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Viewing 1 to 17 of 17
2017-09-16
Journal Article
2017-01-9180
Johannes Wurm, Eetu Hurtig, Esa Väisänen, Joonas Mähönen, Christoph Hochenauer
Abstract The presented paper focuses on the computation of heat transfer related to continuously variable transmissions (CVTs). High temperatures are critical for the highly loaded rubber belts and reduce their lifetime significantly. Hence, a sufficient cooling system is inevitable. A numerical tool which is capable of predicting surface heat transfer and maximum temperatures is of high importance for concept design studies. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a suitable method to carry out this task. In this work, a time efficient and accurate simulation strategy is developed to model the complexity of a CVT. The validity of the technique used is underlined by field measurements. Tests have been carried out on a snowmobile CVT, where component temperatures, air temperatures in the CVT vicinity and engine data have been monitored. A corresponding CAD model has been created and the boundary conditions were set according to the testing conditions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0041
Daniele Piazzullo, Michela Costa, Luigi Allocca, Alessandro Montanaro, Vittorio ROCCO
In gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines, dynamics of the possible spray-wall interaction are key factors affecting the air-fuel mixture distribution and equivalence ratio at spark timing, hence influencing the development of combustion and the pollutants formation at the exhaust. Gasoline droplets impact may rebound with consequent secondary atomization or deposit in the liquid phase over walls as a wallfilm. This last slowly evaporate with respect to free droplets, leading to local enrichment of the mixture, hence to increased unburned hydrocarbons and particulate matter emissions. In this scenario, complex phenomena characterize the turbulent multi-phase system where heat transfer involves the gaseous mixture (made of air and gasoline vapour), the liquid phase (droplets not yet evaporated and wallfilm) and the solid wall, especially in the so-called wall-guided mixture formation mode.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0032
Gilles Decan, Stijn Broekaert, Tommaso Lucchini, Gianluca D'Errico, Jan Vierendeels, Sebastian Verhelst
The present work details a study of the heat flux through the walls of an internal combustion engine. The determination of this heat flux is an important aspect in engine optimization, as it influences the power, efficiency and the emissions of the engine. Therefore, a set of simulation tools in the OpenFOAM® software has been developed, that allows the calculation of the heat transfer through engine walls for ICEs. Normal practice in these types of engine simulations is to apply a wall function model to calculate the heat flux, rather than resolving the complete thermo-viscous boundary layer, and perform simulations of the closed engine cycle. When dealing with a complex engine, this methodology will reduce the overall computational cost. It however increases the need to rely on assumptions on both the initial flow field and the behavior in the near-wall region.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0021
Sabino Caputo, Federico Millo, Giancarlo Cifali, Francesco Concetto Pesce
One of the key technologies for the improvement of the diesel engine thermal efficiency is the reduction of the engine heat transfer through the thermal insulation of the combustion chamber. This paper presents a numerical investigation on the effects of the combustion chamber insulation on the heat transfer, thermal efficiency and exhaust temperatures of a 1.6 l passenger car, turbo-charged diesel engine. First, the complete insulation of the engine components, like pistons, liner, firedeck and valves, has been simulated. This analysis has showed that the piston is the component with the greatest potential for the in-cylinder heat transfer reduction (ideally up to 46 %) and for Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC) reduction (up to 9 %), while firedeck, liner and valves only contribute respectively to 23 %, 19 % and 15 % in heat transfer decrease.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0016
Morris Langwiesner, Christian Krueger, Sebastian Donath, Michael Bargende
Aiming on the evaluation of SI-engines with extended expansion cycle realized over the crank drive, engine process simulation is an important tool to predict the engine efficiency. One challenge is to consider concept specific effects as best as possible by using appropriate submodels. Particularly the choice of a suitable heat transfer model is crucial due to the significant change in cranktrain kinematics. The usage of the mean piston speed to calculate a heat-transfer-relevant velocity is not sufficient. The heat transfer model according to Bargende combines for its calculation the current piston speed with a simplified k-ε-model. In this paper the eligibility of this model for engines with extended expansion is assessed. Therefore a single-cylinder engine is equipped with fast-response surface-thermocouples in the cylinder head. The surface heat flux is calculated by solving the unsteady heat conduction equation.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0161
Noboru Uchida, Hideaki Osada
It can’t be avoided reducing heat loss from in-cylinder wall for further improvement in brake thermal efficiency (BTE). Especially for diesel engines, spray flame interference on the cavity and piston top wall during combustion period could be a major cause of the heat loss. To reduce heat transfer between hot gas and cavity wall, thin Zirconia layer (0.5mm) on the cavity surface of the forged steel piston was firstly formed by thermal spray coating aiming higher surface temperature swing precisely synchronized with flame temperature near the wall resulting in the reduction of temperature difference. However, no apparent difference in the heat loss was observed. On the contrary, BTE was deteriorated by the increase in other energy losses. To find out the reason why heat loss was not so improved, direct observation of flame impingement to the cavity wall was carried out with the top view visualization technique, for which one of the exhaust valves was modified to a sapphire window.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0107
Alessandro Montanaro, Luigi Allocca, Vittorio Rocco, Michela Costa, Daniele Piazzullo
Enhancement of i.c. engine performances in terms of fuel economy and environment and human health preservation is an increasing key factor of the research in recent times. Mainly, that is due to the more and more stringent European and worldwide regulations tending to limit pollutant emissions to carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxide, and particulate matter. Development of direct injection strategy (DI) in spark ignition (SI) engines partially fulfilled these tasks, as they run at higher compression ratios, with respect to port fuel injection (PFI), and operating with different injection strategies, so a greatest control over the air-to-fuel ratio is achieved. However, today the engines’ complexity and the number of sub-systems have increased, so the traditional techniques used for their optimization are often inadequate for the required challenges of high power output and low environmental impact.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0722
Pablo Olmeda, Jaime Martin, Antonio Garcia, David Villalta, Alok Warey, Vicent Domenech
Abstract Growing awareness about CO2 emissions and their environmental implications are leading to an increase in the importance of thermal efficiency as criteria to design internal combustion engines (ICE). Heat transfer to the combustion chamber walls contributes to a decrease in the indicated efficiency. A strategy explored in this study to mitigate this efficiency loss is to promote low swirl conditions in the combustion chamber by using low swirl ratios. A decrease in swirl ratio leads to a reduction in heat transfer, but unfortunately, it can also lead to worsening of combustion development and a decrease in the gross indicated efficiency. Moreover, pumping work plays also an important role due to the effect of reduced intake restriction to generate the swirl motion. Current research evaluates the effect of a dedicated injection strategy to enhance combustion process when low swirl is used.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0732
Stijn Broekaert, Thomas De Cuyper, Michel De Paepe, Sebastian Verhelst
Abstract Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines can achieve both a high thermal efficiency and near-zero emissions of NOx and soot. However, their maximum attainable load is limited by the occurrence of a ringing combustion. At high loads, the fast combustion rate gives rise to pressure oscillations in the combustion chamber accompanied by a ringing or knocking sound. In this work, it is investigated how these pressure oscillations affect the in-cylinder heat transfer and what the best approach is to model the heat transfer during ringing combustion. The heat transfer is measured with a thermopile heat flux sensor inside a CFR engine converted to HCCI operation. A variation of the mass fuel rate at different compression ratios is performed to measure the heat transfer during three different operating conditions: no, light and severe ringing. The occurrence of ringing increases both the peak heat flux and the total heat loss.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0266
Shervin Shoai Naini, Junkui (Allen) Huang, Richard Miller, John R. Wagner, Denise Rizzo, Scott Shurin, Katherine Sebeck
Designing an efficient cooling system with low power consumption is of high interest in the automotive engineering community. Heat generated due to the propulsion system and the on-board electronics in ground vehicles must be dissipated to avoid exceeding component temperature limits. In addition, proper thermal management will offer improved system durability and efficiency while providing a flexible, modular, and reduced weight structure. Traditional cooling systems are effective but they typically require high energy consumption which provides motivation for a paradigm shift. This study will examine the integration of passive heat rejection pathways in ground vehicle cooling systems using a “thermal bus”. Potential solutions include heat pipes and composite fibers with high thermal properties and light weight properties to move heat from the source to ambient surroundings.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0160
Longjie Xiao, Tianming He, Gangfeng Tan, Bo Huang, Xianyao Ping
Abstract While the car ownership increasing all over the world, the unutilized thermal energy in automobile exhaust system is gradually being realized and valued by researchers around the world for better driving energy efficiency. For the unexpected urban traffic, the frequent start and stop processes as well as the acceleration and deceleration lead to the temperature fluctuation of the exhaust gas, which means the unstable hot-end temperature of the thermoelectric module generator (TEG). By arranging the heat conduction oil circulation at the hot end, the hot-end temperature’s fluctuation of the TEG can be effectively reduced, at the expense of larger system size and additional energy supply for the circulation. This research improves the TEG hot-end temperature stability by installing solid heat capacity material(SHCM) to the area between the outer wall of the exhaust pipe and the TEG, which has the merits of simple structure, none energy consumption and light weight.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0127
Norimitsu Matsudaira, Mitsuru Iwasaki, Junichiro Hara, Tomohiko Furuhata, Tatsuya Arai, Yasuo Moriyoshi, Naohiro Hasegawa
Abstract Among the emerging technologies in order to meet ever stringent emission and fuel consumption regulations, Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system is becoming one of the prerequisites particularly for diesel engines. Although EGR cooler is considered to be an effective measure for further performance enhancement, exhaust gas soot deposition may cause degradation of the cooling. To address this issue, the authors studied the visualization of the soot deposition and removal phenomena to understand its behavior. Based on thermophoresis theory, which indicates that the effect of thermophoresis depends on the temperature difference between the gas and the wall surface exposed to the gas, a visualization method using a heated glass window was developed. By using glass with the transparent conductive oxide: tin-doped indium oxide, temperature of the heated glass surface is raised.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0625
Yen-Chung Liu, Brian Sangeorzan, Alex Alkidas
Abstract The purpose of this research was to measure and correlate the area-average heat transfer coefficients for free, circular upward-impinging oil-jets onto two automotive pistons having different undercrown shapes and different diameters. For the piston heat transfer studies, two empirical area-average Nusselt number correlations were developed. One was based on the whole piston undercrown surface area with the Nusselt number based on the nozzle diameter, and the other was based on the oil-jet impingement area with the Nusselt number based on the oil-jet effective impingement diameter. The correlations can predict the 95% and 94% of the experimental measurements within 30% error, respectively. The first correlation is simpler to use and can be employed for cases in which the oil jet wets the whole piston undercrown. The latter may be more useful for larger pistons or higher Prandtl number conditions in which the oil jet wets only a portion of the undercrown.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1036
Silvia Marelli, Simone Gandolfi, Massimo Capobianco
Abstract In the last few years, the effect of diabatic test conditions on compressor performance maps has been widely investigated leading some Authors to propose different correction models. The aim of the paper is to investigate the effect of heat transfer phenomena on the experimental definition of turbocharger maps, focusing on turbine performance. An experimental investigation on a small turbocharger for automotive application has been carried out and presented. The study focused onto the effects of internal heat transfer on turbine thermomechanical efficiency. The experimental campaign was developed considering the effect of different heat transfer state by varying turbine inlet temperature, oil and coolant temperature and compressor inlet pressure. An original model previously developed by the Authors is adopted for the correction of compressor steady flow maps.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0011
Kesav Kumar Sridharan, Swaminathan Viswanathan
Abstract Current generation automobiles are controlled by electronic modules for performing various functions. These electronic modules have numerous semiconductor devices mounted on printed circuit boards. Solders are generally used as thermal interface material between surface mount devices and printed circuit boards (PCB) for efficient heat transfer. In the manufacturing stage, voids are formed in solders during reflow process due to outgassing phenomenon. The presence of these voids in solder for power packages with exposed pads impedes heat flow and can increase the device temperature. Therefore it is imperative to understand the effect of solder voids on thermal characteristics of semiconductor devices. But the solder void pattern will vary drastically during mass manufacturing. Replicating the exact solder void pattern and doing detail simulation to predict the device temperature for each manufactured module is not practical.
2017-03-14
Journal Article
2017-01-9276
Joseph K. Ausserer, Marc D. Polanka, Jacob A. Baranski, Keith D. Grinstead, Paul J. Litke
Abstract The rapid expansion of the market for remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) includes a particular interest in 10-25 kg vehicles for monitoring, surveillance, and reconnaissance. Power-plant options for these aircraft are often 10-100 cm3 internal combustion engines. Both power and fuel conversion efficiency decrease with increasing rapidity in the aforementioned size range. Fuel conversion efficiency decreases from ∼30% for conventional-scale engines (>100 cm3 displacement) to <5% for micro glow-fuel engines (<10 cm3 displacement), while brake mean effective pressure decreases from >10 bar (>100 cm3) to <4 bar (<10 cm3). Based on research documented in the literature, the losses responsible for the increase in the rate of decreasing performance cannot be clearly defined.
2016-10-25
Technical Paper
2016-36-0262
Edney Rejowski, Juliano Pallaoro de Souza, Rafael Bettini Rabello
Abstract Engine development activities are being driven forward primarily by the challenge of continuing to reduce CO2 and exhaust emissions. From the piston/liner system it is well known that Lube Oil Consumption (LOC) is affected by the bore distortion occurrences within Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) that usually demands a redesign on the piston ring pack not in favor to reduce friction losses. This article shows a potential solution to reduce bore distortion and oil evaporation through more efficient heat dissipation from combustion chamber to engine cooling system in a modern aluminum Spark Ignition (SI) block. Electroplated nickel coating applied to the external cast iron surface previous to the casting process enable a metallurgical diffusion layer with the aluminum block material and therefore improve heat conductivity in fired operation conditions compared to conventional cast iron liners.
Viewing 1 to 17 of 17

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