Criteria

Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 7621
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2888
Devadatta Mukutmoni, Tristan Donley, Jaehoon Han, Karthik Mahadevan Muthuraman, P. David Campbell, Tom Mertz
Design and evaluation of construction equipments and vehicles constitute a very important but expensive and time consuming part of the engineering process. This is especially so because of the large number of variants and the relatively small production volume of each variant leading to large costs of engineering and design of vehicles as a proportion of total sales. A simulation based methodology could potentially reduce the cost and time of the entire design process. In this study, we look into an alternative simulation based approach to the design process. However, given the enormity of the task, we limit the scope of this investigation to design evaluation and improvement for thermal considerations only. In particular, thermal evaluation of the electronic control units are looked into.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2792
Olof Erlandsson, Thomas Skare, Arnaud Contet
The automotive industry have become more and more interesting in recovering waste heat from internal combustion engines (ICE) , especially with future, tighter fuel and CO2 emission regulations in sight. Potential systems that recover waste heats have in all in common that they have lower efficiency than the ICE itself (otherwise the use of ICE would be questioned), hence the recovery system also need to expel a lot of waste heat to the surrounding. In this study we consider a simple automotive Rankine waste heat recovery system (WHRS) on a long-haulage truck that transform some of the ICE waste heat into useful energy but it still needs to return remaining heat to the surrounding, either through a direct condenser (CDS) or from an indirect CDS via a Low temperature radiator (LTR) to the surrounding, and this in the regular cooling module of the vehicle.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2838
Dharmar Ganesh, Riyaz Mohammed, Hareesh Krishnan, Radakrishnan Rambabu
In-vehicle displays such as an instrument cluster in a vehicle provide vital information to the user. The information in terms of displays and tell-tales needs to be perceived by the user with minimal glance during driving. Drivers must recognize the condition of the vehicle and the state of its surroundings through primarily visual means. Drivers then process this in the brain, draw on their memory to identify problem situations, decide on a plan of action and execute it in order to avoid an accident. There are visual hindrances seen in real world scenario such as obscuration, reflection and glare on the instrument cluster which prevents the vital information flow from vehicle to the driver. In order to ensure safety while driving, the instrument cluster or driver displays should be placed in an optimized location. This paper deals with how to achieve a visual hindrance free cluster position in a vehicle to protect the important information flow from the vehicle to the driver.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2873
Sumit Sharma, Sandeep Sharma, Sanjay Tiwari, Umashanker Gupta
Years ago the main purpose of heavy duty truck is to carrying the loads, in the current scenario cabin comfort and safety is also equally important. With the improved infrastructure quality the average speed of these types of vehicle has also been increased. With the higher average speed, the chances of getting crash have also been increased. In order to provide safety to the driver, all the safety parameters should be considered in advance at the time of design and development of cabin. Sufficient survival space must be present at the time of crash. In order to provide optimum ride comfort, fully suspended cab was designed. The main aim of this study is to develop detailed 3D finite element (FE) model of fully suspended heavy duty truck cabin with detailed suspensions system and simulate crash test scenario presented in regulation ECE-R29 using LS-Dyna explicit solver.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2869
Sumit Sharma, Sandeep Sharma, Umashanker Gupta, Ravi Joshi, Shailesh Pawar
Buses are one of the main and favorite sources of public transit in India. Thousands of people die or injure severely every year due to Bus accidents. Passenger injury in Bus accidents can be due to high stiff seat structures. Most of the occupants seated in the second row or further back were injured by hitting the seat back in the row in front of them. AIS023 (AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY STANDARDS) is one of the several mandatory standards from CMVR (CENTRAL MOTOR VEHICLES RULES) to ensure the safety during crash. As per AIS-023 passenger seat of bus should not cause injury because of high stiffness, on the other hand seat should also be able to carry the passenger force during accidents. With this mechanism AIS023 specifies minimum and maximum range deformations of seat back to minimize the passenger injury. This study includes the FE (Finite Element) analysis and design of Bus seat as per AIS023 test setup with LS-Dyna explicit tool.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2809
Sajit Pillai, Julian LoRusso, Matthew Van Benschoten
Cylinder deactivation was evaluated both analytically and experimentally on a diesel engine. This paper evaluates cylinder deactivation for potential benefits in fuel consumption and exhaust thermal management for improved after treatment system performance. An analytical study was conducted using GT-Power to evaluate potential benefits of deactivation. The model was validated at low-load, steady-state points by optimizing Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) and Variable Geometry Turbocharger (VGT) to maintain similar or acceptable emission levels between base and deactivated modes of operation. The results demonstrated significant improvements in Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC) for low and part load operating points along with higher exhaust gas temperatures. The analytical results offered enough potential benefit to warrant an experimental investigation. To validate the analytical results, an experimental evaluation was performed.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2415
Kyle Shimmin, Greg Russell, Robert A. Reuter, Steven Iden
A reduced order dynamic aircraft model has been created for the purpose of enabling constructive simulation studies involving integrated electrical power and thermal management subsystems using Multidisciplinary Design Optimization methods. Previous higher-order models that have been used for this purpose have the drawbacks of much higher development time, along with much higher execution times in the simulation studies. The new formulation allows for climbs, accelerations and turns without incurring computationally expensive stability considerations; a dynamic inversion control law provides tracking of user-specified mission data. To assess the trade-off of improved run-time performance against model capability, the reduced order formulation is compared to a traditional six degree-of-freedom model of the same air vehicle. Thrust command comparisons against the higher fidelity model are shown to be excellent.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2420
Henry A. Catherino
The heat generation rate of a lithium ion cell was estimated using a reversible heat generation rate equation. Because the equation is based on the energy conservation law, the influence of kinetically slow processes should be considered. In this analysis, the influence of kinetically slow processes is present but it is small within the domain of the test measurements. This approximation can be of significant usefulness for modeling the thermal response of single cells and multi-cell batteries.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2418
Ricardo Gandolfi, Luiz Ribeiro, Jorge Oliveira, Kleber Paiva, Marcia Mantelli
Due to the increasing power density of onboard electrical and electronic equipments and heat dissipation in civil and military aircraft, more efficient ways of transferring heat and new cooling techniques are a necessity. A passive heat transfer prototype was developed and experimentally evaluated in laboratory, at flight and ground tests in an Embraer ERJ-170 test aircraft. The passive heat transfer device consists of a loop-thermosyphon with two condensers and a common evaporator, using water as the heat transfer working fluid. An electrical resistance and a variable power source were used to dissipate heat inside the evaporator, simulating heat transfer from an onboard electronics bay. The fuselage/external air stream and the air flow inside an air conditioning system duct were used as heat sinks. Prior to flight tests, laboratory tests were conducted simulating ground and flight operations.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2419
Naoki Seki, Noriko Morioka, Hidefumi Saito, Hitoshi Oyori
This paper describes the concept of air/fuel integrated thermal management system, which employs VCS (Vapor Cycle System) for the refrigeration unit of ECS (Environment Control System) and exchange the heat between VCS refrigerant and the fuel into the engine, and present feasibility study to apply the concept to the future all electric aircraft system. The key component of the aircraft thermal management system is ECS. The heat generated in the aircraft is transferred to ECS heat exchanger by the recirculation of the cabin air and exhausted into the ram air. While some of the aircrafts employ the fluid heat transfer loop, the transferred heat is exhausted into the ram air as ever. The usage of ram air for the cooling will increase the ram drag and the fuel consumption, thus, less usage of ram air is preferable. Another source for heat exhaust is the fuel.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2582
Andre Silva, Nayeff Najjar, Shalabh Gupta, Paul D'Orlando, Rhonda Walthall
The main function of the Environmental Control System (ECS) is to deliver thermal control and cabin pressurization of the air for the comfort and safety of crew members and the passengers on-board. The Heat Exchanger of the ECS is the critical component that ensures healthy system operation and maintains this key function. The heat exchanger mainly exhibits the failure known as fouling, which is the accumulation of clogging due to contamination. For safe and efficient operation of the ECS under the complex environments of aerospace systems, it is necessary to develop the capability to diagnose degradation of system components in the early phase of fault evolution. Periodic maintenance of these components without knowledge of their remaining useful life estimates causes significant financial expenses for the airliners and unnecessary interruption of aircraft operation.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2416
Charles E. Oberly, Michelle Bash, Benjamin R. Razidlo, Travis E. Michalak, Fernando Rodriguez
Abstract An IPTMS hardware facility has been established in the laboratories of the Aerospace Systems Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright-Paterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). This hardware capability was established to analyze the transient behavior of a high power Electrical Power System (EPS) coupled virtually to a Thermal Management System (TMS) under fast dynamic loading conditions. The system incorporates the use of dynamic electrical load, engine emulation, energy storage, and emulated thermal loads operated to investigate dynamics under step load conditions. Hardware architecture and control options for the IPTMS are discussed. This paper summarizes the IPTMS laboratory demonstration system, its capabilities, and preliminary test results.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2545
Reza Ahmadi, Oliver Marquardt, Marc Riedlinger, Reinhard Reichel
Abstract Aircraft cabin systems, especially cabin management systems (CMS) have to cope with frequent cabin changes during their lifecycle. This includes not only layout rearrangements and technological upgrades during the service, but also extensive CMS customizations and product variations before aircraft delivery. Therefore it is inevitable for the CMS to be highly changeable and offer an easy and agile change process. Today's CMS solutions face this challenge with configurable system architectures. Although such architectures offer a vast change domain, they usually come with time consuming and error prone change processes. This paper introduces an adaptive avionics software architecture that enables the CMS to cope with cabin changes highly automatically and with minimal human interactions. The adaptation is performed during an on ground organization phase, in which system changes are detected and evaluated by the CMS itself.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2561
Fernando Stancato, Sandro Conceicao, Ramon Papa, Luis Santos
Abstract Nowadays CFD analysis including virtual manikins is vastly applied to evaluate thermal comfort inside different working environments, such as buildings cars and aircrafts. Inside aircraft cabins, added to the numerical challenges due to geometrical complexity, the available subjective responses used to judge occupant local thermal comfort are usually based on buildings and cars experiments [1]. In the present paper however, it is applied an aircraft based subjective responses to evaluate thermal comfort which was specifically developed using regional jet mock-up experiments. The evaluation for the two approaches will be compared providing insight of the main differences.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2533
Mirko Bovo, Joop Somhorst
The focus on engine thermal management is rapidly increasing due to the significant effect of heat losses on fuel consumption, engine performance and emissions. This work presents a time resolved, high resolution 3D engine heat balance model, including all relevant components. Notably, the model calculates the conjugated heat transfer between the solid engine components, the coolant and the oil. Both coolant and oil circuits are simultaneously resolved with a CFD solver in the same finite volume model as the entire engine solid parts. The model includes external convection and radiation. The necessary boundary conditions of the thermodynamic cycle (gas side) are mapped from a calibrated 1D gas exchange model of the same engine. The boundary conditions for the coolant and at the oil circuits are estimated with 1D models of the systems. The model is calibrated and verified with measurement data from the same engine as modeled.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2443
Jesus Benajes, Jaime Martin, Antonio Garcia, David Villalta, Alok Warey, Vicent Domenech, Alberto Vassallo
In the last two decades engine research has been mainly focused on reducing pollutant emissions. This fact together with growing awareness about the impacts of climate change are leading to an increase in the importance of thermal efficiency over other criteria in the design of internal combustion engines (ICE). In this framework, the heat transfer to the combustion chamber walls can be considered as one of the main sources of indicated efficiency diminution. In particular, in modern direct-injection diesel engines, the radiation emission from soot particles can constitute a significant component of the efficiency losses. Thus, the main of objective of the current research was to evaluate the amount of energy lost to soot radiation relative to the input fuel chemical energy during the combustion event under several representative engine loads and speeds. Moreover, the current research characterized the impact of different engine operating conditions on radiation heat transfer.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2536
Julien Bouilly, Francois Lafossas, Ali Mohammadi, Roger Van Wissen
Abstract In the automotive field, reducing harmful pollutant, CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of vehicles while increasing customer comfort is a continuous challenge that requires more and more sophisticated technology implementations. However, it is often difficult to anticipate the advantages and drawbacks of a technology without having its prototype parts and/or knowing the optimal control strategy. In order to meet these challenges, the authors have developed a vehicle thermal model in AMESim platform to evaluate the benefits of an Active Grille Shutter (AGS) on fuel economy when applied. The vehicle model was based on a C-Segment vehicle powered by a 1.4L Diesel engine. The complete oil and coolant circuits were modeled as well as a friction model based on engine coolant and oil temperature.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2303
Katherine Tao, Alan Parrett, David Nielubowicz
Abstract The headliner system in a vehicle is an important element in vehicle noise control. In order to predict the performance of the headliner, it is necessary to develop an understanding of the substrate performance, the effect of air gaps, and the contribution from any acoustic pads in the system. Current Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) models for predicting absorption performance of acoustic absorbers are based on material Biot properties. However, the resources for material Biot property testing are limited and cost is high. In this paper, modeling parameters for the headliner substrate are identified from a set of standard absorption measurements on substrates, using curve fitting and optimization techniques. The parameters are then used together with thickness/design information in a SEA model to predict the vehicle headliner system absorption performance.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2339
Márcio Calçada, Alan Parrett
Abstract Sound absorption materials can be key elements for mass-efficient vehicle noise control. They are utilized at multiple locations in the interior and one of the most important areas is the roof. At this location, the acoustic treatment typically comprises a headliner and an air gap up to the body sheet metal. The acoustic performance requirement for such a vehicle subsystem is normally a sound absorption curve. Based on headliner geometry and construction, the sound absorption curve shape can be adjusted to increase absorption in certain frequency ranges. In this paper an overall acoustic metric is developed to relate design parameters to an absorption curve shape which results in improved in-vehicle performance. This metric is based on sound absorption coefficient and articulation index. Johnson-Champoux-Allard equivalent fluid model and diffuse field equations are used. The results are validated using impedance tube measurements.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2210
Quan Wan
Abstract Five parameters are often used in acoustic modeling of porous absorption material, which are air flow resistivity σ, porosity φ, tortuosity α∞, viscous and thermal characteristic lengths Λ and Λ′. These parameters are not easy to be directly tested, especially the latter three parameters. One software capable of identifying inversely these parameters from impedance tube test results becomes increasingly popular. However, its detail stability analysis is rarely reported till now. This paper studies its stability on those porous fiber materials generally applied in vehicle interior trim, such as PET fiber, shoddy, PP/PET mixed fiber. Some conclusions are obtained. (1) The identification of α∞, Λ and Λ′ is always stable when σ and φ are assumed in advance.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2249
Saad Bennouna, Said Naji, Olivier Cheriaux, Solene Moreau, Boureima Ouedraogo, Jean Michel Ville
Abstract Passengers' thermal comfort inside a car cabin is mainly provided by the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) module. Air provided by HVAC is blown via a blower, passing through different components: flaps, thermal exchangers, ducts… and then distributed to car cabin areas. Interaction between airflow and HVAC components generates noises that emerge in car cabin. Due to this fact, noise is naturally created and its level is linked to flow rate. Valeo is aiming, though CEVAS project, to develop a prediction tool which will provide HVAC spectrum and sound quality data. This tool will be based, in particular, on aeroacoustic measurements using 2N-ports model and Particle Image Velocimetry methods to provide characteristics of HVAC components.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2235
Arnaud Caillet, Denis Blanchet
Abstract The need in the automotive industry to understand the physical behavior of trims used in a vehicle is high. The PEM (poro-elastic method) was developed to permit an explicit representation of the trims in the FEM full vehicle models and to give tools to diagnose the effect of the trims and test design changes (porous material property, geometry, etc.,). During the last decade, the evolution of software and hardware has allowed the creation of models with highly detailed trim description (porous material using Biot parameters, plastic trims, etc.,). These models can provide good correlation up to 400Hz compared to measurements in contrast to classical NSM (Non Structural Mass) methodology which shows limitations.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2266
Andrzej Pietrzyk
Abstract Several of the exterior noise sources existing around a vehicle can cause airborne noise issues at relatively low frequencies. SEA, traditionally used for airborne sound issues is not suitable for the frequency range of interest. Finite Element analysis has been used. Handling of the non-reflecting condition on the outer boundary of the exterior cavity is an issue. Recently, advances have been made in several commercially available codes, which made the analysis practical. Including the poro-elastic material model for foam-based carpets is also becoming practically possible. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the practical applications of those new developments against test data, and to estimate the feasibility of using these procedures in the vehicle development projects. Measurements were carried out in a new semi-anechoic chamber at Volvo Cars.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2271
Yong Du Jun, Bong Hyun Park, Kang Seok Seo, Tae Hyun Kim, Myoung Jae Chae
Abstract Modern automotive seats require improvements in their design, safety, comfort including sitting and riding comfort. Among those, seat comfort is known to be difficult to evaluate because the comfort is a human feeling. As an approach to evaluate the human comfort in an objective manner, an objective measure is proposed for seat riding comfort evaluation under low frequency vibratory conditions which represents typical roll and pitch motions of driving motor vehicles. The related feeling due to this low frequency vehicle motion is termed ‘hold feeling’ because the seated body may tend to deviate from the defined seating position under such vehicle motion input. Dynamic pressure measurements have been conducted in the frequency range up to 1.0 Hz to monitor the interface pressure change behavior of the seat-subject body.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2273
Curtis Jones, Zhengyu Liu, Suhas Venkatappa, James Hurd
Abstract This paper presents the methodology of predicting vehicle level automotive air-handling system air-rush noise sound quality (SQ) using the sub-system level measurement. Measurement setup in both vehicle level and sub-system levels are described. To assess the air-rush noise SQ, both 1/3 octave band sound pressure level (SPL) and overall Zwicker's loudness are used. The “Sound Quality Correlation Functions (SQCF)” between sub-system level and vehicle level are developed for the specified climate control modes and vehicle segment defined by J.D. Power & Associates, while the Zwicker's loudness is calculated using the un-weighted predicted 1/3 octave band SPL. The predicting models are demonstrated in very good agreement with the measured data. The methodology is applied to the development of sub-system SQ requirement for upfront delivery of the optimum design to meet global customer satisfaction
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2275
Manfred Koberstein, Zhengyu Liu, Curtis Jones, Suhas Venkatappa
Abstract In the thermal expansion valve (TXV) refrigerant system, transient high-pitched whistle around 6.18 kHz is often perceived following air-conditioning (A/C) compressor engagements when driving at higher vehicle speed or during vehicle acceleration, especially when system equipped with the high-efficiency compressor or variable displacement compressor. The objectives of this paper are to conduct the noise source identification, investigate the key factors affecting the whistle excitation, and understand the mechanism of the whistle generation. The mechanism is hypothesized that the whistle is generated from the flow/acoustic excitation of the turbulent flow past the shallow cavity, reinforced by the acoustic/structural coupling between the tube structural and the transverse acoustic modes, and then transmitted to evaporator. To verify the mechanism, the transverse acoustic mode frequency is calculated and it is coincided to the one from measurement.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2276
Zhengyu Liu, Donald Wozniak, Manfred Koberstein, Curtis Jones, Jan Xu, Suhas Venkatappa
Abstract Refrigerant flow-induced gurgling noise is perceived in automotive refrigerant systems. In this study, the condition of the gurgling generation is investigated at the vehicle level and the fundamental root cause is identified as the two-phase refrigerant flow entering the TXV for system equipped with variable displacement compressors. By conducting literature reviews, the acoustic characteristics of the flow patterns and the parameters affecting the flow regimes in horizontal and vertical tubes are summarized. Then the gurgling mechanism is explained as the intermittent flow is developed at the evaporator inlet. In the end, the improved and feasible design for avoiding the intermittent flow (slug, plug or churn flow) or minimizing its formation is proposed and verified in refrigerant subsystem (RSS) level. Finally, the guidelines for the attenuation and suppression of the gurgle are provided.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2323
Abdelhakim Aissaoui, Ravindra S Tupake, Vilas Bijwe, Mohammed Meskine, Franck Perot, Alain Belanger, Rohit J Vaidya
For the automotive industry, acoustic comfort is of increasing importance. The market and customer expectation make the HVAC system noise quality a question to be addressed as early as possible in the vehicle development process. On one hand, the so-called traditional sources of annoyance such as engine, road-tires contact, exhaust systems and wind-noise have been significantly reduced for most traditional combustion engine vehicles. On the other hand, considered in the past as secondary noise sources, HVAC systems become the main sources for hybrid and electric and Stop-start vehicles. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of a CFD/CAA approach based on the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) to predict HVAC system noise including real and complex ducts, registers, mixing unit and blower geometries.
2015-05-01
Journal Article
2015-01-9017
Johannes Wurm, Matthias Fitl, Michael Gumpesberger, Esa Väisänen, Christoph Hochenauer
Abstract Nowadays, investigating underhood airflow by using numerical simulation is a standard task in the development process of passenger cars and commercial vehicles. Numerous publications exist which deal with simulating the airflow through the engine compartment of road vehicles. However, hardly anything can be found which deals with off-road vehicles and nothing exists which focuses on snowmobiles. In the presented paper the airflow and the thermal conditions inside the engine compartment of a snowmobile are investigated by the usage of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as well as experimental methods. Field tests at arctic conditions have been conducted on a serial snowmobile to measure temperatures inside the compartment and to gain realistic boundary conditions for the numerical simulation. Thermocouples (type K) were attached under the hood to measure exhaust, air, coolant and surface temperatures of several components at previously defined load cases.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1710
Xinran Tao, Kan Zhou, Andrej Ivanco, John R. Wagner, Heath Hofmann, Zoran Filipi
Abstract The components in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) powertrain include the battery pack, an internal combustion engine, and the electric machines such as motors and possibly a generator. These components generate a considerable amount of heat during driving cycles. A robust thermal management system with advanced controller, designed for temperature tracking, is required for vehicle safety and energy efficiency. In this study, a hybridized mid-size truck for military application is investigated. The paper examines the integration of advanced control algorithms to the cooling system featuring an electric-mechanical compressor, coolant pump and radiator fans. Mathematical models are developed to numerically describe the thermal behavior of these powertrain elements. A series of controllers are designed to effectively manage the battery pack, electric motors, and the internal combustion engine temperatures.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 7621