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Viewing 5581 to 5610 of 5810
1968-12-01
Standard
AIR1059
This document provides guidance concerning the maintenance and serviceability of oxygen cylinders beginning with the quality of oxygen that is required, supplemental oxygen information, handling and cleaning procedures, transfilling and marking of serviced oxygen assemblies. This document attempts to outline in a logical sequence oxygen quality,serviceability and maintenance of oxygen cylinders.
1968-11-01
Standard
ARP1048
The desired system for general aviation aircraft instrument panel and cockpit lighting should furnish light of adequate intensity and distribution under all conditions of external illumination so that the crew may read instrumentation, placards, check lists, manuals, maps, instrument color coding, and distinguish controls without undue interference with their vision outside of the aircraft. Heretofore, considerable effort has been made to insure night vision adaptation at all costs. Efforts to maintain this adaptation have been based on certain military requirements, night flight involving pilotage and takeoffs or landings using only moonlight or less light intensity. With present navigational methods, adequate airport lighting and aircraft landing lights, night vision adaptation is rarely necessary.
1968-10-01
Standard
AIR1069
Determine the required minimum oxygen concentration to be breathed prior to, during, and after a loss of cabin pressurization. Determine recommended means necessary to provide the required oxygen concentrations.
1968-06-01
Standard
J336_196806
This SAE Recommended Practice describes the equipment and procedure for determining the truck cab interior sound level over the upper half of the engine speed range. This practice applies to motor trucks and truck-tractors and does not include construction and industrial machinery.
1968-06-01
Magazine
1968-05-01
Magazine
1968-04-01
Standard
ARP922
The recommendations set forth herein are the results of the combined efforts of engineers associated with manufacturing of lamps, instrumentation, aircraft, aerospace equipment and vehicles, Air Transport and interested Government Agencies. The information contained in this initial release of the ARP is general in nature and will suffice as an introduction to this type of lighting. However, it is recommended that it be developed, in further revisions, into a more specific document.
1968-03-01
Standard
AIR822
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides a general overview of oxygen systems for general aviation use. Included are a brief review of the factors and effects of hypoxia, system descriptions and mission explanations for system or component selection, and techniques for safe handling of oxygen distribution systems.
1968-02-15
Standard
ARP498A
This document is intended to cover the design of plastic lighted panels, mounting plates, and their installation.
1968-02-01
Technical Paper
680107
Carl G. Seashore, Elmer C. Lundquist
To the average truck or bus driver the critical problem of the “blind spot” has existed ever since flat mirrors were first applied to vehicles. With large vehicles and the single plane mirror it is entirely possible for a car to be hidden under the driver’s lower line of vision. This problem of “blind spot” is compounded, depending on the size of the vehicle, driver’s eye level above the ground, and the distance and position of his eyes from the mirrors. The mathematically designed mirrors discussed in this paper permit the driver to utilize the upper flat mirror for rearward vision; the reflected view of the blind area is in the bottom prepositioned mirror. It is believed that the next area of optics improvement will be with the noncommercial driver.
1968-02-01
Technical Paper
680105
WILLIAM A. DEVLIN
The effect of pillar size on vision obscuration in the forward field of view is discussed. The SAE J941a Eyellipse has become an accepted design tool and is one of the first of its kind to be used in automotive driver work space design. A review of this recommended practice will include a brief reminder of its value and also of its limitations. An expansion of the tools limitations covering a driver head turned consideration is included. A review of a study in process for developing an Eyellipse for use in truck packaging is also included.
1968-02-01
Technical Paper
680091
Richard A. Lee, Fred Pradko
A method to determine analytically the response of the human being to vibration is developed. This method uses a parameter called absorbed power. The advantage of absorbed power as a measurement criterion is that it has physical significance. It places vibration severity on an absolute scale and is applicable in the time or frequency domain.
1968-02-01
Technical Paper
680090
Bruce D. Van Deusen
This paper reviews experiments for determining human response to vibration and interprets them in the vehicle vibration context. It reviews the author's research and compares it with findings of other investigators. From the results of vehicle tests, it is concluded that properly weighted “acceleration variance” is a meaningful measure of vehicle vibration. For a single vehicle subjected only to surface profile changes, a single number summed over all frequencies can be used. For two or more vehicles with different vibrational characteristics, acceleration variance must be computed in several frequency bands to yield correction factors that define the nature of the vibration.
1968-02-01
Technical Paper
680555
Gordon H. Robinson
Accidents and their causation in man-machine control systems are defined using the automobile and driver as an example. The complex tasks performed by the automobile driver are delineated, and arguments are put forward that the driver’s ability to switch from one task to another, his control of attention, is crucial to the system performance.
1968-02-01
Technical Paper
680601
Curtis L. Shufflebarger
This report is oriented to: 1. Research and development in highway transportation under sponsorship of the Bureau of Public Roads. 2. Traffic operations and control aspects of highway transportation. 3. Importance of combining vehicle engineering and human engineering along with highway engineering in programs to improve the service, effectiveness, and safety of highway traffic operations. As these new traffic systems, or improvements in the performance of highway transportation emerge, they will require new and far reaching decisions not only for highway users and administrators but for industry as well. Along with decisions there must also be commitments and investments of a scope and magnitude not experienced before. This report describes how new traffic systems are developing, what they consist of, and how they will be of benefit. It treats major features of new traffic systems which very directly involve vehicle and human engineering.
1968-02-01
Magazine
1967-10-31
Standard
ARP582A
This ARP covers the general requirements and test procedures for illuminating systems for integrally lighted aircraft instruments in order to provide (a) uniformity of illumination within each instrument, (b) legibility of instrument presentation under daylight or integral light, and (c) uniformity of illumination between instrument displays.
1967-09-01
Magazine
1967-08-01
Standard
J941A_196708
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the location of drivers' eyes inside a vehicle. Elliptical (eyellipse) models in three dimensions are used to represent tangent cutoff percentiles of driver eye locations. Procedures are provided to construct 95th and 99th percentile tangent cutoff eyellipses for a 50/50 gender mix, adult user population. Neck pivot (P) points are defined in Section 6 to establish specific left and right eye points for direct and indirect viewing tasks described in SAE J1050. These P points are defined only for the adjustable seat eyellipses defined in Section 4. This document applies to Class A Vehicles (Passenger Cars, Multipurpose Passenger Vehicles, and Light Trucks) as defined in SAE J1100. It also applies to Class B vehicles (Heavy Trucks), although these eyellipses have not been updated from previous versions of SAE J941. The appendices are provided for information only and are not a requirement of this document.
1967-07-01
Standard
J73
1967-07-01
Standard
J994_196707
The scope of this SAE Standard is the definition of the functional, environmental, and life cycle test requirements for electrically operated backup alarm devices primarily intended for use on off-road, self propelled work machines as defined by SAE J1116 (limited to categories of 1) construction, and 2) general purpose industrial). This purpose of this document is to define a set of performance requirements for backup alarms, independent of machine usage. The laboratory tests defined in this document are intended to provide a uniform and repeatable means of verifying whether or nor a test alarm meets the stated requirements. For on-machine requirements and test procedures, refer to SAE J 1446.
1967-04-01
Standard
J985_196704
The design and location of rear viewing mirrors or systems, and the presentation of the rear view to the driver can be best achieved if the designer and the engineer have adequate references available on the physiological functions of head and eye movements and on the perceptual capabilities of the human visual system. The following information and charts are provided for this purpose. For more complete information of the relationship of vision to forward vision, see SAE SP-279.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670664
Vernon L. Grose
Reliability and maintainability of both terrestrial and space systems have too long been needlessly sacrificed because man's role within each system has been an afterthought. To overcome this short-sighted approach, man's capabilities as well as limitations must be clearly understood at the outset of system development by those who are responsible for design. This paper presents the results of recent research in human engineering which should aid system designers to optimize man's role as a control element in space systems. In particular, five human characteristics necessary for spacecraft control are shown to exceed the capabilities of any known or planned machines. The maximum role of which man is capable should be defined for each particular space system. When this maximum role is known, then tradeoffs become possible between human and automatic control.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670720
Jack W. Dunlap
Human engineering has demonstrated its utility in all phases of the design process. Examples illustrating the contributions of human engineering in the conceptual, design, and evaluation phases are discussed. Human engineering techniques are employed to test the feasibility of design concepts involving man-machine interactions. Methodologies and techniques are useful in making direct inputs to the design process during both the design and evaluation phases.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670719
Richard M. Michaels, Burton W. Stephens
This paper describes some of the considerations underlying human engineering in system design. The emphasis will first be on how the engineering psychologist looks at human behavior as a basis of designing man-machine systems. Second, the purpose is to define some of the major methods that are employed in human engineering as part of this systems engineering function.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670718
William Wokoun, Sylvester E. Kalen
Human engineering is “engineering for human use.” Because the human being cannot be redesigned, his equipment must be designed around his attributes and his environment. This paper illustrates the importance of human engineering in a simple example of the adding machine, with all the questions which should enter into its design. The goals of human engineering are: easy operation, faster operation, fewer errors, fewer accidents, less complicated requirements for operators, less training, all ultimately resulting in the need for fewer men to do a job. Examples of attaining these goals are given.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670642
W. B. Rossnagel
Governmental assurance documentation bibliography updated; new tabulation effective as of April 1, 1967. Latest revision indicated in all instances, but no attempt was made to list supplements or amendments. Department of Defense Index of Specifications and Standards (DODISS) published annually in three parts (alphabetic, numerical, and listing of Federal Supply Classification following unclassified documents.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670496
Sylvester E. Kalen
The goal of the United States Army human factors engineering in Army research, development, test, and evaluation programs is assuring that the fully-equipped soldier can operate and maintain Army materiel in all environments. To this end, the United States Army Human Engineering Laboratories have published several human engineering standards that assist and guide contractor human factors programs, provide design principles and criteria for the design engineers, and serve as a tool the human factors engineering specialist can use in evaluating the materiel he is helping to develop. This paper briefly discusses three of the standards.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670620
Robert V. Katter
Managers of complex human factors efforts have the problem of managing their management information. This requires tools for monitoring and assuring both the flow and application of current information to the solutions of technical problems. The challenge posed by the amount and diversity of both information and requirements for information has outstripped the capacity of current methods for handling and managing such information. Some core problems involve lack of between-persons agreement regarding the judgment, evaluation, and characterization of information. There is evidence that behavior-oriented experimental research of the human factors variety can help to solve such core problems. Three examples of such empirical study projects are described.
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