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1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480106
ROBERT R. HOUSTON, JOHN M. PARKER
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480230
D. O. MOELLER, O. A. SANNE
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470162
CHARLES W. MORRIS
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470148
Amos E. Neyhart, Carl G. Seashore
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470096
T. D. DAVIES
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470137
JOHN J. CASEY, R. DIXON SPEAS
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460028
E. J. W. Ragsdale
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460064
W. W. Thayer
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460252
WALTHER PROKOSCH
VARIOUS factors in cabin design are discussed by Mr. Prokosch in their relation to the governing considerations of types of service to be offered. Suggestions for overcoming some of the present discrepancies in design and furnishings are brought up, together with their relation to weight, cost, and ground time.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460149
BRUCE E. DEL MAR
Summary A study is made in this paper of the fundamental requirements and methods associated with providing uncompromised air freshness, temperature conditioning, and humidity comfort for the passengers and crew of a typical large pressurized transport airplane, such as the Douglas DC-6, for flight under 30,000 feet. Investigation is made of the advisability of reclamation of cabin air through recirculation or by the use of counter-odorants. Special emphasis is given to the investigation and analysis of cabin air humidities. Air conditioning design recommendations for transport aircraft are made in the paper based on the charts and tables developed.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460150
H. J. WOOD
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460200
BERNARD L. MESSINGER
THE need for refrigeration in aircraft air conditioning has not been generally recognized in the past. Shown here are the reasons why refrigeration is a necessity. Three different methods of accomplishing it are also presented. The cooling requirements of the Lockheed Constellation are used as a basis for the study.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460165
ALBERT P. ELEBASH
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460157
WALTHER PROKOSCH
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450206
G. F. BEAL
THE safety and dependability of scheduled air transportation depends, in part, on how practical is the cockpit in which the pilots spend their time and carry on their functions while in flight. The author of this paper, himself a pilot, has compiled here information gained from a questionnaire answered by representatives from every scheduled airline in the country. It appears that these pilots have definite ideas on the improvements that are needed in cockpits, discussed by the author under the following headings: 1. Cockpit window layout (including provisions for all-weather visibility). 2. Instrument panel arrangement. 3. Cockpit lighting. 4. Pilot comfort (including adequate seats, ventilation, and heating). 5. Type, location, and accessibility of controls.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450167
GREGORY FLYNN, ARTHUR F. UNDERWOOD
INCREASING engine outputs have required methods to control the piston temperature. The work presented in this paper shows one successful means through the use of a piston of low conductive, correlated with an appropriate rate of piston cooling oil from the engine lubrication system. The effects of coolant temperature, load, and speed over the propeller load curve, and a piston baffle, on piston temperatures are investigated by thermocouples silver soldered in a 6 x 6½-in. diesel, two-cycle piston. Tests indicate that the rate of cooling oil does not have to be excessive to secure adequate cooling. Substantiating data from an 8 x 10-in. diesel engine are given. Steel piston designs for use with jet oil cooling are shown. These are for the 6-in. diesel on which most of the data for the paper were taken.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450062
Gordon Hebert
ABSTRACT
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450020
A. D. Dircksen
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450003
M. F. Vanik
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440093
Henry Dreyfuss
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440098
M. G. Beard
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440095
Charles W. Morris
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430083
Maurice Olley
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420132
PAUL A. SCHERER
THIS paper presents a simple and rapid method of determining the performance of cross-flow intercoolers, oil coolers, or Prestone radiators from laboratory tests of a model or basic unit of the cooler. The method lends itself equally as well to the determination of the size of a cooler of any set performance. Due to the comparative rapidity with which these calculations can be made, it becomes, with the use of this method, an easy matter to make a series of calculations to determine the relations between lengths, cooling air flow, and pressure drops, for any desired performance.
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420008
N. S. Leichter, R. S. Rosé
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