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1980-01-01
Standard
J1013_198001
This SAE Standard defines a method for the measurement of the whole body vibration to which the seated operator of off-highway self-propelled work machines is exposed while performing an actual or simulated operation. It applies to vibration transmitted to the operator through the seat. There are not equivalent ISO Standards. In the main body of this document, conditions are defined for measuring and recording whole body vibration of the seated operator of off-highway self-propelled work machines. The specification of instruments, analytic methods, and description of site and operating conditions allows the measurements to be made and reported with an acceptable precision. The procedure includes means of weighing the vibration level at different frequencies as specified in ISO2631. A standard format for reporting spectral data is recommended. The definitions, instruments, and analytic methods also apply to simulated tests for operator vibration as performed in laboratories.
1980-01-01
Standard
J1163_198001
This SAE standard specifies a method and the device for use in determining the position of the Seat Index Point (SIP) for any kind of seat. This SAE document provides a uniform method for defining the location of the SIP in relation to some fixing point on the seat.
1979-06-01
Standard
J115A_197906
SAE J115 specifies the relevant ISO standards for application to safety signs for use on off-road work machines as defined in SAE J1116.
1979-04-01
Standard
J1166A_197904
This SAE Standard sets forth the procedures to be used in measuring sound levels and determining the time weighted sound level at the operator's station(s) of specified off-road self-propelled work machines. This document applies to the following work machines which have operator stations as specified in SAE J1116: Crawler Loader Wheel Loader Dumper Tractor Scraper Grader Crawler Tractor with Dozer Wheel Tractor with Dozer Pad Foot Wheel Compactor with Dozer Backhoe Hydraulic Excavator Log Skidder Excavator and Wheel Feller-Buncher Pipelayer Roller/Compactor Trencher Sweeper The instrumentation requirements and specific work cycles for these machines are described. The method used to calculate the time weighted average sound level at the operator station(s) is specified for Leq(5), or optional exchange rates, during continuous operation in a work cycle. A method to relate the time weighted average sound level at the operator station(s) to operator sound exposure is also provided.
1979-04-01
Standard
J1257_197904
This recommended practice applies to mobile construction type cranes with cantilevered, telescopic booms when used in lifting crane service.
1979-04-01
Standard
J919C_197904
This SAE Standard describes the instrumentation and procedures to be used in measuring sound levels at the operator station for self-propelled sweepers as defined in SAE J2130 and self-propelled off-road work machines in categories 1, 2, 4, and 5, of SAE J1116. This SAE document is applicable to machines that have operator stations where the operator can either stand or sit and will be either transported by, or walk with the machine during its operation. The sound levels obtained using this procedure are repeatable and representative of the higher range of sound levels generated by machines under actual field operating conditions. Due to variability of field operating conditions, this data is not intended to be used for operator noise exposure evaluations. Measurement and calculation of the operator's sound exposure should follow SAE J1116.
1979-03-01
Standard
J154_197903
This SAE Standard defines the minimum normal operating space envelope for clothed seated (SAE J899 seat configuration) and standing operators (95th percentile operator, SAE J833). This document applies to off-road, self-propelled work machines used in construction, general purpose industrial, agricultural, and forestry as identified in SAE J1116. Purpose This document defines dimensions for the minimum normal operating space envelope around the operator for operator enclosures (cabs, ROPS, FOPS) on off-road machines.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790850
Walter P. Wieland, Wolf Poesl
The historical evolution of the spherical roller bearings is discussed briefly. The difrent internal and external designs common in today's market are evaluated regarding their load carrying ability, roller guidance, and friction. It can be shown that all these criteria have to be evaluated simultaneously with a view towards the application conditions expressed by the load magnitude, load angle, load direction changes, speed, speed changes and mounting conditions. It can also be shown that the method of guiding the rollers by means of a retainer or by means of an integral center flange are equally valid and equally efficient methods under most application conditions. In cases of extreme application conditions, however, it is evident that the positive guidance of the rolling elements through an integral centerflange will result in lower friction, i.e. better running conditions.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790383
Paul Green
Two experiments were conducted to develop symbols for seven automobile controls and displays (heater, air conditioner, fresh air vent, radio volume, radio tuning, exterior lamp failure, and tire pressure) and answer several related questions. In the first, 43 drivers drew pictures they thought should be used as symbols for the items in question. Based on their suggestions the author designed several candidate symbols for each function. In the second, 62 drivers rated how well each candidate's intended meaning was understood. For many functions a “best” symbol was found, often one which differed from that currently used by the automobile manufacturers.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790054
Richard A. Nedbal
A new microcomputer family simplifies the system design of display panels and dashboards by minimizing the parts count. Both high voltage and low voltage drive capability together with analog inputs and outputs enable efficient human communication while simultaneously performing system control and computations.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790011
Robert M. Nicholson
This paper reviews some of the progress that has been made in recent years in the transportation field by behavioral scientists and human factors engineers. The major areas covered are public transportation systems, railroad systems, highway systems, and personal transportation systems. The report suggests what future problems may be encountered in these areas that will need the attention of human factors specialists.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790514
Dale Jackson
Two, broad, alternative philosophies are described for engineering managers who wish to improve the performance of their subordinates. Each of those alternatives is subdivided into more specific courses of action. Those actions are characterized according to their probable effects on the attitudes and responses of subordinates. Contributions are taken from transactional analysis, effectiveness training, nonverbal communication and positive reinforcement.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790498
Susanne M. Gatchell
In order to quantify the effects of part proliferation on assembly line operators' decision making capabilities, a research study was conducted. Using a Choice Reaction Time technique, 16 operators were tested to determine their reaction times and error rates when selecting parts. These operators were from four training levels (trained, relief, untrained/job and untrained/plant) and had to decide between 4, 7 or 10 major parts. Results show that operators with 10 parts made 46% more errors and needed 13% more decision time than operators with 4 parts. Furthermore, the relief and untrained/job operators made three times more errors than the trained operators. The untrained/plant operators had over five times more errors than the trained operators. These results indicate that all operators could make a selection when working with 10 major parts. However, their reaction times and error rates increased as the number or parts increased from 4 to 10.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790317
Stephan Konz
A computer program has been developed which predicts an individual's physiological responses to various combinations of environment and exercise. The user enters information concerning the individual (height, weight, age, etc.), the environment (dry bulb temperature, air velocity, etc), the task (sit, walk, metabolic rate, etc) and the simulation (for 50 min, output every 10, etc). The program then predicts body temperatures, heart rate, sweat rate, comfort, etc and prints it out at the desired times. An important feature of the program is that variables can change during the simulation. For example, the task can change from sit to walk, the temperature from 30 C to 45 C, etc. The article gives an overview of the program and compares predictions vs data for some situations.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790122
Frederick H. Rohles, Stan B. Wallis
From 1973 to 1977 a series of laboratory tests involving almost 3000 people were conducted to determine the factors that contribute to the thermal comfort of automobile passengers while using air conditioning under summer heat loads. Four studies will be reviewed. In the first study, 2200 subjects were exposed for 45 min. to an environment of 110°F/40% in a 1973 Ford Vehicle buck for the purpose of evaluating the effects of the register size, the air flow rate and the discharge air temperature on comfort. The results showed that while the register size does not affect the time to reach a comfortable condition, the time to reach comfort in the front seat varies from 4 minutes with an air flow of 400 cfm (50°F discharge air at 10 minutes) to 18 minutes with 150 cfm (60°F discharge air); in the rear seat, the corresponding times were 8.5 and 39 minutes.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790385
Alexander A. Alexandridis, Brian S. Repa, Walter W. Wierwille
The effects of changes in understeer, control sensitivity, and location of the lateral aerodynamic center of pressure of a typical passenger vehicle on the driver's opinion and on the performance of the driver-vehicle system were studied in the moving-base driving simulator at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Twelve subjects with no prior experience on the simulator and no special driving skills performed regulation tasks in the presence of both random and step wind gusts. The lower weights and moments of inertia of future passenger vehicles can be expected to change the effect of wind gusts making the evaluation of aerodynamic and control response characteristics on closed-loop wind disturbance regulation a matter of increased interest.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790262
Yasuhisa Nagayama, Takanobu Morita, Toshiaki Miura, Junichi Watanabem, Nobuo Murakami
Motorcyclists' visual behavior was examined and compared with that of drivers' by an eye-marker method. The background of this research is as follows. From the accident statistics of Osaka prefecture, characteristics of motorcycle accidents and those of ordinary passenger cars were analysed and compared and it was revealed that collisions on turning right (in the United States, collisions on turning left) are most remarkable. In this case, collisions between motorcycles running straight ahead and automobiles turning right are most typical. The automobile drivers expected that the motorcyclists would give way. But, almost without braking, the motorcycles crashed into the automobiles turning right. Here, one of the problems is motorcyclists' unawareness of existence of automobiles turning right. We focused upon this. Three males participated as subjects in these experiments with an eye-marker. Independent variables were type of vehicel and speed.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790384
Lawrence W. Schneider, Charles K. Anderson, Paul L. Olson
A sample population of 51 male and 57 female subjects ranging in age from 18 to 78 years was assembled and tested in six different vehicles for preferred seat positions under non-driving and driving conditions. Volunteer subjects were selected by age, stature, and weight criteria in order to match the U.S. adult population to the extent practical. Preliminary analyses of these data suggest that on a total sample basis there is little difference between seat positions selected under non-driving and driving conditions, but that individuals may show significant differences. The small differences in group mean positions observed in this study may be due to a seat belt and/or an initial seat position factor. Post-drive seat position results were analyzed in a variety of ways to identify factors that may influence a person's preferred seat position.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790131
D. F. Huelke, E. A. Moffatt, R. A. Mendelsohn, J. W. Melvin
In that the neck has a wide range of movements--flexion, extension, lateral bending and rotation, there is a large variety of types of neck fractures and fracture-dislocations. This paper describes these various fractures and dislocations emphasizing the mechanisms as determined from clinical experience and potential, neurological damage. Fractures and fracture-dislocations with and without spinal cord involvement have been extensively described in the medical literature. This paper will give a brief overview of some of the types of fractures, as well as the mechanisms involved in these injuries. For more detailed descriptions, the reader is encouraged to review the articles in the list of suggested readings found in this symposium proceedings.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790132
D. F. Huelke, R. A. Mendelsohn, John D. States, J. W. Melvin
Because of its flexibility and structure, the cervical spine is disposed to various mechanisms of injury: although not so common as injuries caused by head impacts, cervical fractures and/or fracture-dislocations have been reported without direct impact to the head. Some cervical injuries reported have been sustained by wearers of lap and shoulder belts in auto accidents; however, we do not consider belt use a potential hazard because ample evidence has accrued in the medical and engineering literature to document general injury and fatality reduction by use of seatbelts. We believe that in many instances occupants would be more seriously injured or killed were belts not worn. The present paper reviews reports of cervical injuries without head impact found in the literature and case histories of such injuries from the Highway Safety Research Institute of The University of Michigan, as well as experimental studies in animals, cadavers, and volunteer subjects.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790130
D. F. Huelke
The anatomy of the major structures of the neck are presented including the anterior throat structures and the components of the cervical spine and associated structures. Basic neck movements and generalized muscle actions are described. Anatomical relationships of the bones, ligaments, muscles and joints of the cervical spine are emphasized as a foundation for a clear understanding of the structural elements involved in neck fractures and dislocations.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
791027
R. Cheng, N. K. Mital, R. S. Levine, A. I. King
Spinal kinematics of the living human volunteers undergoing -Gx impact acceleration are described along with the experimental procedures followed to acquire such data. There were 4 male and 3 female volunteers who were subjected to impacts in the tensed and relaxed mode from 2 - 8 g, in 1-g increments. Their lower extremities were tightly clamped to the impact seat and the pelvis was restrained by a lapbelt. The biodynamic response of the living spine is quite similar to that of the cadaveric spine, particularly in terms of T1 displacement, acceleration at T1 and flexural resistance. Female volunteers tend to withdraw from the test program at lower g-levels than males due to transient neck pain.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
791007
Arvind J. Padgaonkar, Priyaranjan Prasad
Abstract By applying some advanced features of the CAL3D occupant simulation model, a single model incorporating the vehicle structure and a simplified occupant was developed for studying the sensitivity of occupant response to parameter changes in perpendicular, vehicle-to-vehicle side impacts, not involving vehicle rotation. The results of the model show qualitative agreement with published experimental results, which indicate that occupant responses are related to the initial clearance of the occupant from the door, the stiffnesses of the front end of the impacting vehicle, and the side structure of the impacted vehicle.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
791020
Guy S. Nusholtz, John W. Melvin, Nabih M. Alem
Abstract The response of the head to impact in the posterior-to-anterior direction was investigated with live anesthetized and post-mortem primates.* The purpose of the project was to relate animal test results to previous head impact tests conducted with cadavers (reported at the 21st Stapp Car Crash Conference (1),** and to study the differences between the living and post-mortem state in terms of mechanical response. The three-dimensional motion of the head, during and after impact, was derived from experimental measurements and expressed as kinematic quantities in various reference frames. Comparison of kinematic quantities between subjects is normally done by referring the results to a standard anatomical reference frame, or to a predefined laboratory reference frame. This paper uses an additional method for describing the kinematics of head motion through the use of Frenet-Serret frame fields.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790681
Peter N. Ziegler, P. Robert Knaff
Currently, consumers must contend with many comfort and convenience problems whenever they use a manually operated (“active”) safety belt. Such problems are prevalent not only in older models but in new cars as well. Beginning with 1982 models, most auto manufacturers plan to install automatic safety belts to meet new Federal requirements for passive occupant protection. To reduce the likelihood of consumer rejection and non-use of automatic as well as manual belt systems, research has been conducted to develop performance specifications for improved comfort and convenience. This paper discusses specifications and criteria to improve the safety belts by reducing comfort and convenience variables for both manual and automatic systems.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790050
Derrick M. Kuzak, Mark S. Guimond
The ambient light levels incident on electronic displays located in the instrument panel can be sufficiently bright to impair their readability, unless optical filtering techniques are employed. The aim of this study was to develop the experimental procedures and associated instrumentation to objectively and quantitatively measure the readability of a given electronic display - optical filter combination. Readability was quantified through the two criteria of recognition accuracy and response time. The effects of display parameters such as character size, luminance, and background color on the accuracy and response time data, and subsequent filter choice, were evaluated.
1979-02-01
Technical Paper
790740
Friedrich O. Jaksch
The vehicle characteristics of two vehicles have been changed by various means. Steering control quality has then been investigated with the help of lane change manoeuvres. The investigation comprises both theoretical analyses and experimental tests. The tests comprise measuring of vehicle characteristics, subjective rating of steering control quality and measuring of performance of the system driver - vehicle, regarding the ability to follow a predicted course. Results have shown that there is a strong relationship between yaw velocity response time, steering wheel angle gradient, steering wheel torque gradient and subjective rating. The results also show that yaw velocity response time is the dominating factor and greatly influences steering control quality in transient steering manoeuvres, with relatively high lateral acceleration.
1979-01-01
Standard
J999A_197901
This SAE Standard applies to cranes which are equipped to adjust the boom angle by hoisting and lowering means through rope reeving. The purpose of this standard is to define the function and to stipulate the requirements of an automatic device to prevent raising a variable angle boom above its highest specified angle.
1978-12-01
Standard
J53_197812
This SAE Recommended Practice provides minimum performance and test criteria for the emergency steering of specified machines in the event of an engine or steering power source failure. This criteria shall enable machine manufacturers to uniformly evaluate emergency steering capability. This recommended practice is specifically limited to tractor scrapers, wheel loaders, wheel tractors, graders, and dumpers (as defined in SAE J1116 (January, 1977) and J1057a (June, 1975) which are designed to operate at a maximum rated speed in excess of 20.0 km/h (12.4 mph) and which employ power (source(s) in addition to the operator control effort to effect machine steering.
1978-10-01
Standard
AIR1358
This AIR indicates those dimensions,d eemed critical by the manufacturer, which are required to be adhered to so that proper mating of the disconnect hose fitting with the correct disconnect be accomplished. The dimensions are critical, but not necessarily complete, in defining these fittings since there are other criteria which must also be met.

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