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2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2338
Dong Guo, Quan Shi, Peng Yi
In-vehicle noise is composed of a variety of tonal (frequency-related) components and the tonal components play an important role in the improvement of interior vehicle sound quality. Much research has been focused on the suppression of sound pressure level and achieved certain positive effects. However, in some operating conditions, customers still perceive the tonal components and complain about the vehicle quality even the sound pressure level is relatively low. Therefore, a better understanding of how tonal components are perceived is necessary for automotive designers. To do so, psychoacoustics results about human hearing mechanism to tonal components are comprehensively summed in this study: human hearing response to pure tone, two tones and multiple tones. Then, well-controlled testing stimuli were generated and subjective annoyance testing was conducted. The results show agreement with former researchers’ findings.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2271
Yong Du Jun, Bong Hyun Park, Kang Seok Seo, Tae Hyun Kim, Myoung Jae Chae
An objective measure is proposed for seat riding comfort evaluation under low frequency (0~2 Hz) vibratory conditions which represents typical roll and pitch motions of driving motor vehicles. The related feeling due to this low frequency vehicle motion is termed ‘hold feeling’ because the seated body may tend to deviate from the defined seating position under such vehicle motion inputs. In the present study, dynamic pressure distribution measurements have been performed with a roll motion simulator at different frequencies between 0.3 and 1.0 Hz, to monitor the interface pressure change behavior of the seat-subject body. Temporal changes in body pressure in terms of the magnitude and the representative locations, and the time delay in pressure change at different regions of the seat are identified to be useful parameters for describing the subject's responses and with the subjective test results.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2285
Arne Nykänen, David Lennström, Roger Johnsson
Subjects who are well aware of what to judge commonly yield more consistent results in laboratory listening tests. This awareness may be raised by explicit instructions and training. However, too explicit instructions or use of only trained subjects may direct experiment results in an undesired way. An alternative is to give fairly open instructions to untrained subjects, but give the subjects a chance to get familiar with the product and context by, for example, riding a representative car under representative driving conditions before entering the laboratory. In this study, sound quality assessments of interior sounds of cars made by two groups were compared. In one group subjects were exposed to the same driving conditions that were later assessed in a laboratory listening test by taking them on a ride in one of the cars to be assessed, just before entering the laboratory. In the other group subjects made the laboratory assessments without prior car riding.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2337
Gordon Ebbitt, Todd Remtema
Speech communication from the front seat to the rear seat in a passenger vehicle can be difficult. This is particularly true in a vehicle with an acoustically absorptive interior. Speech Transmission Index (STI) measurements can quantify the speech intelligibility, but they require specialized signal processing. The STI calculations can be simplified if it is assumed that reverberation and echoes play an insignificant role in an automobile. A simplification of a STI measurement is described that uses a stationary reference speech signal from a talker mannequin in the driver’s seat to create a signal at the rear passenger positions. On-road noise measurements are used for the noise level and the calculated signal to noise ratio is used to calculate a simplified STI value that tracks closely to a full implementation of the STI method for sedans. In fact, this method is very similar to the techniques described in the Articulation Index (AI) and Speech Interference Index (SII) standards.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2332
Jan Deleener, Akira Sekitou, Masanori Ohta
Shift feeling is an important comfort attribute for manual transmission driven vehicles. For front-wheel-drive vehicles, there are 3 main parts of interest: the gearbox, the shifter and the shift cable. Often only a test based evaluation process on the actual assembly is available in the later stages of development. In order to frontload the shift feeling evaluation a virtual simulation process is required. For the shift lever and the gearbox there are well established models available. With 3D multibody models or even 2D planar models the effect of kinematics and compliances like connection stiffness and friction are already studied today. However, the modelling of the transmission cable, connecting the gearbox and the shifter remains a challenge to accurately represent the physical feel. By experience it was known that the 3D positioning and curvature of the cable affected the friction force and therefore the shift feeling.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2216
Dong Chul Park, Eun Soo Jo, Seokgwan Hong, Michael Csakan
Abstract An important trend among vehicle NVH engineers is the production of attractive engine acceleration sound quality for the enhancement of a vehicle's image and performance. In addition, customers have increasing interest and enjoyment in customizing their cars to reflect their personal taste and preferences. The PESS (Personalized Engine Sound System) has been developed for making a unique and individually customizable vehicle concept. The system allows the customers an opportunity to create a variety of engine sounds in a single vehicle using active sound design technology. In this system, three different engine sound concepts are pre-defined, Dynamic, Sporty, and Extreme. Each of the engine sounds can then be adjusted with parameters that determine the timbre, such as main order, rumble, and high order. In addition, the pedal position during acceleration has also been used as a parameter to further personalize the experience.
2015-05-19
WIP Standard
J2944_201505
This Recommended Practice, Operational Definitions of Driving Performance Measures and Statistics, provides functional definitions of and guidance for performance measures and statistics concerned with driving on roadways. As a consequence, measurements and statistics will be calculated and reported in a consistent manner in SAE and ISO standards, journal articles proceedings papers, technical reports, and presentations so that the procedures and results can be more readily compared. Only measures and statistics pertaining to driver/vehicle responses that affect the lateral and longitudinal positioning of a road vehicle are currently provided in this document. Measures and statistics covering other aspects of driving performance may be included in future editions. For eye glance-related measures and statistics, see SAE J2396 (Society of Automotive Engineers, 2007) and ISO 15007-1 (International Standards Organization, 2002).
2015-05-15
Article
A tire pressure monitoring chipset can help fleet managers improve fuel economy and tell when vehicles are overloaded while also simplifying setup times. The Freescale Semiconductor device is said to be the industry’s smallest sensor, yet it has a broad operating range of 100-1500 kPa, exceeding the levels normally required for heavy commercial trucks.
2015-05-08
WIP Standard
J2365
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to both Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) and aftermarket route-guidance and navigation system functions for passenger vehicles. This recommended practice provides a method for calculating the time required to complete navigation system-related tasks. These estimates may be used as an aid to assess the safety and usability of alternative navigation and route guidance system interfaces to assist in their design. This document does not consider voice-activated controls, voice output from the navigation system, communication between the driver and others, or passenger operation.
2015-05-07
Standard
J1757/1_201505
The scope of this SAE Standard is to provide methods to determine display optical performance in all typical automotive ambient light illumination - with focus on High Ambient Contrast Ratio, which is critical for display legibility in a sunshine environment. It covers indoor measurements and simulated outdoor lighting. It is not the scope of this document to set threshold values for automotive compliance. However some recommended values are presented for reference.
2015-05-05
WIP Standard
J3099
Presents the seating accommodation model used to determine seat track length for accommodation in design.
2015-05-05
Magazine
Democratizing hybrid technologies Engineers continue to wring efficiency and mass out of their latest electrified propulsion systems with the aim of mainstreaming the technology. Automakers see possibilities, limits for gesture controls Recent concepts have shown the possibilities of gesture for controlling infotainment functions but the need for industry standards and control simplification complicate development. Ferrari massages 458 to create 488 GTB Ferrari engineers have further refined the 458 Italia model with a new turbocharged and downsized engine and revised aerodynamics to create the 488 GTB.
2015-04-30
Standard
J1174_201504
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes the instrumentation and procedure to be used in measuring the operator ear sound level for engine powered equipment under 30 kW (40 bhp). The sound levels obtained by using this procedure are representative of the sound levels generated by the equipment under typical operating conditions. It is intended to include equipment such as lawn mowers, snow blowers, and tillers. It is not intended to include equipment designed primarily for operation on highways or within factories or buildings, or vehicles such as motorcycles, snowmobiles, and pleasure motorboats that are covered by other SAE Standards or Recommended Practices. This procedure does not cover handheld equipment such as chainsaws, leaf blowers, and trimmers. This SAE Recommended Practice may also be used when measuring the operator ear sound level of similar equipment powered by electricity or other power sources.
2015-04-21
Article
Although 30% of traffic fatalities are alcohol-related, and electronic Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety has appeal, more targeted approaches to reducing them are being taken by car makers. Programs aimed at reducing teen driver accidents and death were described at the 25th annual World Traffic Safety Symposium during the New York Auto Show.
2015-04-14
Collection
This collection of technical papers focus on studies of driver behavior modeling, driving simulator techniques, vehicle ride comfort evaluation and enhancement, test/simulation correlation analysis, vehicle elastomeric component modeling (i.e. bushings, rubber mounts, springs, dampers, seat cushions), passive, semi-active and active suspension systems, suspension seat analysis and modeling techniques, the effect and control of beaming, shaking, impact harshness, brake judder and any other phenomena affecting ride comfort of driver, passengers, goods, etc.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1120
Siddhartha Singh, Sudha Ramaswamy
Abstract 1 The modern engine is capable of producing high torque and horsepower. Now the customer wants state of the art comfort and ergonomics.Thus the manufacturers are focusing on reducing the clutch pedal effort and providing a pleasurable driving experience. In heavy traffic conditions where the clutch is used frequently, the pedal effort required to disengage the clutch should be in comfortable range. Often drivers who drive HCV complain about knee pain which is caused due to high pedal effort, this occurs when ergonomics of ABC (accelerator, brake and clutch) pedals is not designed properly. Thus there is a need to reduce the driving fatigue by optimizing the clutch system. Latest technologies like turbo charging and pressure injection have increased the engine power and torque but have also led to increase the clamp load of clutch. Thus the release load required to disengage the clutch has also increased.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1161
Lei Feng, Ming Cheng, Bo Chen
Abstract This paper studies model predictive control algorithm for Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) energy management to improve HEV fuel economy. In this paper, Model Predictive Control (MPC), a predictive control method, is applied to improve the fuel economy of power-split HEV. A dedicated model predictive control method is developed to predict vehicle speed, battery state of charge (SOC), and engine fuel consumption. The power output from the engine, motor, and the mechanical brake will be adjusted to match driver's power request at the end of the prediction window while minimizing fuel consumption. The controller model is built on Matlab® MPC toolbox® and the simulations are based on MY04 Prius vehicle model using Autonomie®, a powertrain and fuel economy analysis software, developed by Argonne National Laboratory. The study compares the performance of MPC and conventional rule-base control methods.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1357
James A. Crowley
Abstract In the area of Human Factors and Usability research a desired output of many studies is identification of what value a specific Design Parameter should be set at to minimize customer dissatisfaction. A Customer Loss Function is a simple way to graphically display the probability customers will be dissatisfied at different levels of a given design parameter, due to a given failure mode. Many design parameters however, have two distinct but related Failure Modes (customer disatisfiers), typically representing two ends of the parameter (i.e. too much/too little; too hot/too cold; too fast/too slow). Each of these Failure modes is represented by its own unique Customer Loss Function. This paper will introduce a technique to combine these two One-Sided Loss Functions into a comprehensive Two Sided Loss Function. The mathematics behind the creation of both one sided and two sided loss functions is based on Binary Logistic Regression [1,2,3] Analysis Techniques.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0503
Hefeng Zhan, Gangfeng Tan, Haobo Xu, Xin Li, Zhaohua Wang, Can Wang
Abstract Plenty of dust particles which are generated when a sweeping vehicle is dumping harm to workers' health. In the study, the designed vacuum dust control system could effectively capture easily raised dust particles in the air in the premise of not impacting the dumping process so as to improve the unloading work environment. Firstly, longitudinal motion trajectory model of dust particles in the dumping process is established. Based on the side collision probability model of dust particles, lateral velocity distribution of dust particles is obtained. What's more, the scope of lateral dust particles is determined. Taking into account coupling of the dust control system and the working state of the vehicle, the suction mouth is arranged at the edge on the outside of hatch cover. Centrifugal horizontal dust removal system designed in the research is fixed in the middle of the filter cover part and discharging hatch cover area.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1390
Venk Kandadai, Helen Loeb, Guyrandy Jean-Gilles, Catherine McDonald, Andrew Winston, Thomas Seacrist, Flaura Winston
Abstract Driving simulators offer a safe alternative to on-road driving for the evaluation of driving performance. Standardized procedures for providing individualized feedback on driving performance are not readily available. The aim of this paper is to describe a methodology for developing standardized procedures that provide individualized feedback (“LiveMetrics”) from a simulated driving assessment used to measure driving performance. A preliminary evaluation is presented to test the performance of the LiveMetrics methodology. Three key performance indicators are used to evaluate the performance and utility of the method in the context of the preliminary evaluation. The results from the preliminary evaluation suggest abilities to customize reporting features for feedback and integrate these into existing driver training and education programs.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1394
Alessandro Naddeo, Marco Apicella, Davide Galluzzi
Abstract General comfort can be defined as the measure of the “level of wellbeing” perceived by humans when interacting with a working environment. The state of the art for comfort/discomfort evaluation shows the need for an objective method to evaluate both “effects on the internal body” and “perceived effects” when considering the perception of comfort. Medical studies show that each joint has its own natural resting posture. In this posture, our muscles are completely relaxed or at minimum levels of strain. The body's geometrical configuration corresponds to the natural resting position of arms/legs/neck etc. From this starting point, the authors experimented to develop and built postural-comfort curves for each degree of freedom (DOF) of upper-limb joints. These curves are regular, and do not show any kind of discontinuity. Software (CA-Man®) was developed to analyze different postures and calculate a postural comfort index for the entire upper body.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1399
Dee Kivett, Victor Gallas Cervo, Aparna Mantha, John Smith
Abstract A common result of aging is a decline in peripheral vision. This study provides a preliminary feasibility analysis of an improved method for alerting drivers of oncoming traffic in blind-spots. Luminescence with an intuitive color-scheme is used as the primary stimulus to permeate a wider field of useful vision than that of existing technology in use today. This method was developed based on concepts of affordance-based design through its adaptation to address specific cognitive and visual acuity challenges of the elderly. The result is an improved, intuitive technique for hazard alert that shows significant improvement over existing technology for all age groups, not just the elderly.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1403
Yi lu Murphey, Dev S. Kochhar, Paul Watta, Xipeng Wang, Tianyu Wang
Abstract Side swipe accidents occur primarily when drivers attempt an improper lane change, drift out of lane, or the vehicle loses lateral traction. Past studies of lane change detection have relied on vehicular data, such as steering angle, velocity, and acceleration. In this paper, we use three physiological signals from the driver to detect lane changes before the event actually occurs. These are the electrocardiogram (ECG), galvanic skin response (GSR), and respiration rate (RR) and were determined, in prior studies, to best reflect a driver's response to the driving environment. A novel system is proposed which uses a Granger causality test for feature selection and a neural network for classification. Test results showed that for 30 lane change events and 60 non lane change events in on-the-road driving, a true positive rate of 70% and a false positive rate of 10% was obtained.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1704
Dee Kivett, John Smith
Several emerging technologies hold great promise to improve the 360-degree awareness of the heavy vehicle driver. However, current industry-standard evaluation methods do not measure all the comprehensive factors contributing to the overall effectiveness of such systems. As a result, industry is challenged to evaluate new technologies in a way that is objective and allows the comparison of different systems in a consistent manner. This research aims to explore the methods currently in use, identify relevant factors not presently incorporated in standard procedures, and recommend best practices to accomplish an overall measurement system that can quantify performance beyond simply the field of view of a driver visibility system. We introduce a new metric, “Clarity of View,” that incorporates several important factors for visibility systems including: gap acceptance accuracy, image detection time, and distortion.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1588
Ibrahim A. Badiru, Michael W. Neal
Abstract Rapidly increasing customer, financial, and regulatory pressures are creating clear changes in the calculus of vehicle design for modern automotive OEM's (Original Equipment Manufacturers). Customers continue to demand shorter product lifecycles; the increasingly competitive global market exerts pressure to reduce costs in all stages of development; and environmental regulations drive a continuous need to reduce mass and energy consumption. OEM's must confront these challenges while continuing to satisfy the customer. The foundation to meeting these challenges includes: (1) Continued development of objective metrics to quantify performance; (2) Frontloading vehicle design content and performance synthesis; (3) A precise understanding of the customer and their performance preferences under diverse usage conditions. These combined elements will enable products better optimized amongst competing (and often contradictory) imperatives.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0169
Kazuyuki Nakata, Maya Seki, Ryoichi Nishikawa, Soju Matsumoto, Shinichiro Murakami, Yukio Yoshino
Abstract Instrument clusters that display all information on a TFT-LCD screen, also known as reconfigurable instrument clusters, have become the new trend in automotive interiors. DENSO mass-produced the world's first reconfigurable instrument cluster in 2008. To satisfy customer requirements, large quantities of resources were required. Coupled with an iterative process due to requirement changes, development costs became very high. Reducing development costs was vital in order to expand the reconfigurable instrument cluster product line. A new artist-centric HMI (human machine interface) software development workflow is proposed to reduce the development effort by introducing a data converter and real-time 3D rendering engine in our earlier paper. Our goal is to realize an environment with little programming during development by utilizing a tool chain to automate the majority of the programmer's tasks.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0259
Tyler Zellmer, Julio Rodriguez, John R. Wagner, Kim Alexander, Philip Pidgeon
Abstract According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), motor collisions account for nearly 2.4 million injuries and 37 thousand fatalities each year in the United States. A great deal of research has been done in the area of vehicular safety, but very little has been completed to ensure licensed drivers are properly trained. Given the inherent risks in driving itself, the test for licensure should be uniform and consistent. To address this issue, an inexpensive, portable data acquisition and analysis system has been developed for the evaluation of driver performance. A study was performed to evaluate the system, and each participant was given a normalized driver rating. The average driver rating was μ=55.6, with a standard deviation of σ=12.3. All but 3 drivers fell into the so-called “Target Zone”, defined by a Driver Rating of μ± 1σ.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0256
Changbo Fu, Paul (Tim) Freeman, John R. Wagner
Abstract Driver modeling is essential to both vehicle design and control unit development. It can improve the understanding of human driving behavior and decrease the cost and risk of vehicle system verification and validation. In this paper, three driver models were implemented to simulate the behavior of drivers subject to a run-off-road recovery event. Target path planning, pursuit behavior, compensate behavior, physical limitations, and neuromuscular modeling were taken into consideration in the feedforward/feedback driver model. A transfer function driver model and a cost function based driver model from a popular vehicle simulation software were also simulated and a comparison of these three models was made. The feedforward/feedback driver model exhibited the best balance of performance with smallest overshoot (0.226m), medium settling time (1.20s) and recovery time (4.30s).
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0418
Vijitashwa Pandey, Megan Conrad
Abstract This paper develops a design paradigm for universal products. Universal design is term used for designing products and systems that are equally accessible to and usable by people with and without disabilities. Two common challenges for research in this area are that (1) There is a continuum of disabilities making it hard to optimize product features, and (2) There is no effective benchmark for evaluating such products. To exacerbate these issues, data regarding customer disabilities and their preferences is hard to come by. We propose a copula-based approach for modeling market coverage of a portfolio of universal products. The multiattribute preference of customers to purchase a product is modeled as Frank's Archimedean Copula. The inputs from various disparate sources can be collected and incorporated into a decision system.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0281
Yang Zheng, Amardeep Sathyanarayana, John Hansen
Abstract In-vehicle signal processing plays an increasingly important role in driving behavior and traffic modeling. Maneuvers, influenced by the driver's choice and traffic/road conditions, are useful in understanding variations in driving performance and to help rebuild the intended route. Since different maneuvers are executed in varied lengths of time, having a fixed time window for analysis could either miss part of maneuver or include consecutive maneuvers in it evaluation. This results in reduced accuracies in maneuver analysis. Therefore, with access to continuous real-time in-vehicles signals, a suitable framing strategy should be adopted for maneuver recognition. In this paper, a non-uniform time window analysis is presented.
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