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Viewing 91 to 120 of 5770
2014-05-08
WIP Standard
ARP5932
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) will provide general guidelines and procedures for servicing and maintaining oxygen systems. Such methods and procedures may be applied to gaseous, liquid, chemical and portable oxygen systems. These guidelines and recommendations will be provided to engineering and maintenance personnel for airlines, modification centers and third party maintenance contractors, to be used while performing maintenance on oxygen systems and components.
2014-04-24
Article
Airbus Helicopters Japan recently inaugurated Japan’s first full flight simulator (FFS) for helicopters at its facilities located in the Kobe Airport vicinity. The simulator is configured to represent Airbus Helicopters’ light twin-engine EC135 P2+ rotorcraft, and has received Level C certification from the Japan Civil Aviation Bureau.
2014-04-24
Article
With 76% high-strength and ultra-high-strength steel, larger welds, and extensive use of structural adhesives, the design is predicted to get top ratings from NHTSA and IIHS. Other highlights are a direct-injection 3.3-L V6, hands- and feet-free liftgate, and UVO infotainment with new eServices.
2014-04-22
Article
In part to improve safety performance of its vehicles and to enhance cross-system integration, General Motors is restructuring its global vehicle-engineering organization. It will now consist of two units: Global Product Integrity and Global Vehicle Components and Subsystems.
2014-04-16
Article
In the wake of its ignition switch recall, General Motors CEO Mary Barra has announced creation of a Global Product Integrity organization. Housed within the Global Production Development group, it will "build on the formula and specific actions we have taken in recent years to lead the industry in vehicle dynamics," Barra said at the 2014 New York International Auto Show.
2014-04-14
Article
The Visteon- and Cisco-developed OASIS (Optimized, Adaptable, Secure, Intelligent, Seamless) concept makes secure car-to-cloud communications the prerequisite for unlocking vehicle network connectivity-associated benefits.
2014-04-14
Standard
ARP5446A
These recommendations are provided to aid the international air transport industry by identifying a standard, minimum amount of safety instructions that should be given to sight-impaired passengers. This document is not meant to address problems associated with communicating safety information to sight- impaired passengers who are also hearing impaired or non- conversant in the language(s) used by the cabin crew to disseminate general safety information to passengers. Aircraft operators are encouraged to customize the safety instructions for their own operations in order to ensure that required safety information is provided to sight-impaired passengers.
2014-04-14
Standard
ARP1283B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) establishes design guidance and photometric values for adequate cargo compartment and cargo access lighting systems for ground handling. The adoption of a standard set of illuminance values, found appropriate for the performance of the task in specified areas should expedite ground handling.
2014-04-10
Article
With the large commercial van market continuing to grow, Mercedes-Benz continues to improve its Sprinter van to keep it the “best” in a crowded field.
2014-04-10
Article
The system uses specific Sport Mode algorithms with modules from the high-speed CAN data bus, including those for adaptive cruise control, forward facing camera, all-wheel drive, shift-by-wire, electric power steering, transmission, and powertrain.
2014-04-10
Article
Dangers from malware, including ransom demands, must be pro-actively avoided as industry and owners enter era of connected cars. For all their conveniences, telematics could pose ugly series of risks that will require new approaches to prevent, explains Cisco Systems scientist to SAE Congress attendees. Vulnerabilities are in many areas, including the OBD system.
2014-04-05
Article
According to Lord's Andrew J. Winzenz, companies wanting to compete in the industrial market must expand their expertise beyond components to system-level design.
2014-04-03
Article
A new occupant-protection technology from TRW Automotive Holdings Corp. has the passenger-seat airbag deploying from the headliner instead of the dashboard. It is being launched on the Citroën C4 Cactus.
2014-04-03
WIP Standard
ARP6503
This document provides guidance for in-flight rest facilities provided for use by cabin crew on commercial transport aircraft.. This document is applicable to dedicated cabin crew rest facilities. Passenger seats used to provide “cabin crew rest facilities” are not within the scope of this document.
2014-04-03
Standard
ARP5647A
This SAE Aerospace Recommend Practice (ARP) is intended to identify both safety related best practices and unique design considerations of metal halides High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps and power supplies in aircraft applications.
2014-04-02
WIP Standard
J284
This SAE Recommended Practice presents the general uses, limitations on use, and appearance of the safety alert symbol.
2014-04-02
WIP Standard
AIR1059D
This document provides guidance concerning the maintenance and serviceability of oxygen cylinders beginning with the quality of oxygen that is required, supplemental oxygen information, handling and cleaning procedures, transfilling and marking of serviced oxygen assemblies. This document attempts to outline in a logical sequence oxygen quality,serviceability and maintenance of oxygen cylinders.
2014-04-01
Article
All new vehicles under 10,000 lb will be required to have rearview camera technology under a final rule issued March 28 by NHTSA (U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration). The rule applies to vehicles ranging from passenger cars to trucks and buses (any vehicle under 10,000 lb) built on or after May 1, 2018.
2014-04-01
Collection
As information and entertainment to and from the vehicle (Telematics) become more prolific it is critical to increase our understanding of how the driver understands and uses Telematics functions. Equally critical is how those functions impact the driver. The papers in this technical paper collection will address these issues.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0875
Mark William Arndt
Abstract The current certification requirements under CFR 49, Part 567 state that GVWR of a motor vehicle shall not be less than the sum of the unloaded vehicle weight, rated cargo weight and 150 pounds times the number of designated seating positions. Actual occupant weight distributions versus certified weight per occupant seat causes a potential conflict between a vehicle's in-use weights versus its certified GVWR. Population weight distributions were developed based upon The Center for Disease Control's (CDC) publication of 2007 - 2010 anthropometric reference data and publically available weights of a special population from high school football teams. For five buses from small (18-seat) to large (55-seat), key parameters were measured. The weight distributions and bus parametric data were combined in a probabilistic analysis to explore the probability that passengers and rated cargo would result in weight distributions that exceeded tire load capability, Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR), or Gross vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR).
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0877
Prasad Kumbhar, Ning Li, Peijun Xu, James Yang
In vehicle driving environment, the driver is subjected to the vibrations in horizontal, vertical, and fore-aft directions. The human body is very much sensitive to whole body vibration and this vibration transmission to the body depends upon various factors including road irregularities, vehicle suspension, vehicle dynamics, tires, seat design and the human body's properties. The seat design plays a vital role in the vibration isolation as it is directly in contact with human body. Vibration isolation properties of a seat depend upon its dynamic parameters which include spring stiffness and damping of seat suspension and cushion. In this paper, an optimization-based method is used to determine the optimal seat dynamic parameters for seat suspension, and cushion based on minimizing occupant's body fatigue (occupant body absorbed power). A 14-degree of freedom (DOF) multibody biodynamic human model in 2D is selected from literature to assess three types of seat arrangements. The human model has total mass of 71.32 kg with 5 body segments.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0879
Jan-Mou Li, David Smith
Abstract Driver is a key component in vehicle simulation. An ideal driver model simulates driving patterns a human driver may perform to negotiate road profiles. There are simulation packages having the capability to simulate driver behavior. However, it is rarely documented how they work with road profiles. This paper proposes a new truck driver model for vehicle simulation to imitate actual driving behavior in negotiating road grade and curvature. The proposed model is developed based upon Gipps' car-following model. Road grade and curvature were not considered in the original Gipps' model although it is based directly on driver behavior and expectancy for vehicles in a stream of traffic. New parameters are introduced to capture drivers' choice of desired speeds that they intend to use in order to negotiating road grade and curvature simultaneously. With the new parameters, the proposed model can emulate behaviors like uphill preparation for different truck drivers. Speed variation while cruising can be explained by the empirical model and therefore facilitating a better estimation of performance in vehicle simulation.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0881
Mitsuru Enomoto, Michiko Kakinuma, Nobuhito Kato, Haruo Ishikawa, Yuichiro Hirose
Abstract Design work for truck suspension systems requires multi-objective optimization using a large number of parameters that cannot be solved in a simple way. This paper proposes a process-based systematization concept for ride comfort design using a set-based design method. A truck was modeled with a minimum of 13 degrees of freedom, and suspension performance under various vehicle speeds, road surface conditions, and load amounts was calculated. The range of design parameters for the suspension, the range of performance requirements, and the optimal values within these ranges were defined based on the knowledge and know-how of experienced design engineers. The final design of the suspension was installed in a prototype truck and evaluated. The performance of the truck satisfied all the objectives and the effectiveness of the set-based design approach was confirmed.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0892
Eric Frank, Peter Jacobsen
Abstract As the demand for Sound Quality improvements in vehicles continues to grow, robust analysis methods must be established to clearly represent end-user perception. For vehicle sounds which are tonal by nature, such as transmission or axle whine, the common practice of many vehicle manufacturers and suppliers is to subjectively rate the performance of a given part for acceptance on a scale of one to ten. The polar opposite of this is to measure data and use the peak of the fundamental or harmonic orders as an objective assessment. Both of these quantifications are problematic in that the former is purely subjective and the latter does not account for the presence of masking noise which has a profound impact on a driver's assessment of such noises. This paper presents the methodology and results of a study in which tonal noises in the presence of various level of masking noise were presented to a group of jurors in a controlled environment. Their subjective ratings were collected and correlated to noise and vibration metrics.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0183
Sooncheol Park, Wonwook Jung, Chunwoo Shin, Jaewung Jung
Abstract Customer vehicle usage monitoring is one of the most fundamental elements to consider in the process of developing a durable vehicle. The extant method to research customer vehicle usage takes considerable time and effort because it requires attaching a series of sensors to the vehicle-gyroscope, accelerometer, microphone, and GPS-to gather information through data logs and then to analyze data in a computer where designated analyzing software has been installed. To solve the problem, this paper introduces a new concept of integrated system developed to examine customer vehicle usage that can analyze data by collecting it from a variety of sensors installed on a smartphone.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0182
Raunak Santosh, Vijayakumar Chekuri
Abstract Rapid growth in the Indian economy has led to new market trends for commercial vehicles. Customers now expect high levels of comfort from all tactile points in a truck cabin; the gear lever knob is frequently used and its reactions greatly influence how a driver perceives Gear Shift Quality (GSQ) and thereby vehicle quality. The subjectivity of human perception is difficult to measure objectively; therefore this paper represents an objective methodology to correlate customer feedback of gearshift reactions. For the attribute evaluation of a set of intermediate commercial vehicles; detailed subjective appraisals were conducted by expert level assessors for GSQ sub-attributes, and a consecutive objective measurement was performed to investigate and substantiate these vehicle assessments. Dynamic and Static testing techniques were used to measure GSQ parameters like efforts during gear shift/select, feel of different phases of gear engagement /selection, gate definitions and lever travels; this helped in formulating objective metrics that can be used to create a definition of GSQ in a vehicle segment and an objective methodology to assess the same.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0452
Helen S. Loeb, Thomas Seacrist, Catherine McDonald, Flaura Winston
Abstract Driving simulators provide a safe, highly reproducible environment in which to assess driver behavior. Nevertheless, data reduction to standardized metrics can be time-consuming and cumbersome. Further, the validity of the results is challenged by inconsistent definitions of metrics, precluding comparison across studies and integration of data. No established tool has yet been made available and kept current for the systematic reduction of literature-derived safety metrics. The long term goal of this work is to develop DriveLab, a set of widely applicable routines for reducing simulator data to expert-approved metrics. Since Matlab™ is so widely used in the research community, it was chosen as a suitable environment. This paper aims to serve as a case study of data reduction techniques and programming choices that were made for simulator analysis of a specific research project, the Simulated Driving Assessment. The initial set of Matlab™ routines was successfully tested by analyzing recognized metrics, such as Distance Headway, Time Headway, Time-To-Collision, and Reaction Time.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0445
Flaura Winston, Catherine McDonald, Venk Kandadai, Zachary Winston, Thomas Seacrist
Abstract Driving simulators offer a safe alternative to on-road driving for the evaluation of performance. In addition, simulated drives allow for controlled manipulations of traffic situations producing a more consistent and objective assessment experience and outcome measure of crash risk. Yet, few simulator protocols have been validated for their ability to assess driving performance under conditions that result in actual collisions. This paper presents results from a new Simulated Driving Assessment (SDA), a 35- to-40-minute simulated assessment delivered on a Real-Time® simulator. The SDA was developed to represent typical scenarios in which teens crash, based on analyses from the National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Survey (NMVCCS). A new metric, failure to brake, was calculated for the 7 potential rear-end scenarios included in the SDA and examined according two constructs: experience and skill. The study included an inexperienced group (n=21): 16-17 year olds with 90 days or fewer of provisional licensure, and an experienced group (n=17): 25-50 year olds with at least 5 years of PA licensure, at least 100 miles driven per week and no self-reported collisions in the previous 3 years.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0431
John D. Bullough
Abstract Present standards for vehicle forward lighting specify two headlamp beam patterns: a low beam when driving in the presence of other nearby vehicles, and a high beam when there is not a concern for producing glare to other drivers. Adaptive lighting technologies such as curve lighting systems with steerable headlamps may be related to increments in safety according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, but isolating the effects of lighting is difficult. Recent analyses suggest that visibility improvements from adaptive curve lighting systems might reduce nighttime crashes along curves by 2%-3%. More advanced systems such as adaptive high-beam systems that reduce high-beam headlamp intensity toward oncoming drivers are not presently allowed in the U.S. The purpose of the present study is to analyze visual performance benefits and quantify potential safety benefits from adaptive high-beam headlamp systems. Before adaptive high-beam systems could be permitted on U.S. roadways, it is necessary to have data describing their potential for crash reductions.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0441
Takahiro Adachi, Takashi Yonekawa, Yoshitaka Fuwamoto, Shoji Ito, Katsuhiko Iwazaki, Sueharu Nagiri
Abstract The driving simulator (DS) developed by Toyota Motor Corporation simulates acceleration using translational (XY direction) and tilting motions. However, the driver of the DS may perceive a feeling of rotation generated by the tilting motion, which is not generated in an actual vehicle. If the driver perceives rotation, a vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is generated that results in an unnecessary correction in the driver's gaze. This generates a conflict between the vestibular and visual sensations of the driver and causes motion sickness. Although such motion sickness can be alleviated by reducing the tilting motion of the DS, this has the effect of increasing the amount of XY motion, which has a limited range. Therefore, it is desirable to limit the reduction in the tilting motion of the DS to the specific timing and amount required to alleviate motion sickness. However, the timing and extent of the VOR has yet to be accurately identified. This paper describes how the eye movement of the driver was used to measure the positional deviation between the gaze of the driver and images caused by unnecessary VOR.
Viewing 91 to 120 of 5770

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