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2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2408
Lei Zhou, Hongxing Zhang, Zhenfeng Zhao, Fujun Zhang
The Opposed Piston Two-Stroke (OPTS) engine has several advantages for power density, fuel tolerance, fuel efficiency and package space. A new type of balanced opposed-piston folded-crank train two-stroke engine for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) was studied in this paper. The effects of high altitude environment on engine performance and emissions are investigated by thermodynamic simulation. Moreover, the matching between the engine and turbocharger was designed and optimized for different altitude levels. The results indicate that a suitable turbocharger for OPTS engine can achieve the purpose of improving the quality of scavenging, lowering the fuel consumption and recovering power at high altitude environment. Finally, an optimized OPTS engine model especially for UAV is proposed in this research.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2160
Ferdinand Spek, Maarten Weehuizen, Ilja Achterberg
In new aircraft programs, systems’ functionality is increasingly becoming integrated into modular avionics. Controllers may not be delivered by the systems supplier so this trend creates a new interface between systems and controllers. A functional software specification is therefore needed to facilitate the building of the software by the controller supplier. In the case of an ECS system controller, the hardware was obtained from different suppliers and a software functional specification was needed for the controller supplier. To be able to design and verify the system functionality, an integrated ECS simulation model was created which coupled the thermodynamics of the aircraft and ECS system to the controller actions. The model also included functionality to simulate sensor noise and component failures. The thermodynamic model was created in Matlab/Simulink and consisted of a combination of direct programming as well as data on a Flowmaster model for the bleed system.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2161
Alexander J. Pollok
For thermal cabin control of commercial aircraft, the cabin is usually divided into a small number of temperature zones. Each zone features its own air supply pipe. The necessary installation space for ducting increases significantly with the number of zones. This requires the number of temperature zones to be low. Factors such as seating layout, galley placement and passenger density result in deviations in heat flux throughout the cabin. These deviations cannot be compensated by the control system, if they occur within the same temperature zone. This work presents a novel temperature regulation concept based on local mixing. In this concept, two main ducts span the complete cabin length, and provide moderately warm and cold air. At each temperature zone, cabin supply air is locally mixed using butterfly valves. In this way, the number of temperature zones can be individually scaled up without any additional ducting, only requiring additional valves for each temperature zone.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2037
Daniel Schlabe, Dirk Zimmer, Alexander Pollok
The thermal inertia of aircraft cabins and galleys is significant for commercial aircraft. The aircraft cabin is controlled by the Environment Control System (ECS) to reach, among other targets, a prescribed temperature. Allowing a temperature band of e.g. 2 K around the prescribed temperature, it is possible to use the cabin dynamics as an energy storage. This storage can then be used to reduce electrical peak power, increase efficiency of ECS, reduce thermal cooling peak power, or reduce engine offtake if it is costly or not sufficiently available. In the same way, also the aircraft galleys can be exploited. Since ECS and galleys are among the largest consumers of electrical power or bleed air, there is a large potential on improving energy efficiency or reducing system mass to reduce fuel consumption of aircraft. This paper investigates different exploitation strategies of cabin and galley dynamics using modelling and simulation.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2038
Russell H. Strehlow
Abstract A Vapor Envelope is an ultra-thin-walled vapor chamber that enables a unique combination of lighter weight, lower profile, and lower cost for heat spreading or heat removal applications. It evolved from work done as part of a DARPA program on Thermal Ground Planes. This paper examines a published testing protocol for the measurement of the thermal resistance of thin flexible thermal ground planes. It then applies an adapted version of the published technique to measure the thermal resistance of a vapor envelope and a dimensionally equivalent solid copper heat spreader. Finally, it looks at the implications of a significantly lower thermal resistance for a specific configuration. The analysis of whether this adapted technique would provide a sufficient metric for industrial application identified the control and understanding of the thermal interface materials as a key determinate.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2044
Mithilesh Kumar Sahu, Tushar Choudhary, Sanjay Y
Aircraft engines powering propulsion of the aircraft is the key component of the system. In aircraft industry it is desirable that an aircraft engines should supply high speeds (for military fighters) with low maintenance (for civil airplanes). In this regard an integration of gas turbine engines with traditional propeller has been introduced and termed as turboprop engine. In present work, a gas turbine with cooled blading has been proposed to be the turboprop engine which has been exergoeconomically analysed to assess the performance and economics related to the proposed turboprop engine. Exergoeconomic analysis is a tool which combines thermodynamic analysis and economic principles to provide information that is helpful to predict thermodynamic performance and total cost of the engine (thermal system). The methodology includes energy, exergy and cost balance equations for component-wise modelling of whole system.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2045
Shivam Mishra, Sanjay Y
Gas turbine air-film blade cooling is widely used aero-derivative gas turbine blade cooling technique. The present paper reviews previously developed air-film blade cooling models. The article further proposes a new blade cooling model for estimating blade coolant mass fraction which takes into account the effect of radiative heat transfer from hot flue gases to aero-derivative gas turbine blade surface. Various possibilities to achieve enhanced performance from aero-derivative gas turbine have been enumerated namely effect of advanced design philosophies, thermal barrier coatings, advancement in blade material. Also adoption of advanced design philosophies such as 3-D CFD would lead to improved component design. Further use of advanced blade material specifically for gas turbine blade application including single-crystal blade, directionally solidified blade material being nickel-chrome-molybdenum alloys may be explored.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2046
Pejman Akbari, Ian Agoos
The Wave Disk Engine (WDE) is a novel engine that has the potential for higher efficiency and power density of power-generation systems. A recent version of wave disk engine architecture known as the two-stage WDE has been studied to address existing challenges of an existing WDE. After describing the engine operation, a cold air-standard thermodynamic model supporting the physical phenomena occurring inside the device is introduced to evaluate performance of the engine. The developed model is general and does not depend on the shape of the wave rotor, it can be applied to radial and axial combustion wave rotors integrated with turbomachinery devices. The analysis starts with predicting internal waves propagating inside the channels of the engine and linking various flow states to each other using thermodynamics relationships. The goal is to find analytical expressions of work output and efficiency in terms of known pressure and temperature ratios.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2039
Michael Sielemann, Changsoo Lee, Victor-Marie LeBrun, Chiwoo Ahn, Arnaud Colleoni, Dongkyu Lee, JeongSeok Lee, Anh Nguyen, Katrin Proelss, Hyon Min Yoon
Abstract Thermal management on aircraft has been an important discipline for several decades. However, with the recent generations of high performance aircraft, thermal management has evolved more and more into a critical performance and capability constraint on the whole aircraft level. Fuel continues to be the most important heat sink on high performance aircraft, and consequently the requirements on thermal models of fuel systems are expanding. As the scope of modeling and simulation is widened in general, it is not meaningful to introduce a new isolated modeling and simulation capability. Instead, thermal models must be derived from existing model assets and eventually enable integration across several physical domains. This paper describes such an integrated approach based on the Modelica Fuel System Library and the 3DExperience Platform.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2158
Fernando Stancato, Luis Carlos dos Santos, Marcelo Pustelnik
Abstract A problem of interest of the aeronautical industry is the positioning of electronic equipment in racks and the associated ventilation system project to guarantee the equipment operational conditions. The relevance of the proper operation of electronic equipment increases considerably when high economical costs, performance reduction and safety are involved. The appropriate operational conditions of the electronic components happen when the working temperature of the equipment installed in the rack is inside a safety project temperature margin. Therefore, the analysis and modelling of heat transfer processes for aircraft rack design becomes mandatory. This paper presents a parametric study considering volumetric and superficial heat generation in electronic equipment within racks in an aircraft. Simulations were performed using the commercial CFD Fluent code and results were compared to experimental data.
2017-09-19
Journal Article
2017-01-2156
Philippe Coni, Jean Luc BARDON, Xavier servantie
A new concept of Head Up Display is presented, using the windshield as a transparent screen. This breakthrough technology does not need the use of complex combiner, bulky optics and overhead projection unit. The novel system use several holographic optical elements to perform a 3D stereoscopic display, with the ability to present floating graphical object in a large field of view. Augmented Reality display will be possible, increasing considerably the User Experience and situational awareness, without the need of wearing a bulky and complex Head Mounted Display.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2052
K Friedman, G Mattos, K Bui, J Hutchinson, A Jafri, J Paver PhD
Aircraft seating systems are evaluated utilizing a variety of impact conditions and selected injury measures. Injury measures like the Head Injury Criterion (HIC) are evaluated under standardized conditions using anthropometric dummies such as those outlined in 14 CFR part 25. An example would be a dummy seated in an upright position held with a two point belt decelerated from an impact speed and allowed to engage components that are in front of the dummy. Examples of head contact surfaces would include video monitors, a wide range of seat back materials, and airbags from which the HIC and other injury measures can be calculated. Other injury measures, such as Nij, are also of interest and can be measured with the Hybrid III dummy as well. A minimum deceleration pulse is defined as part of the regulations for a frontal impact. In this study the effect of variations in decelerations that meet the requirements is considered.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2054
K Friedman, G Mattos, K Bui, J Hutchinson, A Jafri, J Paver
Aircraft seating systems are evaluated utilizing a variety of impact conditions and selected injury measures. Injury measures like the Head Injury Criterion (HIC) are evaluated under standardized conditions using anthropometric dummies such as those outlined in 14 CFR part 25. An example would be a dummy seated in an upright position held with a two point belt decelerated from an impact speed and allowed to engage components that are in front of the dummy. Examples of head contact surfaces would include video monitors, a wide range of seat back materials, and airbags from which the HIC and other injury measures can be calculated. Other injury measures, such as Nij, are also of interest and can be measured with the Hybrid III dummy as well. It has been shown that the friction between the head form and contact surfaces can affect the test results obtained in other safety applications.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2062
Tushar Choudhary, Mithilesh Sahu, Shreya KRISHNA
Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is the most promising candidate for utilization of waste generated from the GT based power system. By coupling SOFC with gas turbine (GT) based power system, a hybrid SOFC–GT power system has been developed and the thermal efficiency of the system can be enhanced upto 70-85%. This paper focuses of thermodynamic analysis of an internal reformed solid oxide fuel cell which is integrated with the gas turbine cycle to form a hybrid power generation system for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a long range. Thermodynamic 1st and 2nd law, parametric analysis has been carried out and the effect of various parameters such as compressor pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature, air flow rate has been examined. In order to validate the results, present work has been compared with the available literature and it shows good agreement.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1766
Dirk von Werne, Stefano Orlando, Anneleen Van Gils, Thierry Olbrechts, Ivan Bosmans
Abstract A methodology to secure cabin noise and vibration targets is presented. Early in the design process, typically in the Joint Definition Phase, Targets are cascaded from system to component level to comply with the overall cabin noise target in various load cases. During the Detailed Design Phase, 3D simulation models are build up to further secure and refine the vibro-acoustic performance of the cabin noise related subsystems. Noise sources are estimated for the target setting based on layer analytical and empirical expressions from literature. This includes various types of engine noise - fan, jet, and propeller noise - as well as turbulent boundary layer noise. For other noise sources, ECS and various auxiliaries, targets are set such as to ensure the overall cabin noise level. To synthesize the cabin noise, these noise sources are combined with estimates of the noise transfer through panels and the cavity effect of the cabin.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1304
Alejandro Rosas Vazquez, Fernando Paisano, Diego Santillan Gutierrez
Abstract For many years, the use of in-mold fasteners has been avoided for various reasons including: not fully understanding the load cases in the part, the fear of quality issues occurring, the need for servicing, or the lack of understanding the complexity of all failure modes. The most common solution has been the use of secondary operations to provide attachments, such as, screws, metal clips, heat staking, sonic welding or other methods which are ultimately a waste in the process and an increase in manufacturing costs. The purpose of this paper is to take the reader through the design process followed to design an in-molded attachment clip on plastic parts. The paper explores the design process for in-molded attachment clips beginning with a design concept idea, followed by basic concept testing using a desktop 3D printer, optimizing the design with physical tests and CAE analysis, and finally producing high resolution 3D prototypes for validation and tuning.
2017-03-14
Journal Article
2017-01-9276
Joseph K. Ausserer, Marc D. Polanka, Jacob A. Baranski, Keith D. Grinstead, Paul J. Litke
Abstract The rapid expansion of the market for remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) includes a particular interest in 10-25 kg vehicles for monitoring, surveillance, and reconnaissance. Power-plant options for these aircraft are often 10-100 cm3 internal combustion engines. Both power and fuel conversion efficiency decrease with increasing rapidity in the aforementioned size range. Fuel conversion efficiency decreases from ∼30% for conventional-scale engines (>100 cm3 displacement) to <5% for micro glow-fuel engines (<10 cm3 displacement), while brake mean effective pressure decreases from >10 bar (>100 cm3) to <4 bar (<10 cm3). Based on research documented in the literature, the losses responsible for the increase in the rate of decreasing performance cannot be clearly defined.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0006
John R. Humm, Narayan Yoganandan, Frank A. Pintar, Richard L. DeWeese, David M. Moorcroft, Amanda M. Taylor, Brian Peterson
The objective of the present exploratory study is to understand occupant responses in oblique and side-facing seats in the aviation environment, which are increasingly installed in modern aircrafts. Sled tests were conducted using intact Post Mortem Human Surrogates (PMHS) seated in custom seats approximating standard aircraft geometry. End conditions were selected to represent candidate aviation seat and restraint configurations. Three-dimensional head center-of-gravity linear accelerations, head angular velocities, and linear accelerations of the T1, T6, and T12 spinous processes, and sacrum were obtained. Three-dimensional kinematics relative to the seat were obtained from retroreflective targets attached to the head, T1, T6, T12, and sacrum. All specimens sustained spinal injuries, although variations existed by vertebral level.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1978
Philippe Coni, Sylvain Hourlier, Xavier Servantie, Laurent Laluque, Aude Gueguen
Abstract A 3D Stereoscopic Head-Up Display (HUD) using direct projection on a transparent screen is presented. Symbol incrustation in conformity with the landscape is performed through the use of simulated collimation offering a large eye-box, in excess of conventional HUD. The use of spectral glasses for our transparent screen was decided as most commonly used polarizing or active glasses were not adapted. Furthermore it gave ususeful green laser attack protection.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1994
Wei Wu, Yeong-Ren Lin, Louis Chow, Edmund Gyasi, John P. Kizito, Quinn Leland
Abstract For aircraft electromechanical actuator (EMA) cooling applications using forced air produced by axial fans, the main objective in fan design is to generate high static pressure head, high volumetric flow rate, and high efficiency over a wide operating range of rotational speed (1x∼3x) and ambient pressure (0.2∼1 atm). In this paper, a fan design based on a fan diameter of 86 mm, fan depth (thickness) of 25.4 mm, and hub diameter of 48 mm is presented. The blade setting angle and the chord lengths at the leading and trailing edges are varied in their suitable ranges to determine the optimal blade profiles. The fan static pressure head, volumetric flow rate, and flow velocity are calculated at various ambient pressures and rotational speeds. The optimal blade design in terms of maximum total-to-total pressure ratio and efficiency at the design point is obtained via CFD simulation.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1997
Wei Wu, Yeong-Ren Lin, Louis Chow, Edmund Gyasi, John P. Kizito, Quinn Leland
Abstract The aircraft electromechanical actuator (EMA) cooling fan is a critical component because an EMA failure caused by overheating could lead to a catastrophic failure in aircraft. Fault tree analysis (FTA) is used to access the failure probability of EMA fans with the goal of improving their mean time to failure (MTTF) from ∼O(5×104) to ∼ O(2.5×109) hours without incurring heavy weight penalty and high cost. The dual-winding and dual-bearing approaches are analyzed and a contra rotating dual-fan design is proposed. Fan motors are assumed to be brushless direct current (BLDC) motors. To have a full understanding of fan reliability, all possible failure mechanisms and failure modes are taken into account.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1999
Debabrata Pal, Frank Feng
Abstract In 3-phase AC application, there is additional heat dissipation due to skin effects and proximity effects in bus bars. In addition, when the 3- phase AC is used to drive a motor at high fundamental frequency, for example between 666 Hz and 1450 Hz, there are higher bus bar losses due to presence of higher frequency harmonic content. High frequency current carrying bus bars in aircraft power panels are typically cooled by natural convection and radiation. In this paper a thermal and electrical finite element analysis (FEA) is done for a bus bar system. For electrical loss modeling, 3D electromagnetic FEA is used to characterize losses in three parallel bus bars carrying AC at various frequencies. This loss analysis provides correlation of heat loss as function of frequency. A method is presented where this AC loss is incorporated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based thermal model.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1998
Michele Trancossi, Jose Pascoa, Carlos Xisto
Abstract Environmental and economic issues related to the aeronautic transport, with particular reference to the high-speed one are opening new perspectives to pulsejets and derived pulse detonation engines. Their importance relates to high thrust to weight ratio and low cost of manufacturing with very low energy efficiency. This papers presents a preliminary evaluation in the direction of a new family of pulsejets which can be coupled with both an air compression system which is currently in pre-patenting study and a more efficient and enduring valve systems with respect to today ones. This new pulsejet has bee specifically studied to reach three objectives: a better thermodynamic efficiency, a substantial reduction of vibrations by a multi-chamber cooled architecture, a much longer operative life by more affordable valves. Another objective of this research connects directly to the possibility of feeding the pulsejet with hydrogen.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2000
Mark Bodie, Thierry Pamphile, Jon Zumberge, Thomas Baudendistel, Michael Boyd
Abstract As technology for both military and civilian aviation systems mature into a new era, techniques to test and evaluate these systems have become of great interest. To achieve a general understanding as well as save time and cost, the use of computer modeling and simulation for component, subsystem or integrated system testing has become a central part of technology development programs. However, the evolving complexity of the systems being modeled leads to a tremendous increase in the complexity of the developed models. To gain confidence in these models there is a need to evaluate the risk in using those models for decision making. Statistical model validation techniques are used to assess the risk of using a given model in decision making exercises. In this paper, we formulate a transient model validation challenge problem for an air cycle machine (ACM) and present a hardware test bench used to generate experimental data relevant to the model.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-2023
Timothy Deppen, Brian Raczkowski, Marco Amrhein, Jason Wells, Eric Walters, Mark Bodie, Soumya Patnaik
Abstract Future aircraft systems are projected to have order of magnitude greater power and thermal demands, along with tighter constraints on the performance of the power and thermal management subsystems. This trend has led to the need for a fully integrated design process where power and thermal systems, and their interactions, are considered simultaneously. To support this new design paradigm, a general framework for codifying and checking specifications and requirements is presented. This framework is domain independent and can be used to translate requirement language into a structured definition that can be quickly queried and applied to simulation and measurement data. It is constructed by generalizing a previously developed power quality analysis framework. The application of this framework is demonstrated through the translation of thermal specifications for airborne electrical equipment, into the SPecification And Requirement Evaluation (SPARE) Tool.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-1995
Patrick McCarthy, Nicholas Niedbalski, Kevin McCarthy, Eric Walters, Joshua Cory, Soumya Patnaik
Abstract As the cost and complexity of modern aircraft systems increases, emphasis has been placed on model-based design as a means for reducing development cost and optimizing performance. To facilitate this, an appropriate modeling environment is required that allows developers to rapidly explore a wider design space than can cost effectively be considered through hardware construction and testing. This wide design space can then yield solutions that are far more energy efficient than previous generation designs. In addition, non-intuitive cross-coupled subsystem behavior can also be explored to ensure integrated system stability prior to hardware fabrication and testing. In recent years, optimization of control strategies between coupled subsystems has necessitated the understanding of the integrated system dynamics.
2016-09-20
Journal Article
2016-01-2054
Deniz Unlu, Federico Cappuzzo, Olivier Broca, Pierpaolo Borrelli
Abstract This paper presents the activities foreseen on the Leonardo Aircraft Division EIS (Entry In Service) 2020 derivative aircraft performed in the frame of the FP7 European research project TOICA (Thermal Overall Integrated Concept of Aircraft). On board air systems for conventional aircraft are fed by the bleed off-take which penalizes the amount of power available to the turbine of jet or turboprop engines. In order to minimize such operating penalties and optimize the energy efficiency of the overall aircraft, it is of major interest to support trade-offs at aircraft level including aircraft systems as early as possible in the development cycle. The study presents the Virtual Integrated Aircraft methodology and associated simulation activities relying on the system simulation platform LMS Imagine.Lab. This methodology is also relying on concept of flexible model and pyramid of models developed in the context of TOICA.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0212
Paras Kaushal, Satishchandra C. Wani
Abstract TeamIndus is the only Indian participant in the Google Lunar X Prize (GLXP). GLXP, also referred to as Moon 2.0, is an inducement prize space competition organized by the X Prize Foundation, and sponsored by Google. The mission objective is to soft land a rover on moon, travel 500 meters and transmit HD videos and images to Earth. Team Indus’s strategy is to design and realize a lunar lander that will deliver a rover on to the surface of the moon which will accomplish GLXP mission objectives. The mission configuration comprises of four phases- Earth orbits, moon orbits, descent and surface operations. The lander during its interplanetary journey from earth to moon is exposed to different thermal loads viz. solar load, earth IR and albedo, moon IR and albedo, cold space at 4K and eclipse periods. The lander is also exposed to high temperatures of thruster nozzle during orbital transfer maneuvers.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2420
Henry A. Catherino
Abstract The heat generation rate of a lithium ion cell was estimated using a reversible heat generation rate equation. Because the equation is based on the energy conservation law, the influence of kinetically slow processes should be considered. In this analysis, the influence of kinetically slow processes is present but it is small within the domain of the test measurements. This approximation can be of significant usefulness for modeling the thermal response of single cells and multi-cell batteries.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2419
Naoki Seki, Noriko Morioka, Hidefumi Saito, Hitoshi Oyori
Abstract This paper describes the concept of an air/fuel integrated thermal management system, which employs the VCS (Vapor Cycle System) for the refrigeration unit of the ECS (Environment Control System), while exchanging the heat between the VCS refrigerant and the fuel into the engine, and presents a feasibility study to apply the concept to the future all electric aircraft systems. The heat generated in an aircraft is transferred to the ECS heat exchanger by the recirculation of air and exhausted into the ram air. While some aircraft employ the fluid heat transfer loop, the transferred heat is exhausted into the ram air. The usage of ram air for the cooling will increase the ram drag and the fuel consumption, thus, less usage of ram air is preferable. Another source for heat rejection is the fuel. The heat exchange with the fuel does not worsen the fuel consumption, thus, the fuel is a preferable source.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 4279