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Viewing 8551 to 8580 of 8586
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440098
M. G. Beard
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440095
Charles W. Morris
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440093
Henry Dreyfuss
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430083
Maurice Olley
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420008
N. S. Leichter, R. S. Rosé
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420132
PAUL A. SCHERER
THIS paper presents a simple and rapid method of determining the performance of cross-flow intercoolers, oil coolers, or Prestone radiators from laboratory tests of a model or basic unit of the cooler. The method lends itself equally as well to the determination of the size of a cooler of any set performance. Due to the comparative rapidity with which these calculations can be made, it becomes, with the use of this method, an easy matter to make a series of calculations to determine the relations between lengths, cooling air flow, and pressure drops, for any desired performance.
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400135
Herbert Chase
MANY question whether a complete job of air-conditioning passenger cars for all weather conditions can be done at a price which most car buyers care to pay and with assurance that dependable and acceptable results can be guaranteed, Mr. Chase reports in prefacing this paper, a comparative study of existing heating, ventilating, and cooling systems. Some 1939 and many more 1940 car models, he believes, yield greatly improved results in heating the entire car and ventilating it well with all windows closed, but, he points out, the design of such systems is still in a state of flux. Mr.
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400171
W. E. LAY, L. C. FISHER
THIS paper reports work begun in 1935 at the instigation of the Murray Corp. of America. Methods used in studying the relations between the automobile seat cushion and its function in transporting passengers with greater comfort and less fatigue are described. Constructed for this purpose was a piece of apparatus called the Universal Test Seat, whose dimensions were completely adjustable with arrangements to vary the distribution of the supporting pressure in any manner which seemed most comfortable to the passenger. The authors describe tests made by use of this apparatus, present summaries of some of the results recorded and conclude that, to give the passenger the maximum comfort and least fatigue, the following mechanical objectives should be attained by the cushion: 1. To support the passenger over a large area to get the smallest unit pressure on the flesh; 2.
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400151
CLYDE R. PATON, E. C. PICKARD, V. H. HOEHN
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400159
W. W. DAVIES
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390133
E. E. Ellies
PRESENT comfort requirements and design trends, Mr. Ellies contends, have created new demands in passenger-car seating. He points out that the natural qualities of foamed-latex cushioning augur its consideration in meeting these seating problems. Mr. Ellies' discussion includes a review of the various applications of this material in the transportation industry. He also describes the properties of foamed latex.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390109
R. E. Gould
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390009
E. L. Mayo
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390094
Edward C. Wells, E. Gifford Emery
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390150
William B. Stout
FUTURE motor-car development, Mr. Stout contends, will follow the functional art of bus and airplane development rather than motor-car precedents. The interior instead of the exterior, he believes, is the basic thing to be studied, pointing out that passenger room has been growing less and less. The car of the future, therefore, he predicts, will have an interior that extends out the full width of the car with no running boards, will have totally enclosed wheels, will have a unit frame and body, the engine in the rear, and either double or sliding doors. The effect of rear-engine construction on ride, bounce control, braking, and traction on muddy and icy roads is explained. New body materials, such as plastics, are looked for on future cars to insulate them from the radiant heat of the sun, especially for roofs. Mr. Stout sees light-weight air-cooled engines in future cars, weighing not over 3½ lb per hp. The possibilities of rubber springs are discussed.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390029
Peter Parke
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390177
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380086
L. J. Verbarg
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380096
F. J. Linsenmeyer
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380147
L. W. Child
ALL factors necessary for year-around air conditioning of cars and buses are covered generally in this paper. How the desired results were obtained in both winter and summer air conditioning is explained with the aid of a chart of air requirements. Types of equipment are discussed, especially the refrigerating system, giving powers, capacities, and safety factors.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360130
Macy O. Teetor
CYLINDER temperature is definitely one of the many important factors affecting the efficiency and life of an internal-combustion engine. Experience has indicated that cylinder temperature can be too low or too high. Each temperature extreme produces its own particular set of evils, but the high temperatures are the most destructive and the most difficult to control. Cooling-water or fin temperature is only slightly indicative of the cylinder-surface temperatures. Since we are most vitally interested in the temperature of the working surfaces, research on the subject must start on the inside. The evils of thermal distortion are well known but probably not fully appreciated. Practically every factor of engine performance is dependent upon lubrication. Excessive cylinder temperature destroys lubrication which, in turn, eventually shortens the life and decreases the efficiency of an engine.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350052
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340067
Fred R. Nohavec
1933-01-01
Technical Paper
330026
F. A. Moss
(ABSTRACT) Dependability, economy, durability, speed, safety, appearance and riding comfort, are the factors considered by Dr. Moss in his resume of progress made in automobile development. Passing then to the problem of the effect of automobile riding on the health of passengers and drivers, he discusses air conditioning, eye strain and body posture while riding. Carbon monoxide probably is the most important of the extraneous harmful substances in relation to air conditioning and an inexpensive investigation, using a carbon-monoxide indicator, is recommended to secure its elimination. Other harmful factors are temperature, relative humidity and motion of the air. A novel suggestion is made that rats be used experimentally in studying the effects of drafts on passengers. Studies to lessen eye strain and improve body posture are also desirable.
1932-01-01
Technical Paper
320025
H. A. Brunn
1932-01-01
Technical Paper
320059
J. W. Frazer
ABSTRACT
1931-01-01
Technical Paper
310015
W. R. Ramsaur
INCREASES in horsepower, compression pressure and engine speed, which have occurred in the last five years, have imposed additional duties on the lubrication system, points out the author, who declares that bearing failure is the most serious trouble resulting on the road from the use of oil temperatures exceeding 300 deg. fahr. To reduce this temperature to a figure between 210 and 230 deg. fahr., heat must be dissipated from the oil at a rate in excess of 250 B.t.u. per min. or a heat equivalent of approximately 6 hp. Two types of oil-cooler, one using air and the other water as the cooling medium, are available at present. The former is extensively employed in connection with air-cooled engines, particularly on airplanes, but the latter is in more general use on automobiles.
1926-01-01
Technical Paper
260014
A G HERRESHOFF
Any cooling-system is, in reality, a cylinder-temperature control-system. The best operating-temperature depends upon fixed physical characteristics of metals, oils and gases. The advantages of a fixed temperature of 212 deg. fahr. under all operating and weather conditions are: Reduced piston-friction, better vaporization, elimination of crankcase-oil dilution, and prevention of rusting, thereby increasing the life of the engine. A method of determining the cylinder-wall temperatures is described and a comparison of the temperatures for water and for steam-cooling under various operating-conditions shows that, with steam-cooling, the hot-spots are no hotter and the cooler parts of the cylinder have a more nearly uniform higher-temperature. A description of the Rushmore steam cooling-system is given, together with the reason for the design of each part and a method of calculating its size.
1926-01-01
Technical Paper
260016
This subject is treated in a paper in two parts. Part I, by Alex Taub, deals with laboratory tests to prove by comparative data that the higher average operating-temperatures maintained in the engine by the constant-temperature, or evaporation, system of cooling have negligible detrimental effects. Part II, by L. P. Saunders, gives the results of road-tests of cars operated under the same conditions when fitted with a standard water-cooling radiator-core and with a constant-temperature cross-flow condenser-core. Although contamination of the crankcase oil by heavy ends of the fuel is not prevented by the higher temperature of constant-temperature operation, it is asserted that this higher temperature is effective in striking an acceptable balance in such contamination and results of the tests show that the cylinder-walls are maintained at temperatures sufficiently above the vaporization point of water to reduce the condensation of water vapor to the minimum.
Viewing 8551 to 8580 of 8586