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2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1941
Tie Wang, Gangfeng Tan, Xuexun Guo, Shengguang Xiong, Zhiwei Zhang, Xin Gao
Abstract Vehicle hydraulic retarders are applied in heavy-duty trucks and buses as an auxiliary braking device. In traditional cooling systems of hydraulic retarders, the working fluid is introduced into the heat exchanger to transfer heat to the cooling liquid in circulation, whose heat is then dissipated by the engine cooling system. This prevents the waste heat of the working fluid from being used effectively. In hydraulic retarder cooling system based on the Organic Rankine Cycle, the organic working fluid first transfers heat with the hydraulic retarder working fluid in Rankine cycle, and then outputs power through expansion machine. It can both reduce heat load of the engine cooling system, and enhance thermal stability of the hydraulic retarder while recovering and utilizing braking energy. First of all, according to the target vehicle model, hydraulic retarder cooling system model based on Rankine cycle is established.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1920
Deaglan O'Meachair, Stamatis Angelinas, Matthew Crumpton, Antonio Rubio Flores, Juan Garcia, Pablo Barles
Abstract Bentley Motors Ltd. has developed a Carbon Silicon Carbide (CSiC) brake system for its Mulsanne product, introduced at 17MY. The CSiC brake system is conceived as a performance brake system, and as such offers notable improvements in brake performance. In developing the brake system, particular focus was placed on meeting the refinement levels required for a premium product, and indeed as the flagship model for Bentley Motors, NVH refinement of the brake system was of particular concern. This paper intends to discuss the technical performance of the brake system and review the NVH performance of the brakes. Particular attention is given to the methodology employed by Bentley Motors Ltd. and IDIADA Automotive Technology S.A. in identifying NVH concerns, and proposing and validating solutions in the field, through extensive NVH endurance runs. The performance of the system is benchmarked against similar systems offered by Bentley Motors.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1935
Binyu Mei, Xuexun Guo, Gangfeng Tan, Ming Chen, Bo Huang, Longjie Xiao
Abstract With the continuous increasing requirements of commercial vehicle weight and speed on highway transportation, conventional friction brake is difficult to meet the braking performance. To ensure the driving safety of the vehicle in the hilly region, the eddy current retarder (ECR) has been widely used due to its fast response, lower prices and convenient installation. ECR brakes the vehicle through the electromagnetic force generated by the current, and converted vehicle mechanical energy into heat through magnetic field. Air cooling structure is often used in the traditional ECR and cooling performance is limited, which causes low braking torque, thermal recession, and low reliability and so on. The water jacket has been equipped outside the eddy current region in this study, and the electric ECR is cooled through the water circulating in the circuit, which prolongs its working time.
2016-09-18
Journal Article
2016-01-1929
Nimrod Kapas, Ajith Jayasundera
Abstract There is an increasing interest in transient thermal simulations of automotive brake systems. This paper presents a high-fidelity CFD tool for modeling complete braking cycles including both the deceleration and acceleration phases. During braking, this model applies the frictional heat at the interface on the contacting rotor and pad surfaces. Based on the conductive heat fluxes within the surrounding parts, the solver divides the frictional heat into energy fluxes entering the solid volumes of the rotor and the pad. The convective heat transfer between the surfaces of solid parts and the cooling airflow is simulated through conjugate heat transfer, and the discrete ordinates model captures the radiative heat exchange between solid surfaces. It is found that modeling the rotor rotation using the sliding mesh approach provides more realistic results than those obtained with the Multiple Reference Frames method.
2016-06-17
Journal Article
2016-01-9144
Pengfei Zang, Zhe Wang, Chenle Sun
Abstract The linear internal combustion engine-linear generator integrated system (LICELGIS) is an innovative structure as a range-extender for the hybrid vehicles, which contains two opposed free piston engines and one linear generator between them. The LICELGIS is a promising power package due to its high power density and multi-fuel flexibility. In the combustion process of linear engines, the top dead center (TDC) position is not stable in different cycles, which significantly affects system operations. Otherwise, pistons move away from the TDC with high-speed because of the tremendous explosive force, which incurs the short residence time of pistons around the TDC and rapid decrease of in-cylinder temperature, pressure and the combustion efficiency. In order to address this problem, a scientific simulation model which includes dynamic and thermodynamic models, is established and a combustion optimization control strategy is proposed.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1778
Gesche Fender, Steffen Marburg, Fabian Duddeck
Abstract One method to lower noise in a cabin is to position damping layers on vibrating panels, thereby reducing their radiated power. To assess the damping effect, criteria like the ERP (equivalent radiated power) are widely employed, which estimate the radiated sound power of a panel without taking into account the actual complex system. Advantageously only a part of the structure has to be modeled, but the optimal solution found on the simplified model then often fails for the complete, coupled system, especially if several variants of a cabin have to be considered. Hence, it is proposed to use the structure-only optimization for identification of a set of candidate solutions for optimal positioning of damping layers. These candidate solutions used as initial designs for the coupled investigations should be well distributed in the design space to avoid being wrongly stuck in an optimum with inferior coupled performance.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1780
Francesca Ronzio, Theophane Courtois
Abstract In automotive acoustics, body NVH design is traditionally carried out without considering the acoustic trim parts. Nevertheless, the vibro-acoustic interaction of body structure and insulation trim cannot be neglected in the middle frequency range, where structure borne propagation might still be dominating and where classical statistical approaches are generally not able to represent the influence of local changes in stiffness and damping. This, together with the market requirement of lightweight and more efficient sound package solutions, is leading the CAE engineers to evaluate new design approaches dedicated to vehicle components such as dash or floor systems, for which the multi-physics interaction between damping, body stiffness and trim impedance is important.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1814
Maxime Legros, Jean Michel Ville, Solène Moreau, Xavier Carniel, Christophe Lambourg, Guillaume Stempfel
Abstract The new requirements during the first stages of the conception of a HVAC prompt the designer to integrate the acoustic problematic increasingly upstream. The designer needs to select a coherent components’ choice in order to comply with the specifications in terms of aeraulic and acoustic performances. A tool has been created to guide the designer’s choices based on an acoustic synthesis which is a design and/or diagnosis approach used to analyze and predict the acoustic behavior of a complex system. The synthesis is developed in order to propose an approach which considers the integration effects and some interaction effects. The acoustic synthesis results are the starting point of a psycho-acoustic study providing audio samples of the prediction and indications of the HVAC acceptance by the prospective user. Also, one may compare the results of different acoustic synthesis projects to study the influence of the parameters on the acoustic prediction.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1808
Manfred Kaltenbacher, Andreas Hüppe, Aaron Reppenhagen, Matthias Tautz, Stefan Becker, Wolfram Kuehnel
Abstract We present a recently developed computational scheme for the numerical simulation of flow induced sound for rotating systems. Thereby, the flow is computed by scale resolving simulations using an arbitrary mesh interface scheme for connecting rotating and stationary domains. The acoustic field is modeled by a perturbation ansatz resulting in a convective wave equation based on the acoustic scalar potential and the substational time derivative of the incompressible flow pressure as a source term. We use the Finite-Element (FE) method for solving the convective wave equation and apply a Nitsche type mortaring at the interface between rotating and stationary domains. The whole scheme is applied to the numerical computation of a side channel blower.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1812
Saad Bennouna, Solène Moreau, Jean Michel Ville, Olivier Cheriaux
Abstract The noise radiated inside the car cabin depends on many sources such as the embedded equipments like the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) module. An HVAC is a compact and complex system composed of several elements: blower, flaps, thermal exchangers, ducts… Air provided by an HVAC is blown by a blower passing through different components and then distributed to car cabin areas. Interactions between airflow and the HVAC fixed components generate noises that emerge in the car cabin. CEVAS project, managed by the automotive equipment manufacturer Valeo, is aiming to develop a prediction tool which will provide HVAC noise spectrum and sound quality data. The tool is based, in particular, on aeroacoustic characterization of individual elements and associations of elements.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1810
Marie Escouflaire, Nicolas Zerbib, David Mas, Nicolas Papaxanthos, Saad Bennouna, Emmanuel Perrey-Debain, Boureima Ouedraogo, Solène Moreau, Jean Michel Ville
Abstract In the framework of noise reduction of HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning) systems designed for cars, the present study deals with the numerical prediction of aeroacoustics phenomena encountered inside such devices for industrial purposes, i.e. with a reasonable CPU time. It is then proposed in this paper to assess the validity of the chaining, via Lighthill-Curle analogy, of a DES (Detached Eddy Simulation) resulting from the CFD code OpenFOAM (ESI Group) versus a RANS-LES (Large Eddy Simulation) and a BEM calculation resulting from the Vibro/Aeroacoustics software VA One (ESI Group) on an academic case of air passing through a rectangular diaphragm at a low Mach number. The BEM code being parallelized, the performances of DMP (Distributed Memory Processing) solution will also be assessed.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1800
Xavier Carniel, Anne Sanon
Abstract The control of sound fields radiated by vibrating structures in a passenger compartment, (especially structures connected to different organs like the engine powertrain, the fan motor unit, seats, the steering column, electrical motors more and more, etc.) is among the functions of the automotive manufacturers. The absence of physical prototypes in the development phase systems led OEMs1 to use tests results obtained on benches following technical specifications from manufacturers. The transition "bench to vehicle" for vibro- acoustic behaviour sets many challenges that this standard intends to clear up. This standard specifies the experimental method to transpose the dynamic forces generated by the global movements of an active component between the vehicle and a test bench. The efforts are first measured on test benches and then transposed from test bench towards the vehicle. The standard is now a French standard (XP R 19-701) and is submitted to ISO process [1].
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1853
Timo Hartmann, Gregor Tanner, Gang Xie, David J. Chappell
Abstract Car floor structures typically contain a number of smaller-scale features which make them challenging for vibro-acoustic modelling beyond the low frequency regime. The floor structure considered here consists of a thin shell floor panel connected to a number of rails through spot welds leading to an interesting multi-scale modelling problem. Structures of this type are arguably best modelled using hybrid methods, where a Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) description of the larger thin shell regions is combined with a finite element model (FEM) for the stiffer rails. In this way the modal peaks from the stiff regions are included in the overall prediction, which a pure SEA treatment would not capture. However, in the SEA regions, spot welds, geometrically dependent features and directivity of the wave field are all omitted. In this work we present an SEA/FEM hybrid model of a car floor and discuss an alternative model for the SEA subsystem using Discrete Flow Mapping (DFM).
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1851
Arnaud Duval, Minh Tan Hoang, Valérie Marcel, Ludovic Dejaeger
Abstract The noise treatments weight reduction strategy, which consists in combining broadband absorption and insulation acoustic properties in order to reduce the weight of barriers, depends strongly on surface to volume ratio of the absorbing layers in the reception cavity. Indeed, lightweight technologies like the now classical Absorber /Barrier /Absorber layup are extremely efficient behind the Instrument Panel of a vehicle, but most of the time disappointing when applied as floor insulator behind the carpet. This work aims at showing that a minimum of 20 mm equivalent “shoddy” standard cotton felt absorption is requested for a floor carpet insulator, in order to be able to reduce the weight of barriers. This means that a pure absorbing system that would destroy completely the insulation properties and slopes can only work, if the noise sources are extremely low in this specific area, which is seldom the case even at the rear footwells location.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1841
Peter R. Hooper
Powertrain system duplication for hybrid electric vehicles and range-extenders presents serious cost challenges. Cost increase can be mitigated by reducing the number of cylinders but this usually has a negative impact on noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) of the vehicle system. This paper considers a novel form of two-stroke cycle engine offering potential for low emissions, reduced production cost and high potential vehicle efficiency. The engine uses segregated pump charging via the use of stepped pistons offering potential for low emissions. Installation as a power plant for automotive hybrid electric vehicles or as a range-extender for electric vehicles could present a low mass solution addressing the drive for vehicle fleet CO2 reduction. Operation on the two-stroke cycle enables NVH advantages over comparable four-stroke cycle units, however the durability of conventional crankcase scavenged engines can present significant challenges.
2016-05-18
Journal Article
2016-01-9110
Jignesh Vaghela
Abstract This study involves the experimental aspects of R134a Automobile Air Conditioning (AAC) system with & without Liquid Suction Heat Exchanger (LSHX). To evaluate the performance of an Automobile Air Conditioning system, an experimental system consisting of original components from an R134a Automobile Air Conditioning system has been set up and instrumented. An additional Liquid Suction Heat Exchanger is used in conventional Automobile Air Conditioning system. Effect of evaporator temperature variation & compressor speed variation on R134a Automobile Air Conditioning system performance is evaluated. From experimental evaluation, it is derived that there is a Coefficient of Performance (COP) improvement in Automobile Air Conditioning system with Liquid Suction Heat Exchanger compared to Automobile Air Conditioning system without Liquid Suction Heat Exchanger. Performance of an R134a Automobile Air Conditioning system degrades with increase in compressor speed.
2016-05-01
Journal Article
2015-01-9148
Saeed Asgari, Shailendra Kaushik
Abstract A linear parameter varying (LPV) reduced order model (ROM) is used to approximate the volume-averaged temperature of battery cells in one of the modules of the battery pack with varying mass flow rate of cooling fluid using uniform heat source as inputs. The ROM runs orders of magnitude faster than the original CFD model. To reduce the time it takes to generate training data, used in building LPV ROM, a divide-and-conquer approach is introduced. This is done by dividing the battery module into a series of mid-cell and end-cell units. A mid-cell unit is composed of a cooling channel sandwiched in between two half -cells. A half-cell has half as much heat capacity as a full-cell. An end-cell unit is composed of a cooling channel sandwiched in between full-cell and a half-cell. A mass flow rate distribution look-up-table is generated from a set of steady-state simulations obtained by running the full CFD model at different inlet manifold mass flow rate samples.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0450
Somnath Sen, Paulson Parayil
Abstract In order to ensure a comfortable space inside the cabin, it is very essential to design an efficient heating ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) system which can deliver uniform temperature distribution at the exit. There are several factors which impact on uniformity of temperature distribution. Airflow distribution is one of the key parameter in deciding the effectiveness of temperature distribution. Kinematics links and linkage system typically termed as ‘mechanism’ is one of the critical sub-systems which greatly affects the airflow distribution. It is not the temperature uniformity but also the HVAC temperature linearity also depends on airflow distribution. Hence the design of mechanism is incomparably of paramount importance to achieve the desired level of airflow distribution at HVAC exit. The present paper describes the design methodology of automotive HVAC mechanism system.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0262
Matthew A. Jeffers, Larry Chaney, John P. Rugh
Abstract When operated, the cabin climate control system is the largest auxiliary load on a vehicle. This load has significant impact on fuel economy for conventional and hybrid vehicles, and it drastically reduces the driving range of all-electric vehicles (EVs). Heating is even more detrimental to EV range than cooling because no engine waste heat is available. Reducing the thermal loads on the vehicle climate control system will extend driving range and increase the market penetration of EVs. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have evaluated strategies for vehicle climate control load reduction with special attention toward grid-connected electric vehicles. Outdoor vehicle thermal testing and computational modeling were used to assess potential strategies for improved thermal management and to evaluate the effectiveness of thermal load reduction technologies. A human physiology model was also used to evaluate the impact on occupant thermal comfort.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0261
Lili Feng, Predrag Hrnjak
Abstract This paper presents a simulation model for a reversible air conditioning and heat pump system for electric vehicles. The system contains a variable speed compressor, three microchannel heat exchangers, an accumulator, and two electronic expansion valves. Heat exchangers are solved by discretizing into cells. Compressor and accumulator models are developed by fitting data with physical insights. Expansion valves are modeled by isenthalpic processes. System performance is calculated by connecting all parts in the same way as the physical system and solved iteratively. The model is reasonably validated against experimental data from a separate experimental study. Future improvement is needed to take into account maldistribution in outdoor heat exchanger working as an evaporator in HP mode. Charge retention in components also requires further study.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0255
Yinhua Zheng
This paper addresses R1234yf A/C system performance impacted by condenser airflow passage blockages of nonhotspot and hotspot objects. With the modern vehicle design trend, more and more chances exist in blocking condenser airflow passages by objects such as TOC (transmission oil cooler) or fine grills etc. These objects create hotspots and narrowed airflow passages to the condenser and result in A/C performance degradation. It is important to understand the specific area of the condenser which is most impacted by a blockage so this area can be avoided in the design/packaging of front end components. In addition, it is important to understand the magnitude of performance loss associated with the specific areas of blockage. As a result of this understanding, optimal design locations for these blockages (including hotspots and grilles) can be proposed in order to mitigate the impact on A/C cooling performance.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0256
Hideaki Nagano, Kenji Tomita, Yasuhiro Tanoue, Yuji Kobayashi, Itsuhei Kohri, Shinsuke Kato
Abstract In the winter, windshield glass fogging must be prevented through the intake of outdoor air into a vehicle. However, the corresponding energy loss via the ventilation system cannot be ignored. In the present study, the defogging pattern on the windshield is evaluated and the water vapor transportation in the flow field in the vehicle is analyzed in order to investigate the ventilation load by means of a numerical simulation. Some examined cases involve new outlet positions. Additionally, a new, energy-saving air supply method for defogging, with so-called “double-layer ventilator”, is proposed. In this method, one air jet layer is obtained via a conventional defogging opening in the vicinity of the windshield, supplying an outdoor air intake. The other jet consists of recirculated air that covers the outdoor air, preventing it from mixing with the surrounding air.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0253
Jun Li, Predrag Hrnjak
Abstract This paper presents the experimental analysis of separation in vertical headers based on flow visualization. Two-phase separation phenomena inside the header is observed and quantified. Driving forces are analyzed to study the mechanisms for two-phase flow motion and flow regimes. Main tube of the header is made of clear PVC for visualization study. R-134a is used as the fluid of interest and the mass flux from the inlet pass is 55 kg/m2s - 195 kg/m2s. Potential ways to improve two-phase separation are discussed. A model is built to show how separation brings potential benefits to MAC heat exchangers by arranging the flow path.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0254
Gursaran D. Mathur
Field tests were conducted on a late full sized sedan with the HVAC unit operating in both Recirculation and OSA modes to monitor build-up of the CO2 concentration inside the cabin and its influence on occupant’s fatigue and alertness. These tests were conducted during 2015 summer on interstate highways with test durations ranging from 4 to 7 hours. During the above tests, fatigue or tiredness of the occupants (including CO2 levels) was monitored and recorded at 30 min intervals. Based on this investigation it is determined that the measured cabin concentration levels reaches ASHRAE (Standard 62-1999) specified magnitudes (greater than 700 ppm over ambient levels) with three occupants in the vehicle. Further, the occupants did show fatigue when the HVAC unit was operated in recirculation mode in excess of 5 hours. Further details have been presented in the paper.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0259
Kaushal Kumar Jha, Sarveshwar Reddy Mulamalla, Anil Anugu
Abstract The main function of an air conditioning system in a vehicle is to provide the thermal comfort to the occupant at minimum possible energy consumption in all environmental conditions. To ensure the best possible thermal comfort, air conditioning system is optimized on various parameters like heat load, air flow distribution, glass area, trim quality, insulations and cabin leak rate. A minimum cabin leakage is regulatory requirements to ensure the air quality of cabin. Anything above the minimum cabin leak rate ultimately turn into reduced thermal comfort and additional energy consumption. The additional energy consumption to maintain the required thermal comfort in the cabin due to cabin leakage affects the fuel efficiency severely. In the present study, the effect of cabin leakage on fuel efficiency and thermal comfort is studied in details by varying the cabin leakage through mechanical means.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0257
Lili Feng, Predrag Hrnjak
Abstract This paper presents the experimentally obtained performance characteristics of an air conditioning-heat pump system that uses heat exchangers from a commercially available Nissan Leaf EV. It was found that refrigerant charge needed for cooling operation was larger than that for heating function with the test setup. The effects of: a). indoor air flow rate, b). outdoor air flow rate, and c). compressor speed on heating capacity and energy efficiency were explored and presented. Appropriate opening size of expansion valve that controlled subcooling for better energy efficiency was discussed and results were presented. Expansion valve opening size also strongly affected charge migration. Warm-up tests at different ambient conditions showed the necessity of a secondary heater to be reserved for very low ambient temperature.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0258
Jason Aaron Lustbader, Bidzina Kekelia, Jeff Tomerlin, Cory J. Kreutzer, Skip Yeakel, Steven Adelman, Zhiming Luo, John Zehme
Abstract Annual fuel use for sleeper cab truck rest period idling is estimated at 667 million gallons in the United States, or 6.8% of long-haul truck fuel use. Truck idling during a rest period represents zero freight efficiency and is largely done to supply accessory power for climate conditioning of the cab. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s CoolCab project aims to reduce heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) loads and resulting fuel use from rest period idling by working closely with industry to design efficient long-haul truck thermal management systems while maintaining occupant comfort. Enhancing the thermal performance of cab/sleepers will enable smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective idle reduction solutions. In addition, if the fuel savings provide a one- to three-year payback period, fleet owners will be economically motivated to incorporate them.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0247
Jiu Xu, Predrag Hrnjak
Abstract Automotive air conditioning compressor produces an annular-mist flow consisting of gas-phase refrigerant flow with oil film and oil droplets. This paper reports a method to calculate the oil retention and oil circulation ratio based on oil film thickness, wave speed, oil droplet size, oil droplet speed, and mass flow rate. Oil flow parameters are measured by high-speed camera capture and video processing in a non-invasive way. The estimated oil retention and oil circulation ratio results are compared quantitatively with the measurements from system experiments under different compressor outlet gas superficial velocity. The agreement between video result and sampling measurement shows that this method can be applied in other annular-mist flow analysis. It is also shown that most of the oil exists in film from the mass point of view while oil droplets contributes more to the oil mass flow rate because they travel in a much higher speed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0248
Mingyu Wang, Edward Wolfe, Timothy Craig, Tim J. Laclair, Omar Abdelaziz, Zhiming Gao
Abstract Without the waste heat available from the engine of a conventional automobile, electric vehicles (EVs) must provide heat to the cabin for climate control using energy stored in the vehicle. In current EV designs, this energy is typically provided by the traction battery. In very cold climatic conditions, the power required to heat the EV cabin can be of a similar magnitude to that required for propulsion of the vehicle. As a result, the driving range of an EV can be reduced very significantly during winter months, which limits consumer acceptance of EVs and results in increased battery costs to achieve a minimum range while ensuring comfort to the EV driver. To minimize the range penalty associated with EV cabin heating, a novel climate control system that includes thermal energy storage has been designed for use in EVs and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The system uses the stored latent heat of an advanced phase change material (PCM) to provide cabin heating.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0251
Somnath Sen, Mayur Selokar
Abstract Maintaining thermal comfort is one of the key areas in vehicle HVAC design wherein airflow distribution inside the cabin is one of the important elements in deciding comfort sensation. However, the energy consumption of air conditioning system needs to stay within the efficient boundaries to efficiently cool down the passenger cabin otherwise the vehicle energy consumption may get worsened to a great extent. One approach to optimize this process is by using numerical methods while developing climate systems. The present paper focuses on the numerical study of cabin aiming and cabin cool-down of a passenger car by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The main goal is to investigate the cabin aiming with a view to figure out the minimum average velocity over the passengers at all vent positions. Cabin aiming ensures substantial amount of airflow reaches to the passengers as well as every corners of the cabin across the wide climatic range.
Viewing 211 to 240 of 8600