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Viewing 1 to 30 of 16268
Technical Paper
2014-09-15
Kai Chen
The synthetic paraffinic kerosine (SPK) produced via HEFAs is of great interest for civil aviation industry as it exhibits an excellent thermal oxidative stability with significantly lower particulate matter emission. However, due to its aromatic free characteristics, the widespread use of SPK is limited by its compatibility with non-metal materials such as fuel tank elastomers. In this research the compatibility of SPK and its blends with widely used aircraft fuel tank elastomers were systematically studied. Experimental results demonstrated the volume swellability of all selected materials showed a linear relationship with volume percentage of No.3 jet fuel in SPK blend. The increase of volume percentage of No.3 jet fuel in the SPK blend increased volume swellability for all materials except fluorosilicone gasket. The alkyl benzenes and naphthalenes in the blend acted as the hydrogen donors, which facilitated the formation of polymer matrix and led to the increase of the distance between polymer chains.
Technical Paper
2014-05-09
Francisco Soriano, Jesus Alvarez-Florez, Manuel Moreno-Eguilaz
This paper presents a novel methodology to develop and validate fuel consumption models of Refuse Collecting Vehicles (RCVs). The model development is based on the improvement of the classic approach. The validation methodology is based on recording vehicle drive cycles by the use of a low cost data acquisition system and post processing them by the use of GPS and map data. The corrected data are used to feed the mathematical energy models and the fuel consumption is estimated. In order to validate the proposed system, the fuel consumption estimated from these models is compared with real filling station refueling records. This comparison shows that these models are accurate to within 5%.
Technical Paper
2014-04-15
Rakesh Kumar Maurya, Avinash Kumar Agarwal
Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines are attracting attention as next-generation internal combustion engines mainly because of very low NOx and PM emission potential and excellent thermal efficiency. Particulate emissions from HCCI engines have been usually considered negligible however recent studies suggest that PM number emissions from HCCI engines cannot be neglected. This study is therefore conducted on a modified four cylinder diesel engine to investigate this aspect of HCCI technology. One cylinder of the engine is modified to operate in HCCI mode for the experiments and port fuel injection technique is used for preparing homogenous charge in this cylinder. Experiments are conducted at 1200 and 2400 rpm engine speeds using gasoline, ethanol, methanol and butanol fuels. A partial flow dilution tunnel was employed to measure the mass of the particulates emitted on a pre-conditioned filter paper. The collected particulate matter (PM) was subjected to chemical analyses in order to assess the amount of Benzene Soluble Organic Fraction (BSOF) and trace metals (marker of toxicity) using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICP-OES).
Technical Paper
2014-04-15
Amit Shrestha, Ziliang Zheng, Tamer Badawy, Naeim Henein, Peter Schihl
This paper presents a new approach for the development of six different JP-8 surrogates for application in diesel cycle simulation. The approach involves a step-wise formulation of 2-, 3-, and 4-component surrogates from a list of pure compounds which are selected based on several criteria. A MATLAB code is developed and is used in conjunction with the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT) and HYSYS software in order to formulate optimal surrogates. The first part of the results shows a comparison between the calculated and the measured DCNs for six surrogates. The differences in the properties such as the density, volatility, lower heating value, H/C ratio, molecular weight, and threshold sooting index of the surrogates and the JP-8 are also highlighted. This is followed by the evaluation of the surrogates with respect to the target JP-8 fuel. The evaluation is made in terms of ignition delays and the rate of heat release at three different IQT test temperatures. Finally, the test results are examined to evaluate the validity of the development approach and the potential use of the IQT in the development and validation of the JP-8 surrogates for application in diesel engines.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Pragadish Nandakumar
The fuel prices are increasing every day and so are the pollution caused by vehicles using fossil fuels. Moreover, in a car with an internal combustion engine, we get on average 25% efficiency, the other 75% is wasted, mostly through friction and heat. One important loss is the dissipation of vibration energy by shock absorbers in the vehicle suspension under the excitation of road irregularity and vehicle acceleration or deceleration. In this paper we design, manufacture and test a regenerative coil-over strut that is compact, simple in design and more economical. Since our strut is a modification of an existing strut design, it would be much more feasible to implement. We tested our prototype strut using a TATA Indica car under city road conditions. The damping characteristics and output voltage of the strut were recorded and compared with a normal coil over strut. Based on the test data, it was found that the strut was able to recover about 8-10 watts of electricity at 20kmph.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Florin Mocanu
On-board fuel identification is important to ensure engine safe operation, similar power output, fuel economy and emissions levels when different fuels are used. Real-time detection of physical and chemical properties of the fuel requires the development of identifying techniques based on a simple, non-intrusive sensor. The measured crankshaft speed signal is already available on series engine and can be utilized to estimate at least one of the essential combustion parameters such as peak pressure and its location, rate of cylinder pressure rise and start of combustion, which are an indicative of the ignition properties of the fuel. Using a dynamic model of the crankshaft numerous methods have been previously developed to identify the fuel type but all with limited applications in terms of number of cylinders and computational resources for real time control. The purpose of the current work is to overcome these limitations and to present how Artificial Neural Networks expand the capability of utilizing engine speed signal for fuel identification by using main combustion characteristics such as firing peak cylinder pressure and peak pressure rise rate.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jill M. Spelina, James C. Peyton Jones, Jesse Frey
This paper collates and summarizes recent advances in knock analysis, simulation and control. The statistical properties of knock intensity and knock events are reviewed showing in particular that knock intensity behaves as an independent random process, and that knock events conform to a binomial distribution. These properties have a significant impact on knock control and simulation. Traditional and recently proposed cumulative-summation-based and Likelihood-based knock control strategies are reviewed and illustrated in this context. Efficient tools for simulating both specific instances of the closed loop time response, and the evolution of the distribution of these responses based on a Markov-like approach, are also briefly reviewed. Finally, it is shown how an optimization of the knock threshold and an associated retuning of the controller parameters can result in significantly improved closed loop performance without any other modification of the control algorithm.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hiroki Tanaka, Shunsuke Somezawa, Takahiro Sako, Yasuyuki Sakai, Hiromitsu Ando, Kazunari Kuwahara
A fuel design concept for an HCCI engine based on chemical kinetics to optimize the heat release profile and achieve robust ignition was proposed, and applied to the design of the optimal methane-based blend. Ignition process chemistry of each single-component of natural gas, methane, ethane, propane, n-butane and isobutane, was analyzed using detailed chemical kinetic computations. Ethane exhibits low ignitability, close to that of methane, when the initial temperature is below 800 K, but higher ignitability, close to those of propane, n-butane and isobutane, when the initial temperature is above 1100 K. Furthermore, ethane shows a higher heat release rate during the late stage of the ignition process. If the early stage of an ignition process takes place during the compression stroke, this kind of heat release profile is desirable in an HCCI engine to reduce cycle-to-cycle variation during the expansion stroke. According to results from engine operation tests using dual-component fuels with methane as the primary component and ethane, propane, n-butane and isobutane as the secondary component, methane/ethane shows a lower COV of IMEP when CA50 is set at the same timing for the expansion stroke.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Markus Schwaderlapp, Mirko Plettenberg, Dean Tomazic, Gregor Schuermann, Felix Ring, Stephen Bowyer
Measures for reducing engine friction within the powertrain are assessed in this paper. The included measures work in combination with several new technologies such as new combustion technologies, downsizing and alternative fuels. The friction reduction measures are discussed for a typical gasoline vehicle. If powertrain friction could be eliminated completely, a reduction of 15% in CO2 emissions could be achieved. In order to comply with more demanding CO2 legislations, new technologies have to be considered to meet these targets. The additional cost for friction reduction measures are often lower than those of other new technologies. Therefore, these measures are worth following up in detail.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mathieu Picard, Camille Baelden, Tian Tian, Takayuki Nishino, Eiji Arai, Hiroyuki Hidaka
The rotary engine provides high power density compared to piston engine, but one of its downside is higher oil consumption. A model of the oil seals is developed to calculate internal oil consumption (oil leakage from the crankcase through the oil seals) as a function of engine geometry and operating conditions. The deformation of the oil seals trying to conform to housing distortion is calculated to balance spring force, O-ring and groove friction, and asperity contact and hydrodynamic pressure at the interface. A control volume approach is used to track the oil over a cycle on the seals, the rotor and the housing as the seals are moving following the eccentric rotation of the rotor. The dominant cause of internal oil consumption is the non-conformability of the oil seals to the housing distortion generating net outward scraping, particularly next to the intake and exhaust port where the housing distortion valleys are deep and narrow. Simulation with housing transverse waviness shows that increasing spring force can lead to an unexpected increase in internal oil consumption.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dileep Kumar Gupta, Abhishek Sharma, Varun Pathak, Naveen Kumar
Due to high energy demand and limited availability of fossil fuels, the energy necessity becomes a point of apprehension as it results in hike of fuel prices. It is essential to develop renewable energy resources while considering the impact on environment. In the last decade, demand of alternative fuels has increased a lot. Therefore, researchers have already started working on the aim of developing a green fuel to overcome the future energy demand. And as we know that the biodiesel is generally prepared from the non-edible and renewable resources thus, it can be among the competitive alternative future fuels. Besides that, it does not require any prior engine modifications for its usual advantage among other alternative fuels while using it within certain boundaries. However, the process biodiesel production is in itself time consuming which increases the cost of production while decreasing the yield. Supercritical method is drawing major attention for its efficient means with overcoming the negatives of conventional production processes.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hu Li, Jim Ebner, Peipei Ren, Laura Campbell, Buland Dizayi, Seyed Hadavi
In order to improve energy supply diversity and reduce carbon dioxide emissions, sustainable bio-fuels are strongly supported by EU and other governments in the world. While the feedstock of biofuels has caused a debate on the issue of sustainability, the used cooking oil (UCO) has become a preferred feedstock for biodiesel manufacturers. However, intensive energy consumption in the trans-esterification process during the UCO biodiesel production has significantly compromised the carbon reduction potentials and increased the cost of the UCO biodiesel. Moreover, the yield of biodiesel is only ∼90% and the remaining ∼10% feedstock is wasted as by-product glycerol. Direct use of UCO in diesel engines is a way to maximize its carbon saving potentials. This paper, as part of the EPID (Environmental and Performance Impact of Direct use of used cooking oil in 44 tonne trucks under real world driving conditions) project, presents the life cycle analysis of Straight UCO (SUCO) in terms of CO2 and energy consumption, compared with the UCO biodiesel and petroleum diesel.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shubham Sharma, Himanshu Tyagi, Naveen Kumar, Vikrant Yadav
For the last decade, the lubricant industry has been trying to formulate biodegradable lubricants with technical characteristics superior to those based on petroleum. A renewable resource, mahua oil, is good alternative to mineral oil because of its environmentally friendly, non toxic and readily biodegradable nature. The triacylglycerol structure of mahua oil is amphiphilic in character that makes it an excellent candidate as lubricant and functional fluid. It is also very attractive for industrial applications that have potential for environmental contact through accidental leakage, dripping or generates large quantities of after-use waste materials requiring costly disposal. Vegetable oil in its natural form has limited use as industrial fluids due to poor thermo-oxidation stability, low temperature behavior and other tribochemical degrading processes. Therefore, in the present paper epoxidation and trans-esterification were employed to overcome the mentioned drawbacks of vegetable oil and explore the possibility of modified mahua oil as lubricant because double bonds present in triacylglycerol structure offer sites for additional functionalization This paper compares the lubricating property and mechanical stability of four samples of epoxidized mahua oil, trans-esterified mahua oil, refined mahua oil and a mineral oil based lubricant.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Federico Perini, Dipankar Sahoo, Paul Miles, Rolf Reitz
In this paper, we studied the accuracy of computational modeling of the ignition of a pilot injectionin the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) light-duty optical engine facility, using the physical properties of a cetane/iso-cetane Diesel Primary Reference Fuel (DPRF) mixture and the reaction kinetics of a well-validated mechanism for primary reference fuels. Local fuel-air equivalence ratio measurements from fuel tracer based planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) experiments were used to compare the mixture formation predictions with KIVA-ERC-based simulations. The effects of variations in injection mass from 1 mg to 4 mg, in-cylinder swirl ratio, and near-TDC temperatures on non-combusting mixture preparation were analyzed, to assess the accuracy of the model in capturing average jet behavior, despite its inability to model the non-negligible jet-by-jet variations seen in the experiments. Fired simulations were able to capture well the measured ignitability trends at the different injection conditions tested, but showed some deviations in the minimum temperature needed for robust ignition, pointing out the need for further work to focus on achieving fully comprehensive modeling with detailed chemical kinetics of the DPRF58 mixture and a full engine geometry representation.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yoann Viollet, Junseok Chang, Gautam Kalghatgi
In the context of stringent future emission standards as well as the need to reduce emissions of CO2 on a global scale, the cost of manufacturing engines is increasing. Naphtha has been shown to have beneficial properties for its use as a fuel in the transportation sector. Well to tank CO2 emissions from the production of Naphtha are lower than any other fuel produced in the refinery due to its lower processing requisites. Moreover, under current technology trends the demand for diesel is expected to increase leading to a possible surplus of light fuels in the future. Recent research has demonstrated that significant fuel consumption reduction is possible based on a direct injection gasoline engine system, when a low quality gasoline stream such as Naphtha is used in compression ignition mode. With this fuel, the engine will be at least as efficient and clean as current diesel engines but will be more cost effective (lower injection pressure, HC/CO after-treatment rather than NOx). In a previous publication, it was demonstrated that a 0.5liter single-cylinder DISI engine of a compression ratio (CR) of 12 could be run in CI mode using a heavy cut of Naphtha with a derived cetane number (DCN) of 41.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kazunari Kuwahara, Takuya Tada, Hiroki Tanaka, Takahiro Sako, Masahiro Furutani, Yasuyuki Sakai, Hiromitsu Ando
Abstract The ignition delay times and heat release profiles of CH4, C2H6, C3H8, i-C4H10, and n-C4H10 and dual-component CH4-based blends with these alkanes in air were determined using a detailed chemical kinetic model. The apparent activation energy of C2H6 in the relationship between initial temperature and ignition delay time is higher than those of the other alkanes because OH formation is dominated by H2O2(+M)=OH+OH(+M) from the beginning over a wide range of initial temperatures. The heat release rate of C2H6 is higher than those of the other alkanes in the late stage of ignition delay time because H2O2 is accumulated with a higher concentration and promotes the OH formation rate of H2O2(+M)=OH+OH(+M). These ignition characteristics are reflected in those of CH4/C2H6. In an HCCI engine, misfire and partial combustion occur easily because the heat release rate during the ignition process after low-temperature OH chain branching and also during the ignition process bypassing low-temperature OH chain branching, becomes lower than the rate of decrease in internal energy during the expansion stroke.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ziliang Zheng, PO-I Lee, Amit Shrestha, Tamer Badawy, Ming-Chia Lai, Naeim Henein, Eric Sattler
Surrogates for JP-8 have been developed in the high temperature gas phase environment of gas turbines. In diesel engines, the fuel is introduced in the liquid phase where volatility plays a major role in the formation of the combustible mixture and autoignition reactions that occur at relatively lower temperatures. In this paper, the role of volatility on the combustion of JP-8 and five different surrogate fuels was investigated in the constant volume combustion chamber of the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT). IQT is used to determine the derived cetane number (DCN) of diesel engine fuels according to ASTM D6890. The surrogate fuels were formulated such that their DCNs matched that of JP-8, but with different volatilities. Tests were conducted to investigate the effect of volatility on the autoignition and combustion characteristics of the surrogates using a detailed analysis of the rate of heat release immediately after the start of injection. In addition, the effect of volatility on the spray dynamics was investigated by Schlieren imaging in an optically accessible rapid compression machine (RCM).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Brandon T. Tompkins, Hoseok Song, Timothy J. Jacobs
The first stage of ignition in saturated hydrocarbon fuels is characterized as low temperature heat release (LTHR) or cool flame combustion. LTHR takes place as a series of isomerization reactions at temperatures from 600K to 900K, and is often detectable in HCCI, rapid compression machines, and early injection low temperature combustion (LTC). The experimental investigation presented attempts to determine the behavior of LTHR in late injection low temperature combustion in a medium duty diesel as fuel varies and the influence of such behavior on LTC torque and emissions. Two experiments were performed: the first studies two operating modes (conventional combustion with −8° after top dead center injection timing and 0% EGR and low temperature combustion with 0° after top dead center injection timing and nominally 42% EGR level) with standard petroleum diesel, palm biodiesel, and soy biodiesel; the second studies a sweep of EGR level from 0% to nominally 45% with petroleum diesel and palm biodiesel with a constant injection timing of 0° after top dead center.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael D. Kass, Timothy Theiss, Steve Pawel, James Baustian, Les Wolf, Wolf Koch, Chris Janke
The compatibility of elastomeric materials used in fuel storage and dispensing applications was determined for test fuels representing neat gasoline and gasoline blends containing 10 and 17 vol.% ethanol, and 16 and 24 vol.% isobutanol. The actual test fuel chemistries were based on the aggressive formulations described in SAE J1681 for oxygenated gasoline. Elastomer specimens of fluorocarbon, fluorosilicone, acrylonitrile rubber (NBR), polyurethane, neoprene, styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and silicone were exposed to the test fuels for 4 weeks at 60°C. After measuring the wetted volume and hardness, the specimens were dried for 20 hours at 60°C and then remeasured for volume and hardness. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was also performed to determine the glass transition temperature (Tg). Comparison to the original values showed that all elastomer materials experienced volume expansion and softening when wetted by the test fuels. The fluorocarbons underwent the least amount of swelling (<25 %) while the SBR and silicone samples exhibited the highest level of expansion (>100%).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Narankhuu Jamsran, Ocktaeck Lim, Norimasa Iida
This study has been computationally investigated how the DME autoignition reactivity is affected by EGR and intake-pressure boost over various engine speed. CHEMKIN-PRO was used as a solver and chemical-kinetics mechanism for DME was utilized from Curran's model. We examined first the influence of EGR addition on autoignition reactivity using contribution matrix. Investigations concentrate on the HCCI combustion of DME at wide ranges of engine speeds and intake-pressure boost with EGR rates and their effects on variations of autoignition timings, combustion durations in two-stage combustion process in-detail including reaction rates of dominant reactions involved in autoignition process. The results show that EGR addition increases the combustion duration by lowering reaction rates. It was also found that autoignition timings were very sensitive to boost pressure due to boost pressure enhances the reactivity of intermediate species but combustion durations dominantly depend on the EGR addition.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jing Gong, Jian Cai, Chenglong Tang
Propanol isomers are oxygenated fuels and have higher octane number and energy density compared to methanol and ethanol. In recent years, with the development of fermentation method, propanol isomers have gained more attention as engine additive to reduce the emission and the consumption of traditional fossil fuels. In this study, Hydrocarbon (HC), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM) emission characteristic of propanol isomers/gasoline blends were comparatively investigated at different blending ratios (0, 10, 20, 40 and 100) combined with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in a spark-ignition engine. The number distribution of particulate matter emission is mainly studied in addition to the particulate matter mass distribution. Results show that pure propanol isomers yield significantly different emission characteristics compared to the other blends. With the increase of blending ratio, CO emission shows a decreased trend while unidentified HC emissions are observed except pure propanol isomers.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael D. Kass, Chris Janke, Timothy Theiss, Steve Pawel, James Baustian, Les Wolf, Wolf Koch
The compatibility of plastic materials used in gasoline storage and dispensing applications was determined for test fuels representing neat gasoline (Fuel C), and blends containing 25% ethanol (CE25a), 16% isobutanol (CiBu16a), and 24% isobutanol (CiBu24a). A solubility analysis was also performed and compared to the volume swell results obtained from the test fuel exposures. The plastic specimens were exposed to each test fuel for16 weeks at 60°C. After measuring the wetted volume and hardness, the specimens were dried for 65 hours at 60°C and then remeasured for volume and hardness. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), which measures the storage modulus as a function of temperature, was also performed on the dried specimens to determine the temperature associated with the onset of the glass-to-rubber transition (Tg). For many of the plastic materials, the solubility analysis was able to predict the relative volume swell for each test fuel. Those plastic materials commonly used as permeation barriers exhibited the least amount of volume and hardness change (<5%) when exposed to the test fuels.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yongming Bao, Qing Nian Chan, Sanghoon Kook, Evatt Hawkes
Abstract This study aims to clarify the spray development of ethanol, gasoline and iso-octane fuel, delivered by a multi-hole injector and spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) fuelling system. The focus is on how fuel properties impact temporal and spatial evolution of sprays at realistic ambient conditions. Two optical facilities were used: (1) a constant-flow spray chamber simulating cold-start conditions and (2) a single-cylinder SIDI engine running at normal, warmed-up operating conditions. In these optical facilities, high-speed Mie-scattering imaging is performed to measure penetrations of spray plumes at various injection pressures of 4, 7, 11 and 15 MPa. The results show that the effect of fuel type on the tip penetration length of the sprays depends on the injection conditions and the level of fuel jet atomisation and droplet breakup. It is observed that at 4 MPa injection pressure, the tip penetration length of ethanol sprays is shorter than that of gasoline sprays, likely due to lower injection velocity and increased nozzle loss associated with higher density and increased viscosity of ethanol, respectively.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Federico Brusiani, Gian Marco Bianchi, Stefania Falfari, Angelo Onorati, Tommaso Lucchini, Rita Di Gioia
Abstract Today, multi-hole Diesel injectors can be mainly characterized by three different nozzle hole shapes: cylindrical, k-hole, and ks-hole. The nozzle hole layout plays a direct influence on the injector internal flow field characteristics and, in particular, on the cavitation and turbulence evolution over the hole length. In turn, the changes on the injector internal flow correlated to the nozzle shape produce immediate effects on the emerging spray. In the present paper, the fluid dynamic performance of three different Diesel nozzle hole shapes are evaluated: cylindrical, k-hole, and ks-hole. The ks-hole geometry was experimentally characterized in order to find out its real internal shape. First, the three nozzle shapes were studied by a fully transient CFD multiphase simulation to understand their differences in the internal flow field evolutions. In detail, the attention was focused on the turbulence and cavitation levels at hole exit. The adopted simulation strategy was previously validated against experimental data.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dimitrios Karonis, Despina Chilari, Constantina Manou
The scope of this work is to examine the use of hydroprossed used cooking oils as substitute for automotive diesel fuel. Hydroprocessing is an alternative method for the transformation of vegetable oils into high quality transport fuels, even if the quality of the oils is low, such as used cooking oils. In the present work, the utilization of hydroprocessed used cooking oil (HUCO) as neat fuel was proved to be very difficult, due to its very poor cold flow properties; therefore, mixtures of the HUCO with low quality middle distillates (a low cetane number gasoil and a light cycle oil) were prepared and evaluated. Throughout the process the formed blends were evaluated according to the european standard EN 590. The following points were mainly recorded: The lower density of HUCO was beneficial, permitting the use of poor quality distillates, in specific concentrations, and the high cetane number of HUCO was appreciable, improving the worse behavior of the other components. On the other hand, some downsides of HUCO have been enhanced by blending, with the low quality middle distillates.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daniel Swain, S O Bade Shrestha
Abstract Landfill gas (LFG) is a waste-product resource composed primarily of methane and carbon dioxide that can be collected and used to produce power either by extracting the methane or using the landfill gas directly in an internal combustion engine in what amounts to a net-negative greenhouse gas emission process. The carbon dioxide component of LFG dilutes the fuel and absorbs some of the heat of combustion, but also suppresses knock. A model is developed, using KIVA-4 code, to simulate engine performance at various operating conditions and evaluate the benefits of methane purification and direct use of LFG as a fuel. It was found that landfill gas used directly at higher compression ratios than can be used for pure methane fuel produces higher fuel efficiency than can be achieved using pure methane. Furthermore the study has shown that the fuel efficiency of the engine can be achieved within 5% of that of pure methane fuel for landfill gas, diluted up to 1:1 with carbon dioxide by simply adjusting the spark timing of the engine.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Len Hamilton, Dianne Luning-Prak, Jim Cowart, Andrew McDaniel, Sherry Williams, Richard Leung
A new alternative fuel has been tested in a number of engines and compared to conventional Navy diesel fuel performance using in-cylinder based diagnostics and brake performance comparisons. This new fuel is derived from a Direct Sugar to Hydrocarbon (DSH) process in which sugar and yeast produce a farnesene type hydrocarbon molecule (branched hydrocarbon with multiple double bonds) which is then processed into a moderately branched single alkane molecule (> 98% purity) with a moderately higher cetane number than conventional diesel fuels. This new fuel was extensively characterized and has a lower density, viscosity and bulk modulus as compared to conventional diesel fuel. These physical property differences lead to later Start of Injection times in three diesel engines (AM General GEP, Waukesha CFR and Yanmar). However, due to the increased reactivity of DSH, ignition delay is reduced - faster across most of the speeds and loads tested. While engine operation on the neat form of DSH falls just inside the proposed Navy alternative fuel acceptance criteria at all operating points, it is expected that a 50% DSH and 50% diesel fuel blend will be tested for broader application due to acceptable combustion characteristics in this compression-ignition study.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kai Morganti, Tien Mun Foong, Michael Brear, Gabriel Da Silva, Yi Yang, Frederick Dryer
This paper presents a combined experimental and numerical study of a modified Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine that allows both the Research and Motor octane numbers (RON and MON) of any arbitrary Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) mixture to be determined. The design of the modified engine incorporates modern hardware that enables accurate metering of different LPG mixtures, together with measurement of the in-cylinder pressure, the air-fuel ratio and the engine-out emissions. The modified CFR engine is first used to measure the octane numbers of different LPG mixtures. The measured octane numbers are shown to be similar to the limited data acquired using the now withdrawn Motor (LP) test method (ASTM D2623). The volumetric efficiency, engine-out emissions and combustion efficiency for twelve alternative LPG mixtures are then compared with equivalent data acquired with the standard CFR engine operating on a liquid fuel. Finally, the modified CFR engine is modelled using GT-Power. The full engine model contains empirical sub-models of the intake and exhaust systems, the gas exchange processes, the flame propagation and the in-cylinder heat transfer.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
C. Scott Sluder, Brian H. West, Aron D. Butler, Arvon L. Mitcham, William J. Ruona
During the 1980s, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) incorporated the R factor into fuel economy calculations in order to address concerns about the impacts of test fuel property variations on corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) compliance, which is determined using the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) and Highway Fuel Economy Test (HFET) cycles. The R factor is defined as the ratio of the percent change in fuel economy to the percent change in volumetric heating value for tests conducted using two differing fuels. At the time the R-factor was devised, tests using representative vehicles initially indicated that an appropriate value for the R factor was 0.6. Reassessing the R factor has recently come under renewed interest after EPA's March 2013 proposal to adjust the properties of certification gasoline to contain significant amounts of ethanol. This proposed change will likely result in a significant deviation from the CAFE baseline test fuel heating value, and thus increased importance of the R factor.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Alessandro Montanaro, Marianna Migliaccio, Luigi Allocca, Valentina Fraioli, Seong-Young Lee, Anqi Zhang, Jeffrey Naber
Abstract This paper reports an experimental and numerical investigation on the spatial and temporal liquid- and vapor-phase distributions of diesel fuel spray under engine-like conditions. The high pressure diesel spray was investigated in an optically-accessible constant volume combustion vessel for studying the influence of the k-factor (0 and 1.5) of a single-hole axial-disposed injector (0.100 mm diameter and 10 L/d ratio). Measurements were carried out by a high-speed imaging system capable of acquiring Mie-scattering and schlieren in a nearly simultaneous fashion mode using a high-speed camera and a pulsed-wave LED system. The time resolved pair of schlieren and Mie-scattering images identifies the instantaneous position of both the vapor and liquid phases of the fuel spray, respectively. The studies were performed at three injection pressures (70, 120, and 180 MPa), 23.9 kg/m3 ambient gas density, and 900 K gas temperature in the vessel. The predictive capabilities of the Lib-ICE code, which is a set of applications and libraries for IC engine simulations developed using the OpenFOAM® technology, were evaluated in describing fuel sprays.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 16268