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CURRENT
2017-07-14
Standard
AIR5479B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) describes the performance of plating’s and coatings for landing gear that potentially provide environmental compliance benefits versus the current baseline processes. The hazardous systems addressed in this version of the document include cadmium plating, chromated primers, and high VOC (volatile organic compounds) topcoats. The AIR applies to landing gear structures and mechanisms for all types of civil and military aircraft. The potential replacements apply to both Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) hardware and overhaul of in-service landing gears.
2017-04-10
WIP Standard
J1752/3
This measurement procedure defines a method for measuring the electromagnetic radiation from an integrated circuit (IC). The IC being evaluated is mounted on an IC test printed circuit board (PCB) that is clamped to a mating port (referred to as a wall port) cut in the top or bottom of a TEM or wideband TEM (GTEM) cell. The test board is not in the cell as in the conventional usage but becomes a part of the cell wall. This method is applicable to any TEM or GTEM cell modified to incorporate the wall port; however, the measured RF voltage is affected by the septum to test board (wall) spacing. This procedure was developed using a 1 GHz TEM cell with a septum to wall spacing of 45 mm and a GTEM cell with average septum to wall spacing of 45 mm over the port area. Other cells may not produce identical spectral output but may be used for comparative measurements, subject to their frequency and sensitivity limitations.
CURRENT
2016-07-12
Standard
AMS3779B
This specification and its supplementary detail specifications cover thermal radiation resistant materials in the form of tape with pressure-sensitive adhesive.
CURRENT
2016-07-12
Standard
AMS3779/2B
This specification covers thermal radiation resistant material in the form of tape with pressure-sensitive adhesive.
CURRENT
2016-07-12
Standard
AMS3779/1B
This specification covers thermal radiation resistant material in the form of tape with pressure-sensitive adhesive.
CURRENT
2016-06-03
Standard
J2990/1_201606
Electric and alternative fueled vehicles present different hazards for first and second responders than conventional gasoline internal combustion engines. Hydrogen vehicles (H2V) including Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) involved in incidents may present unique hazards associated with the fuel storage and high voltage systems. The electrical hazards associated with the high voltage systems of hybrid-electric vehicles and FCVs are already addressed in the parent document, SAE J2990. This Recommended Practice therefore addresses electric issues by reference to SAE J2990 and supplements SAE J2990 to address the potential consequences associated with hydrogen vehicle incidents and suggest common procedures to help protect emergency responders, tow and/or recovery, storage, repair, and salvage personnel after an incident has occurred. Industry design standards and tools were studied and where appropriate, suggested for responsible organizations to implement.
CURRENT
2013-05-28
Standard
J1113/21_201305
This part of SAE J1113 specifies test methods and procedures for testing electromagnetic immunity (of vehicle radiation sources) of electronic components for passenger cars and commercial vehicles. To perform this test method, the electronic module along with the wiring harness (prototype or standard test harness) and peripheral devices will be subjected to the electromagnetic disturbance generated inside an absorber-lined chamber. The electromagnetic disturbances considered in this part of SAE J1113 are limited to continuous narrowband electromagnetic fields. Immunity measurements of complete vehicles are generally only performed at the vehicle manufacturer. The reasons, for example, are high costs of a large absorber-lined chamber, preserving the secrecy of prototypes, or the large number of different vehicle models. Therefore, for research, development and quality control, a laboratory measuring method shall be applied by the manufacturers.
CURRENT
2013-03-25
Standard
ARP4242A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) establishes overall system electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) control requirements. EMC includes the following: Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3) Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Electromagnetic Vulnerability (EMV) Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance (HERO) Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Personnel (HERP) Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Fuels (HERF) High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Lightning Protection Static Electricity TEMPEST This document is intended to be used for the procurement of land, sea, air, or space systems by any procurement activity. Tailoring of specific requirements is necessary and Appendix A has been provided for guidance.
CURRENT
2011-08-10
Standard
AIR746C
This document supplements ARP85, to extend its use in the design of ECS for supersonic transports. The ECS provides an environment controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals, and equipment. These limits include pressure, temperature, humidity, conditioned air velocity, ventilation rate, thermal radiation, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.) of the environment. The ECS is comprised of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply and distribute conditioned air to the occupied compartments. This system is defined within the ATA 100 specification, Chapter 21. It interfaces with the pneumatic system (Chapter 36 of ATA 100), at the inlet of the air conditioning system shutoff valves.
CURRENT
2011-07-29
Standard
ARP6161
This document is a tool for the certifying authority, cockpit designers, instrument suppliers, lighting suppliers, and component suppliers. It is an aid to understanding and meeting relavant regulatory requirements, particularly those relating to pilot compartment view {CFR 25.773(a)(2)} and instrument lights {25.1381(a)(2)} for glare arising from visible eletromagnetic radiation.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/2A
Heat transfer is the transport of thermal energy from one point to another. Heat is transferred only under the influence of a temperature gradient or temperature difference. The direction of heat transfer is always from the point at the higher temperature to the point at the lower temperature, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The fundamental modes of heat transfer are conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the net transfer of energy within a fluid or solid occurring by the collisions of molecules, atoms, or electrons. Convection is the transfer of energy resulting from fluid motion. Convection involves the processes of conduction, fluid motion, and mass transfer. Radiation is the transfer of energy from one point to another in the absence of a transporting medium. In practical applications several modes of heat transfer occur simultaneously.
CURRENT
2011-06-17
Standard
J1752/3_201106
This measurement procedure defines a method for measuring the electromagnetic radiation from an integrated circuit (IC). The IC being evaluated is mounted on an IC test printed circuit board (PCB) that is clamped to a mating port (referred to as a wall port) cut in the top or bottom of a TEM or wideband TEM (GTEM) cell. The test board is not in the cell as in the conventional usage but becomes a part of the cell wall. This method is applicable to any TEM or GTEM cell modified to incorporate the wall port; however, the measured RF voltage is affected by the septum to test board (wall) spacing. This procedure was developed using a 1 GHz TEM cell with a septum to wall spacing of 45 mm and a GTEM cell with average septum to wall spacing of 45 mm over the port area. Other cells may not produce identical spectral output but may be used for comparative measurements, subject to their frequency and sensitivity limitations.
CURRENT
2010-03-09
Standard
J551/11_201003
This part of SAE J551 specifies off-vehicle radiation source test methods and procedures for testing passenger cars and commercial vehicles. Two methods for calibrating electromagnetic fields are defined in the document: a substitution method and a closed-loop method. The substitution method is the method most commonly used. SAE J551-1 specifies general, definitions, practical use, and basic principles of the test procedure.
HISTORICAL
2005-10-06
Standard
J1113/21_200510
This part of SAE J1113 specifies test methods and procedures for testing electromagnetic immunity (of vehicle radiation sources) of electronic components for passenger cars and commercial vehicles. To perform this test method, the electronic module along with the wiring harness (prototype or standard test harness) and peripheral devices will be subjected to the electromagnetic disturbance generated inside an absorber-lined chamber. The electromagnetic disturbances considered in this part of SAE J1113 are limited to continuous narrowband electromagnetic fields. Immunity measurements of complete vehicles are generally only performed at the vehicle manufacturer. The reasons, for example, are high costs of a large absorber-lined chamber, preserving the secrecy of prototypes, or the large number of different vehicle models. Therefore, for research, development and quality control, a laboratory measuring method shall be applied by the manufacturers.
HISTORICAL
2005-01-05
Standard
J100_200501
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes boundaries for shade bands on glazed surfaces in class "A" vehicles. These boundaries are located so that the shade band can provide occupant comfort and driver vision protection from glare, with respect to solar radiation, under some lighting and driving conditions. Since shade bands transmit less visible light than adjacent glazed surfaces, the shade band boundaries establish boundaries for the driver's field of view.
CURRENT
1998-03-01
Standard
AIR4964
Long wave ultraviolet or UV-A radiation (between 320 to 400 nm) is used for fluorescent inspections in magnetic particle and liquid penetrant examinations. The UV-A radiation is obtained from either fluorescent or high intensity discharge lamps that are stationary or portable. The commercially available UV-A lamps possess a large variation in intensity output that can cause a legitimate concern for possible health hazard. This draft reviews the nature of UV-A radiation emitted by these lights, blacklight equipment, acceptable UV dosage limits adopted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) and the European Standards Committee for Nondestructive Testing, and recommendation of proper practices when working with UV-A radiation.
CURRENT
1992-09-01
Standard
AIR64B
This document considers the cooling of equipment installed in equipment centers, which usually consist of rack-mounted equipment and panel mounted equipment in the flight deck. In instances where these two locations result in different requirements, these are identified. For purposes of this document, the cooled equipment is referred to generally as E/E equipment, denoting that both electrical and electronic equipment is considered, or as an E/E equipment line-replaceable-unit (LRU). The majority of cooled equipment takes the form of LRUs. This document primarily relates to E/E equipment which is designed to use forced air cooling in order to maintain the equipment within acceptable environmental limits, in order to maintain equipment operating performance (within acceptable tolerances), and to maintain reliability. Cooling may be applied internally or externally to the case of the item of E/E equipment.
CURRENT
1989-09-01
Standard
AIR1168/3
This section presents methods and examples of computing the steady-state heating and cooling loads of aircraft compartments. In a steady-state process the flows of heat throughout the system are stabilized and thus do not change with time. In an aircraft compartment, several elements compose the steady-state air conditioning load. Transfer of heat occurs between these sources and sinks by the combined processes of convection, radiation, and conduction in the following manner: Convection between the boundary layer and the outer airplane skin. Radiation between the external skin and the external environment. Solar radiation through transparent areas directly on flight personnel and equipment and on the cabin interior surfaces. Conduction through the cabin walls and structural members. Convection between the interior cabin surface and the cabin air. Convection between cabin air and flight personnel or equipment.
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