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Viewing 121 to 150 of 8600
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1046
Christian Binder, Fahed Abou Nada, Mattias Richter, Andreas Cronhjort, Daniel Norling
Abstract Diesel engine manufacturers strive towards further efficiency improvements. Thus, reducing in-cylinder heat losses is becoming increasingly important. Understanding how location, thermal insulation, and engine operating conditions affect the heat transfer to the combustion chamber walls is fundamental for the future reduction of in-cylinder heat losses. This study investigates the effect of a 1mm-thick plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating on a piston. Such a coated piston and a similar steel piston are compared to each other based on experimental data for the heat release, the heat transfer rate to the oil in the piston cooling gallery, the local instantaneous surface temperature, and the local instantaneous surface heat flux. The surface temperature was measured for different crank angle positions using phosphor thermometry.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1036
Silvia Marelli, Simone Gandolfi, Massimo Capobianco
Abstract In the last few years, the effect of diabatic test conditions on compressor performance maps has been widely investigated leading some Authors to propose different correction models. The aim of the paper is to investigate the effect of heat transfer phenomena on the experimental definition of turbocharger maps, focusing on turbine performance. An experimental investigation on a small turbocharger for automotive application has been carried out and presented. The study focused onto the effects of internal heat transfer on turbine thermomechanical efficiency. The experimental campaign was developed considering the effect of different heat transfer state by varying turbine inlet temperature, oil and coolant temperature and compressor inlet pressure. An original model previously developed by the Authors is adopted for the correction of compressor steady flow maps.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0527
Arya Yazdani, Jeffrey Naber, Mahdi Shahbakhti, Paul Dice, Chris Glugla, Stephen Cooper, Douglas McEwan, Garlan Huberts
An accurate estimation of cycle-by-cycle in-cylinder mass and the composition of the cylinder charge is required for spark-ignition engine transient control strategies to obtain required torque, Air-Fuel-Ratio (AFR) and meet engine pollution regulations. Mass Air Flow (MAF) and Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensors have been utilized in different control strategies to achieve these targets; however, these sensors have response delay in transients. As an alternative to air flow metering, in-cylinder pressure sensors can be utilized to directly measure cylinder pressure, based on which, the amount of air charge can be estimated without the requirement to model the dynamics of the manifold.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0526
Oldrich Vitek, Jan Macek
Abstract The proposed paper deals with thermodynamic optimization of highly flexible ICE (variable compression ratio, intake/exhaust VVA) while comparing e-turbocharging concept with classical one. The e-turbocharging approach is based on idea that compressor/turbine has its own electric machine (motor/generator) and that additional electric energy can be supplied/attached from/to engine crank train. Hence it allows independent control of compressor/turbine. On the other hand, classical approach is based on a standard mechanical connection between turbine and compressor. The whole system (flexible engine + boost device) is optimized under steady operation – low load (BMEP of 4 bar), medium load (BMEP of 13 bar), high load (BMEP of 30, 25 and 18 bar) and maximum load are considered. Moreover, 3 combustion concepts are considered – classical SI and CI, and ideal RCCI.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0633
Kurt Stuart, Terry Yan, James Mathias
Abstract In this paper, the air-standard cycle analysis is performed for a 5-stroke engine to obtain the indicated thermal efficiency and power output over a range of operating points and design characteristics, including engine RPM, compression ratio, overall expansion ratio, expansion cylinder clearance volume, and transfer port volume. The results are compared with those of a baseline 4-stroke engine. This analysis is accomplished by an air-standard thermodynamic model for both engines with heat release function with heat transfer and mass loss for both the combustion cylinder and the expansion cylinder. The results indicate increased thermal efficiency and power output over the baseline 4-stroke engine, depending on the engine RPM and overall expansion ratios.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0629
John Kuo, George Garfinkel
Abstract Thermal modeling of liquid-cooled vehicle traction battery assemblies using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) usually involves large models to accurately resolve small cooling channel details, and intensive computation to simulate drive-cycle transient solutions. This paper proposes a segregated method to divide the system into three parts: the cells, the cold plate and the interface between them. Each of the three parts can be separated and thermally characterized and then combined to predict the overall system thermal behavior for both steady-state and transient operating conditions. The method largely simplifies battery thermal analysis to overcome the limitations of using large 3D CFD models especially for pack level dynamic drive cycle simulations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0631
David C. Ogbuaku, Timothy Potter, James M. Boileau
Abstract The need to increase the fuel-efficiency of modern vehicles while lowering the emission footprint is a continuous driver in automotive design. This has given rise to the use of engines with smaller displacements and higher power outputs. Compared to past engine designs, this combination generates greater amounts of excess heat which must be removed to ensure the durability of the engine. This has resulted in an increase in the number and size of the heat exchangers required to adequately cool the engine. Further, the use of smaller, more aerodynamic front-end designs has reduced the area available in the engine compartment to mount the heat exchangers. This is an issue, since the reduced engine compartment space is increasingly incapable of supporting an enlarged rectangular radiator system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1304
Alejandro Rosas Vazquez, Fernando Paisano, Diego Santillan Gutierrez
Abstract For many years, the use of in-mold fasteners has been avoided for various reasons including: not fully understanding the load cases in the part, the fear of quality issues occurring, the need for servicing, or the lack of understanding the complexity of all failure modes. The most common solution has been the use of secondary operations to provide attachments, such as, screws, metal clips, heat staking, sonic welding or other methods which are ultimately a waste in the process and an increase in manufacturing costs. The purpose of this paper is to take the reader through the design process followed to design an in-molded attachment clip on plastic parts. The paper explores the design process for in-molded attachment clips beginning with a design concept idea, followed by basic concept testing using a desktop 3D printer, optimizing the design with physical tests and CAE analysis, and finally producing high resolution 3D prototypes for validation and tuning.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1298
Kamlesh Yadav, Abhishek Sinha, Rajdeep Singh Khurana
Abstract Vehicle Hood being the face of a passenger car poses the challenge to meet the regulatory and aesthetic requirements. Urge to make a saleable product makes aesthetics a primary condition. This eventually makes the role of structure optimization much more important. Pedestrian protection- a recent development in the Indian automotive industry, known for dynamics of cost competitive cars, has posed the challenge to make passenger cars meeting the regulation at minimal cost. The paper demonstrates structure optimization of hood and design of peripheral parts for meeting pedestrian protection performance keeping the focus on low cost of ownership. The paper discusses development of an in-house methodology for meeting Headform compliance of a flagship model of Maruti Suzuki India Ltd., providing detailed analysis of the procedure followed from introduction stage of regulatory requirement in the project to final validation of the engineering intent.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0634
Schoeffmann Wolfgang, Helfried Sorger, Siegfried Loesch, Wolfgang Unzeitig, Thomas Huettner, Alois Fuerhapter
Abstract In order to achieve future CO2 targets - in particular under real driving conditions - different powertrain technologies will have to be introduced. Beside the increasing electrification of the powertrain, it will be essential to utilize the full potential of the internal combustion engine. In addition to further optimization of the combustion processes and the reduction of mechanical losses in the thermal- and energetic systems, the introduction of Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) is probably the measure with the highest potential for fuel economy improvement. VCR systems are expected to be introduced to a considerable number of next generation turbocharged Spark Ignited (SI) engines in certain vehicle classes. The basic principle of the AVL VCR system described in this paper is a 2-stage variation of the conrod length and thus the Compression Ratio (CR).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1391
Heather Bronczyk, Michael Kolich, Marie-Eve Cote
Abstract Load deflection testing is one type of test that can be used to understand the comfort performance of a complete trimmed automotive seat. This type of testing can be conducted on different areas of the seat and is most commonly used on the seatback, the seat cushion and the head restraint. Load deflection data can be correlated to a customer’s perception of the seat, providing valuable insight for the design and development team. There are several variables that influence the results obtained from this type of testing. These can include but are not limited to: seat structure design, suspension system, component properties, seat materials, seat geometry, and test set-up. Set-up of the seat for physical testing plays a critical role in the final results. This paper looks at the relationship of the load deflection data results on front driver vehicle seatbacks in a supported and unsupported test set-up condition.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1390
Monica Lynn Haumann Jones, Jangwoon Park, Sheila Ebert-Hamilton, K. Han Kim, Matthew P. Reed
Abstract Seat fit is characterized by the spatial relationship between the seat and the vehicle occupant’s body. Seat surface pressure distribution is one of the best available quantitative measures of this relationship. However, the relationships between sitter attributes, pressure, and seat fit have not been well established. The objective of this study is to model seat pressure distribution as a function of the dimensions of the seat and the occupant’s body. A laboratory study was conducted using 12 production driver seats from passenger vehicles and light trucks. Thirty-eight men and women sat in each seat in a driving mockup. Seat surface pressure distribution was measured on the seatback and cushion. Relevant anthropometric dimensions were recorded for each participant and standardized dimensions based on SAE J2732 (2008) were acquired for each test seat.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1389
Ankush Kamra, Sandeep Raina, Pankaj Maheshwari, Abhishek Agarwal, Prasad Latkar
Abstract Automotive seating is designed by considering safety, comfort and aesthetics for the occupants. Seating comfort is one of the important parameters for the occupant for enhancing the overall experience in a vehicle. Seating comfort is categorized as static (or showroom) comfort and dynamic comfort. The requirements for achieving static and dynamic comfort can sometimes differ and may require design parameters such as PU hardness to be set in opposite directions. This paper presents a case wherein a base seat with good dynamic comfort is taken and an analysis is done to improve upon the static comfort, without compromising on the dynamic comfort. The study focuses on improving the initial comfort by considering various options for seating upholstery.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1474
Raed E. El-Jawahri, Agnes Kim, Dean Jaradi, Rich Ruthinowski, Kevin Siasoco, Cortney Stancato, Para Weerappuli
Abstract Sled tests simulating full-frontal rigid barrier impact were conducted using the Hybrid III 5th female and the 50th male anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs). The ATDs were positioned in the outboard rear seat of a generic small car environment. Two belt configurations were used: 1) a standard belt with no load limiter or pre-tensioner and 2) a seatbelt with a 4.5 kN load-limiting retractor with a stop function and a retractor pre-tensioner (LL-PT). In the current study, the LL-PT belt system reduced the peak responses of both ATDs. Probabilities of serious-to-fatal injuries (AIS3+), based on the ATDs peak responses, were calculated using the risk curves in NHTSA’s December 2015 Request for Comments (RFC) proposing changes to the United States New Car Assessment Program (US-NCAP). Those probabilities were compared to the injury rates (IRs) observed in the field on point estimate basis.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1215
Peter Haussmann, Joachim Melbert
Abstract Battery safety is the most critical requirement for the energy storage systems in hybrid and electric vehicles. The allowable battery temperature is limited with respect to the battery chemistry in order to avoid the risk of thermal runaway. Battery temperature monitoring is already implemented in electric vehicles, however only cell surface temperature can be measured at reasonable cost using conventional sensors. The internal cell temperature may exceed the surface temperature significantly at high current due to the finite internal electrical and thermal cell resistance. In this work, a novel approach for internal cell temperature measurement is proposed applying on board impedance spectroscopy. The method considers the temperature coefficient of the complex internal cell impedance. It can be observed by current and voltage measurements as usually performed by standard battery management systems.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1213
Yilin Yin, Zhong Zheng, Song-Yul Choe
Abstract Analysis of thermal behavior of Lithium ion battery is one of crucial issues to ensure a safe and durable operation. Temperature is the physical quantity that is widely used for analysis, but limited for accurate investigations of behavior of heat generation of battery because of sensitivities affected by heat transfer in experiments. Calorimeter available commercially is widely used to measure the heat generation of battery, but does not follow required dynamics because of a relatively large thermal time constant given by cavity and a limited heat transfer capability. In this paper, we proposed a highly dynamic calorimeter that was constructed using two thermoelectric devices (TEMs). For the design of the calorimeter and its calibration, a printed circuit board (PCB) with the same size as the battery was used as a dummy load to generate controlled heat.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0122
Gursaran D. Mathur
Water drainage characteristics are dependent on the design of the evaporator: specifically the design of the fins and plates along with hydrophilic coating. A part of the hydrophilic coating washes off with the moisture that condenses over the evaporator core from the air-stream. Hence, water drainage characteristics of an evaporator changes with the vehicle mileage or the age of the vehicle. Since a part of the hydrophilic coating washes away, more water is retained within the evaporator at this condition. Hence, the effectiveness of the evaporator drainage deteriorates with the age of the vehicles. At this condition, the contact angle measured at the plate increases. Author has conducted an experimental study to measure the effectiveness of hydrophilic coating from evaporators taken out from arid (9 cores) and humid areas (16 cores) as a function of vehicle mileage or vehicle age. Contact angles and water retention were measured for a number of evaporators from different OEMs.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0120
Yoichiro Kawamoto, Gota Ogata, Zhiwei Shan
Abstract This study reports on a new generation ECS (Ejector Cycle System) which includes a highly efficient ejector and a novel system configuration. The ejector is working as a fluid jet pump that recovers expansion energy which is wasted in the conventional refrigeration cycle decompression process, and converts the recovered expansion energy into pressure energy and raises the compressor suction pressure. Consequently, the ejector system can reduce power consumption of the compressor by using the above mentioned pressure-rising effect and improve energy efficiency of the refrigeration cycle. The ejector consists of a nozzle, a suction section, a mixing section and a diffuser. The objective of this study is to improve actual fuel economy of all vehicles by ejector technology. The previous generation ECS was reported in 2012 SAE World Congress1. Now, a new generation ECS has been successfully developed and released in the market for Mobile Air Conditioning systems as of 2013.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0178
Mark Hepokoski, Allen Curran, Sam Gullman, David Jacobsson
Abstract Passive sensor (HVAC) manikins have been developed to obtain high-resolution measurements of environmental conditions across a representative human body form. These manikins incorporate numerous sensors that measure air velocity, air temperature, radiant heat flux, and relative humidity. The effect of a vehicle’s climate control system on occupant comfort can be characterized from the data collected by an HVAC manikin. Equivalent homogeneous temperature (EHT) is often used as a first step in a cabin comfort analysis, particularly since it reduces a large data set to a single intuitive number. However, the applicability of the EHT for thermal comfort assessment is limited since it does not account for human homeostasis, i.e., that the human body actively counter-balances heat flow with the environment to maintain a constant core temperature.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0170
Aditya Velivelli, Daniel Guerithault, Stefan Stöwe
Abstract Seat cooling and heating strategies have enhanced human thermal comfort in automotive environments. Cooling/heating strategies also need to focus on the distribution of the seat cooling/heating power across the seat and the effect of such distributions on human thermal comfort. This paper studies the effect of active cooling combined with ventilation only strategy on thermal comfort. As part of the study, heat flux between the occupant and seat is mapped and is correlated to a step increase in the occupant’s local thermal comfort of body segments in contact with seat. A human physiological model and the Berkeley comfort model were combined to determine power and optimum placement of cooling to effectively cool an occupant using a climate control seat in a warm environment. This leads to a new approach using asymmetric seat cooling to distribute cooling power resulting in improved and balanced subjective comfort than traditional climate seat and ventilation technologies.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0165
Jingwei Zhu, Stefan Elbel
Abstract Expansion work recovery by two-phase ejector is known to be beneficial to vapor compression cycle performance. However, one of the biggest challenges with ejector vapor compression cycle is that the ejector cycle performance is sensitive to working condition changes which are common in many applications, including automotive AC systems. Different working conditions require different ejector geometries to achieve maximum performance. Slightly different geometries may result in substantially different COPs under the same conditions. Ejector motive nozzle throat diameter (motive nozzle restrictiveness) is one of the key parameters that can significantly affect COP. This paper presents the experimental investigation of a new motive nozzle restrictiveness control mechanism for two-phase ejectors used in vapor compression cycles, which has the advantages of being simple, potentially less costly and less vulnerable to clogging.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0147
Brian Sweetman, Ingo Schmitz, Burkhard Hupertz, Nathanael Shaw, John Goldstein
Abstract Driven by the demand to continuously reduce the development time of new vehicles, it is of critical importance to robustly develop design and packaging concepts early within a new vehicle program using CAE methods. As the underhood and underbody package is constantly getting tighter and the engine power increases, the development of a sophisticated heat protection concept requires much more attention. For many years, heat protection CAE is an integral part of the vehicle development at Ford. However, due to challenges related to transient analysis, e.g. high numerical effort, simulation of transient buoyancy driven airflow (thermal soak), and dependency on high quality thermal material properties, heat protection CAE was primarily focused on steady state vehicle operating conditions.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1302
Hyung In Yun, Jae Kyu Lee, Jae Hong Choi, MyoungKwon Je, Junhyuk Kim
Abstract A sliding door is one of the car door systems, which is generally applied to the vans. Compared with swing doors, a sliding door gives comfort to the passengers when they get in or out the car. With an increasing number of the family-scale activities, there followed a huge demand on the vans, which caused growing interests in the convenience technology of the sliding door system. A typical sliding door system has negative effects on the vehicle interior package and the operating effort. Since the door should move backward without touching the car body, the trajectory of the center rail should be a curve. The curve-shaped center rail infiltrates not only the passenger shoulder room, but also the opening flange curve, which results in the interior package loss. Moreover, as the passenger pulls the door outside handle along the normal direction of the door outer skin, the curved rail causes the opening effort loss.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1305
Yucheng Liu, Jeremy Batte, Zachary Collins, Jennifer Bateman, John Atkins, Madelyn Davis, David Salley, Cindy L. Bethel, John Ball, Christopher Archibald
Abstract A robot mining system was developed by the State Space Robotic undergraduate student design team from Mississippi State University (MSU) for the 2016 NASA Robotic Mining Competition. The mining robot was designed to traverse the Martian chaotic terrain, excavate a minimum of 10 kg of Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a collector bin within 10 minutes as part of the competition. A Systems Engineering approach was followed in proceeding with this design project. The designed mining robot consisted of two major components: (1) mechanical system and (2) control system. This paper mainly focuses on the design and assessment process of the mechanical system but will also briefly mention the control system so as to evaluate the designed robotic system in its entirety. The final designed robot consisted of an aluminum frame driven by four motors and wheels. It utilized a scoop and lifting arm subsystem for collecting and depositing Martian regolith.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1520
Teddy Hobeika, Peter Gullberg, Simone Sebben, Lennart Lofdahl
Abstract Quantification of heat exchanger performance in its operative environment is in many engineering applications an essential task, and the air flow rate through the heat exchanger core is an important optimizing parameter. This paper explores an alternative method for quantifying the air flow rate through compact heat exchangers positioned in the underhood of a passenger car. Unlike conventional methods, typically relying on measurements of direct flow characteristics at discrete probe locations, the proposed method is based on the use of load-cells for direct measurement of the total force acting on the heat exchanger. The air flow rate is then calculated from the force measurement. A direct comparison with a conventional pressure based method is presented as both methods are applied on a passenger car’s radiator tested in a full scale wind tunnel using six different grill configurations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0169
Ward J. Atkinson, William Raymond Hill, Gursaran D. Mathur
Abstract The EPA has issued regulations in the Final Rulemaking for 2017-2025 Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Standards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards (420r12901-3). This document provides credits against the fuel economy regulations for various Air Conditioning technologies. One of these credits is associated with increased use of recirculation air mode, when the ambient is over 24°C (75°F.). The authors want to communicate the experiences in their careers that highlighted issues with air quality in the interior of the vehicle cabin. Cabin contamination sources may result in safety and health issues for both younger and older drivers. Alertness concerns may hinder their ability to operate a vehicle safely.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0937
David Culbertson, James Pradun, Magdi Khair, Jeff Diestelmeier
Abstract Tightening regulations throughout the world demand a reduction in fuel consumption and NOX emission levels, creating an increasing need for additional heat for SCR aftertreatment. A durable and low cost heating system is needed for vehicles with hybrid or 24Vdc electricity. Recent development efforts have resulted in much smaller and lower cost heating systems for electrical systems ranging from 400 to 24Vdc. Test results demonstrate the feasibility of reducing the size of the heater and the relationship of heater power to the amount of time required to heat the exhaust. Intelligent solid state switching enables the heater to be smaller without compromising durability.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0175
Jing He, Bill Johnston, Debasish Dhar, Loren Lohmeyer
The natural refrigerant, R744 (CO2), remains a viable solution to replace the high GWP refrigerant R134a which is to be phased out in light-duty vehicles in EU and US market. In this study, thermodynamic analysis is performed on a R744 parallel compression system to evaluate its potential in automotive climate control. The model adopts a correlation of isentropic efficiency as a function of compression ratio based on a prototype R744 MAC compressor and accounts for the operating limits defined in the latest DIN specifications. Optimization is run over typical MAC operating conditions which covers both transcritical and subcritical domain. Comparing to the conventional single compression cycle, effectiveness of parallel compression is found most pronounced in low evaporating temperature and high ambient conditions, with up to 21% increase in COP and 5.3 bar reduction in discharge pressure observed over the considered parametric range.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0180
Jun Li, Pega Hrnjak
Abstract This paper introduces the concept of separation of two-phase flow in condenser as a way to improve condenser efficiency. The benefits of vapor-liquid refrigerant separation and the reason why it will improve the condenser performance are explained. Numerical studies are presented on the effects of separation on performance of an R134a microchannel condenser, with the comparison to experiment data. Model predicts that at the same mass flow rate, the exit temperature is lower by 2.2 K in the separation condenser compared with that in the baseline. Up to 9% more flow rate of condensate is also predicted by the model in the separation condenser. Experiment results confirm the same trend. In addition, the reason why a certain circuiting of passes with pre-assumed separation results in the header improves the condenser is investigated by the model and results are presented.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0495
Michael Christian Haverkamp
Abstract The vehicle interior constitutes the multi-sensory environment of driver and passengers. Beside overall design and execution, materials and its surfaces are of specific interest to the customer. They are not only needed to fulfil technical functions, but are in direct focus of the customer’s perception. The perceived quality is based on all sensory data collected by the human perceptual system. Surfaces express design intent and craftsmanship by their visual appearance. Haptic features supervene when materials are touched. And even smell has an influence on the perception of ambience. Although sound is generated nearly every time when fingers slide across a surface, touch-sounds have been disregarded so far. In various cases, these contact sounds are clearly audible. As essential sound responses to haptic activity, they can degrade perceived quality. A method has been developed for a standardized generation of touch-sounds.
Viewing 121 to 150 of 8600