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Viewing 5911 to 5939 of 5939
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470092
C. W. CANNON, EARLE COX
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470086
Leonard C. Mead
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470024
FREDERICK C. HORNER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470023
V. F. LARSEN
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460185
O. F. QUARTULLO
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460157
WALTHER PROKOSCH
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460038
Stanley Lippert
Investigators in this country and abroad have experimentally determined human response to the kinds of vibration encountered in street traffic, elevators, ships, trains, automobiles and airplanes. Each has covered a limited range of frequencies and amplitudes and employed different descriptive terms for grading their effects on the human body. In this article the findings of a number of studies on the effects of vertical vibration are reconciled graphically, making possible an easy classification of the human responses to a vertical sinusoidal motion. The range of vibrations covered by the graph - namely, for frequencies between 0.1 and 256 cps and amplitudes between 100 and 0.00003 inches, includes the regions of interest in all modes of transportation.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450062
Gordon Hebert
ABSTRACT
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450008
Howard K. Edwards
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440093
Henry Dreyfuss
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440095
Charles W. Morris
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440127
Marvin J. Parks
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440052
Maurice Olley
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430051
L. R. Grandy
ABSTRACT
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400171
W. E. LAY, L. C. FISHER
THIS paper reports work begun in 1935 at the instigation of the Murray Corp. of America. Methods used in studying the relations between the automobile seat cushion and its function in transporting passengers with greater comfort and less fatigue are described. Constructed for this purpose was a piece of apparatus called the Universal Test Seat, whose dimensions were completely adjustable with arrangements to vary the distribution of the supporting pressure in any manner which seemed most comfortable to the passenger. The authors describe tests made by use of this apparatus, present summaries of some of the results recorded and conclude that, to give the passenger the maximum comfort and least fatigue, the following mechanical objectives should be attained by the cushion: 1. To support the passenger over a large area to get the smallest unit pressure on the flesh; 2.
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400084
H. J. McIntyre
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400098
Walter Forster
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390080
C. B. Veal
About 27 million persons, or ½ of our total adult population, are enrolled in some form of adult education. Such education, continuing through years of maturity, engenders tolerance toward others and makes possible individual fulfillment. These are the only two forces that can successfully combat the spirit of hostility between countries, political, social or economic groups. In engineering especially, the age limit in education has been raised. The Engineering Council for Professional Development, in its minimum definition of an engineer, specifies not less than four years after graduation from an approved engineering school as the minimum time in which a young engineer can be expected to reach full professional status. Along with the increased emphasis on the post college training of engineers has occurred a change in engineering colleges themselves.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380036
Roy W. Brown
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380083
Roy W. Brown
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370099
J. W. Lord
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340036
Phillip R. Wheeler
1933-01-01
Technical Paper
330026
F. A. Moss
(ABSTRACT) Dependability, economy, durability, speed, safety, appearance and riding comfort, are the factors considered by Dr. Moss in his resume of progress made in automobile development. Passing then to the problem of the effect of automobile riding on the health of passengers and drivers, he discusses air conditioning, eye strain and body posture while riding. Carbon monoxide probably is the most important of the extraneous harmful substances in relation to air conditioning and an inexpensive investigation, using a carbon-monoxide indicator, is recommended to secure its elimination. Other harmful factors are temperature, relative humidity and motion of the air. A novel suggestion is made that rats be used experimentally in studying the effects of drafts on passengers. Studies to lessen eye strain and improve body posture are also desirable.
1932-01-01
Technical Paper
320025
H. A. Brunn
1928-01-01
Technical Paper
280057
O. T. KREUSSER
CONSTRUCTIVE criticism of automobile bodies as now built is given herein, based on experience gained in driving five-passenger sedan cars of many makes a total distance of nearly 10,000,000 miles in one year in tests at the General Motors Proving Ground. The fault finding, although humorously exaggerated, will be valuable if taken seriously, as it gives to all body designers and builders the benefit of testing experience that few companies are in a position to gain at first hand. The author treats his subject from the viewpoint of the abstract customer; that is, the automobile-purchasing public as a whole and as represened by the imaginary average man, who is assumed to have average stature and body structure and to drive all the different makes of car. Thus he is assumed to change from one to another make frequently, instead of becoming used to only one or two cars.
1928-01-01
Technical Paper
280038
D. SENSAUD DELAVAUD
Abstract MENTIONING the various attempts that have been made to secure continuous progressive changes of gear in the automobile, the author states that nothing of this sort is of value unless it is automatic. He has designed a transmission consisting of a wabble-plate which actuates six connecting-rods that operate as many roller clutches on the rear axle. Changes in speed result from varying the inclination of the wabble-plate, and this is controlled automatically through the combined effects of inertia and the reaction of resistance. This transmission has been applied to a number of cars of different weights, some of which have seen much service. The action of the various elements of the transmission is analyzed with the aid of drawings, diagrams and formulas, and the proportions that have been found most successful are stated. This transmission is combined with a gearless differential and a planetary reverse-gear.
1925-01-01
Technical Paper
250026
F A MOSS, H H ALLEN
Although many variables enter into the personal equation of the driver of an automobile, this paper concerns principally his reaction-time. The tests described had for their objects the determining of (a) the average time that elapses between the hearing of a signal, such, for example, as the shot of a pistol, and the applying of the brake; (b) the relation between the reaction-time and the variability of the individual; and (c) the effect on reaction-time of such factors as the speed of driving, training, age, sex, race, and general intelligence. The reaction-time was determined by two pistols mounted on the under-side of the running-board of an automobile and pointed toward the ground, the first being fired by the experimenter when the car had reached the desired speed, the second, by the person under test in making the initial motion of operating the brake-pedal.
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170006
N. W. AKIMOFF
The author believes that an incompatibility exists between the results achieved in this country by the growth of the automobile industry and the almost complete lack of rational data on the most essential elements of kinetics relating to the modern automobile. He submits considerations that can be used in establishing a rational theory of spring suspension in general. A few words are devoted to the first principles of dynamics of springs, to damping, kinematic features of harmonic motion, energy consumption and shock absorbers. An introductory problem, involving an imaginary one-wheel “elemental car”, meant for purely inductive purposes, is then analyzed. Finally the main problem is presented in the form of an analysis of a skeleton-car, spring-suspended and simplified as much as possible.
1908-01-01
Technical Paper
080014
H. VANDERBEEK
Viewing 5911 to 5939 of 5939