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Viewing 5581 to 5610 of 5771
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670022
Donald F. Livermore
When a stationary automobile is on a horizontal road, the car and its suspension linkages are in static equilibrium under the actions of gravity loading, road reactions, and internal spring forces. When this same system is acted on by steady cornering and/or axial acceleration loads, in addition to gravity loading, the equilibrium configuration of the suspension will be changed substantially from its gravity-load-only condition, affecting the driving characteristics of the automobile. This paper presents a general computer-based method for determining displacement relations and equilibrium configurations of mechanisms which are restrained by springs and subjected to steady external loading. The method is illustrated by its application to several suspension systems of varying complexity.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670043
Elmer A. Herider, William F. Le Fevre
This is a two part paper on the considerations involved in truck seating design. The first part discusses physiological factors of seating comfort which are essentially static in comparison to requirements for vibration isolation discussed in the second part. Basically, a truck driver’s seat should be designed to furnish the most in driver seating comfort within bounds of reasonable cost. Improved safety is gained by reducing muscular and nervous tensions which, in turn, reduce physical fatigue. The ability of the chair to isolate the driver from vibrations influences riding comfort. While the proper chair design can isolate high frequency, low amplitude vibrations the lower frequency, high amplitude chassis pitch vibrations can best be controlled by proper vehicle suspension systems, thus providing optimum riding comfort.
1967-02-01
Technical Paper
670919
H. J. Mertz, L. M. Patrick
The kinematics of rear-end collisions based on published acceleration pulses of actual car-to-car collisions (10 and 23 mph) were reproduced on a crash simulator using anthropomorphic dummies, human cadavers, and a volunteer. Comparison of the responses of subjects without head support were based on the reactions developed at the base of the skull (occipital condyles). The cadavers gave responses which were representative of persons unaware of an impending collision. The responses of both dummies used were not comparable with those of the cadavers or volunteer, or to each other. An index based on voluntary human tolerance limits to statically applied head loads was developed and used to determine the severity of the simulations for the unsupported head cases. Results indicated that head torque rather than neck shear or axial forces is the major factor in producing neck injury. When the head was initially supported by a flat, padded headrest, all subjects gave comparable headrest loads.
1967-02-01
Standard
ARP924
This recommended practice cover the requirements for the types of glass to be utilized in the fabrication of cover glasses and lighting wedges used in aerospace instruments. It defines the maximum extent of physical defects and recommend standard methods of inspection and evaluation. Definitions of terminology used in this document are covered in Appendix A.
1966-10-01
Magazine
1966-08-15
Standard
ARP842A
This recommended practice sets forth the design objectives for handling qualities applicable to transport aircraft operating in the subsonic, transonic and supersonic speed range. These objectives are not necessarily applicable to rotor or VTOL aircraft.
1966-08-01
Magazine
1966-08-01
Standard
ARP699C
This Recommended Practice is intended to outline the design, installation, testing, and field maintenance criteria for a high temperature metal pneumatic duct system, for use as a guide in the aircraft industry. These recommendations are to be considered as currently applicable and necessarily subject to revision from time to time, as a result of the rapid development of the industry.
1966-08-01
Standard
J966_196608
This SAE Recommended Practice provides a test procedure for determining passenger car tire revolutions per mile. It is intended to supplement SAE J678.
1966-06-01
Standard
J964_196606
This test procedure is intended for use in measuring the reflectance of rear view mirrors.
1966-05-01
Magazine
1966-05-01
Standard
J919_196605
This SAE Standard describes the instrumentation and procedures to be used in measuring sound levels at the operator station for self-propelled sweepers as defined in SAE J2130 and self-propelled off-road work machines in categories 1, 2, 4, and 5, of SAE J1116. This SAE document is applicable to machines that have operator stations where the operator can either stand or sit and will be either transported by, or walk with the machine during its operation. The sound levels obtained using this procedure are repeatable and representative of the higher range of sound levels generated by machines under actual field operating conditions. Due to variability of field operating conditions, this data is not intended to be used for operator noise exposure evaluations. Measurement and calculation of the operator's sound exposure should follow SAE J1116.
1966-04-01
Magazine
1966-04-01
Standard
AIR512
This document covers the general recommendations for cabin lighting in order to provide satisfactory illumination for, but not limited to: a. Boarding and deplaning b. Movement about the cabin c. Reading d. Use of lavatories e. Use of work areas f. Exiting under emergency conditions g. Using stowage compartments, coat rooms, and closets h. Using interior stairways and elevators (lifts)
1966-03-01
Magazine
1966-03-01
Standard
ARP917
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) sets forth general specifications for the location, accessibility and restraint for those items of survival, emergency, and miscellaneous equipment which are intended to be used by the operating flight crew, and which are stowed on or near the flight deck.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660581
J. B. Liljedahl
Many improvements have been made during the past 5 years in the design of the human work space on off-highway vehicles. Some of the possible effects of the severe environment encountered on tractors are pointed out in this paper. This article emphasizes that engineers who design the controls and human work space on off-highway vehicles should work as a team with medical doctors and industrial psychologists. Some explanations are given as to why the human work space on tractors has not received an adequate share of engineering design effort. Several suggestions for the improvement of the human work space are made: There should be more supervision of noise, better vibration insulation, addition of automatic safety controls, use of air conditioned cabs, addition of power safety controls, use of air conditioned cabs, addition of power meters and wheel slip meters.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660587
Bernard J. McGuire
A brief history of the human factors field is given. Methods of obtaining design information in such basic human factors areas as operator size, ride, and control are discussed. The psychological aspects of the interaction between the operator and the earthmover during testing are discussed. The effects of level of motivation, learning, and transfer of training on operator performance are described in terms of laboratory test results.
1965-11-01
Standard
AIR910
The purpose of this report is to provide information on ozone and its control in high altitude aircraft environmental systems. Sources of this information are listed in the selected bibliography appearing at the end of this report, to which references are made throughout.
1965-11-01
Standard
AIR847
The purpose of this information report is to provide minimum design criteria for oxygen equipment to be used on commercial transport aircraft which fly above 45,000 ft. To separate these requirements from those for spaceplanes, the maximum flight altitude for aircraft defined by this report is limited to the maximum altitude obtainable by aircraft using air-breathing engines.
1965-11-01
Standard
J941_196511
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the location of drivers' eyes inside a vehicle. Elliptical (eyellipse) models in three dimensions are used to represent tangent cutoff percentiles of driver eye locations. Procedures are provided to construct 95th and 99th percentile tangent cutoff eyellipses for a 50/50 gender mix, adult user population. Neck pivot (P) points are defined in Section 6 to establish specific left and right eye points for direct and indirect viewing tasks described in SAE J1050. These P points are defined only for the adjustable seat eyellipses defined in Section 4. This document applies to Class A Vehicles (Passenger Cars, Multipurpose Passenger Vehicles, and Light Trucks) as defined in SAE J1100. It also applies to Class B vehicles (Heavy Trucks), although these eyellipses have not been updated from previous versions of SAE J941. The appendices are provided for information only and are not a requirement of this document.
1965-10-20
Technical Paper
650968
G. A. RYAN, A. J. McLEAN
1965-10-01
Standard
ARP881
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) lists the lamps in Table 1 that are recommended for the type of service indicated. This list is not intended as a catalog and does not include many types that are now in use. This specification is not applicable to Solid State Lighting Lamp Assemblies (Based LED lamps). It does, however, reflect current practice.
1965-10-01
Standard
AS452A
The purpose of this standard is to establish optimum standards for crew demand and pressure-breathing oxygen mask assemblies for use by crew members in civil aircraft. This standard covers both general type and quick-donning type mask assemblies in the following classes: a. Class A, oronasal, demand b. Class B, oronasal, pressure-demand c. Class C, full face, demand d. Class D, full face, pressure-demand
1965-07-30
Standard
AIR805A
The purpose of this information report is to present factors which affect the design and development of jet blast windshield rain removal systems for commercial transport aircraft. A satisfactory analytical approach to the design of these systems has not yet been developed. Although detailed performance data are available for some test configurations, rain removal systems will generally be unique to specific aircraft. This, then, requires a preliminary design for the system based on available empirical data to be followed with an extensive laboratory development program.
1965-06-01
Standard
ARP798
The purpose of this document is to recommend to the designer the various criteria, and to familiarize him with techniques, associated with white incandescent lighted aerospace instruments. This recommended practice covers the general requirements and test procedures recommended for use with white incandescent integrally lighted instruments. Its use should provide uniformity of illumination from instrument to instrument and legibility under daylight operation. An appendix is provided to familiarize the designer with some of the techniques used to obtain uniformity of color and illumination in various types of instruments.
1965-05-01
Standard
ARP712
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides minimum standards and environmental design requirement recommendations for lighting and control in galley areas. It also addresses electrical shock hazard in galley areas. The purpose of this recommended practice is to provide minimum standards for the illumination of galleys (buffets) and for the location of lighting controls within the galley area of passenger transport aircraft.
1965-03-25
Standard
AIR825
No scope available.
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650426
Fred Pradko, Theodore R. Orr, Richard A. Lee
A new method has been developed to study the effects of vibration environments upon human beings. The method is usable to assess the effects of random vibration, transients, or sinusoidal wave forms. It is equally effective for synthesis or analysis of applied force, effective mass, impedance, displacement, or acceleration. The linearity of human response to vibration is established. The procedure employs the transfer function technique. Data are presented describing human response to vertical motion for voluntary tolerance and low intensity acceleration. The frequency spectrum studied was 1–60 cps.
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