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Viewing 61 to 90 of 8600
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0171
Quansheng Zhang, Yan Meng, Christopher Greiner, Ciro Soto, William Schwartz, Mark Jennings
Abstract In this paper, the tradeoff relationship between the Air Conditioning (A/C) system performance and vehicle fuel economy for a hybrid electric vehicle during the SC03 drive cycle is presented. First, an A/C system model was integrated into Ford’s HEV simulation environment. Then, a system-level sensitivity study was performed on a stand-alone A/C system simulator, by formulating a static optimization problem which minimizes the total energy use of actuators, and maintains an identical cooling capacity. Afterwards, a vehicle-level sensitivity study was conducted with all controllers incorporated in sensitivity analysis software, under three types of formulations of cooling capacity constraints. Finally, the common observation from both studies, that the compressor speed dominates the cooling capacity and the EDF fan has a marginal influence, is explained using the thermodynamics of a vapor compression cycle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0172
Suhas Venkatappa, Manfred Koberstein, Zhengyu Liu
Abstract The refrigerant transition from HFC-134a to HFO-1234yf has proven to be more challenging on controlling refrigerant flow-induced noises generated from automotive air-conditioning (A/C) systems than originally anticipated. The objectives of this paper are to describe the noise issues with HFO-1234yf, understand the mechanisms and key factors affecting HFO-1234yf refrigerant flow-induced noise. Finally, the countermeasures and guidelines for attenuating and suppressing the noise are presented.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0170
Aditya Velivelli, Daniel Guerithault, Stefan Stöwe
Abstract Seat cooling and heating strategies have enhanced human thermal comfort in automotive environments. Cooling/heating strategies also need to focus on the distribution of the seat cooling/heating power across the seat and the effect of such distributions on human thermal comfort. This paper studies the effect of active cooling combined with ventilation only strategy on thermal comfort. As part of the study, heat flux between the occupant and seat is mapped and is correlated to a step increase in the occupant’s local thermal comfort of body segments in contact with seat. A human physiological model and the Berkeley comfort model were combined to determine power and optimum placement of cooling to effectively cool an occupant using a climate control seat in a warm environment. This leads to a new approach using asymmetric seat cooling to distribute cooling power resulting in improved and balanced subjective comfort than traditional climate seat and ventilation technologies.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0169
Ward J. Atkinson, William Raymond Hill, Gursaran D. Mathur
Abstract The EPA has issued regulations in the Final Rulemaking for 2017-2025 Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Standards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards (420r12901-3). This document provides credits against the fuel economy regulations for various Air Conditioning technologies. One of these credits is associated with increased use of recirculation air mode, when the ambient is over 24°C (75°F.). The authors want to communicate the experiences in their careers that highlighted issues with air quality in the interior of the vehicle cabin. Cabin contamination sources may result in safety and health issues for both younger and older drivers. Alertness concerns may hinder their ability to operate a vehicle safely.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0167
Steven Lambert, William Jamo, Mike Kurtz
Abstract The failure of an A/C system often results in the introduction of contaminants to the A/C system. The sources of the contaminants include debris from damaged components and debris from the surrounding environment. Returning the A/C system to service requires the removal of these contaminants from any reused components. The recommended approach to cleaning contaminated components and systems is to flush with a solvent flushing machine. Previous internal studies have concluded that solvent flushing will remove all contaminants, restoring component and system performance. Many commercial refrigerant recovery and recharge machines include a refrigerant “flush” feature which can flush oil from the system and components with the systems refrigerant. The effectiveness of using the “flush” feature of a refrigerant recovery and recharge machine with an added in-line filter to remove contaminants is investigated.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0168
B. Vasanth, Muthukumar Arunachalam, Sathya Narayana, S. Sathish Kumar, Murali govindarajalu
In current scenario, there is an increasing need to have faster product development and achieve the optimum design quickly. In an automobile air conditioning system, the main function of HVAC third row floor duct is to get the sufficient airflow from the rear heating ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and to provide the sufficient airflow within the leg locations of passenger. Apart from airflow and temperature, fatigue strength of the duct is one of the important factors that need to be considered while designing and optimizing the duct. The challenging task is to package the duct below the carpet within the constrained space and the duct should withstand the load applied by the passenger leg and the luggage. Finite element analysis (FEA) has been used extensively to validate the stress and deformation of the duct under different loading conditions applied over the duct system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0164
Venkatesan Muthusamy, S. Sathish Kumar, Saravanan Sambandan
Abstract In an automotive air-conditioning (AC) system, upfront prediction of the cabin cool down rate in the initial design stage will help in reducing the overall product development (PD) time. Vehicle having higher seating capacity will have higher thermal load and providing thermal comfort to all passengers uniformly is a challenging task for the automotive HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning) industry. Dual HVAC unit is generally used to provide uniform cooling to a large cabin volume. One dimensional (1D) simulation is being extensively used to predict the HVAC performance during the initial stage of PD. The refrigerant loop with components such as compressor, condenser, TXV and evaporator was modeled. The complicated vehicle cabin including the glazing surfaces and enclosures were modeled as a three row duct system using 1D tool AMESim®. The material type, density, specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity of the material were specified.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0163
Gursaran D. Mathur
The author has developed a model that can be used to predict build-up of cabin carbon dioxide levels for automobiles based on many variables. There are a number of parameters including number of occupants that dictates generation of CO2 within the control volume, cabin leakage (infiltration or exfiltration) characteristics, cabin volume, blower position or airflow rate; vehicle age, etc. Details of the analysis is presented in the paper. Finally, the developed model has been validated with experimental data. The simulated data follows the same trend and matches fairly well with the experimental data.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0165
Jingwei Zhu, Stefan Elbel
Abstract Expansion work recovery by two-phase ejector is known to be beneficial to vapor compression cycle performance. However, one of the biggest challenges with ejector vapor compression cycle is that the ejector cycle performance is sensitive to working condition changes which are common in many applications, including automotive AC systems. Different working conditions require different ejector geometries to achieve maximum performance. Slightly different geometries may result in substantially different COPs under the same conditions. Ejector motive nozzle throat diameter (motive nozzle restrictiveness) is one of the key parameters that can significantly affect COP. This paper presents the experimental investigation of a new motive nozzle restrictiveness control mechanism for two-phase ejectors used in vapor compression cycles, which has the advantages of being simple, potentially less costly and less vulnerable to clogging.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0166
Noori Pandit
Abstract The effects of substituting a 12 mm thick subcool on top condenser in place of a 16 mm subcool on bottom condenser are evaluated in a vehicle level AC pull down test. The A to B testing shows that a thinner condenser with subcool on top exhibits no degradation in AC performance while resulting in a lower total system refrigerant charge. The results are from vehicle level tests run in a climatically controlled vehicle level wind tunnel to simulate an AC pull down at 43°C ambient. In addition to cabin temperature and AC vent temperatures, comparison of compressor head pressures was also done. The conclusion of the study was that a standard 16 mm thick subcool on bottom IRD condenser can be replaced by a 12 mm thick subcool on top IRD condenser with no negative effects on performance.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0159
Peng Liu, Ge-Qun Shu, Hua Tian, Xuan Wang, Dongzhan Jing
Abstract The environmental issues combined with the rising of crude oil price have attracted more interest in waste heat recovery of marine engine. Currently, the thermal efficiency of marine diesels only reaches 48~51%, and the rest energy is rejected to the environment. Meanwhile, energy is required when generating electricity and cooling that are necessary for vessels. Hence, the cogeneration system is treated as the promising technology to conform the strict environment regulation while offering a high energy utilization ratio. In this paper, an electricity and cooling cogeneration system combined of Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) and Absorption Refrigeration Cycle (ARC) is proposed to recover waste heat from marine engine. ORC is applied to recover exhaust waste heat to provide electricity while ARC is used to utilize condensation heat of ORC to produce additional cooling.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0160
Longjie Xiao, Tianming He, Gangfeng Tan, Bo Huang, Xianyao Ping
Abstract While the car ownership increasing all over the world, the unutilized thermal energy in automobile exhaust system is gradually being realized and valued by researchers around the world for better driving energy efficiency. For the unexpected urban traffic, the frequent start and stop processes as well as the acceleration and deceleration lead to the temperature fluctuation of the exhaust gas, which means the unstable hot-end temperature of the thermoelectric module generator (TEG). By arranging the heat conduction oil circulation at the hot end, the hot-end temperature’s fluctuation of the TEG can be effectively reduced, at the expense of larger system size and additional energy supply for the circulation. This research improves the TEG hot-end temperature stability by installing solid heat capacity material(SHCM) to the area between the outer wall of the exhaust pipe and the TEG, which has the merits of simple structure, none energy consumption and light weight.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0161
Dandong Wang, Cichong Liu, Jiangping Chen
Abstract This study investigates the cycle performance and potential advantages of the replacement of fin-and-tube evaporator with parallel flow micro-channel evaporator, in R134a roof-top bus air conditioner (AC) system. The heat exchangers for bus AC system are featured by a stringent space height limitation. The configuration of inclined four piece or six piece micro-channel evaporators was proposed to satisfy this space requirement, instead of original two piece fin-and-tube evaporators. Additionally, the individual superheat control method with thermostatic expansive valve (TXV) in each evaporator was adopted to improve refrigerant distribution. Three kinds of micro-channel evaporators were designed and equipped in an 8-m roof-top bus AC system. Except the replacement of evaporators, TXV and connecting pipes, other cycle components were kept same.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0162
Jun Li, Lili Feng, Pega Hrnjak
Abstract This paper presents the results of an experimental study to determine the effect of vapor-liquid refrigerant separation in a microchannel condenser of a MAC system. R134a is used as the working fluid. A condenser with separation and a baseline condenser identical on the air side have been tested to evaluate the difference in the performance due to separation. Two categories of experiments have been conducted: the heat exchanger-level test and the system-level test. In the heat exchanger-level test it is found that the separation condenser condenses from 1.6% to 7.4% more mass flow than the baseline at the same inlet and outlet temperature (enthalpy); the separation condenser condenses the same mass flow to a lower temperature than the baseline condenser does. In the system-level test, COP is compared under the same superheat, subcooling and refrigerating capacity. Separation condenser shows up to 6.6% a higher COP than the baseline condenser.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0155
Yongbing Xu, Gangfeng Tan, Xuexun Guo, Xianyao Ping
Abstract The closed cabin temperature is anticipated to be cooled down when it is a bit hot inside the driving car. The traditional air-condition lowers the cabin temperature by frequently switching the status of the compressor, which increases the engine’s parasitic power and shortens the compressor’s service-life. The semiconductor auxiliary cooling system with the properties of no moving parts, high control precision and quick response has the potential to assist the on-board air-condition in modulating the cabin temperature with relative small ranges. Little temperature differences between the cabin and the outside environment means that the system energy consumption to ensure the occupant comfort is relatively low and the inefficiency could be made up by the renewable energy source.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0156
Olaf Erik Herrmann, Matteo Biglia, Takashi YASUDA, Sebastian Visser
Abstract The coming Diesel powertrains will remain as key technology in Europe to achieve the stringent 2025 CO2 emission targets. Especially for applications which are unlikely to be powered by pure EV technology like Light Duty vehicles and C/D segment vehicles which require a long driving range this is the case. To cope with these low CO2 targets the amount of electrification e.g. in form of 48V Belt-driven integrated Starter Generator (BSG) systems will increase. On the other hand the efficiency of the Diesel engine will increase which will result in lower exhaust gas temperatures resulting in a challenge to keep the required NOx reduction system efficiencies under Real Drive Emissions (RDE) driving conditions. In order to comply with the RDE legislation down to -7 °C ambient an efficient thermal management is one potential approach.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0157
Forrest Jehlik, Simeon Iliev, Eric Wood, Jeff Gonder
Abstract This work details two approaches for evaluating transmission warming technology: experimental dynamometer testing and development of a simplified transmission efficiency model to quantify effects under varied real world ambient and driving conditions. Two vehicles were used for this investigation: a 2013 Ford Taurus and a highly instrumented 2011 Ford Fusion (Taurus and Fusion). The Taurus included a production transmission warming system and was tested over hot and cold ambient temperatures with the transmission warming system enabled and disabled. A robot driver was used to minimize driver variability and increase repeatability. Additionally the instrumented Fusion was tested cold and with the transmission pre-heated prior to completing the test cycles. These data were used to develop a simplified thermally responsive transmission model to estimate effects of transmission warming in real world conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0158
Masaaki Nakamura, Koichi Machida, Kiyohiro Shimokawa
Abstract A diesel engine is advantageous in its high thermal efficiency, however it still wastes about 50% of total input energy to exhaust and cooling losses. A feasibility study of thermoacoustic refrigerator was carried out as one of the means to recuperate waste heat. The thermoacoustic refrigerator prototyped for this study showed a capability to achieve cooling temperature lower than -20 degree C, which indicated that the system has a potential to be used in refrigerator trucks not only for cargo compartment cooling but also for cabin cooling.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0150
Ankit Kumar Shukla, Raj Dhami, Aashish Bhargava, Sanjay Tiwari
Abstract In the current landscape of commercial vehicle industry, fuel economy is one of the major parameter for fleet owner’s profitability as well as greenhouse gasses emission. Less fuel efficiency results in more fuel consumption; use of conventional fuel in engines also makes environment polluted. The rapid growth in fuel prices has led to the demand for technologies that can improve the fuel efficiency of the vehicle. Phase change material (PCMs) for Thermal energy storage system (TES) is one of the specific technologies that not only can conserve energy to a large extent but also can reduce emission as well as the dependency on convention fuel. There is a great variety of PCMs that can be used for the extensive range of temperatures, making them attractive in a number of applications in automobiles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0152
Gang Liu, Zheng Zhao, Hao Guan, Chunhui Zhang, Dingwei Gao, Yongwei Cao
Abstract Advanced technology of thermal management is an effective method to reduce fuel consumption. There are several different technologies for coolant control, for example, electric water pump, split cooling and coolant control module. Through 1D thermal management simulation, coolant control module was chose for the test due to the best benefit for fuel consumption under NEDC cycle. 1D thermal management simulation model includes vehicle, cooling system, lubrication system and detailed engine model with all friction components. Coolant control module is designed to fix on 2.0L turbocharger GDI gasoline and to control 5 coolant ways, including radiator, by-pass, engine oil cooler, cabin heater and transmission oil cooler. The prototype is designed and made. The function and strategy is verified on designed test-bed. The vehicle with coolant control module is running under NEDC cycle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0154
Sudhi Uppuluri, Hemant R Khalane, Ajay Naiknaware
Abstract With the upcoming regulations for fuel economy and emissions, there is a significant interest among vehicle OEMs and fleet managers in developing computational methodologies to help understand the influence and interactions of various key parameters on Fuel Economy and carbon dioxide emissions. The analysis of the vehicle as a complete system enables designers to understand the local and global effects of various technologies that can be employed for fuel economy and emission improvement. In addition, there is a particular interest in not only quantifying the benefit over standard duty-cycles but also for real world driving conditions. The present study investigates impact of exhaust heat recovery system (EHRS) on a typical 1.2L naturally aspirated gasoline engine passenger car representative of the India market.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0144
Zhijia Yang, Song Lan, Richard Stobart, Edward Winward, Rui Chen, Iain Harber
Abstract The application of state-of-art thermoelectric generator (TEG) in automotive engine has potential to reduce more than 2% fuel consumption and hence the CO2 emissions. This figure is expected to be increased to 5%~10% in the near future when new thermoelectric material with higher properties is fabricated. However, in order to maximize the TEG output power, there are a few issues need to be considered in the design stage such as the number of modules, the connection of modules, the geometry of the thermoelectric module, the DC-DC converter circuit, the geometry of the heat exchanger especially the hot side heat exchanger etc. These issues can only be investigated via a proper TEG model. The authors introduced four ways of TEG modelling which in the increasing complexity order are MATLB function based model, MATLAB Simscape based Simulink model, GT-power TEG model and CFD STAR-CCM+ model. Both Simscape model and GT-Power model have intrinsic dynamic model performance.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0147
Brian Sweetman, Ingo Schmitz, Burkhard Hupertz, Nathanael Shaw, John Goldstein
Abstract Driven by the demand to continuously reduce the development time of new vehicles, it is of critical importance to robustly develop design and packaging concepts early within a new vehicle program using CAE methods. As the underhood and underbody package is constantly getting tighter and the engine power increases, the development of a sophisticated heat protection concept requires much more attention. For many years, heat protection CAE is an integral part of the vehicle development at Ford. However, due to challenges related to transient analysis, e.g. high numerical effort, simulation of transient buoyancy driven airflow (thermal soak), and dependency on high quality thermal material properties, heat protection CAE was primarily focused on steady state vehicle operating conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0141
Ray Host, Peter Moilanen, Marcus Fried, Bhageerath Bogi
Abstract Future vehicle North American emissions standards (e.g., North American Tier 3 Bin 30 or LEVIII SULEV 30) require the exhaust catalyst to be greater than 80% efficient by 20 seconds after the engine has been started in the Federal Test Procedure. Turbocharged engines are especially challenged to deliver fast catalyst light-off since the presence of the turbocharger in the exhaust flow path significantly increases exhaust system heat losses. A solution to delivering cost effective SULEV 30 emissions in turbocharged engines is to achieve fast catalyst light-off by reducing exhaust system heat losses in cold start, without increasing catalyst thermal degradation during high load operation. A CAE methodology to assess the thermal performance of exhaust system hardware options, from the exhaust port to the catalyst brick face is described, which enables compliance with future emissions regulations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0143
Neelakandan Kandasamy, Steve Whelan
Abstract During cabin warm-up, effective air distribution by vehicle climate control systems plays a vital role. For adequate visibility to the driver, major portion of the air is required to be delivered through the defrost center ducts to clear the windshield. HVAC unit deliver hot air with help of cabin heater and PTC heater. When hot air interacts with cold windshield it causes thermal losses, and windshield act as sink. This process may causes in delay of cabin warming during consecutive cabin warming process. Thus it becomes essential to predict the effect of different windscreen defrost characteristics. In this paper, sensitivity analysis is carried for different windscreen defrosts characteristics like ambient conditions, modes of operation; change in material properties along with occupant thermal comfort is predicted. An integrated 1D/3D CFD approach is proposed to evaluate these conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0142
Chunhui Zhang, Mesbah Uddin, Lee Foster
Abstract The demand for better fuel economy pushed by both consumer and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), made OEMs to put more effort on other areas beside vehicle external aerodynamics. As one of these areas, under-hood aero-thermal management has taken an important role in the new road vehicle design process, due to the combination of growing engine power demands, utilization of sophisticated under-hood and underbody devices, and emission regulations. The challenge of the under-hood aerothermal management is not only due to the complexity of under-hood compartment, but also as a result of the complex heat transfer phenomena involving conduction, convention and thermal radiation. In this study, 3D CFD simulations were used to investigate the under-hood aerothermal flow features. The full vehicle model with detailed under-hood components used in this study is a Hyundai Veloster. A commercial CDF code Star-CCM+ version 11.04 from CD-adapco was used to run all the simulations.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0130
Phillip Bonkoski, Amey Y. Karnik, Adrian Fuxman
Abstract Control of vehicle powertrain thermal management systems is becoming more challenging as the number of components is growing, and as a result, advanced control methods are being investigated. Model predictive control (MPC) is particularly interesting in this application because it provides a suitable framework to manage actuator and temperature constraints, and can potentially leverage preview information if available in the future. In previous SAE publications (2015-01-0336 and 2016-01-0215), a robust MPC control formulation was proposed, and both simulation and powertrain thermal lab test results were provided. In this work, we discuss the controller deployment in a vehicle; where controller validation is done through road driving and on a wind tunnel chassis dynamometer. This paper discusses challenges of linear MPC implementation related to nonlinearities in this over-actuated thermal system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0134
Jan Eller, Heinrich Reister, Thomas Binner, Nils Widdecke, Jochen Wiedemann
Abstract There is a growing need for life-cycle data – so-called collectives – when developing components like elastomer engine mounts. Current standardized extreme load cases are not sufficient for establishing such collectives. Supplementing the use of endurance testing data, a prediction methodology for component temperature collectives utilizing existing 3D CFD simulation models is presented. The method uses support points to approximate the full collective. Each support point is defined by a component temperature and a position on the time axis of the collective. Since it is the only currently available source for component temperature data, endurance testing data is used to develop the new method. The component temperature range in this data set is divided in temperature bands. Groups of driving states are determined which are each representative of an individual band. Each of the resulting four driving state spaces is condensed into a substitute load case.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0124
V N Bhasker, Abhinav Agarwal, Abhishek Sharma, Avisek Das, Nirajkumar Mishra
Abstract Vehicle heat management has become a serious concern due to escalating under-hood and exhaust temperatures. Compact vehicle packaging caused by downsizing has further magnified this concern. In an automobile, fuel is stored in a metallic or plastic fuel tank. In addition to fuel storage, temperature inside fuel tank has to be maintained at a certain limit in order to control high fuel evaporation rate and prevent deterioration of parts. The fuel tank surface temperature is governed by heat rejection from the engine, exhaust system and heat radiated from the road. Generally, mechanical shielding has been found to be an efficient defense to the heat management problem. However ‘what to shield’, ‘where to place the shield’ and ‘how to shield’ are the major challenges. This paper describes a methodology followed to reduce temperature on fuel tank surface by varying material, geometry and layout of heat shields.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0121
Zhijia Yang, Jesus PradoGonjal, Matthew Phillips, Song Lan, Anthony Powell, Paz Vaqueiro, Min Gao, Richard Stobart, Rui Chen
Abstract Thermoelectric generator (TEG) has received more and more attention in its application in the harvesting of waste thermal energy in automotive engines. Even though the commercial Bismuth Telluride thermoelectric material only have 5% efficiency and 250°C hot side temperature limit, it is possible to generate peak 1kW electrical energy from a heavy-duty engine. If being equipped with 500W TEG, a passenger car has potential to save more than 2% fuel consumption and hence CO2 emission reduction. TEG has advantages of compact and motionless parts over other thermal harvest technologies such as Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) and Turbo-Compound (TC). Intense research works are being carried on improving the thermal efficiency of the thermoelectric materials and increasing the hot side temperature limit. Future thermoelectric modules are expected to have 10% to 20% efficiency and over 500°C hot side temperature limit.
Viewing 61 to 90 of 8600