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Viewing 1 to 30 of 7393
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Youcai Liang, Gequn Shu, Hua Tian, Haiqiao Wei, Xingyu Liang, Mingru Zhao
Abstract Cogeneration system has become a valuable alternative approach for cascade waste heat recovery (WHR). In this paper, a novel electricity-cooling cogeneration system (ECCS) based on organic Rankine cycle-absorption refrigeration cycle (ORC-ARC) combined system is proposed to recover the waste heat of marine engine. ORC was adopted in the higher temperature cycle, in which alternatives D4, MDM and MM were selected as the working fluids. An ARC was adopted in the lower temperature cycle to recover the heat of the working fluid at the regenerator outlet in ORC. It aims to satisfy refrigeration requirement aboard ship, in which a binary solution of ammonia-water is used as the working pairs. Electricity output, cooling capacity, total exergy output, primary energy ratio (PER) and exergy efficiency are chosen as the objective functions. The results show that the additional cooling capacity is up to 10.9 MW, and such an ECCS has improved the exergy efficiency by 51% compared to the basic ORC.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mengjia Cao, Idan Kovent, Jerry Ku
Abstract Hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) is one of the most highly pursued technologies for improving energy efficiency while reducing harmful emissions. Thermal modeling and control play an ever increasing role with HEV design and development for achieving the objective of improving efficiency, and as a result of additional thermal loading from electric powertrain components such as electric motor, motor controller and battery pack. Furthermore, the inherent dual powertrains require the design and analysis of not only the optimal operating temperatures but also control and energy management strategies to optimize the dynamic interactions among various components. This paper presents a complete development process and simulation results for an efficient modeling approach with integrated control strategy for the thermal management of plug-in HEV in parallel-through-the road (PTTR) architecture using a flexible-fuel engine running E85 and a battery pack as the energy storage system (ESS). While the main motivation for the work is to deliver a design for the Department of Energy's EcoCAR2 Plugging in to the Future Competition, yet the framework and methodologies should be useful for any typical hybrid powertrain thermal and control development.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xuan Wang, Ge-Qun Shu, Hua Tian, Youcai Liang, Xiangxiang Wang
Abstract Currently, the thermal efficiency of vessel diesels only reaches 48∼51%, and the rest energy is rejected to the environment in forms of exhaust, cooling water, engine oil and so on. Meanwhile, energy is required when generating electricity and fresh water that are necessary for vessels. A system that combines the ORC thermal electric generation system with the single-effect evaporating desalination system simultaneously driven by waste heat of charge air is proposed. The research object was 12S90ME-C9.2 diesel engine produced by MAN corp., and a calculation model of the system is built by MATLAB. The variation of the output power, the thermal efficiency and the freshwater production with some operational parameters of the combined system are calculated and analyzed. On the other hand, under the condition of an assumed freshwater production 110.3t/d, the variation of the charge air temperature at the outlet of the desalination evaporator with some operational parameters of the system is studied in the paper.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Matthew Klein, Shijie Tong, Jae Wan Park
Abstract Optimizing the hardware design and control strategies of thermal management systems (TMS) in battery packs using large format pouch cells is a difficult but important problem due to the limited understanding of how internal temperature distributions impact the performance and lifetime of the pack. Understanding these impacts is difficult due to the greatly varying length and time scales between the coupled phenomena, causing the need for complex and computationally expensive models. Here, an experimental investigation is performed in which a set of fixed one-dimensional temperature distributions are applied across the face of a Nickel-Cobalt-Manganese (NCM) cathode lithium ion pouch cell in order to study the performance impacts. Effects on the open circuit voltage (OCV), Ohmic resistance, bulk discharge and charge resistance and instantaneous power are investigated. It is observed that temperature gradients have a negative impact on the bulk performance by lowering the OCV and also increasing the bulk discharge resistance.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Saeed Asgari, Xiao Hu, Michael Tsuk, Shailendra Kaushik
The thermal behavior of a fluid-cooled battery can be modeled using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Depending on the size and complexity of the battery module and the available computing hardware, the simulation can take days or weeks to run. This work introduces a reduced-order model that combines proper orthogonal decomposition, capturing the variation of the temperature field in the spatial domain, and linear time-invariant system techniques exploiting the linear relationship between the resulting proper orthogonal decomposition coefficients and the uniform heat source considered here as the input to the system. After completing an initial CFD run to establish the reduction, the reduced-order model runs much faster than the CFD model. This work will focus on thermal modeling of a single prismatic battery cell with one adjacent cooling channel. The extension to the multiple input multiple output case such as a battery module will be discussed in another paper.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiao Hu, Scott Stanton
Abstract Due to growing interest in hybrid and electric vehicles, li-ion battery modeling is receiving a lot of attention from designers and researchers. This paper presents a complete model for a li-ion battery pack. It starts from the Newman electrochemistry model to create the battery performance curves. Such information is then used for cell level battery equivalent circuit model (ECM) parameter identification. 28 cell ECMs are connected to create the module ECM. Four module ECMs are connected through a busbar model to create the pack ECM. The busbar model is a reduced order model (ROM) extracted from electromagnetic finite element analysis (FEA) results, taking into account the parasitic effects. Battery thermal performance is simulated first by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Then, a thermal linear and time-invariant (LTI) ROM is created out of CFD solution. The thermal LTI ROM is then two-way coupled with the battery pack ECM to form a complete battery pack model. Thanks to the ROM technology, such a battery pack model can finish a complete charge discharge cycle within seconds of simulation time.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lijun Zhang, Hongzheng Cheng, Kun Diao, Cheng Ruan
To accurately and efficiently predict the temperature fields inside a lithium-ion battery is key technology for the enhancement of battery thermal management and the improvement of battery performances. The dimensional analysis method is applied to derive similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients of battery interior temperature fields, based on the governing partial differential equations describing the three dimensional transient temperature field. To verify the correctness of similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients, 3D finite element models of battery temperature field are established with a prototype and scale model, on the assumption that the battery cell has single-layer structure and multi-layers structure separately. The simulation results show that the similarity criterions and the similarity coefficients are correct. The calculation efficiency is checked to be much more efficient compared with FEM model based on the original cell structure in aspect of amount of resources occupied.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ehsan Samadani, Leo Gimenez, William Scott, Siamak Farhad, Michael Fowler, Roydon Fraser
Abstract In electrified vehicle applications, the heat generated of lithium-ion (Li-ion) cells may significantly affect the vehicle range and state of health (SOH) of the pack. Therefore, a major design task is creation of a battery thermal management system with suitable control and cooling strategies. To this end, the thermal behavior of Li-ion cells at various temperatures and operating conditions should be quantified. In this paper, two different commercial pouch cells for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are studied through comprehensive thermal performance tests. This study employs a fractional factorial design of experiments to reduce the number of tests required to characterize the behavior of fresh cells while minimizing the effects of ageing. At each test point, the effects of ambient temperature and charge/discharge rate on several types of cell efficiencies and surface heat generation is evaluated. A statistical thermal ramp rate model is suggested which enables fast and accurate determination of cell surface temperature and heat generation where the vehicle is started from cold or warm environments at a range of constant currents over the entire state of charge (SOC) range.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vijay Somandepalli, Kevin Marr, Quinn Horn
As lithium-ion cells and systems become larger and more ubiquitous in automotive applications, fire and explosion hazards that are rare or non-existent in smaller systems may exist in these larger systems. One potential hazard can occur when flammable gases emitted from a lithium-ion cell failure accumulate in or around automobiles and are ignited by electrical activity or by the cells themselves and result in a fire or explosion. In some instances, the safety aspects related to fires and explosions protection of electric vehicles and hybrid vehicles using these large energy storage battery packs are a significant challenge to address. This paper describes and characterizes the combustion and explosion hazards that can occur when a lithium ion battery pack fails and goes into thermal runaway in an enclosed space. Metrics such as gas composition, maximum overpressure, rate of pressure rise, and flammability limits are described. This information can be helpful to battery and pack designers, vehicle designers, first responders and emergency personnel in developing strategies to mitigate and prevent explosion hazards from the use of battery packs in automobiles and other fields where large battery packs are used.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ehsan Samadani, Roydon Fraser, Michael Fowler
Abstract Despite significant progress toward application of Li-ion batteries in electric vehicles, there are still major concerns about the range of electric vehicles and battery life. Depending on the climate of the region where the vehicle is in use, auxiliary loads could also play a significant role on the battery performance and durability. In this paper, the effect of air conditioning (AC) load on the electric range and Li-ion battery life is evaluated. For this purpose, a thermodynamic model for the vehicle cabin is developed and integrated to a battery model. The thermodynamic model takes the ambient conditions, solar load, and the vehicle drive cycle as inputs and calculates the instantaneous cabin temperature and humidity. The battery model, which represents a Li-on battery pack installed on a fully electrified Ford Escape 2009, consists of a voltage source in series with a lump resistance, a thermal sub-model, and a degradation sub-model to predict the battery capacity fade. At an initial cabin temperature and a desired set point, the model is capable of predicting the required cooling load and its corresponding required battery power as well as reductions in the vehicle range and battery state of health (SOH).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kevin L. Snyder, Jerry Ku
Abstract The Wayne State University (WSU) EcoCAR2 student team is investigating powertrain optimizations as a part of their participation in the EcoCAR2 design competition for the conversion of a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu into a plug-in hybrid. EcoCAR2 is the current three-year Department of Energy (DoE) Advanced Vehicle Technical Competition (AVTC) for 15 select university student teams competing on designing, building, and then optimizing their Plug-In Hybrid conversions of GM donated vehicles. WSU's powertrain design provides for approximately 56-64 km (35-40 miles) of electric driving before the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) powertrain is needed. When the ICE is started, the ICE traditionally goes through a cold start with the engine, transmission, and final drive all at ambient temperature. The ICE powertrain components are most efficient when warmed up to their normal operating temperature, typically around 90-100 °C. There are now some conventional vehicles currently available that employ active warm-up to recover waste heat from hot engine coolant to more quickly heat up the transmission fluid for reduced parasitic losses to improve fuel economy by approximately 2%. [1] [2] The WSU student team is investigating the improvements to fuel consumption (FC) of the ICE powertrain operation in the team's plug-in hybrid through pre-heating the ICE powertrain components before the engine is started.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Abhijit Nitin Khare, Henning Lohse-Busch, Douglas Nelson
Abstract Ambient temperature plays an important role in the operational behavior of a vehicle. Temperature variances from 20 F to 72 F to 95 F produce different operation from different HEVs, as prescribed by their respective energy management strategies. The extra variable of Climate Control causes these behaviors to change again. There have been studies conducted on the differences in operational behavior of conventional vehicles as against HEVs, with and without climate control. Lohse-Bush et al conclude that operational behavior of conventional vehicles is much more robust as compared to HEVs and that the effect of ambient temperature is felt more prominently in HEVs (1). However, HEVs cover a broad range of powertrain architectures, climate control systems, vehicle weights etc.The objective of this paper is to examine three different HEVs under three different temperature conditions, both with or without climate control, and come up with observations and trends on their energy usage and operational behavior.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mirko Schulze, Rashad Mustafa, Benjamin Tilch, Peter Eilts, Ferit Küçükay
Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are facing increased challenges of optimizing the energy flow through a vehicle system, to enhance both the fuel economy and emissions. Energy management of HEVs is a difficult task due to complexity of total system, considering the electrical, mechanical and thermal behavior. Innovative thermal management is one of the solutions for reaching these targets. In this paper, the potential of thermal management for a parallel HEV with a baseline control strategy under different driving cycles and ambient temperatures is presented. The focus of the investigations is on reducing fuel consumption and increasing comfort for passengers. In the first part of this paper, the developed HEV-model including the validation with measurements is presented. In the second part, the combined thermal management measures, for example the recuperation of exhaust-gas energy, engine compartment encapsulation and the effect on the target functions are discussed. Simulation results show potential of reduction fuel consumption together with increasing the comfort for the passenger cabin.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Scott Peck, Aditya Velivelli, Wilko Jansen
Integration of advanced battery systems into the next generation of hybrid and electric vehicles will require significant design, analysis, and test efforts. One major design issue is the thermal management of the battery pack. Analysis tools are being developed that can assist in the development of battery pack thermal design and system integration. However, the breadth of thermal design issues that must be addressed requires that there are a variety of analysis tools to address them efficiently and effectively. A set of battery modeling tools has been implemented in the thermal modeling software code PowerTHERM. These tools are coupled thermal-electric models of battery behavior during current charge and discharge. In this paper we describe the three models in terms of the physics they capture, and their input data requirements. We discuss where the capabilities and limitations of each model best align with the different issues needed to be addressed by analysis. Model outputs are compared with measured data for various analysis scenarios, including simulation of constant current charge/discharge, and response to charge/discharge profiles derived from a standard drive cycle, for both single cell and multi-cell pack configurations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jiri Hvezda
Abstract The paper introduces a recently developed toolset to be implemented into the complex simulation codes for internal combustion engines to treat the calculations dealing with a high-pressure part of the thermodynamic cycle in a four-stroke spark ignition engine. This multi-zone simulating tool works on the basis of a simple quasi-dimensional method reflecting the real combustion chamber geometry and uses a specific approach to describe the species chemical transformation during combustion. Here a standard kinetic scheme is combined adaptively with a flexible method for chemical equilibrium in the cases of abnormally fast chemical reactions to improve the numerical performance of the equation system. Real 3-D combustion chamber geometry is taken into account by means of geometrical characteristics created in advance. A newly generalized tool providing these data is presented here. The new code is also able to work in predictive or inverse mode. The selected results regarding these two algorithms are mentioned at the end.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Peter Eilts, Claude-Pascal Stoeber-Schmidt
A model for the calculation of heat release in direct injection Diesel engines is presented. It needs only one engine-specific experimental parameter. In the form the model is presented here it is limited to the medium and upper load range, where Diesel combustion is mainly mixing controlled. The development of the model is based on data from medium speed engines. The applicability to automotive engines is shown in some examples. The model is based on the theory of single phase turbulent jets. Starting from the balance of momentum and fuel mass flow the stationary part of the jet can be calculated. The propagation of the front of the unsteady jet is determined from a continuity consideration. Heat release is calculated based on the assumptions of the Simple Chemically Reacting System (SCRS). Fuel that is mixed with air is assumed to be burnt instantaneously. Adjustment of the model to a good correspondence of measured and calculated heat release results in an experimental parameter which is in the same range as the figures published for turbulent jet flames.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ashok Mache, Anindya Deb, G.S. Venkatesh
Abstract Natural fiber-based composites such as jute-polyester composites have the potential to be more cost-effective and environment-friendly substitutes for glass fiber-reinforced composites which are commonly found in many applications. In an earlier study (Mache and Deb [1]), jute-polyester composite tubes of circular and square cross-sections were shown to perform competitively under axial impact loading conditions when compared to similar components made of bidirectional E-glass fiber mats and thermo-setting polyester resin. For jute-reinforced plastic panels to be feasible solutions for automotive interior trim panels, laminates made of such materials should have adequate perforation resistance. In the current study, a systematic characterization of jute-polyester and glass-polyester composite laminates made by compression molding is at first carried out under quasi-static tensile, compressive and flexural loading conditions. Low velocity impact perforation tests at speeds of around 4 m/s are then performed in an instrumented drop-weight testing device on square plates extracted from the same laminates.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ankang Jin, Weiguo Zhang, Shihu Wang, Yu Yang, Yunqing Zhang
The suspension system of a heavy truck's driver seat plays an important role to reduce the vibrations transmitted to the seat occupant from the cab floor. Air-spring is widely used in the seat suspension system, for the reason that its spring rate is variable and it can make the seat suspension system keep constant ‘tuned’ frequency compared to the conventional coil spring. In this paper, vibration differential equation of air-spring system with auxiliary volume is derived, according to the theory of thermodynamic, hydrodynamics. The deformation-load static characteristic curves of air-spring is obtained, by using a numerical solution method. Then, the ADAMS model of the heavy truck's driver seat suspension system is built up, based on the structure of the seat and parameters of the air-spring and the shock-absorber. At last, the model is validated by comparing the simulation results and the test results, considering the seat acceleration PSD and RMS value.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yousof Azizi, Vaidyanadan Sundaram, Patricia Davies, Anil Bajaj
Flexible polyurethane foam is the main cushioning element used in car seats. Optimization of an occupied seat's static and dynamic behavior requires models of foam that are accurate over a wide range of excitation and pre-compression conditions. In this research, a method is described to estimate the parameters of a global model of the foam behavior from data gathered in a series of impulse tests at different settling points. The estimated model is capable of describing the responses gathered from all the impulse tests using a unique set of parameters. The global model structure includes a nonlinear elastic term and a hereditary viscoelastic term. The model can be used to predict the settling point for each mass used and, by expanding the model about that settling point, local linear models of the response to impulsive excitation can be derived. From this analysis the relationship between the local linear model parameters and the global model parameters is defined. A series of experiments are conducted using different sized masses on the foam block.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shuming Chen, Dengzhi Peng, Dengfeng Wang
Abstract Automobile cabin acoustical comfort is one of the main features that may attract customers to purchase a new car. The acoustic cavity mode of the car has an effect on the acoustical comfort. To identify the factors affecting computing accuracy of the acoustic mode, three different element type and six different element size acoustic finite element models of an automobile passenger compartment are developed and experimentally assessed. The three different element type models are meshed in three different ways, tetrahedral elements, hexahedral elements and node coupling tetrahedral and hexahedral elements (tetra-hexahedral elements). The six different element size models are meshed with hexahedral element varies from 50mm to 75mm. Modal analysis test of the passenger car is conducted using loudspeaker excitation to identify the compartment cavity modes. All the acoustic cavity models are coupled with the structure model respectively, the cavity modes are calculated with structural-acoustic coupling model.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mitsuru Enomoto, Michiko Kakinuma, Nobuhito Kato, Haruo Ishikawa, Yuichiro Hirose
Abstract Design work for truck suspension systems requires multi-objective optimization using a large number of parameters that cannot be solved in a simple way. This paper proposes a process-based systematization concept for ride comfort design using a set-based design method. A truck was modeled with a minimum of 13 degrees of freedom, and suspension performance under various vehicle speeds, road surface conditions, and load amounts was calculated. The range of design parameters for the suspension, the range of performance requirements, and the optimal values within these ranges were defined based on the knowledge and know-how of experienced design engineers. The final design of the suspension was installed in a prototype truck and evaluated. The performance of the truck satisfied all the objectives and the effectiveness of the set-based design approach was confirmed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ram Iyer, Jin Zhou, Li Lu, Jeffrey Webb, Qaiser Khan
Abstract A CAE simulation methodology was developed to predict the warpage and shape deviation from nominal in finished plastic sub-assemblies that are joined using Infra-Red (IR), hot-plate or vibration welding processes. An automotive glove box bin and door sub-assembly was used to develop the methodology. It was seen that part warpage from injection molding and welding causes warpage in final assembled product which results in gaps and the consequent loss in quality of appearance. The CAE simulation methodology included prediction of the part warpage with residual stress from the injection molding process, use the post-molded shape as an initial part condition for the welding process, and simulation of the welding process itself. The welding process simulation included fixturing of the parts in the welding process, localized heating in the case of an IR welding process, fusion of the parts at the weld locations and thermal creep resulting in long term stress and shape relaxation of the part.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mohammed K Billal, B V Moorthy, Dan Aquilina, Steven Schenten
Abstract A snap-fit is a form-fitting joint, which is used to assemble plastic parts together. Snap-fits are available in different forms like a projecting clip, thicker section or legs in one part, and it is assembled to another part through holes, undercuts or recesses. The main function of the snap-fit is to hold the mating components, and it should withstand the vibration and durability loads. Snap-fits are easy to assemble, and should not fail during the assembling process. Based on the design, these joints may be separable or non-separable. The non- separable joints will withstand the loads till failure, while separable joints will withstand only for the design load. The insertion and the retention force calculation for the snaps are very essential for snap-fit design. The finite element analysis plays a very important role in finding the insertion and the retention force values, and also to predict the failure of the snaps and the mating components during this process. The snap insertion and retention simulation is highly non-linear, due to the non-linear material behavior and contact between the mating components.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Egon Moos
Abstract In today's vehicles underbody parts are absolutely necessary to reach a certain performance level regarding fuel saving, corrosion protection, driving performance and exterior as well as interior noise. With the constant demand for additional parts, which means additional weight on the car, lightweight materials have come more and more into the focus of development work. LWRT (low weight reinforced thermoplastic) is the acronym for this material group. The ongoing success of such materials in underbody applications that compared to compact materials such as GMT (glass mat reinforced thermoplastic) is the weight saving of up to 50 %, or in other words, with LWRT you can cover twice as much surface then with GMT. The production process is compression molding, but with low pressure because LWRT-material needs only partial compact areas, most regions of these parts can have a density even below 0.5 g/cm3. Another advantage coming with the process is the possibility to use multi-cavity tools, so a high volume production becomes very economical.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Venkat Pisipati, Srikanth Krishnaraj, Edgar Quinto Campos
Abstract Motor vehicle safety standards are getting to be more demanding with time. For automotive interiors, instrument panel (IP) head impact protection is a key requirement of the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 201. To ensure compliance of this requirement, head impact tests are conducted at 12 and 15 mph for performance verification. Computer simulation has become more prevalent as the primary development tool due to the significant reduction in time and cost that it offers. LS-DYNA is one of the most commonly used non-linear solvers in the automotive industry, particularly for safety related simulations such as the head impact of automotive interiors. LS-DYNA offers a wide variety of material models, and material type 024 (MAT 024, piecewise linear plasticity) is one of the most popular ones [1]. Although it was initially developed for metals, it is commonly used for polymers as well. LS-DYNA also offers several other material models specifically developed to simulate polymers, such as material types 019, 089, 123, to name a few.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mohammed K Billal, Vinothkumar Subramani, Mohan Rao, Tim Potok
Abstract An automotive cockpit module is a complex assembly, which consists of components and sub-systems. The critical systems in the cockpit module are the instrument panel (IP), the floor console, and door trim assemblies, which consist of many plastic trims. Stiffness is one of the most important parameters for the plastic trims' design, and it should be optimum to meet all the three functional requirements of safety, vibration and durability. This paper presents how the CAE application and various other techniques are used efficiently to predict the stiffness, and the strength of automotive cockpit systems, which will reduce the product development cycle time and cost. The implicit solver is used for the most of the stiffness analysis, and the explicit techniques are used in highly non-linear situations. This paper also shows the correlations of the CAE results and the physical test results, which will give more confidence in product design and reduce the cost of prototype testing.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Arnon Poran, Moris Artoul, Moshe Sheintuch, Leonid Tartakovsky
This paper describes a model for the simulation of the joint operation of internal combustion engine (ICE) with methanol reformer when the ICE is fed by the methanol steam reforming (SRM) products and the energy of the exhaust gases is utilized to sustain endothermic SRM reactions. This approach enables ICE feeding by a gaseous fuel with very favorable properties, thus leading to increase in the overall energy efficiency of the vehicle and emissions reduction. Previous modeling attempts were focused either on the performance of ICE fueled with SRM products or on the reforming process simulation and reactor design. It is clear that the engine performance is affected by the composition of the reforming products and the reforming products are affected by the exhaust gas temperature, composition and flow rate. Due to the tight interrelations between the two main parts of the considered ICE-reformer system, it is desirable to create a single model that simulates joint operation of the ICE and the SRM reactor.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sebastian Salbrechter, Markus Krenn, Gerhard Pirker, Andreas Wimmer, Michael Nöst
Abstract Optimization of engine warm-up behavior has traditionally made use of experimental investigations. However, thermal engine models are a more cost-effective alternative and allow evaluation of the fuel saving potential of thermal management measures in different driving cycles. To simulate the thermal behavior of engines in general and engine warm-up in particular, knowledge of heat distribution throughout all engine components is essential. To this end, gas-side heat transfer inside the combustion chamber and in the exhaust port must be modeled as accurately as possible. Up to now, map-based models have been used to simulate heat transfer and fuel consumption; these two values are calculated as a function of engine speed and load. To extend the scope of these models, it is increasingly desirable to calculate gas-side heat transfer and fuel consumption as a function of engine operating parameters in order to evaluate different ECU databases. This paper describes the creation of a parameter-based heat transfer model using a statistical approach.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sergii Bogomolov, Vit Dolecek, Jan Macek, Antonin Mikulec, Oldrich Vitek
Abstract The mass and overall dimensions of massively downsized engines for very high bmep (up to 35 bar) cannot be estimated by scaling of designs already available. Simulation methods coupling different levels of method profoundness, as 1-D methods, e.g., GT Suite/GT Power with in-house codes for engine mechanical efficiency assessment and preliminary design of boosting devices (a virtual compressor and a turbine), were used together with optimization codes based on genetic algorithms. Simultaneously, the impact of optimum cycle on cranktrain components dimensions (especially cylinder bore spacing), mass and inertia force loads were estimated since the results were systematically stored and analyzed in Design Assistance System DASY, developed by the authors for purposes of early-stage conceptual design. General thermodynamic cycles were defined by limiting parameters (bmep, burning duration, engine speed and turbocharger efficiency only). The unprejudiced assessment was based on variability of any other engine design feature.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Changxin Wang, Deguang Fang, Fuxiang Guo
Abstract To find out the main excitation sources of a bus floor's vibration, modal analysis and spectral analysis were respectively performed in the paper. First we tested the vibration modal of the bus's floor under the full-load condition, and the first ten natural frequencies and vibration modes were obtained for the source identification of the bus floor's vibration. Second the vibration characteristic of the bus floor was measured in an on-road experiment. The acceleration sensors were arranged on the bus's floor and the possible excitation sources of the bus, which includes engine mounting system, driveline system, exhaust system, and wheels. Then the on-road experiment was carefully conducted on a highway under the four kinds of test condition: in-situ acceleration, uniform velocity (90km/h, 100km/h, 110km/h, 120km/h), uniform acceleration with top gear, and stall sliding condition with neutral gear. After that, by performing order tracking analysis and spectral analysis, the 1st order rotation frequency of the driveline and the 2nd order frequency of engine were identified to be the main cause of bus floor's vibration.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 7393