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Viewing 121 to 150 of 6148
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1427
Richard Young, Li Hsieh, Sean Seaman
Abstract The Dimensional Model of Driver Demand is extended to include Auditory-Vocal (i.e., pure “voice” tasks), and Mixed-Mode tasks (i.e., a combination of Auditory-Vocal mode with visual-only, or with Visual-Manual modes). The extended model was validated with data from 24 participants using the 2014 Toyota Corolla infotainment system in a video-based surrogate driving venue. Twenty-two driver performance metrics were collected, including total eyes-off-road time (TEORT), mean single glance duration (MSGD), and proportion of long single glances (LGP). Other key metrics included response time (RT) and miss rate to a Tactile Detection Response Task (TDRT). The 22 metrics were simplified using Principal Component Analysis to two dimensions. The major dimension, explaining 60% of total variance, we interpret as the attentional effects of cognitive demand. The minor dimension, explaining 20% of total variance, we interpret as physical demand.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1439
Nazan Aksan, Lauren Sager, Sarah Hacker, Robert Marini, Jeffrey Dawson, Steven Anderson, Matthew Rizzo
Abstract We examined the effectiveness of a heads-up Forward Collision Warning (FCW) system in 39 younger to middle aged drivers (25-50, mean = 35 years) and 37 older drivers (66-87, mean = 77 years). The warnings were implemented in a fixed based, immersive, 180 degree forward field of view simulator. The FCW included a visual advisory component consisting of a red horizontal bar which flashed in the center screen of the simulator that was triggered at time-to-collision (TTC) 4 seconds. The bar roughly overlapped the rear bumper of the lead vehicle, just below the driver’s line-of-sight. A sustained auditory tone (∼80 dB) was activated at TTC=2 to alert the driver to an imminent collision. Hence, the warning system differed from the industry standard in significant ways. 95% Confidence intervals for the safety gains ranged from -.03 to .19 seconds in terms of average correction time across several activations. Older and younger adults did not differ in terms of safety gains.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1486
Qi Zhang, Bronislaw Gepner, Jacek Toczyski, Jason Kerrigan
Abstract While over 30% of US occupant fatalities occur in rollover crashes, no dummy has been developed for such a condition. Currently, an efficient, cost-effective methodology is being implemented to develop a biofidelic rollover dummy. Instead of designing a rollover dummy from scratch, this methodology identifies a baseline dummy and modifies it to improve its response in a rollover crash. Using computational models of the baseline dummy, including both multibody (MB) and finite element (FE) models, the dummy’s structure is continually modified until its response is aligned (using BioRank/CORA metric) with biofidelity targets. A previous study (Part I) identified the THOR dummy as a suitable baseline dummy by comparing the kinematic responses of six existing dummies with PMHS response corridors through laboratory rollover testing.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1526
Daniel V. McGehee, Cheryl A. Roe, Linda Ng Boyle, Yuqing Wu, Kazutoshi Ebe, James Foley, Linda Angell
Abstract Pedal misapplications may be rare, but the outcomes can be tragic. A naturalistic driving study with 30 drivers was conducted to gain a better understanding of foot pedal behaviors. Foot movements were observed from the moment subjects entered and positioned themselves in their vehicle, and continued through starting the ignition, shifting into gear, accelerating to driving speed, and finally, resting their foot after parking the vehicle. A coding methodology was developed to categorize the various foot movements and behaviors. Over 3,300 startup and parking sequences were coded. This paper describes the unique challenges involved in classifying foot movements and behaviors when drivers’ intentions are not known. For example, hesitant or interrupted foot movements often occurred when a driver was transitioning from a gas pedal press to a brake pedal press.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1507
Jisi Tang, Qing Zhou, Bingbing Nie, Tsuyoshi Yasuki, Yuichi Kitagawa
Abstract Lower extremities are the most frequently injured body regions in vehicle-to-pedestrian collisions and such injuries usually lead to long-term loss of health or permanent disability. However, influence of pre-impact posture on the resultant impact response has not been understood well. This study aims to investigate the effects of preimpact pedestrian posture on the loading and the kinematics of the lower extremity when struck laterally by vehicle. THUMS pedestrian model was modified to consider both standing and mid-stance walking postures. Impact simulations were conducted under three severities, including 25, 33 and 40 kph impact for both postures. Global kinematics of pedestrian was studied. Rotation of the knee joint about the three axes was calculated and pelvic translational and rotational motions were analyzed.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0260
Yoshiichi Ozeki, Hideaki Nagano, Itsuhei Kohri
Abstract In order to develop various parts and components of electric vehicles, understanding the effects of their structures and thermal performance on the energy consumption and cruising distance is important. However, such essential and detailed information is generally not always available to suppliers of vehicle parts and components. This paper presents the development of a simple model of the energy consumption by an electric vehicle in order to roughly calculate the cruising performance based only on the published information to give to suppliers, who otherwise cannot obtain the necessary information. The method can calculate the cruising distance within an error of 4% compared to the published information. The effects of the glass and body heat transfer characteristics on the cruising performance in winter were considered as an example application of the proposed model.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0461
Wenfei Li, Haiping Du, Weihua Li
Abstract This paper proposes a new braking torque distribution strategy for electric vehicles equipped with a hybrid hydraulic braking and regenerative braking system. The braking torque distribution strategy is proposed based on the required braking torque and the regenerative braking system’s status. To get the required braking torque, a new strategy is designed based on the road conditions and driver's braking intentions. Through the estimated road surface, a robust wheel slip controller is designed to calculate the overall maximum braking torque required for the anti-lock braking system (ABS) under this road condition. Driver's braking intentions are classified as the emergency braking and the normal braking. In the case of emergency braking, the required braking torque is to be equal to the overall maximum braking torque. In the case of normal braking, the command braking torque is proportional to the pedal stroke.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0462
Chunlei Wang, Xinjie Zhang, Konghui Guo, Fangwu Ma, Dong Chen
Abstract With the development of the advanced driver assistance system and autonomous vehicle techniques, a precise description of the driver’s steering behavior with mathematical models has attracted a great attention. However, the driver’s steering maneuver demonstrates the stochastic characteristic due to a series of complex and uncertain factors, such as the weather, road, and driver’s physiological and psychological limits, generating negative effects on the performance of the vehicle or the driver assistance system. Hence, this paper explores the stochastic characteristic of driver’s steering behavior and a novel steering controller considering this stochastic characteristic is proposed based on stochastic model predictive control (SMPC). Firstly, a search algorithm is derived to describe the driver’s road preview behavior.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0466
Daan Roethof, Tarik Sezer, Mustafa Ali Arat, Barys Shyrokau
Research of the past century has demonstrated that wheel camber regulation provides great potential to improve vehicle safety and performance. This led to the development of various prototypes of the camber mechanisms over the last decade. An overview of the existing prototypes is discussed in the presented paper. Most of the investigations related to camber control cover open-loop maneuvers to evaluate a vehicle response. However, a driver’s perception and his reaction can be the most critical factor during vehicle operation. Therefore, the research goal of the presented study is to assess an influence of active camber control on steering feel and driving performance using a driving simulator. In the proposed investigation, a dSPACE ASM vehicle model has been extended by introducing advanced models of steering system and active camber regulation. The steering system describes dynamics of steering components (upper and lower columns, torsion bar, steering rack and others).
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1303
Haiqing Xu, Chang Jin, Hong Zhou, Yi Zhou
Abstract On the study of reducing the disturbance on driver’s attention induced by low frequency vehicle interior stationary noise, a subjective evaluation is firstly carried out by means of rank rating method which introduces Distraction Level (DL) as evaluation index. A visual-finger response test is developed to help evaluating members better recognize the Distraction Level during the evaluation. A non-linear back propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) is then modeled for the prediction of subjective Distraction Level, in which linear sound pressure RMS amplitudes of five Critical Band Rates (CBRs) from 20 to 500Hz are selected as inputs of the model. These inputs comprise an input vector of BPANN. Furthermore, active noise equalization (ANE) on DL is realized based on Filtered-x Least Mean Square (FxLMS) algorithm that controls the gain coefficients of inputs of trained BPANN.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1304
Tadayoshi Fukushima, Hitoshi Takagi, Toshio Enomoto, Hiroyuki Sawada, Tomoyuki Kaneda
Abstract Interior noise caused by exterior air flow, or wind noise, is one of the noise-and-vibration phenomena for which a systematic simulation method has been desired for enabling their prediction. One of the main difficulties in simulating wind noise is that, unlike most other noises from the engine or road input, wind noise has not one but two different types of sources, namely, convective and acoustic ones. Therefore, in order to synthesize the interior sound pressure level (SPL), the body sensitivities (interior SPL/outer source level) for both types of sources have to be considered. In particular, sensitivity to the convective input has not been well understood, and hence it has not been determined. Moreover, the high-frequency nature of wind noise (e.g., the main energy range extends up to 4000 Hz) has limited the effective application of CAE for determining body sensitivities, for example, from the side window glass to the occupants’ ears.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1553
Akihito Yamamoto, Wataru Tanaka, Takafumi Makino, Shunya Tanaka, Ken Tahara
Abstract This paper reports that estimation accuracy of suspension stroke velocity is increased by considering the damping force delay characteristics to an observer. Thereby ride comfort is improved, using the simple and low-cost semi active suspension systems that use only three vertical acceleration sensors.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1435
Amber Hall, Michael Kolich
Abstract Many studies have been conducted and supporting literature has been published to better understand thermal comfort for the automotive environment, particularly, for the HVAC system within the cabin. However, reliable assessment of occupant thermal comfort for seating systems has lacked in development and understanding. Evaluation of seat system performance in terms of comfort has been difficult to quantify and thus most tests have been established such that the hardware components are tested to determine if the thermal feature does no harm to the customer. This paper evaluates the optimal seat surface temperature range to optimize human thermal comfort for an automotive seating system application for heated and ventilated seats.
2016-04-01
Magazine
Electronic Warfare Next Generation FPGAs for Electronic Warfare Systems Materials: Composites Managing the Impact of Nanomaterials in Aerospace Manufacturing Aerospace Materials/Manufacturing Turbine Flow Meters Alternative Power Sources Designing a Power Generation System for a More-Electric Aircraft
2016-03-27
Article
Self-driving car project CEO John Krafcik discussed Google's work underway toward fully autonomous vehicles, at a recent NY forum. First likely market: the elderly and impaired.
2016-03-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-1737
Thitsadee Ngernsukphaiboon, Sunhapos Chantranuwathana, Nuksit Noomwongs, Angkee Sripakagorn, Solaphat Hemrungrojn MD
Abstract The world is aging rapidly. Many countries can already be categorized as aging or aged societies while a few are becoming super-aged societies. In Thailand as well as in other countries, traffic accidents caused by elderly drivers will continue to rise as a significant percentage of elderly people still prefer to drive. Accidents may be prevented with driving tests and screening methods for elderly drivers. However, it is also necessary to understand the effect of aging on driving ability. With this understanding, driver training, driver assistant systems, and improvements on infrastructure may be designed accordingly. Among various physical changes, cognitive ability of the brain is one of the most significant factors affecting driving ability. In this paper, correlation between various cognitive functions of the brain and car following skill of drivers are considered.
2016-03-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-1738
Natt Winitthumkul, Peerapat Phondeenana, Nuksit Noomwongs
Abstract According to the recent study, Thailand has the 2nd most dangerous road in the world. Based on many researches, the driver is the main influencers of the traffic fatalities. Since the more dangerous the driver drive, the more chance of accident become. Therefore, driver’s monitoring system become one of the solutions that acceptable and reliable, especially for fleet management and public transportation. This paper’s goal is to find an algorithm that can distinguish driving behaviour based on cars’ acceleration and velocity, calling it as Risk Driving Score (RDS). The algorithm was tested by driving test by volunteers on highways with observers, who were told to rank the drivers in terms of driving risk from the 1-5 point. Meanwhile, the drivers were asked to drive in 3 different styles, normal, safety, and hurry. All drives were recorded by satellite and video data then filtered and used for the algorithm calculation.
2016-03-25
WIP Standard
AIR5661A
This report provides data and general analysis methods for calculation of internal and external, pressurized and unpressurized airplane compartment pressures during rapid discharge of cabin pressure. References to the applicable current FAA and EASA rules and advisory material are provided. While rules and interpretations can be expected to evolve, numerous airplanes have been approved under current and past rules that will have a continuing need for analysis of production and field modifications, alterations and repairs. The data and basic principles provided by this report are adaptable to any compartment decompression analysis requirement.
2016-03-12
Article
The standard German taxi cab, now entering its 10th generation, is 80% ready for autonomous driving on the autobahn, according to its chief engineer.
2016-03-11
Standard
J287_201603
This recommended practice describes boundaries of hand control locations that can be reached by a percentage of different US driver populations in passenger cars, multi-purpose passenger vehicles, and light trucks (Class A vehicles). This practice is not applicable to heavy trucks (Class B vehicles).
2016-03-10
Standard
USCAR25-3
This document decribes the deign relative to assembly force, and hand clearance guidelines for conventional hand-plug, mechanical assist and twist lock electrical connectors, as well as Connector Position Assurances (CPAs). The minimum values associated with this design guide need to be evaluated against other critical characteristics that impact quality, efficiency and other traits of assembly feasibility. all possible designs and appications could not be anticipated in creating these guidelines. Where there are questions of adherence to this document, such as use of an "off-the'shelf" design, always consult the responsible Ergonomics Department.
2016-03-09
WIP Standard
ARP5021B
This document provides guidance for oxygen cylinder installation on commercial aircraft based on rules and methods practiced in aerospace industry and applicable in other associations. It covers considerations for oxygen systems from beginning of project phase up to production, maintenance, and servicing. The document is focused on requirements regarding DOT approved oxygen cylinders. However, its basic rules may also be applicable to new development pertaining to use of such equipment in an oxygen environment. For information regarding oxygen cylinders itself, reference should be made to AIR825/12 also.
2016-03-08
WIP Standard
AIR5742A
The scope of this document is related to the particular needs of oxygen equipment with regards to packaging and transportation. The document provides guidance for handling chemical, gaseous and liquid oxygen equipment. It summarizes national and international regulations to be taken into account for transportation on land, sea and air and provides information on classification of hazardous material. The aim of this document is to summarize information on packaging and transportation of oxygen equipment. Statements and references to regulations cited herein are for information only and should not be considered as interpretation of a law. Processes to maintain cleanliness of components and subassemblies during processing and assembly or storage of work-in-progress are outside the scope of this document.
2016-03-06
Article
Dana Holding Corp.’s Spicer Smart Suite technology is a platform of fully integrated, connected-vehicle features that converts operating data from the drivetrain into actionable insights for enhancing productivity, improving operator and machine safety and reducing total operating costs.
2016-03-06
Article
ZF TRW has enhanced the capabilities of its electronic stability control (ESC) system—in addition to its wide range of advanced braking functionality, the technology can act as a “black-box” integration hub, hosting software algorithms to control automated driving, safety, chassis and drivetrain functions.
2016-03-04
Article
The TMPV7602XBG image recognition processor from Toshiba America Electronic Components is suitable for monocular cameras used in advanced driver assistance systems and will help designers implement ADAS applications using a cost-optimized camera system with a small form factor.
2016-03-03
Magazine
Multi-material structures move mpg upward The quest to improve fuel economy is not waning, nor is the desire to achieve higher mpg through the use of just the right lightweight material for the right vehicle application. Cars poised to become 'a thing' Making automobiles part of the Internet of Things brings both risks and rewards. Agility training for cars Chassis component suppliers refine vehicle dynamics at the high end and entry level with four-wheel steering and adaptive damping. SAE 2016 World Congress Preview Technology trends and exhibitor products are highlighted in this special section, which features Toyota's plans for the show floor, tech sessions, and more.
2016-02-24
WIP Standard
ARP6901
Develop an Aerospace Recommended Practice that describes means of certification compliance for approval of passive rotorcraft engine/APU induction system ice protection (inadvertent and full icing).
2016-02-24
Standard
J3048_201602
The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for the implementation of driver-vehicle interfaces (DVI) for intervention-type lane keeping assistance systems (LKAS), as defined by ISO 11270. LKAS provide support for safe lane keeping operations by drivers via momentary intervention in lane keeping actions, but do not automate part or all of the dynamic driving task on a sustained basis (see SAE J3016). Thus they are not classified as a driving automation system per SAE J3016 - Taxonomy and Definitions for Terms Related to On-Road Motor Vehicle Automated Driving Systems, nor do they prevent possible lane or roadway departures, as drivers can always override an LKAS intervention and road conditions may be such that they cannot support an LKAS intervention (e.g., too slippery, curve to tight, lateral velocity too high, etc.).
2016-02-16
Magazine
Autonomous vehicles: impact on society Self-driving technology offers plenty of promise, but not everything about autonomous vehicles will be a panacea. Crankshaft reliability by integrated design, simulation, and testing This testing method is proven and beneficial for the design and development of the crankshaft and could be applied to other critical engine components, thereby extending to system reliability. New Engines 2016 Highlighting the design, engineering, and technologies inside some of the most competitive gasoline and light-duty diesel ICEs. Touch and go Avionics developments are changing life in the cockpit and at airborne work stations. Improving heavy-duty engine component efficiencies Cylinder deactivation can improve fuel economy by using a reduced number of cylinders that operate at higher loads and thermal efficiency, while other cylinders are turned off, when the engine operates at partial load conditions.
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