologies to detect risk of fog formation on the cabin side (or inner) surface of the windshield. The erroneous information from a sensor such as the measurement lag can cause imperfect visibility due to the delayed response of the climate control system. Also the high value, low cost vehicles may not have this sensor due to its high cost. A differential equation based model of the cabin air humidity is proposed to calculate in real-time specific humidity of the passenger compartment air. The specific humidity is used along with the windshield surface temperature to determine relative humidity of air and therefore, the risk of fog formation on the interior surface of a windshield.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0370
Modar Horani, Osamah Rawashdeh
Abstract Traditional Heat Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) control systems are reactive by design and largely dependent on the on-board sensory data available on a Controller Area Network (CAN) bus. The increasingly common Internet connectivity offered in today's vehicles, through infotainment and telematic systems, makes data available that may be used to improve current HVAC systems. This includes real-time outside relative humidity, ambient temperature, precipitation (i.e., rain, snow, etc.), and weather forecasts. This data, combined with position and route information of the vehicle, may be used to provide a more comfortable experience to vehicle occupants in addition to improving driver visibility through more intelligent humidity, and defrost control. While the possibility of improving HVAC control utilizing internet connectivity seems obvious, it is still currently unclear as to what extent.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0355
Matthew A. Jeffers, Larry Chaney, John P. Rugh
Abstract Passenger compartment climate control is one of the largest auxiliary loads on a vehicle. Like conventional vehicles, electric vehicles (EVs) require climate control to maintain occupant comfort and safety, but cabin heating and air conditioning have a negative impact on driving range for all-electric vehicles. Range reduction caused by climate control and other factors is a barrier to widespread adoption of EVs. Reducing the thermal loads on the climate control system will extend driving range, thereby reducing consumer range anxiety and increasing the market penetration of EVs. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have investigated strategies for vehicle climate control load reduction, with special attention toward EVs. Outdoor vehicle thermal testing was conducted on two 2012 Ford Focus Electric vehicles to evaluate thermal management strategies for warm weather, including solar load reduction and cabin pre-ventilation.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0356
Aniket Patil, Manoj Radle, Biswadip Shome, Sankar Ramachandran
Abstract Passenger comfort and safety are major drivers in a typical automotive design and optimization cycle. Addressing thermal comfort requirements and the thermal management of the passenger cabin within a car, which involves accurate prediction of the temperature of the cabin interior space and the various aggregates that are present in a cabin, has become an area of active research. Traditionally, these have been done using experiments or detailed three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, which are both expensive and time-consuming. To alleviate this, recent approaches have been to use one-dimensional system-level simulation techniques with a goal to shorten the design cycle time and reduce costs. This paper describes the use of Modelica language to develop a one-dimensional mathematical model using Modelica language for automotive cabin thermal assessment when the car is subjected to solar heat loading.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0353
Kaushal Kumar Jha, Ravi Badathala
Abstract The prime focus of automotive industries in recent times is to improve the energy efficiency of automotive subsystem and system as whole. Harvesting the waste energy and averaging the peak thermal loads using thermal energy storage (TES) materials and devices can help to improve the energy efficiency of automotive system and sub-system. The phase change materials (PCM) well suit the requirement of energy storage/release according to demand requirement. One such example of TES using PCM is extended automotive cabin comfort during vehicle idling and city traffics including start/stop of the engine at traffic stops. PCM as TES poses high density and capacity in thermal energy storage and release. It is due to latent heat absorption and release during phase change. Generally the latent heat of a material compare to it sensible heat is much higher, almost an order of 2.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0354
Ji Wan Kim, Tae Hee Lee
Abstract This study has been conducted to analyze microbial diversity and its community by using a method of NGS(Next generation sequencing) technique that is not rely on cultivation for microbial community in an core evaporator causing odor of car air conditioner. The NGS without any cultivation method of cultivation, has been developed recently and widely. This method is able to research a microorganism that has not been cultivated. Differently with others, it can get a result that is closer to fact, also can acquire more base sequence with larger volume in relatively shorter time. According to bacteria population analysis of 23 samples, It can be known limited number of bacteria can inhabit in Evaporator core, due to small exposure between bacteria and evaporate, as well as its environmental characteristics. With the population analysis, only certain group of it is forming biofilm in proportion.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0360
Maryline Leriche, Wolfgang Roessner, Heinrich Reister, Bernhard Weigand
Abstract An accurate model to predict the formation of fogging and defogging which occurs for low windshield temperatures is helpful for designing the air-conditioning system in a car. Using a multiphase flow approach and additional user-defined functions within the commercial CFD-software STAR-CCM+, a model which is able to calculate the amount of water droplets on the windshield from condensation and which causes the fogging is set up. Different parameters like relative humidity, air temperature, mass flow rate and droplet distributions are considered. Because of the condition of the windshield's surface, the condensation occurs as tiny droplets with different sizes. The distribution of these very small droplets must be obtained to estimate numerically the heat transfer coefficient during the condensation process to predict the defogging time.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 7604