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Standard
2014-06-20
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides design guidance and a method for testing thermal performance of airplane in-flight food storage carts. It is noted that thermal performance criteria is not part of AS8056.
WIP Standard
2014-06-11
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines lightning strike zones and provides guidelines for locating them on particular aircraft, together with examples. The zone definitions and location guidelines described herein are applicable to Parts 23, 25, 27, and 29 aircraft. The zone location guidelines and examples are representative of in-flight lightning exposures.
WIP Standard
2014-06-09
This document recommends contents for Emergency Medical Kits, including medications and instrumentation, intended for use on passenger-carrying aircraft serviced by at least 1 flight attendant. Recommended practices for carriage of, access to, and maintenance of Emergency Medical Kits are also included.
Standard
2014-04-14
These recommendations are provided to aid the international air transport industry by identifying a standard, minimum amount of safety instructions that should be given to sight-impaired passengers. This document is not meant to address problems associated with communicating safety information to sight- impaired passengers who are also hearing impaired or non- conversant in the language(s) used by the cabin crew to disseminate general safety information to passengers. Aircraft operators are encouraged to customize the safety instructions for their own operations in order to ensure that required safety information is provided to sight-impaired passengers.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ahmed A. Abdel-Rehim, Ahmed A.A. Attia
Abstract The effect of magnetic field has attracted many researchers to investigate the impact of this type of force on different applications such as combustion and water. Different systems supported by many patents were introduced to the market to treat these applications. In the present study, a series of experiments were conducted to explore the impact of magnetic fuel treatment on engine performance. The magnetic field was produced from two different sources based on permanent and electromagnetic coils. Two engines with different configurations were used. Three fuels were tested, gasoline and diesel as liquid fuels and natural gas as a gaseous fuel. Vast numbers of experiments at different operating conditions were conducted on the two engines. Fuel consumption, output power, and exhaust emissions were analyzed under the exposure of magnetic field. Gasoline was the most affected fuel while other fuels showed less or negligible effect. Magnetic field strength was a key parameter to have any impact on engine performance.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sebastian Karwaczynski, Mehmet H. Uras
This work is based on a current project funded by the United States Army Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and is being conducted with the Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) Ground Systems Survivability (GSS) Team and Paradigm Research and Engineering. The focus of this project is to develop an advanced and novel sensing and activation strategy for Pyrotechnic Restraint Systems, Air Bags and other systems that may require activation. The overriding technical challenge is to activate these systems to effectively protect the Soldier during blast events in addition to Crash, Rollover and Other Injury Causing events. These activations of Pyrotechnic systems must occur in fractions of milliseconds as compared to typical automotive crashes. By investigating systems outside of typical accelerometer based applications and activations, the potential exists to exploit systems that require little power, are self-contained and provide the required output for the desired result.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Bryan Styles, Jeffrey Santrock, Curtis Vincent, Michael Leffert, Narasimha Putcha
An evaluation methodology has been developed for assessing the suitability of R-1234yf in vehicles. This relates primarily to evaluating the flammability of R-1234yf in the engine compartment during a frontal collision. This paper will discuss the process followed in the methodology, the technical rationale for this process, and the results of the analysis. The specific types of analysis included in the methodology are: exhaust-system thermal characterization, computer simulated crash tests, actual crash tests, teardown and examination of crashed parts, and releases of refrigerant onto hot exhaust manifolds. Each type of analysis was logically ordered and combined to produce a comprehensive evaluation methodology. This methodology has been applied and demonstrates that R-1234yf is difficult to ignite when factors that occur in frontal crashes are simultaneously considered. Factors considered in this analysis include: crush and deformation of the vehicle structure, airflow in the engine compartment, exhaust system temperatures during different driving scenarios, and coolant release due to damage of the engine coolant system.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jeff D. Colwell
Abstract Results from a full-scale vehicle burn test involving a 1998 compact passenger car were used to evaluate vehicle fire dynamics and how burn patterns produced during the fire correlated with important characteristics of the fire, such as the area of origin. After the fire was initiated at the air filter in the engine compartment, the fire spread locally and, once the temperature near the origin reached about 750°C, the temperature at all but one location within the engine compartment began to increase. These temperatures continued to increase for the next 6 minutes and then a temperature gradient began to develop in the passenger compartment between the ceiling and the floor. About 5 minutes after the engine compartment became fully involved, the ceiling temperature reached about 590°C and flame spread within the passenger compartment increased. Over the next 4 minutes, the passenger compartment also became fully involved. The fire then spread to the trunk and the rear wheels before self-extinguishing.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Guanyu Zheng, Indrek Wichman, Andre Benard, Hongyu Wang, Xiaohui Li, Jie Gao
Abstract Flame spread over a melting thermally thick composite polymer is investigated in a channel flow above a condensed fuel. The condensed fuel consists of an isotropic (melted layer of) liquid near the heated surface and an anisotropic (not-yet-melted) solid surrounding it. The influence of the solid anisotropy is evaluated by changing the solid conductivity (ksx or ksy) in one particular direction (x in horizontal flame spread direction or y in vertical direction, see schematics in Figure 1) while keeping the other properties fixed. Note that the liquid conductivity kl has no isotropic behavior. Numerically, it is found that the flame spread rate decreases with either increasing ksx or ksy. The decrease with respect to ksy is less than for a comparable case described by the de Ris formula for an isotropic pure solid. The flame spread rate is more accurately determined by an analytical formula derived for spread across a melting solid fuel. Qualitatively, the liquid layer extent decreases with either increasing ksx or ksy due to the role played by the solid conduction as a heat loss mechanism in a thermally thick fuel.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Raúl Ochoterena, Maria Hjohlman, Michael Försth
Abstract Fires in the engine compartments of surface and underground non-rail heavy duty vehicles are still highly frequent. Statistics show that most of the reported fires commenced in the engine compartment and that these were not promptly detected by the drivers. Fires which were not detected rapidly, spread oftentimes beyond the firewall of the engine compartment having notorious economical and environmental repercussions; furthermore, endangering the safety of the occupants. Detecting fires in the engine compartments of heavy duty (HD) vehicles with inexpensive and simple automatic detection systems is in general challenging. High air flows and large amounts of suspended pollutants, together with the complicated geometry and wide range of surface temperatures typically occurring during the normal operation of the vehicle, complicate the reliable operation of almost all types of detectors. This work presents a theoretical study assessing the effectiveness of different detection systems in a simulated fire scenario.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lothar Seybold, Bryan Styles, Ioannis Lazaridis, Hans-Joerg Kneusels
The European Commission (EC) as well as the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published legislations to regulate or encourage the use of low Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerants applied to Mobile Air Conditioning (MAC) systems. Europe mandates a GWP less than 150 of MAC refrigerants for new vehicle types. The thermodynamic refrigerant properties of R-1234yf are slightly different from the properties of R-134a, currently used in MAC systems. Although the basic material data show that R-1234yf is flammable, ignition tests performed for an automotive engine under-hood environment reveal design and packaging influences of its ignition behavior. After extensive collaborative research in 2009, the Society of Automotive Engineers Cooperative Research Team (SAE CRP1234) concluded that R-1234yf is suitable for use in automotive applications. Further ignition risk assessment regarding R-1234yf usage in MAC systems was done by SAE CRP1234-4 in 2013. They concluded that “risks are still very small compared to the risks of a vehicle fire from all causes and well below risks that are commonly viewed as acceptable by the general public.”
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yohsuke Tamura, Masayuki Takeuchi, Kiyotaka Maeda, Noriaki Ohtsuka, Kenji Sato
The localized fire test provided in the Global Technical Regulation for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles gives two separate test methods: the ‘generic installation test - Method 1′ and the ‘specific vehicle installation test - Method 2′. Vehicle manufacturers are required to apply either of the two methods. Focused on Method 2, the present study was conducted to determine the characteristics and validity of Method 2. Test results under identical burner flame temperature conditions and the effects of cylinder protection covers made of different materials were compared between Method 1 and Method 2. The following results were obtained: (1) Methods 1 and 2 produced nearly identical results when the minimum temperature profile in the GTR test procedure was followed in both cases. (2) A steel protection cover on the cylinder significantly lowered cylinder surface temperatures during the fire test until activation of the thermal pressure relief device (TPRD). (3) A thermoplastic cover on the cylinder melted during the fire test and produced an engulfing pool fire during the localized fire portion of the test that accelerated activation of the TPRD.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Haizhen Liu, Weiwen Deng, Changfu Zong, Jian Wu
Abstract This paper first presents an algorithm to detect tire blowout based on wheel speed sensor signals, which either reduces the cost for a TPMS or provides a backup in case it fails, and a tire blowout model considering different tire pressure is also built based on the UniTire model. The vehicle dynamic model uses commercial software CarSim. After detecting tire blowout, the active braking control, based on a 2DOF reference model, determines an optimal correcting yaw moment and the braking forces that slow down and stop the vehicle, based on a linear quadratic regulator. Then the braking force commands are further translated into target pressure command for each wheel cylinder to ensure the target braking forces are generated. Some simulations are conducted to verify the active control strategy. From the simulation results, it is shown that this active brake control strategy can not only ensure the flat tire vehicle stability, but also slow down the vehicle with a safe speed and for a shorter distance.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Masashi Takahashi, Masayuki Takeuchi, Kiyotaka Maeda, Shouma Nakagawa
Electric vehicles have become more popular and may be involved in fires due to accidents. However, characteristics of fires in electric vehicles are not yet fully understood. The electrolytic solution of lithium-battery vehicles is inflammable, so combustion characteristics and gases generated may differ from those of gasoline cars. Therefore, we conducted fire tests on lithium-ion battery vehicles and gasoline vehicles and investigated the differences in combustion characteristics and gases generated. The fire tests revealed some differences in combustion characteristics. For example, in lithium-ion battery vehicles, the battery temperature remained high after combustion of the body. However, there was almost no difference in the maximum CO concentration measured 0.5 to 1 m above the roof and 1 m from the side of the body. Furthermore, HF was not detected in either type of vehicle when measured at the same positions as for CO. The experiment results did not reveal any reason to treat vehicles with lithium-ion batteries differently from gasoline vehicles with regard to safety measures against harmful gases that may be generated around the burning vehicle.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vijay Somandepalli, Kevin Marr, Quinn Horn
As lithium-ion cells and systems become larger and more ubiquitous in automotive applications, fire and explosion hazards that are rare or non-existent in smaller systems may exist in these larger systems. One potential hazard can occur when flammable gases emitted from a lithium-ion cell failure accumulate in or around automobiles and are ignited by electrical activity or by the cells themselves and result in a fire or explosion. In some instances, the safety aspects related to fires and explosions protection of electric vehicles and hybrid vehicles using these large energy storage battery packs are a significant challenge to address. This paper describes and characterizes the combustion and explosion hazards that can occur when a lithium ion battery pack fails and goes into thermal runaway in an enclosed space. Metrics such as gas composition, maximum overpressure, rate of pressure rise, and flammability limits are described. This information can be helpful to battery and pack designers, vehicle designers, first responders and emergency personnel in developing strategies to mitigate and prevent explosion hazards from the use of battery packs in automobiles and other fields where large battery packs are used.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Vijay Somandepalli, Hubert Biteau
The emergence of Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs) as a viable means of transportation has been coincident with the development of lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery technology and electronics. These developments have enabled the storage and use of large amounts of energy that were previously only possible with internal combustion engines. However, the safety aspects of using these large energy storage battery packs are a significant challenge to address. In addition, the rapid advances in electrode and electrolyte materials for Li-Ion batteries have made comparisons and ranking of safety parameters difficult because of the substantial variations in cell designs. In this work, we outline a method for quantifying the thermal safety aspects of Li-ion battery technologies using a Cone Calorimeter. The Cone Calorimeter is a suitable tool to measure and quantify critical information such as the heat release rate and total energy released from the combustion of organic material.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection focuses on current developments in the fields of vehicle fire science, statistics, risks, assessment and mitigation. Papers addressing vehicle design, live-fire tests and fire investigation issues applicable to traditional, electric and alternatively fueled vehicles are included.
WIP Standard
2014-02-26
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) specifies minimum performance standards for Electronic Flight Information System (EFIS) Displays that are intended for use in the flight deck by the flightcrew in all 14 CFR Part 23, 25, 27, and 29 aircraft. The requirements and recommendations in this document are intended to apply to, but are not limited to, the following types of display functions: • Primary Flight and Primary Navigation which include vertical situation, horizontal situation, and moving map displays. • Systems display and displays that have alerting functions which may include engine instrument, aircraft systems information/control, pilot or flightcrew alerting, and documentation displays. • Control Displays including communication, navigation and system control displays. • Information Displays which may include navigation displays used for situation awareness only, supplemental data displays, and maintenance displays. • Display Unit (DU) providing the visual display of SG symbology.
Magazine
2014-02-03
Thermal simulation and testing of expanded metal foils for lightning protection With the implementation of major aircraft structures fabricated from carbon fiber reinforced plastic materials, lightning protection has become a more complicated issue for designers and engineers to solve. Electronics take charge Digital controls are handling more engine control tasks on a wider range of aircraft.
Standard
2013-12-17
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) specifies minimum performance standards for the following types of fire detection instruments intended for use in protecting aircraft cargo compartments, galleys, electronic equipment bays and other similar installations.
Standard
2013-10-10
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) establishes safety recommendations for lavatories in transport category airplanes.
Standard
2013-09-19
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides information demonstrating the need for establishing design and performance standards for aircraft crash axes.
Standard
2013-09-19
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) is to provide recommendations which will lead to the standardization of passageway door operation in all transport aircraft, by providing in the design, features which will result in minimum exit passage blockage and jamming.
Standard
2013-09-19
This Aerospace Recommended Practice provides design and installation criteria intended to enhance overall safety by mitigating exposure of cabin crew and passengers to risks from: a. Routine use of galley systems. b. Galley components or equipment becoming dislodged under routine or abnormal operating conditions and under survivable crash or ditching conditions. c. Malfunctions of, or defects in, a galley system or associated galley equipment. NOTE: It is not the purpose of this Aerospace Recommended Practice to specify the specific designs or design methods to be followed in the accomplishment of stated objectives.
Technical Paper
2013-09-17
Fidele Moupfouma, William Tse, Mohsen Jalali
In order to guarantee systems immunity, lightning induced electromagnetic energy has to be lower than the system's susceptibility threshold. This can be achieved, if the aircraft structure provides a good protection against lightning current as well as against its electromagnetic induced field. Moreover such a structure is also required to constitute a ground plane that guarantees very low common mode impedance between all grounded systems in order to keep them at the same electrical potential. The interaction of lightning with aircraft structure, and the coupling of induced energy with harnesses and systems inside the airframe, is a complex phenomenon, mainly for composite aircraft. Composite structures are either not conductive at all (e.g., fiberglass) or are significantly less conductive than metals (e.g., carbon fiber). Consequently, current from a lightning strike will not linger long time on aircraft skin (outside) but will enter the structure and seek metal paths available to propagate through.
Technical Paper
2013-09-17
Fidele Moupfouma
During its flight an aircraft can be struck by lightning and the induced high current will require a highly conductive airframe skin structure in order for it to propagate through with minimum damage. However an aircraft skin is generally coated with paint and the airframer does not always have control on the paint thickness. Paint thickness generates heightened concerns for lightning strike on aircraft, mainly because most of coatings dedicated to that purpose are non-conductive. Using insulating material or non-conductive coating with certain thickness may contribute to or increase damage inflicted by the swept stroke lightning energy, even on metallic structures Due to its high relative permittivity, a non-conductive paint or coating on a fuselage skin surface will contribute to slow down the lightning current propagation through structure. With this comes the risk of increasing heat that will favor structural damage and possible melt through. The correlation between paint thickness, lightning dwell time, and aircraft skin thickness are all contributing factors in lightning swept stroke damage in aircraft lightning Zone 2A.
Technical Paper
2013-09-17
Fidele Moupfouma, Zdzislaw Klim, Adam Skorek
The lightning represents a fundamental threat to the proper operation of aircraft systems. For aircraft protection, Electromagnetic Compatibility requires conductive structure that will provide among all, electromagnetic shielding and protection from HIRF and atmospheric electricity threat. The interaction of lightning with aircraft structure, and the coupling of induced energy with harnesses and systems inside the airframe, is a complex subject mainly for composite aircraft. The immunity of systems is governed by their susceptibility to radiated or conducted electromagnetic energy. The driving mechanism of such susceptibility to lightning energy is the exposure to the changing magnetic field inside the aircraft and IR voltage produced by the flow of current through the structural resistance of the aircraft. The amplitude of such magnetic field and IR voltage is related to the shielding effectiveness of the aircraft skin (wiremesh, composite conductivity). However, it is also known that copper wiremesh does not provide adequate protection from magnetic field, even though it is needed for lightning current dissipation and the reduction of the heat that could damage the structure, following a lightning strike.
Technical Paper
2013-09-17
John C. Dalton, Roger Nicholson
We live in an era of increasing twin-engine commercial airplane operations, with large and very quiet high bypass ratio engines. At the same time, due to several decades of increased attention to the environment, we have large and increasing hazardous species bird populations. These trends, when combined, are not a prescription for continued assurance of a remarkable and enviable safety record for commercial aviation. Therefore, greater diligence must be placed on the evaluation of the current and future aviation wildlife hazard. We have some new weapons in this fight for greater capability to live with this situation. The basic problem is that different databases are populated independently from one another and often contain conflicting, contradictory, and erroneous data. Databases that were used individually, but not necessarily combined, are being utilized in a conjoined methodology to give us a better picture of the actual risk involved. And new analytical techniques are being applied that will enable us to better visualize and evaluate the nature of the wildlife threat.
Technical Paper
2013-09-17
Paul Lebbin
This paper presents a review of the flight deck and cabin fire and smoke incidents reported to the Canadian airworthiness authorities over a ten year span. The fire and smoke related diversions are categorized to identify areas where efforts could be increased to improve safety. The costs of diversions are estimated to identify areas where operators could reduce costs by seeking technologies to reduce the number of diversions without any impact on safety. Only twenty-eight investigation reports into fire and smoke incidents onboard aircraft have been published over the past three decades. These reports are not sufficient to identify areas where operators can reduce their operating costs. The Canadian airworthiness authorities received over 1,000 smoke and fire incidents from the years 2001 to 2010, of which, over 680 reported fire and smoke in the flight deck and cabin compartments for various makes and models of aircraft. Some of these flight deck and cabin incidents were related to in-flight entertainment or galley systems that were remedied while in-flight and did not require a diversion in most cases.
Technical Paper
2013-09-17
Jeffrey Morgan
Since the 1960's, lightning protection of aircraft has been an important design aspect, a concern for the flying public, aircraft manufacturers and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). With the implementation of major aircraft structures fabricated from carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials, lightning protection has become a more complicated issue to solve. One widely used material for lightning strike protection of CFRP structures within the aerospace industry is expanded metal foil (EMF). EMF is currently used in both military and commercial passenger aircraft. An issue that has historically been an area of concern with EMF is micro cracking of paint on the composite structure which can result in corrosion of the metal foil and subsequent loss of conductivity. This paper addresses the issues of stress and displacement in the composite structure layup which contribute to paint cracking caused by aircraft thermal cycling. The analysis of EMF by computer modeling is made using commercially available COMSOL Multiphysics software that is supported by data from limited experimental testing.
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