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Standard
1965-11-01
The purpose of this information report is to provide minimum design criteria for oxygen equipment to be used on commercial transport aircraft which fly above 45,000 ft. To separate these requirements from those for spaceplanes, the maximum flight altitude for aircraft defined by this report is limited to the maximum altitude obtainable by aircraft using air-breathing engines.
Standard
1965-11-01
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the location of drivers' eyes inside a vehicle. Elliptical (eyellipse) models in three dimensions are used to represent tangent cutoff percentiles of driver eye locations. Procedures are provided to construct 95th and 99th percentile tangent cutoff eyellipses for a 50/50 gender mix, adult user population. Neck pivot (P) points are defined in Section 6 to establish specific left and right eye points for direct and indirect viewing tasks described in SAE J1050. These P points are defined only for the adjustable seat eyellipses defined in Section 4. This document applies to Class A Vehicles (Passenger Cars, Multipurpose Passenger Vehicles, and Light Trucks) as defined in SAE J1100. It also applies to Class B vehicles (Heavy Trucks), although these eyellipses have not been updated from previous versions of SAE J941. The appendices are provided for information only and are not a requirement of this document.
Technical Paper
1965-10-20
G. A. RYAN, A. J. McLEAN
Standard
1965-10-01
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) lists the lamps in Table 1 that are recommended for the type of service indicated. This list is not intended as a catalog and does not include many types that are now in use. This specification is not applicable to Solid State Lighting Lamp Assemblies (Based LED lamps). It does, however, reflect current practice.
Standard
1965-10-01
The purpose of this standard is to establish optimum standards for crew demand and pressure-breathing oxygen mask assemblies for use by crew members in civil aircraft. This standard covers both general type and quick-donning type mask assemblies in the following classes: a. Class A, oronasal, demand b. Class B, oronasal, pressure-demand c. Class C, full face, demand d. Class D, full face, pressure-demand
Standard
1965-07-30
The purpose of this information report is to present factors which affect the design and development of jet blast windshield rain removal systems for commercial transport aircraft. A satisfactory analytical approach to the design of these systems has not yet been developed. Although detailed performance data are available for some test configurations, rain removal systems will generally be unique to specific aircraft. This, then, requires a preliminary design for the system based on available empirical data to be followed with an extensive laboratory development program.
Standard
1965-06-01
The purpose of this document is to recommend to the designer the various criteria, and to familiarize him with techniques, associated with white incandescent lighted aerospace instruments. This recommended practice covers the general requirements and test procedures recommended for use with white incandescent integrally lighted instruments. Its use should provide uniformity of illumination from instrument to instrument and legibility under daylight operation. An appendix is provided to familiarize the designer with some of the techniques used to obtain uniformity of color and illumination in various types of instruments.
Standard
1965-05-01
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides minimum standards and environmental design requirement recommendations for lighting and control in galley areas. It also addresses electrical shock hazard in galley areas. The purpose of this recommended practice is to provide minimum standards for the illumination of galleys (buffets) and for the location of lighting controls within the galley area of passenger transport aircraft.
Standard
1965-03-25
No scope available.
Technical Paper
1965-02-01
DeWitt W. Cooper
The program for force and torque analysis of planar and spatial linkages is part of the KAM (Kinematic Analysis Method) system. A general set of force and moment equilibrium equations has been developed. The program generates the parameters for the equations from a computer stored description (the plex) of a linkage and then solves the equations for all static forces and torques.
Technical Paper
1965-02-01
Frank Bitonti
This is the sixth paper in a series of six papers describing the KAM (Kinematic Analysis Method) system being developed by the IBM Automotive and Machine Design Project. The system will be used in the analysis of most industrial linkages for which an explicit position solution exists. This paper describes the application of vector algebra to a linkage mechanism that is more complex than those classes acceptable to the KAM system. The intent here is to outline the methods developed, and their advantages, for such an application of vector algebra.
Technical Paper
1965-02-01
Frank Bitonti
This is the third paper in a series of six papers describing the KAM (Kinematic Analysis Method) system, which is a computer oriented generalized approach to solving linkage mechanisims consisting of single or multiple series loops of one or more degrees of freedom. The generalized position solution section of KAM is described herein along with its scope and limitations
Technical Paper
1965-02-01
Howard H. Hansen
This paper discusses the use of vector algebra to obtain the motion of elements of linkages falling within the scope of the KAM system. Both the mathematical and the programming techniques used to obtain the velocities and accelerations are discussed in detail. The procedure used results in a set of linear equations and thus provides an exact solution.
Technical Paper
1965-02-01
DeWitt W. Cooper
An experimental computer programmed system has been developed to aid in the analysis of planar and spatial linkage mechanisms. Linkages are described to the system in a simple FORTRAN-like language. The system compiles and solves the equations, which define position, motion, and force for the linkage. The design of the system is based on concepts developed for computer aids to engineering in other fields and on recent developments of analytic methods for mechanical design. Basic requirements of any design analysis system were identified during the programming of the system.
Technical Paper
1965-02-01
David N. Frayne
This paper presents the system concepts of the Kinematic Analysis Method (KAM). The KAM system enables the design engineer to automate the analysis of a wide variety of mechanical linkages. This is the second in a series of papers from the IBM Automotive and Machine Design Group, which originated the KAM system.
Technical Paper
1965-02-01
R. Thomas Bundorf
This paper describes the use of the GMR variable stability passenger car in a brief study of driver performance in a maneuvering task. The study was part of a pilot program for evaluation of test methods and equipment for future and more extensive human factors evaluations. Three distinct types of passenger car directional control characteristics were simulated, and each configuration was driven by each of six different drivers through a complex course. The results of the investigation are presented in terms of the average driver performance with each vehicle configuration.
Technical Paper
1965-02-01
James F. Meldrum
This paper reports results of a driver eye position survey made to provide the automobile industry with standardized data on driver eye location. Coordinate anthropometric measurements of eye position and top of head were recorded on film by a special photogrammetric technique. Data were smoothed into elliptical tangent cutoff percentile contours referenced to car body inch-lines and to points on the manikin. Results revealed a new shape to the driver’s eye position zone, compared to the area outlined in SAE J906, Glazing Manual.
Technical Paper
1965-02-01
J. T. Tielking
An elastically supported cylindrical shell is used to represent the motion of a pneumatic tire in the plane of the wheel. This is an attempt to utilize shell motion as an analog to the plane motion of the pneumatic tire tread. The idea is suggested by the constructional features of a pneumatic tire, both from the point of view of mass distribution and the distribution of elastic stiffness. The equations of motion for such a model are derived by reference to conventional energy methods. In this derivation, the influence of internal pressure and elastic support of the shell is taken into account. The frequencies are determined as functions of the mode shape, and it is shown that nodes, as well as antinodes, rotate with an angular velocity somewhat less than the angular velocity of the rotating pneumatic tire, to an extent determined by the particular mode shape in question. It is hoped that these phenomena may be useful in explaining or understanding some vibratory or acoustic interactions between a tire and suspension system.
Technical Paper
1965-02-01
Stanley Deutsch
This paper deals with a few of the important problem areas involved in a long duration manned space flight. Some of the problems discussed in detail that will be encountered in an extended space voyage are space vehicle maintenance and extra-vehicular activities, visual skill performance, and manual and automatic control of spacecraft systems. Although some of these areas have been studied in the Mercury and Gemini programs, additional testing must be undertaken before successful extended manned spaceflights can be carried out.
Technical Paper
1965-02-01
Fred Pradko, Theodore R. Orr, Richard A. Lee
A new method has been developed to study the effects of vibration environments upon human beings. The method is usable to assess the effects of random vibration, transients, or sinusoidal wave forms. It is equally effective for synthesis or analysis of applied force, effective mass, impedance, displacement, or acceleration. The linearity of human response to vibration is established. The procedure employs the transfer function technique. Data are presented describing human response to vertical motion for voluntary tolerance and low intensity acceleration. The frequency spectrum studied was 1–60 cps.
Standard
1965-01-10
This report is intended to furnish the aerospace industry with brief design information and data on cabin and cargo space electrical heating. The design information and data contained herin are applicable to modern aircraft utilizing main propulsion systems such as turbo-jet, turbo-fan, and turbo-prop.
Standard
1964-08-01
The purpose of this Aerospace Recommended Practice is to provide recommendations which will lead to the standardization of flight deck interior doors and their operation in all transport aircraft by establishing design criteria which will provide optimum use under normal and emergency conditions. The flight deck interior door is that door which connects the flight deck area with any cabin area or area leading to any cabin area, whether passenger or cargo, and does not include any door leading from the flight deck directly to the outside of the aircraft.
Standard
1964-08-01
This standard covers all types of oxygen breathing equipment used in non-military aircraft. It is intended that this standard supplement the requirements of the detail specification or drawings of specific components or assemblies, e.g., regulators, masks, cylinders, etc. Where a conflict exists between this and detail specifications, detail specifications shall take precedence.
Standard
1964-06-20
This recommended practice is intended to recommend the basic shapes and dimensions for knobs used in aircraft. Two basic types of knobs, the bar shape and the round shape, are described, as well as several widely used variations of these two basic shapes.
Standard
1964-04-01
This SAE Standard covers minimum dimensional relations for sheaves, drums, and wire rope for mobile, construction type lift cranes.
Standard
1964-02-01
The purpose of this information report is to present factors which affect the design and development of jet blast windshield rain removal systems for commercial transport aircraft. A satisfactory analytical approach to the design of these systems has not yet been developed. Although detailed performance data are available for some test configurations, rain removal systems will generally be unique to specific aircraft. This, then, requires a preliminary design for the system based on available empirical data to be followed with an extensive laboratory development program.
Technical Paper
1964-01-01
J. Jay Keegan
Abstract A scientific medical study of “Alterations of the Lumbar Curve Related to Posture and Seating” has shown that the cause of most postural lower back discomfort and pain when sitting is degeneration and posterior protrusion of lower lumbar intervertebral discs. Sitting at a right angle greatly flattens the lumbar spine curve and increases this disc protrusion. Seats need to be designed to allow more backward inclination of the shoulders and give support over the lower lumbar region. Other requirements for a comfortable and protective seat are presented, with application to automobile seats.
Technical Paper
1964-01-01
Stanley R. Mohler, John J. Swearingen, Ernest B. McFadden, J. D. Garner
Abstract This paper presents newly discovered principles concerning human factors in emergency evacuation of aircraft following survivable accidents. A comprehensive summary and evaluation of all known emergency evacuation tests through December 1963 is presented. Human factors data resulting from tests conducted between July 1963 and February 1964 in CARI's 132,000 gal indoor ditching pool, under extreme conditions of lighting, and at Lake Tenkiller in eastern Oklahoma are presented. Also, land tests were conducted using new escape devices, including the “Telescape” device. Lack of familiarity with emergency equipment on the part of the crew, plus certain equipment design defects, doubled the escape times, and in certain instances resulted in unsuccessful escapes. Designs enabling a minimum escape time of 90 sec are recommended for future civil aircraft. The results indicate the desirability of instituting changes in crew emergency evacuation training and in passenger briefing practices.
Technical Paper
1964-01-01
Paul L. Connolly
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