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Viewing 5581 to 5610 of 5832
1969-07-01
Standard
J100_196907
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes boundaries for shade bands on glazed surfaces in class "A" vehicles. These boundaries are located so that the shade band will provide driver vision protection from glare, and occupant comfort with respect to solar radiation. Since shade bands transmit less visible light than surrounding glazed surfaces, the boundaries establish limits for the driver's field of view.
1969-05-01
Magazine
1969-04-01
Standard
ARP1109
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) recommends performance requirements for test equipment used in dynamic testing of aviation oxygen breathing equipment. This document describes test equipment and methods used for testing continuous flow, demand and pressure demand regulators and their associated masks as well as filtered protective breathing devices; such articles of oxygen breathing or protective breathing equipment may be tested as individual components or as a complete system.
1969-03-01
Standard
J386_196903
This standard provides performance and test requirements for operator restraint systems provided for off-road self-propelled work machines. This document applies to pelvic restraint systems (Type 1) for off-road, self-propelled work machines fitted with ROPS and commonly used in construction, earthmoving, forestry, and mining as referred to in SAE J1040 and industrial machines fitted with ROPS as referred to in SAE J1042.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690817
C. L. Ewing, D. J. Thomas, L. M. Patrick, G. W. Beeler, M. J. Smith
Abstract A methodical investigation and measurement of human dynamic response to impact acceleration is being conducted as a Joint Army-Navy-Wayne State University investigation. Details of the experimental design were presented at the Twelfth Stapp Car Crash Conference in October 1968. Linear accelerations are being measured on the top of the head, at the mouth, and at the base of the neck. Angular velocity is also being measured at the base of the neck and at the mouth. A redundant photographic system is being used for validation. All data are collected in computer compatible format and data processing is by digital computer. Selected data in a stage of interim analysis on 18 representative human runs of the 236 human runs completed to date are presented. Review of the data indicates that peak accelerations measured at the mouth are higher than previous estimates.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690795
Ross A. McFarland
Abstract The number of fatalities and injuries from all types of motor vehicle accidents have been increasing throughout the world. This paper analyzes these statistics in an effort to find the causes of this high accident rate and to suggest possible solutions. Among the findings are: the number of people injured is increasing more rapidly than fatalities; the greatest percentage of fatalities occurs in the teenage and young adult age bracket with males predominating; alcohol is a dominating cause of many accidents; the personal and emotional maladjustment of the driver is a contributing factor; those related to old age, disease, and illness of drivers need to be more carefully studied and criteria for disqualification established. Possible solutions include: improved driver training; improved highway design, especially with regard to lighting; improved vehicular design. The author feels the latter is most important as it seems unlikely that driving habits can be radically improved.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690248
V. L Roberts, D. H. Robbins
A series of mathematical models of the interaction between an occupant and the interior of a vehicle is presented. The following parameter studies using an eight-mass, two-dimensional model are discussed: belt material properties, belt slack, belt geometric configuration, and comparison of seats with and without headrests in rear impact. In addition, it is demonstrated by example that simple mathematical models can perform a valuable service in laying the groundwork for more sophisticated analytical and experimental work as well as yielding short term results. Finally, three-dimensional models are discussed. It is shown that a three-mass, three-dimensional model is a logical extension of current simulation efforts in order to provide insight into occupant response in oblique and lateral impact as well as nonsymmetric restraint systems.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690163
J. B. Liljedahl, E. J. McCormick
This paper discusses the necessity for designing farm tractors which have logical, rather than arbitrary, safety features. The paper is directed primarily to those who buy and use industrial equipment and urges this group to exercise their influence on tractor design by purchasing only those vehicles which meet recommended standards for safety and construction.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690105
J. W. Chaffee
A method of determining the reach envelope, termed “ergosphere,” of vehicle operators is presented together with an example of the measured ergosphere of a general automotive package geometry. Application of this method in determining percentile of reach is described.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690328
Christopher L. Lair, Kenneth W. Bender
Relative merits of three types of aircraft engine instruments were examined in respect to aircraft changing conditions. The experimental design considered interference, workload, age, and experience. Instruments were comparable so far as instrument size and characteristics would allow. Experimental results and comments indicated the experimental apparatus and failure parameters were comparable to actual aircraft situations. It was discovered that vertical-scale engine instruments required less recognition and scan time. Age and flight experience were not significant in this experimental design.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690270
Pieter L. Walraven, John A. Miction
General considerations about the use of convex mirrors indicate that they may be very useful to enlarge the field of view. There seems to be no need to use smaller values for the radius of the mirror than 1000 mm. A reaction time experiment is described in which plane mirrors of equal size at different positions on the fender are used. There are indications that the position of about 20° out of the line of sight straight ahead might be optimal. Whether this also holds for convex mirrors is not investigated. An experiment is described in which a driver must decide whether he can overtake a car in front of him, while a car behind him is approaching. This is done with several speeds of the car behind and with different curvatures of the side mirrors. Especially if the radius of curvature is not less than 1200 mm, no serious effects on driver behavior is observed. The instrumented car used in the studies is briefly described.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690458
Donald W. Conover, Wesley E. Woodson, Peter H. Selby, Gerald E. Miller
A human engineering survey of the control/display arrangements in 1969 passenger automobiles was conducted under contract to the National Highway Safety Bureau. Survey rationale, methodology, and preliminary findings are presented. Marked variability was noted between various control/display arrangements and certain important driver compartment dimensions. This and other findings suggest need for development of human engineering design criteria against which to base future design standards for the driver-vehicle interface.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690459
Earl D. Sharp
Research in human factors considerations to controls and control design conducted under the aegis of the Air Force is reviewed in this paper. Seven categories are discussed, with appropriate reference material. These general categories include: checklists, guides, and manuals; control design; control coding; control forces; control spacing; gloved operation; and workplace layout.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690467
Barry Griffith King, Elmer C. Paul, Carl R. Spitznagel
Percentile distributions of children's body measurements are presented for use in design and sizing of automobile restraint devices and as a basis for guiding parents in the selection of makes and models suitable for the child. The influence of these measurements on the stability, protection, and surrounding clearance dimension requirements for seating systems for children weighing less than 50 lb and those more than 50 lb are discussed.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690408
J. M. Naish, M. F. von Wieser
Effects which normally diminish the value of a manually flown instrument approach are examined in the light of flight test results with the Head-Up Display (HUD). It is possible to avoid shortsightedness (space myopia) and disorientation phenomena associated with poor external visibility, by choice of display position and format, allowing an efficient alternation between display and forward view. The display can also be designed to fit the man, in both static and dynamic characteristics, with benefits of rapid learning and accurate tracking. These results remove the basis for supposing man's intervention in the all-weather landing to be disastrous. On the other hand, man's participation may be necessary, because more information is connected with a safe approach than can be dealt with by an unaided machine. Synthesis of an automatic system with HUD may turn out to be the most acceptable solution to the overall problem of all-weather operation.
1969-02-01
Standard
J941B_196902
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the location of drivers' eyes inside a vehicle. Elliptical (eyellipse) models in three dimensions are used to represent tangent cutoff percentiles of driver eye locations. Procedures are provided to construct 95th and 99th percentile tangent cutoff eyellipses for a 50/50 gender mix, adult user population. Neck pivot (P) points are defined in Section 6 to establish specific left and right eye points for direct and indirect viewing tasks described in SAE J1050. These P points are defined only for the adjustable seat eyellipses defined in Section 4. This document applies to Class A Vehicles (Passenger Cars, Multipurpose Passenger Vehicles, and Light Trucks) as defined in SAE J1100. It also applies to Class B vehicles (Heavy Trucks), although these eyellipses have not been updated from previous versions of SAE J941. The appendices are provided for information only and are not a requirement of this document.
1969-02-01
Standard
J765_196902
This SAE Standard may be used for all revolving cranes wherein the capacity of the crane to support loads is based on its resistance to overturning. it is not applicable to cranes wherein the capacity of the crane is based on structural strength or available hoisting power. The purpose of this test is to determine the maximum capacity of a crane to counterbalance loads applied on its hook block. The capacity of the crane is reported in terms of the load in kilograms (pounds) and its corresponding radius in meters (feet) for a specified position of the upperstructure with respect to the mounting.
1969-02-01
Standard
J765A_196902
This SAE Standard may be used for all revolving cranes wherein the capacity of the crane to support loads is based on its resistance to overturning. it is not applicable to cranes wherein the capacity of the crane is based on structural strength or available hoisting power. The purpose of this test is to determine the maximum capacity of a crane to counterbalance loads applied on its hook block. The capacity of the crane is reported in terms of the load in kilograms (pounds) and its corresponding radius in meters (feet) for a specified position of the upperstructure with respect to the mounting.
1968-12-01
Standard
AS1065
This specification covers the servicing of gaseous oxygen cylinders used for breathing purposes in civil aircraft. (Refer to AIR1059 on transfilling & Maintenance of Oxygen Cylinders.)
1968-12-01
Standard
AS1066
This standard covers all types of manually operated high pressure oxygen, cylinder shut off valves for use in commercial type aircraft. It is intended that the valve shall be attached to a pressure cylinder storing oxygen under pressure of 1800 to 2100 psi at 70 F. Upon opening the valve, oxygen will be permitted to discharge from the storage cylinder to the valve outlet and thence to other components of the oxygen system. It shall also be possible to recharge the cylinder through the valve. The purpose of this standard is to define general minimum standards for the design, fabrication, test and packaging of manually operated, high pressure breathing oxygen cylinder shut off valves. Applicable is AS 861, MINIMUM GENERAL STANDARDS FOR OXYGEN SYSTEMS.
1968-12-01
Standard
AIR1059
This document provides guidance concerning the maintenance and serviceability of oxygen cylinders beginning with the quality of oxygen that is required, supplemental oxygen information, handling and cleaning procedures, transfilling and marking of serviced oxygen assemblies. This document attempts to outline in a logical sequence oxygen quality,serviceability and maintenance of oxygen cylinders.
1968-12-01
Standard
AIR1059A
Recharging of small portable oxygen cylinders by the user is a practice both condemned and discouraged by the Compressed Gas Association (CGA) and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). Their condemnation is based on the firm conviction of the majority of the Association members that 'transfilling' and oxygen cylinder by 'unqualified' personnel is basically unsafe and should not be performed. By logic, therefore, it must be deduced that all personnel assigned to transfilling must be qualified. The purpose of this document is to list the best available information and guidelines for the qualification of personnel who are responsible for the filling of fixed or portable aircraft oxygen cylinders. It is a matter of record that the commercial airlines, aircraft manufacturers, and aircraft service stations have been involved in, and will continue to follow, the practice of filling the small portable oxygen units and fixed oxygen cylinders in commercial and general aviation.
1968-11-01
Standard
ARP1048
The desired system for general aviation aircraft instrument panel and cockpit lighting should furnish light of adequate intensity and distribution under all conditions of external illumination so that the crew may read instrumentation, placards, check lists, manuals, maps, instrument color coding, and distinguish controls without undue interference with their vision outside of the aircraft. Heretofore, considerable effort has been made to insure night vision adaptation at all costs. Efforts to maintain this adaptation have been based on certain military requirements, night flight involving pilotage and takeoffs or landings using only moonlight or less light intensity. With present navigational methods, adequate airport lighting and aircraft landing lights, night vision adaptation is rarely necessary.
1968-10-01
Standard
AIR1069
Determine the required minimum oxygen concentration to be breathed prior to, during, and after a loss of cabin pressurization. Determine recommended means necessary to provide the required oxygen concentrations.
1968-06-01
Standard
J336_196806
This SAE Recommended Practice describes the equipment and procedure for determining the truck cab interior sound level over the upper half of the engine speed range. This practice applies to motor trucks and truck-tractors and does not include construction and industrial machinery.
1968-06-01
Magazine
1968-05-01
Magazine
1968-04-01
Standard
ARP922
The recommendations set forth herein are the results of the combined efforts of engineers associated with manufacturing of lamps, instrumentation, aircraft, aerospace equipment and vehicles, Air Transport and interested Government Agencies. The information contained in this initial release of the ARP is general in nature and will suffice as an introduction to this type of lighting. However, it is recommended that it be developed, in further revisions, into a more specific document.
1968-03-01
Standard
AIR822
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides a general overview of oxygen systems for general aviation use. Included are a brief review of the factors and effects of hypoxia, system descriptions and mission explanations for system or component selection, and techniques for safe handling of oxygen distribution systems.
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