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2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2197
Vignesh Pandian Muthuramalingam, Anders Karlsson
Owing to increased interest in blended fuels for automotive applications, a great deal of understanding is sought for the behavior of multicomponent fuel sprays. This sets a new requirement on spray model since the volatility of the fuel components in a blend can vary substantially. It calls for careful solution to implement the differential evaporation process concerning thermodynamic equilibrium while maintaining a robust solution. This work presents the Volvo Stochastic Blob and Bubble (VSB2) spray model for multicomponent fuels. A direct numerical method is used to calculate the evaporation of multicomponent fuel droplets. The multicomponent fuel model is implemented into OpenFoam CFD code and the case simulated is a constant volume combustion vessel. The CFD code is used to calculate liquid penetration length for surrogate diesel (n-dodecane)-gasoline (iso-octane) blend and the result is compared with experimental data.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2405
Christophe Chaillou, Alexandre Bouet, Arnaud Frobert, Florence Duffour
Fuels from crude oil are the main energy vectors used in the transport sector but these fuels associated to CI engines are nowadays often criticized. Nevertheless, engine and fuel co-research is one of the main leverage to reduce both CO2 footprint and criteria pollutants. CI engines, with gasoline-like fuels, are a promising way for NOx and particulates emission abatement while keeping lower CO2 emission. To introduce a new fuel/engine technology, investigations of pollutants are mandatory. Previous work [1] already studied the behavior of low RON gasoline soot generated with a CI engine. The aim of this paper is to assess the impact of such fuel/engine technology on the HC emissions and on the DOC behavior. HC speciation is performed upstream and downstream DOC. Warm-up and efficiency are also tested for different operating conditions. Then, exothermal capacities are considered to ensure high level of temperature for DPF regeneration.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2268
Zhanming Chen, Long Wang, Tiancong Zhang, Qimeng Duan, Bo Yang
Liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuelled engines have been widely equipped on heavy duty vehicles both for fuel-economic and environmental protection concerns, however, they always suffer from deteriorated combustion performance and flame stability due to relatively low burning velocity of methane for lean mixture. In this paper, experimental study was conducted on a turbo-charged, spark-ignition, lean-burn LNG engine with methanol port injection. The combustion characteristics such as cylinder pressure traces, heat release rate (HRR), mass fraction burned (MFB), ignition delay, centroid of heat release, position of CA50 and CA90, as well as cyclic variation of peak pressure were analysed under light load (BMEP=0.3876MPa) with different methanol substitution rates (MSR=0%, 5.2%, 10.2%, 17.2%). The experimental results show that combustion phase advanced with increment of MSR due to faster burning velocity of methanol.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2223
Vikram Singh, Per Tunestal, Martin Tuner
In recent years, stricter regulations on emissions and higher demands for more fuel efficient vehicles have led to a greater focus on increasing the efficiency of the internal combustion engine. Nowadays, there is increasing interest in the recovery of waste heat from different engine sources such as the coolant and exhaust gases using, for example, a Rankine cycle. In diesel engines 15% to 30% of the energy from the fuel can be lost to the coolant and hence, does not contribute to producing work on the piston. This paper looks at reducing the heat losses to the coolant by increasing coolant temperatures within a single cylinder Scania D13 engine and studying the effects of this on the energy balance within the engine as well as the combustion characteristics. To do this, a GT Power model was first validated against experimental data from the engine.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2369
Prakash Arunachalam, Martin Tuner, Per Tunestal, Marcus Thern
Humid air motor (HAM) is an engine operated with humidified inlet charge. System simulations study on HAM showed the waste heat recovery potential over a conventional system. An HAM setup was constructed, to comprehend the potential benefits in real-time, the HAM setup was built around a 13-litre six cylinder Volvo diesel engine. The HAM engine process is explained in detail in this paper. Emission analysis is also performed for all three modes of operation. The experiments were carried out at part load operating point of the engine to understand the effects of humidified charge on combustion, efficiency, and emissions. Experiments were conducted without EGR, with EGR, and with humidified inlet charge. These three modes of operation provided the potential benefits of each system. Exhaust heat was used for partial humidification process. Results show that HAM operation, without compromising on efficiency, reduces NOx and soot significantly over the engine operated without EGR.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2422
Na Li, Fenlian Huang, Yuhua Bi, Yueqiang Xu, Lizhong Shen, Dewen Jia
The assembly of connecting rod bearing and crankpin is a key friction pair which offers an important guarantee for stable operation of diesel engine. Specific to the non-road 2-cylinder diesel engine developed independently and based on the theory of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication as well as multi-body dynamics, this paper establishes a multi-body dynamics model for connecting rod bearing of the 2D25 horizontal diesel engine and makes a research on the influence of bearing width, bearing clearance, and oil inlet position and diameter upon lubrication of connecting rod bearing, taking into consideration that of the surface appearance of bearing bush and the elastic deformation of bearing bush and axle journal upon the same. Research results show that bearing width and bearing clearance are the major factors that influence lubrication characteristics of connecting rod bearing while oil inlet position and diameter only have a small influence on such characteristics.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2382
Tul Suthiprasert, Sirichai Jirawongnuson, Ekathai Wirojsakunchai, Tanet Aroonsrisopon, Krisada Wannatong, Atsawin Salee
One of the most important challenges on implementing Diesel Dual Fuel (DDF) engine into the vast market is CH4 emission in its exhaust. This is due to the fact that CH4 is hard to oxidize at lower temperature environment of DDF exhaust comparing to that of conventional or bi-fuel engines. In addition, another parameter such as exhaust flow rate, specie concentration, especially CO, C3H8, and water have tremendous impact on Diesel Oxidation Catalyst performance on reducing CH4. Combining of all these factors together, a study of CH4 reduction is a major research problems that researchers around the world are keen to gain more fundamental understandings. In this work, a new CH4 kinetic model, which is based on Langmuir Hinshelwood mechanism, including CO, C3H8, and water is implemented into 1-D and 3-D Catalytic Converter models. The CH4 kinetic model is calibrated with the experiment by using synthetic exhaust gas generator.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2409
Erbao Zhang, Yinchun Gong, Jun Deng, Zongjie Hu, Chuanqian Jiang, Zhijun Wu, Liguang Li
Hydrogen fuel will be a potential energy source for internal combustion engines in the future. A promising approach for improving the efficiency and achieving zero-emission is to employ the noble gas argon. The work of this paper aimed at investigating the cyclic variation of argon power cycle engine with fuel of hydrogen. The engine has been modified based on a 0.4 L, one signal cylinder diesel engine into spark ignition engine with a port fuel injection system. The influencing factors on the cyclic variation in the argon power cycle engine with fuel of hydrogen, such as type of working gas, ignition timing, compression ratio (5.6, 6.9, and 7.35), and CO2 fraction in the mixture of argon and oxygen, were test in this study. The results show that compared to air, higher indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) and better engine operation stability could be achieved under an atmosphere of argon and oxygen.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2354
Dave Horstman, John Sparrow
Due to recent legislation on CO2 emissions, Heavy Duty OEM’s and their suppliers have had an increased interest in improving vehicle fuel economy. Many aspects are being investigated including vehicle aerodynamics, tire rolling resistance, waste heat recovery, engine fuel efficiency, and many others. Crankcase lubricants offer a cost-effective mechanism to reduce engine friction and increase engine fuel efficiency. The potential gains realized by optimized fuel-efficient lubricants are relatively small, on the order of 1-3%. Therefore, in order to develop these lubricants, formulators must have a robust, repeatable, and realistic test method for differentiation. To address this need, Intertek has been involved with developing fuel economy tests for many years, starting with what became the Sequence VI test for passenger car lubricants in the early 1990’s. Most recently, Intertek has helped develop different FE programs to support the MD and HD diesel industry.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2358
Michael P Gahagan
The automotive transmission market has seen an increase in the number of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), and forecasts predict additional growth. In HEVs, the hybrid drivetrain hardware can combine electric motor, clutches, gearbox, electro-hydraulics and the control unit. In HEV hardware the transmission fluid can be designed to be in contact with an integrated electric motor. One transmission type well-suited to such hybridization is the increasingly utilized dual clutch transmission (DCT), where a lubricating fluid is in contact with the complete motor assembly as well as the DCT driveline architecture. This includes its electrics, and therefore raises questions around the suitability of standard transmission fluids in such an application. This therefore drives the need for further understanding of fluid electrical properties in addition to the more usually studied engineering hardware electrical properties.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2357
Mark Devlin, Jeffrey Guevremont, Chip Hewette, Marc Ingram, Grant Pollard, William Wyatt
Different mechanical components in a vehicle can be made from different types of steel and can even contain different steel alloys or coatings. Lubricant technology is needed to prevent wear and control friction on all of these different surfaces. Phosphorus compounds are the key additives that are used to control wear and they do this by forming tribofilms on surfaces. It has been shown that different operating conditions (pressures and loads) can influence the formation of tribofilms formed by different anti-wear additives. The effect of surface metallurgy and morphology on tribofilm formation is described in this paper. Our results show that additive technology can form proper tribofilms on various surfaces and the right combination of additives can be found for current and future surfaces.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2361
David R. Lancaster
The auto industry today is a global industry that must conform to local emissions and fuel consumption regulation in virtually all markets. These regulations apply different methodologies to different test cycles. This variation in methodologies and test cycles makes direct comparison of standards difficult. This paper compares the NEDC, WLTC and US EPA driving cycles by examining the tractive energy requirements of vehicles from the 2017 US fleet on each of the cycles. In addition, the mass and footprint data from those vehicles are used to compute the CO2 standards for each vehicle under European, US and Chinese standards.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2326
Ang Li, Zhiwei Deng, Lei Zhu, Zhen Huang
In the present study a novel surrogate model for biodiesel including methyl decanoate (MD) and methyl crotonate (MC) was proposed and validated. In the binary mixture of surrogate fuel, MD was chosen to represent saturated methyl esters, which exhibited great low-temperature reactivity with typical negative temperature-coefficient (NTC) behavior and MC represented unsaturated components in real biodiesel, which was mainly responsible for soot formation and evolution. The proportion of MD and MC was determined by matching the characteristics such as derived cetane number (DCN), molecular weight (MW), atom number, H/C ratio and unsaturated degree. All of the criterions were calculated by the least square principles and the calculated surrogate of biodiesel was comprised of 92% MD and 8% MC in mole fraction. Furthermore, detailed kinetic model of the surrogate fuel was constructed and developed with modifications, which was composed of 2918 species and 9164 reactions.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2347
Kazushi Tamura, Kenji Sunahara, Motoharu Ishikawa, Masashi Mizukami, Kazue Kurihara
Modern lubricants such as fuel economy engine oils control friction through tribofilms formed by functional additives mixture. Although many cases on synergistic or antagonistic effects of additives on friction have been reported, their mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we found that some of the detergent additives with metallic soap reduced friction synergistically with molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC), which is a widely-used friction modifier additive that forms slippery tribofilm, while detergents themselves increased friction without MoDTC. These results indicate that detergents enhance friction-induced formation of slippery tribofilms by MoDTC. To reveal this mechanism, using surface force apparatus equipped with a resonance shear measurement system (SFA-RSM), we examined mechanical properties of detergent-containing oils confined at single-asperity contact.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2190
Alessandro D'Adamo, Marco Del Pecchia, Sebastiano Breda, Fabio Berni, Stefano Fontanesi, Jens Prager
CFD simulations of reacting flows are fundamental investigation tools used to predict combustion behaviour and pollutants formation in modern spark-ignition internal combustion engines. Most of the flamelet-based combustion models adopted in current simulations use the fuel/air/residual laminar flame speed as a background to predict the turbulent flame speed. This in turn is a fundamental requirement to model the effective burn rate. The consolidated approach in engine combustion simulations relies on the adoption of empirical correlations for laminar flame speed, which are derived from fitting activity of combustion experiments. However, these last are conducted at largely different pressure and temperature ranges from those encountered in engines: for this reason, correlation extrapolation at engine conditions is inevitably accepted and relevant differences between proposed correlations emerge even for the same fuel and conditions.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2236
Mateos Kassa, Carrie Hall, Fabien Vidal-Naquet, Thomas Leroy
In this study, the impact of the intake valve timing on knock propensity is investigated on a dual-fuel SI engine leveraging a low octane fuel and a high octane fuel to adjust the fuel mixture’s octane rating (RON) based on operating point. Variations in the intake valve timing have a direct impact on residual gases concentration due to valve overlap and changes in the compression pressure and temperature due to variations of the effective compression ratio. In this study, it is shown that the fuel RON requirement for a non-knocking condition at a fixed operating point can vary significantly solely due to variations of the intake valve timing. The fuel RON requirement at 2000 rpm and 6 bar BMEP ranges between 80 to 90 as a function of VVT, and between 98 to 104 at 2000 rpm and 14 bar BMEP.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2186
Lukas Urban, Michael Grill, Sebastian Hann, Michael Bargende
The development of IC engines is a complex process where 0D/1D-simulation tools became more important in the past few years. Different designs can be investigated in very early stages of the development process without the expensive buildup of prototypes and it is possible to get reliable results with passable effort. The quality of the overall simulation results depends on the quality of the sub-models. Simulation of the combustion process in natural-gas SI engines relies on predictive models for burn rates and knock. Existing knock models for gasoline fuels are based on a time-integrated ignition delay, using a fitted Arrhenius equation. Within a research project an enhanced knock-model approach for methane based fuels was developed. Chemical kinetics models were used to calculate the auto-ignition times for various temperatures, pressures and air-fuel-ratios (AFR).
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2350
Chalermwut Wongtaewan, Umaporn Wongjareonpanit, Komkrit Sivara, Ken Hashimoto, Yoichiro Nakamura
In Thailand, most heavy-duty trucks were equipped with diesel engine, while a small portion was equipped with compressed natural gas (CNG) engine. However, in the past few years the number of CNG fuel trucks in Thailand has increased significantly due to the cheaper cost of CNG. In general, the emphasis of heavy-duty diesel engine oil performance is on piston cleanliness and soot handling properties, while thermal and anti-oxidation properties are most critical for CNG engine oil performance. For truck fleet owners who operate both types of trucks, using the inappropriate oil that is not fit-for-purpose can adversely affect engine performance and reduce engine service lifespan under prolonged usage. A novel CNG/diesel engine oil has developed by PTT to meet both JASO DH-2 performance for heavy-duty diesel engine oils and OEM requirements for CNG engine oils.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2247
Wenbin Zhang, Haichun ding, Shijin Shuai, Bin Zheng, Alex Cantlay, Vinod Natarajan, Zhang Song ZHAN, Yunping Pu
Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines have been developed rapidly in recent years, driven by stringent legislative requirements on vehicle fuel efficiency and emissions. However, one challenge facing GDI is the formation of particulate emissions, particularly with the presence of injector tip deposits. The Chinese market features some gasoline fuels that contain no detergent additives and are prone to deposit formation, which can affect engine performance and emissions. The use of detergent additives to mitigate the formation of injector deposits in a GDI engine was investigated in this study by testing a 1.5L turbocharged GDI engine available in the Chinese market. The engine was operated both on base gasoline and on gasoline dosed with detergent additives to evaluate the effect on injector deposit formation and engine performance and emissions.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2333
Marcos Gutierrez, Andres Castillo, Juan Iniguez, Gorky Reyes
The aim for cleaner and more efficient energy from the internal combustion engines makes necessary to ensure the conditions for the exploitation of alternative fuels. The vibrations on engines are primarily understood as effects of mechanical failures, but the engine vibration is subject of the fuel combustion effects too. This effects will depend on the fuel type and its capacity to be burned. The vibrations of a diesel engine were measured and analyzed with a frequency spectrum calculated with Fast Fourier Transforms. The engine was operated with a fuel blend from 10 % recycled lubricating oil with 90% diesel as well as only diesel. It was found the engine operation with this fuel blend has a lower vibration level in comparison with the use of pure diesel. The goal of this research is to determine the properties of the fuel blend, which provides more stability to the engine by means of vibrations reduction.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2193
Andreas Nygren, Anders Karlsson
When developing new combustion concepts, CFD simulations is a powerful tool. The modeling of spray formation is a challenging but important part when it comes to CFD modelling of non-premixed combustion. There is a large difference in the accuracy and robustness among different spray models and their implementation in different CFD codes. In the work presented in this paper a spray model, designated as VSB2 has been implemented in OpenFOAM. VSB2 differ from traditional spray models by replacing the Lagrangian parcels with stochastic blobs. The stochastic blobs consists of a droplet size distribution rather than equal sized droplets, as is the case with the traditional parcel. The VSB2 model has previously been thoroughly validated for spray formation and combustion of n-heptane. The aim of this study was to validate the VSB2 spray model for ethanol spray formation and combustion as a step in modelling dual-fuel combustion with alcohol and diesel.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2415
Valery Dunaevsky
The film thickness–roughness ratio Λ has been used since the mid-1960s as a criterion for the lubrication conditions in rolling bearings. However, due to an assumed Gaussian distribution of the roughness height amplitudes of the functional surfaces of rolling bearings and other unsubstantiated assumptions concerning the mechanisms of contact interaction, concerns have arisen about the representability of Λ in terms of lubrication. In this study, a more objective Λ-type ratio that does not depend on the law of roughness height distribution and the peculiarities of contact mechanics is introduced and defined as Λz. The relevant range of the new Λ ratio, which identifies a full-film lubrication, is lower than that of its conventional counterpart, and it coincides directionally with contemporary theoretical and experimental results. The study exhibits unique profilometric data of the functional surfaces of the roller bearings, produced by the major bearing manufacturers.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2226
Edward S. Richardson, Michael J. Gill, Mathew Middleton, Bruno S. Soriano
Cylinder deactivation enables improvements in fuel economy in spark-ignition engines by reducing pumping losses during part load operation. The efficiency benefits of a new intake valve system that enables cycle-by-cycle deactivation of different cylinders is investigated in this study. The system minimises the need for throttling by varying the fraction of strokes that are deactivated in order to vary engine output. The intake valve system involves two intake valves in series, with a fast solenoid-actuated valve upstream of a conventional cam-actuated intake valve. Compared to conventional cam-actuated valves, the new valve system has potential to achieve very rapid closing rates with a high degree of flexibility in respect of the timing of inlet valve closure. The fuel economy benefits provided by a number of valve control strategies are evaluated using a one-dimensional modelling approach, considering a vehicle following the New European Drive Cycle.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2194
Mateusz Pucilowski, Mehdi Jangi, Sam Shamun, Martin Tuner, Xue-Song Bai
Experimental heavy-duty DICI methanol engine is studied under high compression ratio conditions (CR=27). The fuel is injected with common-rail injector close to the top-dead-center (TDC) position with three different injector pressures, leading to a spray formation causing a so called wall-wetting. Numerical simulations using RANS/LPT/WSR and PDF models are employed to investigate the local conditions of the injection and combustion process. The CFD results are compared with the pressure trace and emissions from the metal engine experiment. It is shown that the simulations captured the same trend of increased amount of unburned hydrocarbons at higher injection pressures. Moreover, the intake temperature adjustments were required to correctly capture the ignition delay time when WSR model was used, whereas with the PDF method such adjustments were not needed.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2232
Liming Cao, Ho Teng, Ruigang Miao, Xuwei Luo, Tingjun Hu, Xianlong Huang
Atkinson cycle realized with a late intake valve closing (LIVC) and Miller cycle achieved with an early intake valve closing (EIVC) have been recognized as effective approaches for improving the gasoline engine fuel economy. In both Atkinson and Miller cycles, the engine can be designed with a higher geometric compression ratio for increasing the expansion work and the effective compression ratio is governed by the intake valve close (IVC) timing for the knock control. Duration of the intake event and IVC timing affect not only the pumping loss during the gas exchange, but also have strong influences on the friction torques of the intake cams and the turbulence intensities for the in-cylinder charge motion. The latter governs duration of combustion and EGR tolerance, both of which have impacts on the engine thermal efficiency.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2245
Xianlin Ouyang, Ho Teng, Xiaochun zeng, Xuwei Luo, Tingjun Hu, Xianlong Huang, Jiankun Luo, Yongli Zhou
Atkinson cycle realized with a late intake valve closing (LIVC) and Miller cycle achieved with an early intake valve closing (EIVC) have been recognized as effective approaches for improving the gasoline engine fuel economy. In both Atkinson and Miller cycles, the engine can be designed with a higher geometric compression ratio for increasing the expansion work and the effective compression ratio is governed by the intake valve close (IVC) timing for the knock control. Duration of the intake event and IVC timing affect not only the pumping loss during the gas exchange, but also have strong influences on the friction torques of the intake cams and the turbulence intensities for the in-cylinder charge motion. The latter governs duration of combustion and EGR tolerance, both of which have impacts on the engine thermal efficiency.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2355
Yungwan Kwak, Christopher Cleveland
Due to its simplicity and fuel economy benefit, continuously variable transmission (CVT) technology has gained a lot of attention in recent years. Market penetration of CVT technology is increasing rapidly compared to step-type automatic transmission technology. OEMs, Tier 1 suppliers, and lubricant suppliers are working to further improve the fuel economy benefit of CVTs. As a lubricant supplier, Afton Chemical Corporation has dedicated significant resources to understand the effects of fluid properties on CVT fuel economy. We have formulated fluids that had KV100 ranges from 3 cSt to 8 cSt with various types and viscosities of base oils. Wide ranges of viscosity indexes, steel-on-steel friction, and other properties were tested. Full vehicle fuel economy tests revealed that there was more than 3% overall variation compared to a reference fluid. Tests were performed in a temperature controlled environment with a robotic driver.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2366
Wenzheng Xia, Yi Zheng, Xiaokun He, Dongxia Yang, Huifang Shao, Joesph Remias, Joseph Roos, Yinhui Wang
Because of the increased use of gasoline direct engine (GDI) in automobile industry, there is a significant need to control particulates from GDI engines based on emission regulations. One potential technical approach is the utilization of a gasoline particulate filter (GPF). The successful adoption of this emission control technology needs to take many aspects into consideration and requires a system approach for optimization. This study conducted research to investigate the impact of vehicle driving cycles, fuel properties, catalyst coating on the performance of GPF. It was found that driving cycle has significant impact on particulate emission. Fuel quality still plays a role in particulate emissions, and can affect the GPF performance. Catalyzed GPF is preferred for soot regeneration, especially for the case that the vehicle operation is dominated by congested city driving condition, i.e. low operating temperatures. The details of the study are presented in the paper.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 20780

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