Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 45
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1301
Deepak A. Patil, Hrishikesh Buddhe
Abstract Frontal collisions account for majority of car accidents. Various measures have been taken by the automotive OEMs’ with regards to passive safety. Honeycomb meso-structural inserts in the front bumper have been suggested to enhance the energy absorption of the front structure which is favorable for passive safety. This paper presents the changes in energy absorption capacity of hexagonal honeycomb structures with varying cellular geometries; under frontal impact simulations. Honeycomb cellular metamaterial structure offers many distinct advantages over homogenous materials since their effective material properties depend on both, their constituent material properties and their cell geometric configurations. The effective static mechanical properties such as; the modulus of elasticity, modulus of rigidity and Poisson’s ratio of the honeycomb cellular meso-structures are controlled by variations in their cellular geometry.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1432
Tadasuke Katsuhara, Yoshiki Takahira, Shigeki Hayashi, Yuichi Kitagawa, Tsuyoshi Yasuki
Abstract This study used finite element (FE) simulations to analyze the injury mechanisms of driver spine fracture during frontal crashes in the World Endurance Championship (WEC) series and possible countermeasures are suggested to help reduce spine fracture risk. This FE model incorporated the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) scaled to a driver, a model of the detailed racecar cockpit and a model of the seat/restraint systems. A frontal impact deceleration pulse was applied to the cockpit model. In the simulation, the driver chest moved forward under the shoulder belt and the pelvis was restrained by the crotch belt and the leg hump. The simulation predicted spine fracture at T11 and T12. It was found that a combination of axial compression force and bending moment at the spine caused the fractures. The axial compression force and bending moment were generated by the shoulder belt down force as the driver’s chest moved forward.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1429
Sung Rae kim, Inju Lee, Hyung joo Kim
Abstract This paper aims to evaluate the biofidelity of a human body FE model with abdominal obesity in terms of submarining behavior prediction, during a frontal crash event. In our previous study, a subject-specific FE model scaled from the 50th percentile Global Human Body Model Consortium (GHBMC) human model to the average physique of three female post mortem human subjects (PMHSs) with abdominal obesity was developed and tested its biofidelity under lap belt loading conditions ([1]). In this study frontal crash sled simulations of the scaled human model have been performed, and the biofidelity of the model has been evaluated. Crash conditions were given from the previous study ([2]), and included five low-speed and three high-speed sled tests with and without anti-submarining device.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1471
Xiao Luo, Wenjing Du, Hao Li, Peiyu LI, Chunsheng Ma, Shucai Xu, Jinhuan Zhang
Abstract Occupant restraint systems are developed based on some baseline experiments. While these experiments can only represent small part of various accident modes, the current procedure for utilizing the restraint systems may not provide the optimum protection in the majority of accident modes. This study presents an approach to predict occupant injury responses before the collision happens, so that the occupant restraint system, equipped with a motorized pretensioner, can be adjusted to the optimal parameters aiming at the imminent vehicle-to-vehicle frontal crash. The approach in this study takes advantage of the information from pre-crash systems, such as the time to collision, the relative velocity, the frontal overlap, the size of the vehicle in the front and so on. In this paper, the vehicle containing these pre-crash features will be referred to as ego vehicle. The information acquired and the basic crash test results can be integrated to predict a simplified crash pulse.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1466
Claudia De La Torre, Ravi Tangirala, Michael Guerrero, Andreas Sprick
Abstract Studies in the EU and the USA found higher deformation and occupant injuries in frontal crashes when the vehicle was loaded outboard (frontal crashes with a small overlap). Due to that, in 2012 the IIHS began to evaluate the small overlap front crashworthiness in order to solve this problem.A set of small overlap tests were carried out at IDIADA’s (Institute of Applied Automotive Research ) passive safety laboratory and the importance of identifying the forces applied in each structural element involved in small overlap crash were determined. One of the most important structural elements in the small overlap test is the wheel. Its interaction in a small overlap crash can modify the vehicle interaction at the crash, which at the laboratory the interaction is with a barrier. That interaction has a big influence at the vehicle development and design strategy.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1468
Do Hoi KIm
Previous work identified a relationship between vehicle drop and dummy injury under the high-speed frontal impact condition [1]. The results showed that vehicle drop greater than 60mm made the dummy injury worse. Moreover, that work identified the front side member as the crucial part affecting the vehicle drop. In this study, the body structure mechanism was studied to reduce vehicle drop by controlling the front side member, shotgun, and A-pillar. By analyzing full vehicles, it was recognized that the arch shape of the front side member was very important. Furthermore, if the top of the arch shape of front side member, shotgun, and A-pillar were connected well, then the body deformation energy could lift the lower part of A-pillar, effectively reducing vehicle drop. This structure design concept is named “Body Lift Structure” (BLS). The BLS was applied to B and C segment platforms. Additionally, a “Ring” shape was defined by the front side member, dash panel, and A-pillar.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1451
Jan Vychytil, Jan Spicka, Ludek Hyncik, Jaroslav Manas, Petr Pavlata, Radim Striegler, Tomas Moser, Radek Valasek
Abstract In this paper a novel approach in developing a simplified model of a vehicle front-end is presented. Its surface is segmented to form an MBS model with hundreds of rigid bodies connected via translational joints to a base body. Local stiffness of each joint is calibrated using a headform or a legform impactor corresponding to the EuroNCAP mapping. Hence, the distribution of stiffness of the front-end is taken into account. The model of the front-end is embedded in a whole model of a small car in a simulation of a real accident. The VIRTHUMAN model is scaled in height, weight and age to represent precisely the pedestrian involved. Injury risk predicted by simulation is in correlation with data from real accident. Namely, injuries of head, chest and lower extremities are confirmed. Finally, mechanical response of developed vehicle model is compared to an FE model of the same vehicle in a pedestrian impact scenario.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0363
Sathyadevi Jayaraman
Abstract The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) Small Overlap Frontal (SOF) impact assessment program is one of the latest challenges for the automotive development. The SOF load bypasses the primary crumple zone structure and concentrating the force in the front wheel, suspension and firewall - areas not traditionally designed to absorb and dissipate crash energy. Design changes of architectural components at later stages of product development is very difficult and expensive. This paper deals with the procedure to improve SOF performance through CAE as well as to develop the physical test cart to avoid the full vehicle SOF test. CAE procedure developed on chassis subsystem level to validate the SOF performance of front suspension. Using this procedure, design changes in the suspension components to improve the SOF performance can be done by keeping the suspension durability and other performance requirements as intact.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0019
Kantilal P. Patil, Viswanatha Saddala
Abstract The objective of this paper is to minimize occupant injuries in offset frontal crash with pulse characterization, by keeping vehicle front crush space & occupant survival space constant. Crash pulse characterization greatly simplifies the representation of crash pulse time histories. The parameters used to characterize the crash pulse are velocity change, time & value of dynamic crush, and zero cross-over time. The crash pulse slope, peaks, average values at discrete time intervals have significant role on occupant injuries. Vehicle crash pulse of different trends have different impact on occupant injury. The intension of crash pulse characterization study is to come out with one particular crash pulse which shows minimum occupant injuries. This study will have significant impact in terms of front loading on crash development of vehicle.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0018
Douglas Eddy, Shreyas Patil, Sundar Krishnamurty, Ian Grosse, Chandrashekhar Thorbole
Abstract Prevention of passenger ejection from motor coach seats in the case of rollover and frontal crashes is critical for minimizing fatalities and injuries. This paper proposes a novel concept of affordably retrofitting 3-point seatbelts to protect passengers during these significant crash scenarios. Currently, the available options involve replacement of either the entire fleet, which takes time to avoid extremely high costs, or all seats with new seats that have seatbelts which is still expensive. Alternatively, this paper presents the development of an innovative product that can be installed in seat belt-ready bus structures at a fraction of the cost. The efficacy of the design is studied using finite element analysis (FEA) to meet Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) 210 standards for conditions involved in frontal and side impacts.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0013
Frank Keck, Marco Alt, Arne Vater, Joseph Wessner
Abstract Current driver assistance systems or forward-looking safety systems mainly address traffic scenarios with cars travelling in the same direction or being stopped. These scenarios are - considered from a dynamical point of view - comparatively easy to handle due to the limitations of the relevant scenario parameters (relative velocity, possible accelerations, …). In the future it will be necessary to address oncoming traffic scenarios as well. These oncoming scenarios are responsible for a lot of critical accidents and the potential benefit is very high if one is able to reduce the crash severity in these scenarios. The problem remains that these scenarios are highly dynamical and therefore difficult to evaluate and handle. The following questions are of interest: How should a system be designed to be able to handle these situations? What are the critical scenarios which define the performance of the whole system? What are the limitations which cannot be overcome?
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0003
Chandrashekhar Thorbole
Abstract The seatbelt is the primary restraint device that increases the level of occupant protection in a frontal crash. The belt performance is enhanced by the supplemental restraint provided by the airbag; seat and knee bolster working in combination with this primary restraining device. Small occupants are vulnerable to upper neck injuries when seated very close to the steering wheel. A lot of research and data availability for this situation ultimately led to the development of countermeasures capable of reducing upper neck loading. However, no data or research is available on the lower neck dynamic response of a small occupant primarily a 5th percentile female seated away from the steering wheel. MADYMO (Mathematical Dynamic Modeling), a biodynamic code is employed to validate a standard NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) frontal impact rigid barrier test with a 5th percentile ATD (Anthropomorphic Test Device) in the driver position.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0001
Harold J. Mertz, Priya Prasad, Dainius J. Dalmotas, Annette L. Irwin
Injury Risk Curves are developed from cadaver data for sternal deflections produced by anterior, distributed chest loads for a 25, 45, 55, 65 and 75 year-old Small Female, Mid-Size Male and Large Male based on the variations of bone strengths with age. These curves show that the risk of AIS ≥ 3 thoracic injury increases with the age of the person. This observation is consistent with NASS data of frontal accidents which shows that older unbelted drivers have a higher risk of AIS ≥ 3 chest injury than younger drivers.
2016-11-07
Technical Paper
2016-22-0018
Harold J. Mertz, Annette L. Irwin, Priya Prasad
In 1983, General Motors Corporation (GM) petitioned the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to allow the use of the biofidelic Hybrid III midsize adult male dummy as an alternate test device for FMVSS 208 compliance testing of frontal impact, passive restraint systems. To support their petition, GM made public to the international automotive community the limit values that they imposed on the Hybrid III measurements, which were called Injury Assessment Reference Values (IARVs). During the past 20 years, these IARVs have been updated based on relevant biomechanical studies that have been published and scaled to provide IARVs for the Hybrid III and CRABI families of frontal impact dummies. Limit values have also been developed for the biofidelic side impact dummies, BioSID, ES-2 and SID-IIs.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1536
Chung-Kyu Park, Cing-Dao Kan
Abstract In this study, the available metrics to evaluate the crash pulse severity are reviewed and their assessability is investigated by using frontal New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) test data. Linear regression analysis and sled test simulations are conducted. In addition, a new approach is proposed to measure the crash pulse severity and restraint system performance separately and objectively.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1529
Gunti R. Srinivas, Anindya Deb, Clifford C. Chou, Malhar Kumar
Abstract Periprosthetic fractures refer to the fractures that occur in the vicinity of the implants of joint replacement arthroplasty. Most of the fractures during an automotive frontal collision involve the long bones of the lower limbs (femur and tibia). Since the prevalence of persons living with lower limb joint prostheses is increasing, periprosthetic fractures that occur during vehicular accidents are likely to become a considerable burden on health care systems. It is estimated that approximately 4.0 million adults in the U.S. currently live with Total Knee Replacement (TKR) implants. Therefore, it is essential to study the injury patterns that occur in the long bone of a lower limb containing a total knee prosthesis. The aim of the present study is to develop an advanced finite element model that simulates the possible fracture patterns that are likely during vehicular accidents involving occupants who have knee joint prostheses in situ.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1453
I-Hsuan Lee, Bi-Cheng Luan
Abstract Autonomous emergency braking (AEB) systems is one of the functions of the Advanced Driver Assists System to avoid or mitigate vehicle frontal collisions. Most of the previous studies focus on two-car scenario where the host vehicle monitors the distances to the vehicles in front, and automatically applies emergency brake when a collision is imminent. The purpose of this paper is to develop an Advanced-AEB control system that mitigates collisions in a multi-car scenario by measuring the distances to the vehicles in front as well as those to the vehicles behind using the concept of impedance control. A simple gain-scheduling PI controller was designed for the host vehicle to track the reference inputs generated by the impedance control. The preliminary simulation results demonstrate that the proposed AEB is effective in mitigating the collisions in a 3-car following scenario.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1496
Richard R. Ruth, Brad Muir
Abstract Earlier research1 suggests there may be positive offset in the longitudinal G sensor in Toyota Corolla Gen 02 EDR’s. This research tests if a similar offset is present in Toyota Gen 04 EDR’s in the 2007 Yaris. A series of low speed forward and rearward collisions into a stationary vehicle were conducted. In addition to the installed vehicle ACM, additional identical “ride along” ACM’s were installed back to back, one front facing and one rear facing. The vehicle was also instrumented with a video VBOX to record speed at impact, and with the high precision “IST” accelerometer reference instrumentation. ACM’s facing toward the crash under-reported the negative longitudinal Delta V. After the initial impact was over, these forward facing ACM’s had a positive slope and at the end of the 200 ms recording were reporting a positive net Delta V, indicating a G sensor bias. The ACM’s facing away from the crash over reported the positive longitudinal Delta V.
2016-02-01
Technical Paper
2016-28-0196
Ajo John, Senthivinayagam Chandrasekaran
Abstract Front under run protection device (FUPD) is a regulatory requirement for passive safety of N2 & N3 category vehicle. This device gives effective protection for small vehicles (M1 or N1 category) against under running of big vehicles (N2 & N3 category) in the event of a frontal collision. FUPD generally consists of the front under run protector (FUP) and its mounting structure. As the compliance load target for N3 category is high, the FUP required achieving regulation target need to have high rigidity. This increases its size and hence the weight, Increase in weight has impact on payload and cost. To curtail the weight of FUP, in general Aluminum with higher strength is in use, but use of Aluminum increases the cost. So the main challenge in FUPD design is to achieve the design with optimal system weight & cost.
2016-02-01
Technical Paper
2016-28-0254
Nitin Tekavde, Srikari Srinivas, Vinod Banthia, Suman Mittemari
Abstract Design of vehicle structure to provide safe structural environment for occupants of vehicles involved in high speed (> 15 km/h) collisions has drawn considerable resources as safety of humans is at stake. Low speed impacts, since these do not cause severe injuries to the occupants, do not generate much concern. However, structural design for this situation has generated a lot of interest among insurance companies as the structural damage caused by these types of collisions is substantial, requiring significant payments by the insurance companies. In this work alternative designs for crash-box have been assessed for RCAR (Research Council of Automotive Repairs) requirement for frontal crash. Using structural details of an existing sedan, various designs of crash-box that can be fitted within the packaging space have been assessed for low speed impact.
2016-02-01
Technical Paper
2016-28-0251
Kantilal Patil, Siva Reddy, Nadeem Zafar
Abstract In the event of a frontal car crash, occupant sitting in a car meets various types of injuries like Head injury, Chest compression, Neck injury etc. These injuries may lead to the death of an occupant if exceeded beyond biomechanical limits. Seat belt is a primary restraint system, which when worn controls the motion of occupant sitting inside the car during the event of a car crash. An Anchorage location of three point seat belt system has significant effect on occupant injuries during the crash event. By changing the mount locations of a seat belt anchor points i.e. D-ring, Anchor & Buckle, performance of seatbelt system can be enhanced further thereby reducing occupant injuries to certain extent. As per regulation AIS015, locations of safety belt anchorage points should be within prescribed zone.
2015-11-17
Technical Paper
2015-32-0705
Takanobu Fujimura
Due to environmental problems, number of small vehicles with fuel efficiency increases. Since the small vehicles have small deformation space, it is difficult for them to achieve good crashworthiness at a frontal impact accident. Small deformation space usually yields high vehicle deceleration to absorb kinetic energy of the vehicle. The high vehicle deceleration may produce high occupant deceleration and lead to high occupant injury value. For example, North America, Japan and Europe specify head and chest injury value at vehicle's frontal collision. Those injury values tend to be improved if vehicle deceleration decreases. Deceleration of small vehicle with a little deformation space must be adjusted in order to prevent increase of the occupant injury value. A vehicle deceleration is expressed by 9, 18 or 36 discrete variables. A vehicle, an occupant and restraint systems such as seat belts are modeled by masses and a spring to simulate a frontal collision.
2015-11-09
Technical Paper
2015-22-0010
Jingwen Hu, Carol A. Flannagan, Shan Bao, Robert W. McCoy, Kevin M. Siasoco, Saeed Barbat
The objective of this study is to develop a method that uses a combination of field data analysis, naturalistic driving data analysis, and computational simulations to explore the potential injury reduction capabilities of integrating passive and active safety systems in frontal impact conditions. For the purposes of this study, the active safety system is actually a driver assist (DA) feature that has the potential to reduce delta-V prior to a crash, in frontal or other crash scenarios. A field data analysis was first conducted to estimate the delta-V distribution change based on an assumption of 20% crash avoidance resulting from a pre-crash braking DA feature. Analysis of changes in driver head location during 470 hard braking events in a naturalistic driving study found that drivers’ head positions were mostly in the center position before the braking onset, while the percentage of time drivers leaning forward or backward increased significantly after the braking onset.
2015-11-09
Technical Paper
2015-22-0011
Yibing Shi, Guy S. Nusholtz
The objective of this study is to analytically model the fatality risk in frontal vehicle-to-vehicle crashes of the current vehicle fleet, and its sensitivity to vehicle mass change. A model is built upon an empirical risk ratio-mass ratio relationship from field data and a theoretical mass ratio-velocity change ratio relationship dictated by conservation of momentum. The fatality risk of each vehicle is averaged over the closing velocity distribution to arrive at the mean fatality risks. The risks of the two vehicles are summed and averaged over all possible crash partners to find the societal mean fatality risk associated with a subject vehicle of a given mass from a fleet specified by a mass distribution function. Based on risk exponent and mass distribution from a recent fleet, the subject vehicle mean fatality risk is shown to increase, while at the same time that for the partner vehicles decreases, as the mass of the subject vehicle decreases.
2015-09-22
Technical Paper
2015-36-0263
Anderson de Lima, Eduardo L. Almeida, Marco A. Gouvea
Abstract In 2010, the UN General Assembly proclaimed the period 2011-2020 as the Decade of Action for Road Safety, with a goal to stabilize and then reduce the forecast level of road traffic fatalities around the world. Road traffic accidents are the 8th cause of death in Brazil, according to World Health Rankings. There are few studies around the world with respect to cost due to traffic accidents, however a study performed in 2011 estimates that were spent R$ 44.6 billion in Brazil. So, the recent Brazilian regulations updates have enforced the automakers to develop vehicles safer to passengers and pedestrians. These regulations focus on prevent, reduce or minimize the traumas and injuries caused by different types of vehicular accidents. The present work was developed to optimize the driver restraint system, while focusing on minimizing the trauma during a vehicle frontal impact.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1490
Tony R. Laituri, Scott Henry, Kaye Sullivan
Abstract Injury distributions of belted drivers in 1998-2013 model-year light passenger cars/trucks in various types of real-world frontal crashes were studied. The basis of the analysis was field data from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS). The studied variables were injury severity (n=2), occupant body region (n=8), and crash type (n=8). The two levels of injury were moderate-to-fatal (AIS2+) and serious-to-fatal (AIS3+). The eight body regions ranged from head/face to foot/ankle. The eight crash types were based on a previously-published Frontal Impact Taxonomy (FIT). The results of the study provided insights into the field data. For example, for the AIS2+ upper-body-injured drivers, (a) head and chest injury yield similar contributions, and (b) about 60% of all the upper-body injured drivers were from the combination of the Full-Engagement and Offset crashes.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1451
Anand Sai Gudlur, Theresa Atkinson
Abstract The current study examined field data in order to document injury rates, injured body regions, and injury sources for persons seated in the second row of passenger vehicles. It was also intended to identify whether these varied with respect to age and restraint use in vehicles manufactured in recent years. Data from the 2007-2012 National Automotive Sampling System (NASS/CDS) was used to describe occupants seated in the second row of vehicles in frontal crashes. Injury plots, comparison of means and logistic regression analysis were used to seek factors associated with increased risk of injury. Restraint use reduced the risk of AIS ≥ 2 injury from approximately 1.8% to 5.8% overall. Seventy nine percent of the occupants in the weighted data set used either a lap and shoulder belt or child restraint system. The most frequently indicated injury source for persons with a MAIS ≥ 2 was “seat, back support”, across restraint conditions and for all but the youngest occupants.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1447
Hirotoshi Ishikawa, Kunihiro Mashiko, Tetsuyuki Matsuda, Koichi Fujita, Asuka Sugano, Toru Kiuchi, Hirotsugu Tajima, Masaaki Yoshida, Isao Endou
Abstract Event Data Recorders (EDRs) record valuable data in estimating the occupant injury severity after a crash. Advanced Automatic Collision Notification (AACN) with the use of EDR data will determine the potential extent of injuries to those involved in motor vehicle accidents. In order to obtain basic information in injury estimation using EDR data, frontal collisions for 29 vehicles equipped with EDRs were analyzed as a pilot study by retrieving the EDR data from the accident vehicles and collecting the occupant injury data from the database of an insurance company. As a result, the severity of occupant injury was closely related to the Delta V recorded on an EDR. However, there were several cases in which the predicted injury level was overestimated or underestimated by the Delta V. Therefore, caution is required when predicting the level of injury in frontal collisions based upon the Delta V alone.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1460
Massoud Tavakoli, Janet Brelin-Fornari
Abstract This study was conducted to explore the effect of various combinations of seatbelt-related safety components (namely, retractor pretensioners and load limiting retractors) on the adult rear passenger involved in a frontal collision. The study was conducted on a 50th Male and a 5th Female Hybrid III ATD in the rear seat of a mid-sized sedan. Each ATD was seated in an outboard position with 3-point continuous lap-shoulder belts. On these belts were combinations of pretensioners and load limiters. Since the main objective of this test series was to cross-compare the seatbelt configurations, front seats were not included in the buck in order to avoid uncontrollable variables that would have affected the comparison study if the possibility of contact with the front seat were allowed. Nevertheless, there was a short barrier devised to act as a foot-stop for both ATDs.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1458
Jia Hu
Abstract A Finite Element (FE) model for analysis of the rear row occupant injury assessment parameters in a frontal crash test was developed by using the LSTC Hybrid III 5th percentile FE dummy model. Three cases were studied using three different rear seatbelt retractor configurations, which were as follows: an ordinary retractor without load limiter or pretensioner (Case 1), a retractor with load limiter only (Case 2), and a retractor with load limiter and pretensioner (Case 3). The simulation results of each of these three cases were compared respectively to the results obtained from two frontal 50-kph full rigid barrier impact tests and one sled test. It turned out that the dummy kinematics and injury assessment parameters of the head, neck, chest, pelvis and femurs were all similar between test and simulation in the three cases. Thus, FE simulation models can be used to predict dummy injury assessment parameters.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 45

Filter