Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 181 to 210 of 16427
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0171
Quansheng Zhang, Yan Meng, Christopher Greiner, Ciro Soto, William Schwartz, Mark Jennings
Abstract In this paper, the tradeoff relationship between the Air Conditioning (A/C) system performance and vehicle fuel economy for a hybrid electric vehicle during the SC03 drive cycle is presented. First, an A/C system model was integrated into Ford’s HEV simulation environment. Then, a system-level sensitivity study was performed on a stand-alone A/C system simulator, by formulating a static optimization problem which minimizes the total energy use of actuators, and maintains an identical cooling capacity. Afterwards, a vehicle-level sensitivity study was conducted with all controllers incorporated in sensitivity analysis software, under three types of formulations of cooling capacity constraints. Finally, the common observation from both studies, that the compressor speed dominates the cooling capacity and the EDF fan has a marginal influence, is explained using the thermodynamics of a vapor compression cycle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0181
Benny Johnson William, Agathaman Selvaraj, Manjeet Singh Rammurthy, Manikandan Rajaraman, V. Srinivasa Chandra
Abstract The modern day automobile customers’ expectations are sky-high. The automotive manufacturers need to provide sophisticated, cost-effective comfort to stay in this competitive world. Air conditioning is one of the major features which provides a better comfort but also adds up to the increase in operating fuel cost of vehicle. According to the sources the efficiency of internal combustion engine is 30% and 70% of energy is wasted to atmosphere. The current Air conditioners in automobiles use Vapour compression system (VCS) which utilizes a portion of shaft power of the engine at its input; this in turn reduces the brake power output and increases the specific fuel consumption (SFC) of the engine. With the current depletion rate of fossil fuels, it is necessary to conserve the available resources and use it effectively which also contributes to maintain a good balance in greenhouse effect thus protecting the environment.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0811
John Williams, Heather D. Hamje, David J. Rickeard, Andreas Kolbeck, Kalle Lehto, Elena Rebesco, Walter Mirabella, Carole A. Bontoft, Maria Dolores Cardenas
Abstract Research Octane Number (RON) and Motor Octane Number (MON) are used to describe gasoline combustion which describe antiknock performance under different conditions. Recent literature suggests that MON is less important than RON in modern cars and a relaxation in the MON specification could improve vehicle performance. At the same time, for the same octane number change, increasing RON appears to provide more benefit to engine power and acceleration than reducing MON. Some workers have advocated the use of an octane index (OI) which incorporates both parameters instead of either RON or MON to give an indication of gasoline knock resistance. Previous Concawe work investigated the effect of RON and MON on the power and acceleration performance of two Euro 4 gasoline passenger cars during an especially-designed acceleration test cycle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1281
Rajesh Kumar, Olivier Laget, Guillaume Pilla, Guillaume Bourhis, Roland Dauphin, Loic de Francqueville, Jean-Pascal Solari
Abstract Reduction of CO2 emissions is becoming one of the great challenges for future gasoline engines. The aim of the current research program (OOD: Octane On Demand) is to use the octane number as a tuning parameter to simultaneously make the engine more efficient and reduce CO2 emissions. The idea is to prevent knock occurrence by adapting the fuel RON injected in the combustion chamber. Thus, the engine cycle efficiency is increased by keeping combustion phasing at its optimum. This is achieved by a dual fuel injection strategy, involving a low-RON base fuel (Naphtha or Low RON cost effective fuel) and a high-RON octane booster (ethanol). The ratio of fuel quantity on each injector is adapted at each engine cycle to fit the RON requirement as a function of engine operating conditions. A first part of the project, described in [18], was dedicated to the understanding of mixture preparation resulting from different dual-fuel injection strategies.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0121
Zhijia Yang, Jesus PradoGonjal, Matthew Phillips, Song Lan, Anthony Powell, Paz Vaqueiro, Min Gao, Richard Stobart, Rui Chen
Abstract Thermoelectric generator (TEG) has received more and more attention in its application in the harvesting of waste thermal energy in automotive engines. Even though the commercial Bismuth Telluride thermoelectric material only have 5% efficiency and 250°C hot side temperature limit, it is possible to generate peak 1kW electrical energy from a heavy-duty engine. If being equipped with 500W TEG, a passenger car has potential to save more than 2% fuel consumption and hence CO2 emission reduction. TEG has advantages of compact and motionless parts over other thermal harvest technologies such as Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) and Turbo-Compound (TC). Intense research works are being carried on improving the thermal efficiency of the thermoelectric materials and increasing the hot side temperature limit. Future thermoelectric modules are expected to have 10% to 20% efficiency and over 500°C hot side temperature limit.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0855
Rakesh Kale, R. Banerjee
Abstract Use of bio fuels in a regular spark ignition engine is becoming common in several countries to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and overall generation of green house emissions. Alcohols such as methanol and ethanol are blended with gasoline when SI engines are considered. Advanced direct injection stratified charge engine technology has gained lot of interest due to its merits over conventional port fuel injection engine. Since the technology is significantly spray controlled, fuel injection and spray behavior under different thermodynamic conditions plays a very important role in successful engine operation. Present work was carried out to understand the spray behavior of isooctane and three alcohols under engine-like pressure and temperature conditions. Selected alcohols were ethanol, isobutanol and n-butanol. A six holes solenoid injector was used for this study.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0865
Mark Walls, Michael Joo, Michael Ross
Abstract Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is commonly known as autogas when used as a fuel for internal combustion engines. In North America, autogas primarily consists of propane, but can contain small amounts of butane, methane and propylene. Autogas is not a new fuel for internal combustion engines, but as engine technology evolves, the properties of autogas can be utilized to improve engine and vehicle efficiency. With support from the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) performed testing to quantify efficiency differences with liquid autogas direct injection in a modern downsized and boosted direct-injected engine using the production gasoline fuel injection hardware. Engine dynamometer testing demonstrated that autogas produced similar performance characteristics to gasoline at part load, but could be used to improve brake thermal efficiency at loads above 9 bar Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0869
Job Immanuel Encarnacion, Edwin Quiros
Abstract The Philippine Biofuels Act of 2006 (RA 9367) requires commercial diesel fuel to be mixed with Coconut Methyl Ester (CME) in accordance with the Philippine Clean Air Act of 1999 (RA 8749). As of 2015, the blend percentage is at 2% CME v/v, contrary to the scheduled 5% as stipulated in the biofuels act. Researches done locally showing the performance and emissions of CME-fueled engines are few and thus the basis for the CME percentage increase is still questionable and hampers the drive for the further implementation of the policy. The study investigates the influence of varying percentages of CME blends (2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% v/v) to the performance and emissions of a heavy-duty turbocharged common rail direct injection (CRDI) engine. The engine is run at steady state at partial load (50Nm and 250 Nm) and at near full load (500Nm). Each run is set at three pedal positions, α (25%, 50% and 60%), controlled directly from the engine control unit.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0866
Edwin N. Quiros, Karl B.N. Vergel, Ernesto B. Abaya
Abstract This paper presents a preliminary study to estimate, using on-road and laboratory tests, the mileage range of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as an alternative fuel for diesel-fed public utility jeepneys in the Philippines. Data from the study would be used by the Philippine Department of Energy to formulate and implement alternative fuel programs for public transport. On-road fuel consumption, load factor, and GPS speed data from selected in-use LPG and diesel jeepneys plying a chosen urban route were gathered to develop corresponding drive cycles for chassis dynamometer testing at 100% load factor were conducted to estimate an upper limit for fuel consumption. Measured on-road diesel jeepney mileage was about 6.7 km/liter at 63.5% load factor while that for LPG jeepney was 3.8-4.2 km/liter at 59.8% load factor. Drive cycle tests yielded 5.2 km/liter for diesel and 2.6-3.1 km/liter for LPG.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0873
Senthilkumar Masimalai, Jai Kumar Mayakrishnan, Natraj Ganesan
Abstract This paper presents a comprehensive study on using MO (Mahua oil) as fuel effectively in a diesel engine by adopting emulsification and TBC (Thermal Barrier Coating) techniques. A mono cylinder diesel engine was used for the study. Initially trials were made on the engine using neat diesel (ND), Neat Mahua oil (NMO) as fuels. In the second phase, NMO was converted into its stable emulsion (called as MOE) and tested in the engine. Finally thermal barrier coating of 0.2 mm was made on the piston, valves and cylinder head of the engine using the ceramic power of Al2O3 and the engine was tested using NMO and MOE as fuels in the TBC engine. Results indicated improvement in BTE (brake thermal efficiency) with MOE as compared to NMO mainly at high power outputs in the unmodified engine. The maximum BTE was found as 31.5% with ND, 27.2% with NMO and 30.4% with MOE at the peak power output.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0263
Krishnaraj Udayachalam, Manan Trivedi, Ziliang Zheng, Amit Shrestha, Naeim Henein
Abstract SASOL IPK is a low cetane number synthetic fuel formed from coal by the Fischer-Tropsch process which can be used as an extender to JP8, currently used in military ground vehicles. This paper presents two surrogates developed considering the following criteria: (a) availability of kinetic combustion models for each component, (b) smallest number of components to reduce computation time and cost, (c) matching the following properties of target fuel DCN, distillation curve, density, LHV, MW and H/C ratio. The autoignition and combustion characteristics of the surrogates were validated in IQT according to ASTM D6890-10a. Surrogate formulation strategy involves an equation to calculate DCN of the surrogate mixture from the DCN of each component. The linear equation commonly used for such calculations was modified to include a multiplier, based on regression analysis, for each component to produces DCN values that agree well with the measured DCN in the IQT.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0269
Doohyun Kim, Jason Martz, Angela Violi
Abstract The ignition delay time for direct injection compression ignition engines is determined by complex physical and chemical phenomena that prepare the injected liquid fuel for gas phase ignition. In this work, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a reacting spray within a constant volume spray chamber are conducted to investigate the relative importance of liquid fuel physical properties and oxidation chemistry on the ignition delay time. The simulations use multi-component surrogates that emulate the physical and chemical properties of petroleum-derived (Jet-A) and natural-gas-derived (S-8) jet fuels. Results from numerical experiments isolating the fuel physical property and chemistry effects show that fuel chemistry is significantly more important to ignition delay than fuel physical properties under the conditions studied.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0462
Marcel Meuwissen, Jippe Van Ruiten, Thijs Besseling, Robbert van Sluijs, Maik Broda, Brian Pearce, Fenton I. O'Shea
Abstract Fuel economy improvement efforts in engines have focused on reducing parasitic losses. This paper addresses the friction losses in the valve train chain drive system where about half of the losses is caused by the chain sliding on plastic guide and tensioner arm faces (Figure 1). Efforts have been made to reduce these friction losses by optimizing the chain link profile, the geometry of the guide and tensioner arm rails, and developments towards low friction materials. This paper describes the approach taken for the development of new low-friction chain tensioner arm plastic materials. The approach is characterized by building an understanding of the friction mechanisms and identifying the most critical material’s properties. A lab-scale test is used for a first assessment of the friction performance of materials. The correlation between this lab-scale test and the actual chain-on-tensioner arm application is discussed.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0546
Sebastiano Breda, Alessandro D'Adamo, Stefano Fontanesi, Fabrizio D'Orrico, Adrian Irimescu, Simona Merola, Nicola Giovannoni
Abstract Conventional fossil fuels are more and more regulated in terms of both engine-out emissions and fuel consumption. Moreover, oil price and political instabilities in oil-producer countries are pushing towards the use of alternative fuels compatible with the existing units. N-Butanol is an attractive candidate as conventional gasoline replacement, given its ease of production from bio-mass and key physico-chemical properties similar to their gasoline counterpart. A comparison in terms of combustion behavior of gasoline and n-Butanol is here presented by means of experiments and 3D-CFD simulations. The fuels are tested on a single-cylinder direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) unit with an optically accessible flat piston. The analysis is carried out at stoichiometric undiluted condition and lean-diluted mixture for both pure fuels.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0687
Patrick Haenel, Henning Kleeberg, Rob de Bruijn, Dean Tomazic
Abstract Modern combustion engines must meet increasingly higher requirements concerning emission standards, fuel economy, performance characteristics and comfort. Especially fuel consumption and the related CO2 emissions were moved into public focus within the last years. One possibility to meet those requirements is downsizing. Engine downsizing is intended to achieve a reduction of fuel consumption through measures that allow reducing displacement while simultaneously keeping or increasing power and torque output. However, to reach that goal, downsized engines need high brake mean effective pressure levels which are well in excess of 20bar. When targeting these high output levels at low engine speeds, undesired combustion events with high cylinder peak pressures can occur that can severely damage the engine. These phenomena, typically called low speed pre-ignition (LSPI), set currently an undesired limit to downsizing.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0799
Arjun Prakash, Chongming Wang, Andreas Janssen, Allen Aradi, Roger Cracknell
Modern spark ignition engines can take advantage of better fuel octane quality either towards improving acceleration performance or fuel economy via an active ignition management system. Higher fuel octane allows for spark timing advance and consequently higher torque output and higher engine efficiency. Additionally, engines can be designed with higher compression ratios if a higher anti-knock quality fuel is used. Due to historical reasons, Research Octane (RON) and Motor Octane Number (MON) are the metrics used to characterize the anti-knock quality of a fuel. The test conditions used to compute RON and MON correlated well with those in older engines designed about 20 years ago. But the correlation has drifted considerably in the recent past due to advances in engine infrastructures mainly governed by stringent fuel economy and emission standards.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0800
Varun Gauba, Tushar Bera, Jannik Reitz, Gregory Hansen, Peter Lee, Craig Wileman, Edward Nelson
Piston ring and liner wear measurements and analyses were performed in a production 3.6L V6 gasoline engine with radiolabelled engine parts. Three isotopes were generated: one in the engine liner using surface layer activation; one each in the top ring face and top ring side using bulk activation. Real-time wear measurements and subsequent rates of these three surfaces were captured using the radioactive decay of the isotopes into the engine oiling system. In addition, surface roughness and wear profile measurements were carried out using white light interferometry. The results from Phase I provided insights on evolution of wear and wear rates in critical engine components in a gasoline engine. Phase II will extend this work further and focus on evaluating the fuel additive effects on engine wear.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0798
Nicholas J. Rounthwaite, Rod Williams, Catriona McGivery, Jun Jiang, Finn Giulliani, Ben Britton
Abstract Modern diesel passenger car technology continues to develop rapidly in response to demanding emissions, performance, refinement, cost and fuel efficiency requirements. This has included the implementation of high pressure common rail fuel systems employing high precision injectors with complex injection strategies, higher hydraulic efficiency injector nozzles and in some cases <100µm nozzle hole diameters. With the trend towards lower diameter diesel injector nozzle holes and reduced cleaning through cavitation with higher hydraulic efficiency nozzles, it is increasingly important to focus on understanding the mechanism of diesel injector nozzle deposit formation and growth. In this study such deposits were analysed by cross-sectioning the diesel injector along the length of the nozzle hole enabling in-depth analysis of deposit morphology and composition change from the inlet to the outlet, using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0808
Sebastian Henkel, Yannis Hardalupas, Alexander Taylor, Christopher Conifer, Roger Cracknell, Tor Kit Goh, Paul-Benjamin Reinicke, Marc Sens, Michael Rieß
Abstract In Gasoline Direct Injection engines, direct exposure of the injector to the flame can cause combustion products to accumulate on the nozzle, which can result in increased particulate emissions. This research observes the impact of injector fouling on particulate emissions and the associated injector spray pattern and shows how both can be reversed by utilising fuel detergency. For this purpose multi-hole injectors were deliberately fouled in a four-cylinder test engine with two different base fuels. During a four hour injector fouling cycle particulate numbers (PN) increased by up to two orders of magnitude. The drift could be reversed by switching to a fuel blend that contained a detergent additive. In addition, it was possible to completely avoid any PN increase, when the detergent containing fuel was used from the beginning of the test. Microscopy showed that increased injector fouling coincided with increased particulate emissions.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0807
Stefan de Goede, Robert Barbour, Adrian Velaers, Brian Sword, Daniel Burton, Konrad Mokheseng
Abstract Internal diesel injector deposits (IDID) are now a well understood phenomenon and a standard test procedure has been developed and partially approved by the Coordinating European Council (CEC). The engine test procedure has been approved for simulation of sodium soap deposits by dosing the test fuel with a sodium salt and dodecenyl succinic acid (DDSA), whilst amide lacquer deposits simulation by dosing the test fuel with a low molecular weight (MWt) polyisobutylene succinimide (PIBSI) is still under development. The solubility of these contaminants in the base fuel should be reasonably constant to achieve consistent results. With the introduction of diesel from varying sources, this study focused on the effect of near-zero aromatics EN 15940 compliant gas-to-liquids GTL diesel, very similar to hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO), on IDID severity across two different engine platforms, and the response of a modern deposit control additive.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0802
Michael D. Kass, Brian H. West
Abstract The compatibility of key fuel system infrastructure elastomers with promising bio-blendstock fuel candidates was examined using Hansen solubility analysis. Thirty-four candidate fuels were evaluated in this study including multiple alcohols, esters, ethers, ketones, alkenes and one alkane. These compounds were evaluated as neat molecules and as blends with the gasoline surrogate, dodecane and a mix of dodecane and 10% ethanol (E10D). The elastomer materials were fluorocarbon, acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene butadiene (SBR), neoprene, polyurethane and silicone. These materials have been rigorously studied with other fuel types, and their measured volume change results were found to correspond well with their predicted solubility levels. The alcohols showed probable compatibility with fluorocarbon and polyurethane, but are not likely to be compatible at low blend levels with NBR and SBR.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0801
Keith Vertin, Brent Schuchmann, William Studzinski, Richard S. Davis, Thomas G. Leone, James E. Anderson, Asim Iqbal
Abstract Automakers are designing smaller displacement engines with higher power densities to improve vehicle fuel economy, while continuing to meet customer expectations for power and drivability. The specific power produced by the spark-ignited engine is constrained by knock and fuel octane. Whereas the lowest octane rating is 87 AKI (antiknock index) for regular gasoline at most service stations throughout the U.S., 85 AKI fuel is widely available at higher altitudes especially in the mountain west states. The objective of this study was to explore the effect of gasoline octane rating on the net power produced by modern light duty vehicles at high altitude (1660 m elevation). A chassis dynamometer test procedure was developed to measure absorbed wheel power at transient and stabilized full power operation. Five vehicles were tested using 85 and 87 AKI fuels.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0809
James E. Anderson, Travis R. Collings, Sherry A. Mueller, James C. Ball, Timothy J. Wallington
Abstract An experimental study of the effects of partially-oxidized biodiesel fuel on the degradation of fresh fuel was performed. A blend of soybean oil fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) in petroleum diesel fuel (30% v:v biodiesel, B30) was aged under accelerated conditions (90°C with aeration). Aging conditions focused on three different degrees of initial oxidation: 1) reduced oxidation stability (Rancimat induction period, IP); 2) high peroxide values (PV); and 3) high total acid number (TAN). Aged B30 fuel was mixed with fresh B30 fuel at two concentrations (10% and 30% m:m) and degradation of the mixtures at the above aging conditions was monitored for IP, PV, TAN, and FAME composition. Greater content of aged fuel carryover (30% m:m) corresponded to stronger effects. Oxidation stability was most adversely affected by high peroxide concentration (Scenario 2), while peroxide content was most reduced for the high TAN scenario (Scenario 3).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0863
Bader Almansour, Sami Alawadhi, Subith Vasu
Abstract The biofuel and engine co-development framework was initiated at Sandia National Labs. Here, the synthetic biologists develop and engineer a new platform for drop-in fuel production from lignocellulosic biomass, using several endophytic fungi. Hence this process has the potential advantage that expensive pretreatment and fuel refining stages can be optimized thereby allowing scalability and cost reduction; two major considerations for widespread biofuel utilization. Large concentrations of ketones along with other volatile organic compounds were produced by fungi grown over switchgrass media. The combustion and emission properties of these new large ketones are poorly known.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0364
Hiroko Ohtani, Kevin Ellwood, Gustavo Pereira, Thiago Chinen, Siddharthan Selvasekar
Abstract This paper describes the basic principles of extensional rheometry, and the successful application to a variety of automotive fluids, including gear lubricants, paints, and forming lubricants. These fluids are used under very complex flow fields containing strong extensional (elongational) components. While exact derivation of extensional viscosities involves sophisticated theories, the measurement of liquid filament break-up time can provide fruitful information. Gear lubes showed different break-up time according to the kinematic viscosities. Addition of viscosity modifier (acrylic copolymer) significantly increased the breakup time, whereas surfactants had little effect. Clearcoat paint sample increased the breakup time, perhaps due to the deterioration. The waxy stamping lubricant showed remarkable change in the extensional properties as the temperature is raised.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0933
Yunhua Zhang, Diming Lou, Piqiang Tan, Zhiyuan Hu, Qian Feng
Biodiesel as a renewable energy is becoming increasingly attractive due to the growing scarcity of conventional fossil fuels. Meanwhile, the development of after-treatment technologies for the diesel engine brings new insight concerning emissions especially the particulate matter pollutants. In order to study the coupling effects of biodiesel blend and CCRT (Catalyzed Continuously Regeneration Trap) on the particulate matter emissions, the particulate matter emissions from an urban bus operated under steady and transient conditions respectively on real road equipped with and without CCRT (the same bus) fuelled with biodiesel blends BD10 (90% pure diesel and 10% biodiesel by volume) and BD0 (100% pure diesel) was tested and analyzed using electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI). Results showed that the particulate number-size distribution of BD10 had two peaks in nuclei mode and accumulation mode respectively except the condition of high speed, which was similar to BD0.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0932
Nehemiah S I Alozie, George Fern, David Peirce, Lionel Ganippa
ABSTRACT The use of diesel particulate filter (DPF) has become a standard after treatment technology in modern diesel engine however; pressure drop develops across the filter as PM accumulates. This requires quick periodic burn-out without incurring thermal runaway temperatures that could compromise DPF integrity in operation. Adequate understanding of soot oxidation is central to design and manufacture of efficient filter traps suitable for the engine system. In this study, we have examined the oxidation of PM generated from a high speed direct injection (HSDI) diesel engine, ran with 20% and 40% blends of two biodiesel fuels. The PM samples were collected on a Pall Tissuquartz filter during constant engine load and oxidised non-isothermally in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA). Then results obtained are compared with PM oxidation data obtained from pure petrodiesel.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0930
Christine K. Lambert, Timothy Chanko, Mark Jagner, Jon Hangas, Xin Liu, James Pakko, Carl Justin Kamp
To meet future particle mass and particle number standards, gasoline vehicles may require particle control, either by way of an exhaust gas filter and/or engine modifications. Soot levels for gasoline engines are much lower than diesel engines; however, non-combustible material (ash) will be collected that can potentially cause increased backpressure, reduced power, and lower fuel economy. The purpose of this work was to examine the ash loading of gasoline particle filters (GPFs) during rapid aging cycles and at real time low mileages, and compare the filter performances to both fresh and very high mileage filters. Current rapid aging cycles for gasoline exhaust systems are designed to degrade the three-way washcoat both hydrothermally and chemically to represent full useful life catalysts. The ash generated during rapid aging is low in quantity although similar in quality to real time ash. Filters were also examined after a low mileage break-in of approximately 3000 km.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0868
Robert L. McCormick, Gina Fioroni, Lisa Fouts, Earl Christensen, Janet Yanowitz, Evgueni Polikarpov, Karl Albrecht, Daniel J. Gaspar, John Gladden, Anthe George
Abstract We describe a study to identify potential biofuels that enable advanced spark ignition (SI) engine efficiency strategies to be pursued more aggressively. A list of potential biomass-derived blendstocks was developed. An online database of properties and characteristics of these bioblendstocks was created and populated. Fuel properties were determined by measurement, model prediction, or literature review. Screening criteria were developed to determine if a bioblendstock met the requirements for advanced SI engines. Criteria included melting point (or cloud point) < -10°C and boiling point (or T90) <165°C. Compounds insoluble or poorly soluble in hydrocarbon were eliminated from consideration, as were those known to cause corrosion (carboxylic acids or high acid number mixtures) and those with hazard classification as known or suspected carcinogens or reproductive toxins.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0882
Alexander Michlberger, Peter Morgan, Ewan E. Delbridge, Matthew D. Gieselman, Michael Kocsis
Abstract Fuel economy is not an absolute attribute, but is highly dependent on the method used to evaluate it. In this work, two test methods are used to evaluate the differences in fuel economy brought about by changes in engine oil viscosity grade and additive chemistry. The two test methods include a chassis dynamometer vehicle test and an engine dynamometer test. The vehicle testing was conducted using the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) testing protocol while the engine dynamometer test uses the proposed American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Sequence VIE fuel economy improvement 1 (FEI1) testing methodology. In an effort to improve agreement between the two testing methods, the same model engine was used in both test methods, the General Motors (GM) 3.6 L V6 (used in the 2012 model year Chevrolet™ Malibu™ engine). Within the lubricant industry, this choice of engine is reinforced because it has been selected for use in the proposed Sequence VIE fuel economy test.
Viewing 181 to 210 of 16427