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Viewing 5911 to 5940 of 5950
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510031
EUGENE F. WILSON
1951-01-01
Technical Paper
510214
Sidney J. Williams
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500121
L. O. STOCKFORD, K. R. KUNZE
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480155
W. R. LOVELACE
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480220
WALTER F. GRETHER
THIS survey of psychological research in the field of reading aircraft and other instruments shows that the majority of serious errors cannot be eliminated by mere improvements in visibility, such as could be obtained by increases in size or illumination. Rather, it is said, we must find methods of indication that actually simplify the interpretational processes interposed between the seeing of an instrument and the making of an appropriate control action. For instance, it appears that most errors in the reading of such instruments as the altimeter can be eliminated by the use of a single-pointer instrument with a counter to indicate the number of revolutions of the pointer.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480061
R. N. JANEWAY
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480106
ROBERT R. HOUSTON, JOHN M. PARKER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470162
CHARLES W. MORRIS
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470148
Amos E. Neyhart, Carl G. Seashore
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470113
V. E. GULICK
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470092
C. W. CANNON, EARLE COX
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470086
Leonard C. Mead
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470024
FREDERICK C. HORNER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470023
V. F. LARSEN
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460185
O. F. QUARTULLO
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460157
WALTHER PROKOSCH
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460038
Stanley Lippert
Investigators in this country and abroad have experimentally determined human response to the kinds of vibration encountered in street traffic, elevators, ships, trains, automobiles and airplanes. Each has covered a limited range of frequencies and amplitudes and employed different descriptive terms for grading their effects on the human body. In this article the findings of a number of studies on the effects of vertical vibration are reconciled graphically, making possible an easy classification of the human responses to a vertical sinusoidal motion. The range of vibrations covered by the graph - namely, for frequencies between 0.1 and 256 cps and amplitudes between 100 and 0.00003 inches, includes the regions of interest in all modes of transportation.
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450062
Gordon Hebert
ABSTRACT
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450008
Howard K. Edwards
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440093
Henry Dreyfuss
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440095
Charles W. Morris
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440127
Marvin J. Parks
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440052
Maurice Olley
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430051
L. R. Grandy
ABSTRACT
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400171
W. E. LAY, L. C. FISHER
THIS paper reports work begun in 1935 at the instigation of the Murray Corp. of America. Methods used in studying the relations between the automobile seat cushion and its function in transporting passengers with greater comfort and less fatigue are described. Constructed for this purpose was a piece of apparatus called the Universal Test Seat, whose dimensions were completely adjustable with arrangements to vary the distribution of the supporting pressure in any manner which seemed most comfortable to the passenger. The authors describe tests made by use of this apparatus, present summaries of some of the results recorded and conclude that, to give the passenger the maximum comfort and least fatigue, the following mechanical objectives should be attained by the cushion: 1. To support the passenger over a large area to get the smallest unit pressure on the flesh; 2.
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400084
H. J. McIntyre
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400098
Walter Forster
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390080
C. B. Veal
About 27 million persons, or ½ of our total adult population, are enrolled in some form of adult education. Such education, continuing through years of maturity, engenders tolerance toward others and makes possible individual fulfillment. These are the only two forces that can successfully combat the spirit of hostility between countries, political, social or economic groups. In engineering especially, the age limit in education has been raised. The Engineering Council for Professional Development, in its minimum definition of an engineer, specifies not less than four years after graduation from an approved engineering school as the minimum time in which a young engineer can be expected to reach full professional status. Along with the increased emphasis on the post college training of engineers has occurred a change in engineering colleges themselves.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380036
Roy W. Brown
Viewing 5911 to 5940 of 5950