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Viewing 1 to 30 of 17339
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1856
Hannes Allmaier, Günter Offner
Abstract Elastohydrodynamic (EHD)-simulation is a widely applied simulation technique that is used in a very diverse field of applications ranging from the study of vibroacoustics to the calculation of friction power losses in lubricated contacts. In particular, but not limited to, the automotive industry, technical advances and new requirements put current EHD simulation methodology under test. Ongoing trends like downsizing, downspeeding, start-stop and the continuing demand for increasing fuel efficiency impose new demands and challenges also on the simulation methodology. Increasing computational capabilities enable new simulation opportunities on the other hand. In the following, an overview is given on the current state of the art and today’s challenges for the elastohydrodynamic simulation of journal bearings and their wide range of applications from highly loaded main bearings supporting the crank shaft in the ICE to high speed turbocharger bearings.
2016-05-18
Journal Article
2016-01-9074
Celeste Wilken, Stefan de Goede, Carl Viljoen
Abstract Gas to Liquids (GTL) diesel has been produced commercially for several years. GTL diesel is known for its excellent properties, including zero aromatics, near zero sulphur and a high cetane number. Most of the GTL diesel produced by commercial plants is utilised as a blend component, especially in blends up to 20%. In these applications, the cold flow properties are potentially less critical, as the cold flow properties of the blend will mostly be determined by the petroleum-derived component. In certain markets, however, it is possible that GTL diesel can be used as a neat diesel, therefore requiring good cold flow properties. An advantage of GTL technology is that the cold flow properties of GTL diesel can be tailored to meet the climatic requirements of a specific geographical area. In the current study, GTL diesel samples with cold flow properties ranging from ‘summer type’ to ‘winter type’ and varying intermediate cold flow qualities were evaluated.
2016-05-18
Journal Article
2016-01-9043
Timo van Overbrueggen, Marco Braun, Michael Klaas, Wolfgang Schroder
Abstract The interaction of biofuel sprays from an outward opening hollow cone injector and the flow field inside an internal combustion engine is analyzed by Mie-Scattering Imaging (MSI) and high-speed stereoscopic particle-image velocimetry (stereo-PIV). Two fuels (ethanol and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)), four injection pressures (50, 100, 150, and 200 bar), three starting points of injection (60°, 277°, and 297° atdc), and two engine speeds (1,500 rpm and 2,000 rpm) define the parameter space of the experiments. The MSI measurements determine the vertical penetration length and the spray cone angle of the ethanol and MEK spray. Stereo-PIV is used to investigate the interaction of the flow field and the ethanol spray after the injection process for a start of injection at 60° atdc. These measurements are compared to stereo-PIV measurements without fuel injection performed in the same engine [19].
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1165
Mahmoud Abdelhamid, Imtiaz Haque, Srikanth Pilla, Zoran S. Filipi, Rajendra Singh
Abstract The challenge of meeting the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards of 2025 has led to major developments in the transportation sector, among which is the attempt to utilize clean energy sources. To date, use of solar energy as an auxiliary source of on-board fuel has not been extensively investigated. This paper is the first study at undertaking a comprehensive analysis of using solar energy on-board by means of photovoltaic (PV) technologies to enhance automotive fuel economies, extend driving ranges, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and ensure better economic value of internal combustion engine (ICE) -based vehicles to meet CAFE standards though 2025. This paper details and compares various aspects of hybrid solar electric vehicles with conventional ICE vehicles.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1166
Zifan Liu, Andrej Ivanco, Zoran S. Filipi
Abstract The 48V mild hybrid technology is emerging as a very attractive option for high-volume vehicle electrification. Compared to high-voltage hybrids, the 48V system has a potential of achieving competitive fuel economy with significantly lower incremental costs. While previous studies of 48V mild hybrid systems discussed vehicle configuration, power management strategy and electric machine design, quantitative assessment of fuel economy under real-world conditions remains an open topic. Objectives of this paper are to propose a methodology for categorizing real-world cycles based on driver aggressiveness, and to subsequently analyze the impact of driving patterns on fuel saving potentials with a 48V mild hybrid system. Instead of using the certification test cycles to evaluate the fuel economy, real-world cycles are extracted from 2001-2003 Southern California Household Travel Survey.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1186
Dong Hao, Yongping Hou, Jianping Shen, Liying Ma
Abstract The vehicular fuel cell stack is unavoidably impacted by the vibration in the real-world usage due to the road unevenness. However, effects of vibration on stacks have yet to be completely understood. In this work, the mechanical integrity and gas-tightness of the stack were investigated through a strengthen road vibration test with a duration of 200 h. The excitation signals applied in the vibration test were simulated by the acceleration of the stack, which were previously measured in a vehicle vibration test. The load signals of the vehicle vibration test were iterated through a road simulator from vehicle acceleration signals which were originally sampled in the proving ground. Frequency sweep test was conducted before and after the vibration test. During the vibration test, mechanical structure inspection and pressure maintaining test of the stack were conducted at regular intervals.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1180
Trevor Crain, Thomas Gorgia, R. Jesse Alley
Abstract EcoCAR is North America's premier collegiate automotive engineering competition, challenging students with systems-level advanced powertrain design and integration. The EcoCAR Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition series is organized by Argonne National Laboratory, headline sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and General Motors, and sponsored by more than 30 industry and government leaders. In the last competition series, EcoCAR 2, fifteen university teams from across North America were challenged to reduce the environmental impact of a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu by redesigning the vehicle powertrain without compromising performance, safety, or consumer acceptability. This paper examines the results of the EcoCAR 2 competition’s emissions and energy consumption (E&EC) on-road test results for several prototype plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The official results for each vehicle are presented along with brief descriptions of the hybrid architectures.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1178
Yang Wang, Chun Hui
Abstract This paper focuses on the dynamic parameters matching and powertrain ratio optimization of an ERCB (Extended Range City Bus) for improving fuel economy. Firstly, according to the bus data and design targets of an ERCB, dynamic parameters are matched. Simulation models of each component that makes up the whole powertrain are established depending on the platform of AVL-CRUISE, including battery, motor, main reducer, wheels, etc. Dynamic performance, such as full load acceleration, climbing performance, maximum speed performance and endurance mileage, is simulated successively using AVL-CRUISE. Also the fuel economy performance under Chinese Urban Driving Cycle (CUDC) is worked out. The simulation results of each performance are analyzed. To improve the fuel economy, the transmission ratio and final ratio are optimized with Isight software.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1200
Zhiyun Zhang, Miaohua Huang, Yupu Chen, Dong Gao
Abstract Whether the available energy of the on-board battery pack is enough for the driver’s next trip is a major contributor in slowing the growth rate of Electric Vehicles (EVs). What’s more, the actual capacity of the battery pack depend on so many factors that a real-time estimation of the state of charge of the battery pack is often difficult. We proposed a big-data based algorithm to build a battery pack dynamic model for the online state of charge estimation and a stochastic model for the energy consumption prediction. And the good performance of sensors, high-bandwidth communication systems and cloud servers make it convenient to measure and collect the related data, which are grouped into three categories: standard, historical and real-time data. First a resistance-capacitance ( RC )-equivalent circuit is taken consideration to simplify the battery dynamics.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1191
Saher Al Shakhshir, Torsten Berning
Abstract Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and waste heat. One critical technical problem of these fuel cells is still the water management: the proton exchange membrane in the center of these fuel cells has to be hydrated in order to stay proton-conductive while on the other hand excessive liquid water can lead to cell flooding and increased degradation rates. Clearly, a fundamental understanding of all aspects of water management in PEMFC is imperative. This includes the fuel cell water balance, i.e. which fraction of the product water leaves the fuel cell via the anode channels versus the cathode channel.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1069
Masayoshi Otaka, Taro Kasahara, Kenichi Komaba
Abstract As a means of further improving combustion efficiency of gasoline engine, an increase in compression ratio, which enhances the risk of knocking, is thinkable. To optimize engine combustion parameters, a technology that can precisely detect knocking is desirable. Presently skillful experts have been evaluating knocking subjectively by listening to radiation noise so far. The authors developed a device that can precisely detect knocking by means of processing sound signals, which are captured by a high-performance microphone that is sensitive in the wide frequency range. Shock waves induced by knocking cause in-cylinder gas vibrations that emits metallic hit noises from the outer engine wall. We studied how to identify the feature values of frequency characteristics when knocking occurs, under the assumption that the engine radiation noise includes more than 2nd-order harmonic components with respect to the basic frequency of the in-cylinder gas vibration mode.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1089
Jagrit Shrivas, Girish Khairnar, Sachin Pande, Yaser Hussaini, Amit Chaudhari
Abstract In Internal Combustion (I.C.) engines, seat inserts and valves are the major components responsible for performance, emissions and reliability. Failure of these components can cause performance deterioration. In case of compressed natural gas (CNG) engines, impact on life of seat inserts and valves are adversely affected due to its dry combustion environment and high operating temperatures. Greaves cotton has developed a single cylinder, water cooled, dedicated CNG engine with port injection from the base diesel engine. Major challenges were encountered during the CNG engine development with respect to seat inserts and valves wear. The design was modified considering the different design parameters to arrest failure modes as given below: 1 Seat insert material compatibility2 Seat angle3 Seat width4 Valve head stiffness5 Alignment of seat inserts and valves6 Valves closing velocities.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1081
Jonathan Harrison, Rodrigo Aihara, Fabian Eisele
Abstract Engine and transmission oil systems are commonly pressurized by gerotor style pumps, due to their simplistic design and low cost. Gerotor pumps are designed with certain tolerances of the gears and housing, thus creating a tradeoff of lower cost with larger tolerances and higher cost with smaller tolerances. By building a detailed gerotor pump model with a 1D hydraulic flow network, engineers can evaluate pump performance with these tolerances as input and compare to find the optimal design. This paper showcases the ease of building a gerotor model in 1D by using an automated process extracting the key model inputs directly from the pump CAD file. The gerotor pump performance is predicted including flow rate, total power loss, volumetric efficiency, and total efficiency vs. pump speed, pressure rise, clearance tolerances, and temperature, and compared with experiment.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1086
Taiyu Zhang, Jing Qin, Bing Li, Minyue Wu, Tongjin Wang, Jing Qin, Bing Li, Minyue Wu, Tongjin Wang, Yunlong Li, Bo Qin
Abstract In order to improve the fuel consumption and expand the range of low fuel consumption area of a 1.5L Atkinson cycle PFI engine, the effect of the intake manifold length and chamber shape on the engine performance is investigated by setting up a GT-power (1-D) and an AVL-Fire (3-D) computational model which are calibrated with experimental data. After this the new engine was transformed to the test bench to do the calibration experiment. The results demonstrate that the intake manifold case_1 (the length is 300mm, side intake form) matched with a new designed chamber improves combustion in cylinder with a range 1.6∼7.4g/(kW•h) reduced in fuel consumption of speed that has been studied; the case_3 (the length is 100mm, intermediate intake form) matched with the new designed chamber with a range 3.86∼7g/(kW•h) reduced in fuel consumption of speed that has been studied. Both case_1 and case_3 expand the range of low fuel consumption area significantly.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1132
Eduardo Mondragon-Parra, Gregory Ambrose
Abstract The required Fuel Economy improvement to meet increasing CAFE standards and the global trend to reduce CO2 emissions has prompted automakers to look at new technologies and optimize current technologies. One area of focus is the reduction of mechanical energy losses in driveline systems, which translate to less fuel consumption. Even though the driveline and chassis components account for only 2% (approximately) of the total mechanical losses in passenger vehicles, automakers have shown interest in maximizing the mechanical efficiency of driveline systems. A key component of any driveline system is the Halfshaft (HS), consisting of two Constant Velocity Joints (CVJ’s). The efficiency of CVJ’s is dependent on the joint architecture, angle of operation, transmitted torque, rotational speed and the grease selected for lubrication. Premium Tripots have the highest mechanical efficiency among CVJ’s. Ball-type joints tend to have lower efficiency.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1045
Paul J. Shayler, Li Cheng, Qile Li, Emad Wahab
Abstract The oil distribution system of an automotive light duty engine typically has an oil pump mechanically driven through the front-endancillaries-drive or directly off the crankshaft. Delivery pressure is regulated by a relief valve to provide an oil gallery pressure of typically 3 to 4 bar absolute at fully-warm engine running conditions. Electrification of the oil pump drive is one way to decouple pump delivery from engine speed, but this does not alter the flow distribution between parts of the engine requiring lubrication. Here, the behaviour and benefits of a system with an electrically driven, fixed displacement pump and a distributor providing control over flow to crankshaft main bearings and big end bearings is examined. The aim has been to demonstrate that by controlling flow to these bearings, without changing flow to other parts of the engine, significant reductions in engine friction can be achieved.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1048
Zachary Westerfield, Yang Liu, Dallwoo Kim, Tian Tian
Abstract The oil control ring (OCR) controls the supply of lubricating oil to the top two rings of the piston ring pack and has a significant contribution to friction of the system. This study investigates the two most prevalent types of OCR in the automotive market: the twin land oil control ring (TLOCR) and three piece oil control ring (TPOCR). First, the basis for TLOCR friction on varying liner roughness is established. Then the effect of changing the land width and spring tension on different liner surfaces for the TLOCR is investigated, and distinct trends are identified. A comparison is then done between the TLOCR and TPOCR on different liner surfaces. Results showed the TPOCR displayed different patterns of friction compared the TLOCR in certain cases.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1626
Hideyuki Kawamata, Satoru Kuroda, Shingo Tanaka, Munehiko Oshima
Abstract Reducing vehicle fuel consumption has become one of the most important issues in recent years in connection with environmental concerns such as global warming. Therefore, in the vehicle development process, attention has been focused on reducing aerodynamic drag as a way of improving fuel economy. When considering environmental issues, the development of vehicle aerodynamics must take into account real-world driving conditions. A crosswind is one of the representative conditions. It is well known that drag changes in a crosswind compared with a condition without a crosswind, and that the change depends on the vehicle shape. It is generally considered that the influence of a crosswind is relatively small since drag accounts for a small proportion of the total running resistance. However, for electric vehicles, the energy loss of the drive train is smaller than that of an internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0877
Preetham Churkunti, Jonathan M. S. Mattson, Christopher Depcik
Abstract Biodiesel is a potential alternative to Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD); however, it often suffers from increased fuel consumption in comparison to ULSD when injection timings and/or pressures are similar. To decrease fuel consumption, increasing biodiesel injection pressure has been found to mitigate the issues associated with its relatively high viscosity and lower energy content. When doing so, the literature indicates decreased emissions, albeit with potentially greater nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions in contrast to ULSD. In order to better understand the trade-off between fuel consumption and NOx emissions, this study explores the influence of fuel injection pressure on ULSD, Waste Cooking Oil (WCO) biodiesel, and their blends in a single-cylinder compression ignition (CI) engine. In particular, fuel injection pressures and timings for WCO biodiesel and blended fuels are adjusted to attempt to mimic the in-cylinder pressure profile of operation using ULSD.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0852
Nwabueze Emekwuru
Abstract The results of the numerical characterization of the hydrodynamics of Soybean Oil Methyl Ester (SME) fuel spray using a spray model based on the moments of the droplet size distribution function are presented. A heat and mass transfer model based on the droplet surface-areaaveraged temperature is implemented in the spray model and the effects on the SME fuel spray tip penetration and droplet sizes at different ambient gas temperature (300 K to 450 K) and fuel temperature (300 K to 360 K) values are evaluated. The results indicate that the SME fuel spray tip penetration values are insensitive to variations to the fuel temperature values but increase with increasing ambient gas temperature values. The droplet size values increase with increasing SME fuel temperature. The fuel vapor mass fraction is predicted to be highest at the spray core, with the axial velocity values of the droplets increasing with increases in the SME fuel spray temperature.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0855
Xiucheng Zhu, Sanjeet Limbu, Khanh Cung, William De Ojeda, Seong-Young Lee
Abstract Dimethyl Ether (DME) is considered a clean alternative fuel to diesel due to its soot-free combustion characteristics and its capability to be produced from renewable energy sources rather than fossil fuels such as coal or petroleum. To mitigate the effect of strong wave dynamics on fuel supply lines caused due to the high compressibility of DME and to overcome its low lubricity, a hydraulically actuated electronic unit injector (HEUI) with pressure intensification was used. The study focuses on high pressure operation, up to 2000 bar, significantly higher than pressure ranges reported previously with DME. A one-dimensional HEUI injector model is built in MATLAB/SIMULINK graphical software environment, to predict the rate of injection (ROI) profile critical to spray and combustion characterization.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0981
Susan Collet
Abstract Light Duty Vehicle corporate average fuel economy (CAFE), fuel economy label, and greenhouse gas (GHG) requirements are related but are very different. The fundamentals to obtain the data are the same, but to derive the required values, the final formulas have different components. These formulas, how to obtain the values which comprise the formulas, and how to use the test output to obtain the final result necessary to determine compliance with the standards are in regulations, but are not easily located. The information is contained in many documents; such as various sections in the Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance documents, SAE International papers, American Society of Testing and Materials standards, and law suit judgments. This paper compiles the fundamentals of vehicle CAFE, fuel economy label, and GHG information. The intent is to provide a reference to the foundation of these requirements.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0977
Jan Czerwinski, Pierre Comte, Zbigniew Stepien, Stanislaw Oleksiak
Abstract A well-balanced use of alternative fuels worldwide is an important objective for a sustainable development of individual transportation. Several countries have objectives to substitute a part of the energy of traffic by ethanol as the renewable energy source. The global share of Bioethanol used for transportation is continuously increasing. Investigations of limited and unregulated emissions of a flex fuel vehicle with gasoline-ethanol blend fuel have been performed in the present work on the chassis dynamometer according to the measuring procedures, which were established in the previous research in the Swiss Network to adequately consider the transient (WLTC) and the stationary operation (SSC). The investigated fuel contained ethanol (E), in the portions of 10% & 85% by volume. The investigated vehicle represented a newer state of technology and an emission level of Euro 5. The engine works with homogenous GDI concept and with 3-W-catalyst (3WC).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0916
Nebojsa Milovanovic, Shant Hamalian
Abstract The future emission legislations for diesel passenger cars are likely to include more dynamic test cycles than we have today, such as the World harmonized Light duty Testing Cycle (WLTC) and Real Drive Emissions (RDE) in the EU and very challenging SULEV legislations in the USA. In order to meet these emission legislations and challenging CO2 targets, more complex Exhaust Gas After Treatment Systems - EGATS and corresponding calibration strategies are needed. The calibration strategies have to provide the best possible fuel consumption and NOx emissions across the entire engine map for all tested cycles. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effect of several EGATS configurations and calibrations on tailpipe NOx and CO2 emissions of a D segment vehicle. The experimental results and potential of various EGATS configurations and calibrations for the optimisation of fuel consumption and NOx emissions are presented and discussed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1020
Yusuke Wada, Koji Nakano, Kei Mochizuki, Ryuichi Hata
Abstract A 1.5 L downsizing turbocharged engine was developed to achieve both driving and environmental performance. The engine is intended to replace 1.8 - 2.4 L class NA engines. In downsizing turbocharged engines, mixture homogeneity is important for suppressing knocking and emission reduction. Particularly under high load, creating rapid combustion and a homogeneous mixture are key technologies. The authors used a long-stroke direct injection engine, which has outstanding rapid combustion and thermal efficiency, as a base engine meeting these requirements. They combined this with a high-tumble port and shallow-dish piston intended to support tumble flow. The combination enhanced flow within the cylinder. The combustion system was built to include a sodium-filled exhaust valve to reduce knocking and a multi-hole injector (six holes) for mixture homogeneity and to reduce the fuel wall wetting.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1024
Adalbert Wolany, Claus Glahn, Hans-Juergen Berner, Michael Bargende
Abstract For scavenging the combustion chamber during the gas exchange, a temporary positive pressure gradient between the intake and the exhaust is required. On a single-scroll turbocharged four cylinder engine, the positive pressure gradient is not realized by the spatial separation of the exhaust manifold (twin-scroll), but by the use of suitable short exhaust valve opening times. In order to avoid any influence of the following firing cylinder onto the ongoing scavenging process, the valve opening time has to be shorter than 180 °CA. Such a short valve opening time has both, a strong influence on the gas exchange at the low-end torque and at the maximum engine power. This paper analyzes a phenomenon, which occurs due to short exhaust valve opening durations and late valve timings: A repeated compression of the burned cylinder charge after the bottom dead center, referred to as “recompression” in this paper.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1025
Daniela Cempirkova, Rostislav Hadas, Lukáš Matějovský, Rolf Sauerstein, Matthias Ruh
Abstract As emission regulations tighten across various regions of the world there is a growing trend in the use of alternative fuels such as Ethanol being blended with gasoline. A notable case of Ethanol usage is found in South America with the widespread use of E100, which has no gasoline content and can often contain up to 10% water. Engine oil contamination by fuel is of major concern and under certain conditions can have negative effects on the durability of turbocharger components which come into contact with contaminated oil, particularly sliding bearings, but also compressor stage through crankcase ventilation system fed gas. The manner in which this effect takes hold can cause a decrease in the lubrication properties and increase in corrosiveness of the engine oil.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1014
Shyam K. Menon, Himakar Ganti, Chris Hagen
Abstract Natural gas is an attractive option for transportation applications in the United States due to its abundant availability and potential for reduced emissions. The scarcity of refueling resources imposes a barrier to widespread use of natural gas in internal combustion engines. A novel bi-modal engine under development is capable of operating in a compressor mode and provide refueling capabilities without any supplemental devices thus overcoming the infrastructure based limitations. As part of this development, a multi-cylinder production engine was acquired and the intake modified on one of the cylinders to perform air compression. This system was tested with accompanying plate heat exchangers that allow for cooling of the compressed air. To make the system self-contained, engine coolant and vehicle refrigerant are used as heat sinks in the heat exchangers.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1016
Yolanda Bravo, Carmen Larrosa, Jose Lujan, Héctor Climent, Manuel Rivas
Abstract Spark ignition (SI) engines are increasing their popularity worldwide since compression ignition (CI) engines have been struggling to comply with new pollutant emission regulations. At the moment, downsizing is the main focus of research on SI engines, decreasing their displacement and using a turbocharging system to compensate this loss in engine size. Exhaust gas recirculation is becoming a popular strategy to address two main issues that arise in heavily downsized turbocharged engines at full load operation: knocking at low engines speeds and fuel enrichment at high engine speeds to protect the turbine. In this research work, a fuel consumption optimization for different operating conditions was performed to operate with a cooled EGR loop, with gasoline and E85. Thus, the benefits of exhaust gas recirculation are proven for a SI gasoline turbocharged direct injection engine.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1005
Yuanzhou Xi, Nathan Ottinger, Z. Gerald Liu
Abstract Regulations on methane emissions from lean-burn natural gas (NG) and lean-burn dual fuel (natural gas and diesel) engines are becoming more stringent due to methane’s strong greenhouse effect. Palladium-based oxidation catalysts are typically used for methane reduction due to their relative high reactivity under lean conditions. However, the catalytic activity of these catalysts is inhibited by the water vapor in exhaust and decreases over time from exposure to trace amounts of sulfur. The reduction of deactivated catalysts in a net rich environment is known to be able to regenerate the catalyst. In this work, a multicycle methane light-off & extinction test protocol was first developed to probe the catalyst reactivity and stability under simulated exhaust conditions. Then, the effect of two different regeneration gas compositions, denoted as regen-A and regen-B, was evaluated on a degreened catalyst and a catalyst previously tested on a natural gas engine.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 17339