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Viewing 151 to 180 of 16434
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0888
Prashant Kumar, Reji Mathai, Sanjeev KUMAR, Ashish Kachhawa, Ajay Kumar Sehgal, Snigdhamayee Praharaj
Abstract The growing transportation sector worldwide has opened up a way forward not only for the scientists & researchers but also for the OEMs to find out the options for fuel efficient automotive vehicles with reduced emissions during their usage. The demand of automotive vehicles has been doubled in last few years and in turn the market for lubricants and transmission fluids are flourishing. Several new formulations of lubricants are getting popularized with major suppliers to achieve the end user expectations in terms of fuel economy benefits, engine life and emissions. The market trend is continuously moving towards the improvement in lubricant formulation to the lower viscosity ranges and in this direction several companies are into development of multi-grade low viscosity range of engine oils (lubricants) which is said to be providing the benefits in terms of fuel economy.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1009
Yajun Wang, Xingyu Liang, Yuesen Wang, Xiuxiu Sun, Hanzhengnan Yu, Xikai Liu
In this paper, the influences of metallic content of lubricating oils on diesel particles were investigated. Three lubricating oils with different levels of metallic content were used in a 2.22 Liter, two cylinders, four stroke, and direct injection diesel engine. 4.0 wt. % and 8 wt. % antioxidant and corrosion inhibitor (T202) were added into baseline lubricating oil to improve the performance respectively. Primary particle diameter distributions and particle nanostructure were compared and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope. The graphitization degrees of diesel particles from different lubricating oils were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Conclusions drawn from the experiments indicate that the metallic content increases the primary particles diameter at 1600 rpm and 2200 rpm. The primary particles diameter ranges from 5 nm to 65 nm and the distribution conformed to Gaussian distribution.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1535
Luca Dalessio, Bradley Duncan, Chinwei Chang, Joaquin Ivan Gargoloff, Ed Tate
Abstract The ultimate goal for vehicle aerodynamicists is to develop vehicles that perform well on the road under real-world conditions. One of the most important metrics to evaluate vehicle performance is the drag coefficient. However, vehicle development today is performed mostly under controlled settings using wind tunnels and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with artificially uniform upstream conditions, neglecting real-world effects due to road turbulence from wind and other vehicles. Thus, the drag coefficients computed with these methods might not be representative of the real performance of the car on the road. This might ultimately lead engineers to develop design solutions and aerodynamic devices which, while performing well in idealized conditions, do not perform well on the road. For this reason, it is important to assess the vehicle’s drag as seen in real-world environments. An effort in this direction is represented by using the wind-averaged drag.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0599
Yichao Guo
Abstract Misfire is generally defined as be no or partial combustion during the power stroke of internal combustion engine. Because a misfired engine will dramatically increase the exhaust emission and potentially cause permanent damage to the catalytic converters, California Air Resources Board (CARB), as well as most of other countries’ on-board diagnostic regulations mandates the detection of misfire. Currently almost all the OEMs utilize crankshaft position sensors as the main input to their misfire detection algorithm. The detailed detection approaches vary among different manufacturers. For example, some chooses the crankshaft angular velocity calculated from the raw output of the crankshaft positon sensor as the measurement to distinguish misfires from normal firing events, while others use crankshaft angular acceleration or the associated torque index derived from the crankshaft position sensor readings as the measurement of misfire detection.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1297
Robert Peckham, Sumit Basu, Marcelo Ribeiro, Sandra Walker
Abstract This study emphasizes the fact that there lies value and potential savings in harmonizing some of the inherent differences between the USA, EU, and China regulations with respect to the role of vehicle mass and lightweighting within Fuel Economy (FE) and Green House Gas (GHG) regulations. The definition and intricacies of FE and mass regulations for the three regions (USA, EU, and China) have been discussed and compared. In particular, the nuances of footprint-based, curb-mass-based, and stepped-mass-based regulations that lead to the differences have been discussed. Lightweighting is a customer benefit for fuel consumption, but in this work, we highlight cases where lightweighting, as a CO2 enabler, has incentives that do not align with rational customer values. A typical vehicle’s FE performance sensitivity to a change in mass on the standard regional certification drive cycles is simulated and compared across the three regions.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1313
Bao Wang, Jianhua Zhou, Min Xu
Abstract Manufacturing tolerances are inevitable in nature. For the bearings used in internal combustion engines, the manufacturing tolerances of roundness, which is of the micron scale, can be very close to the bearing radial clearance, and as a result the roundness could affect the lubrication of the bearings and thus affecting the friction loss of the engine. However, there is insufficient understanding of this mechanism. This study aims to find out the effects of the amplitude and the phase of journal roundness in the shape of ellipse on the lubrication of engine bearings. The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) theory is applied to model the bearing since the EHD model takes account of the elastic deformation of the journal and the bearing shell. The analysis of the DOE results shows the existence of roundness can be beneficial to the lubrication in some cases.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1513
Young-Chang Cho, Chin-Wei Chang, Andrea Shestopalov, Edward Tate
Abstract The airflow into the engine bay of a passenger car is used for cooling down essential components of the vehicle, such as powertrain, air-conditioning compressor, intake charge air, batteries, and brake systems, before it returns back to the external flow. When the intake ram pressure becomes high enough to supply surplus cooling air flow, this flow can be actively regulated by using arrays of grille shutters, namely active grille shutters (AGS), in order to reduce the drag penalty due to excessive cooling. In this study, the operation of AGS for a generic SUV-type model vehicle is optimized for improved fuel economy on a highway drive cycle (part of SFTP-US06) by using surrogate models. Both vehicle aerodynamic power consumption and under-hood cooling performance are assessed by using PowerFLOW, a high-fidelity flow solver that is fully coupled with powertrain heat exchanger models.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0776
Ulrich Kramer, Thomas Lorenz, Christian Hofmann, Helmut Ruhland, Rolf Klein, Carsten Weber
Abstract A fundamental requirement for natural gas (NG) and renewable methane (e.g. bio-methane or power-to-gas methane) as automotive fuel is reliable knock resistance; to enable optimization of dedicated NG engines with high compression ratio and high turbocharger boost (which enables considerable engine downsizing factors). In order to describe the knock resistance of NG, the Methane Number (MN) has been introduced. The lowest MN which generally can be found in any NG is 65, and the vast majority of NG (~ 99.8%) is delivered with a MN above 70. The MN of bio-methane and power-to-gas methane is usually far above 80. Thus, from an automotive point of view any methane fuel should at least provide a minimum Methane Number of 70 at any point of sale. But the European draft standard describing the automotive CNG fuel quality so far proposes a minimum MN limit of 65.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0780
Dongwei Wu, Baigang Sun, Qinghe Luo, Xi Wang, Yunshan Ge
Abstract The combustion characteristics of hydrogen-air mixtures have significance significant impact on the performance and control of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and the combustion velocity is an important parameter in characterizing the combustion characteristics of the mixture. A four-cylinder hydrogen internal combustion engine was used to study hydrogen combustion; the combustion characteristics of a hydrogen mixture were experimentally studied in a constant-volume incendiary bomb, and the turbulent premixed combustion characteristics of hydrogen were calculated and analyzed. Turbulent hydrogen combustion comes under the folded laminar flame model. The turbulent combustion velocity in lean hydrogen combustion is related not only to the turbulent velocity and the laminar burning velocity, but also to the additional turbulence term caused by the instability of the flame.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0871
Alexander K. Voice, Tom Tzanetakis, Michael Traver
Abstract Lubricity is an empirically-determined tribological property, which is a function of the fluid properties and system, and which is known to influence fuel system wear durability. In this work, the lubricity of various fuels was tested using a modified version of ASTM D6079, which uses a high frequency reciprocating rig (HFRR). The fuels were tested as received and with various amounts of commercial diesel lubricity additives. Lubricity of all light-end fuels test as received (without lubricity additives) was found to be substantially worse than additized diesel certification fuel, and lowest for unadditized straight-run gasoline. All diesel lubricity additives tested were able to substantially improve the lubricity of the light-end fuel formulations. The best additives reduced the wear scar diameter in the HFRR test to around 200 μm at a concentration of 200 mg/kg, putting them well within the maximum allowable limit for market No. 2 diesel fuel.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0906
Thomas L. Darlington, Gary A. Herwick, Dennis Kahlbaum, Dean Drake
Abstract The Environmental Protection Agency, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and California Air Resources Board released the joint mid-term Technical Assessment Review of the light-duty GHG standards in July of 2016. The review generally asserted that the GHG standards adopted in calendar year 2012 for 2022-2025 model year vehicles were feasible. Although many different technologies were evaluated, the review did not assess the benefits of high compression ratio engines enabled by a high-octane low carbon fuel. This study fills in the gap in the Technical Assessment Review by examining the impacts of a 98-research octane number gasoline-ethanol blend with 25 percent ethanol. We find that this fuel would enable higher compression ratios to improve tailpipe greenhouse gas emissions by about 6 percent on most engines.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0805
Jue Li, Tushar K. Bera, Michael Parkes, Timothy J. Jacobs
Abstract This paper investigates the effect of the cetane number (CN) of a diesel fuel on the energy balance between a light duty (1.9L) and medium duty (4.5L) diesel engine. The two engines have a similar stroke to bore (S/B) ratio, and all other control parameters including: geometric compression ratio, cylinder number, stroke, and combustion chamber, have been kept the same, meaning that only the displacement changes between the engine platforms. Two Coordinating Research Council (CRC) diesel fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) were studied. The two fuels were selected to have a similar distillation profile and aromatic content, but varying CN. The effects on the energy balance of the engines were considered at two operating conditions; a “low load” condition of 1500 rev/min (RPM) and nominally 1.88 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP), and a “medium load” condition of 1500 RPM and 5.65 BMEP.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0806
Genki Kikuchi, Masashi Miyagawa, Yoshiaki Yamamoto, Naruhiko Inayoshi
Abstract Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) systems reduce exhaust emissions and improve fuel efficiency. Recently, the number of EGR system installed vehicles has been increasing, especially for gasoline engine systems. One of the major causes of decreasing EGR function is deposit accumulation on a gas passage. The deposit consists mainly of hydrocarbons which are degradation products of fuel, thus the amount of deposit seems to be strongly affected by fuel compositions. Unfortunately there are not as many studies on EGR deposits with gasoline fuel as there are with diesel fuel. In this study, the influence of gasoline fuel compositions, especially aromatics which are major components of EGR gas, on chemical structures of the deposit were investigated. To clarify the accumulation mechanism of EGR deposits, a thermal oxidative degradation test with an autoclave unit and an actual gasoline engine test were employed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0933
Yunhua Zhang, Diming Lou, Piqiang Tan, Zhiyuan Hu, Qian Feng
Abstract Biodiesel as a renewable energy is becoming increasingly attractive due to the growing scarcity of conventional fossil fuels. Meanwhile, the development of after-treatment technologies for the diesel engine brings new insight concerning emissions especially the particulate matter pollutants. In order to study the coupling effects of biodiesel blend and CCRT (Catalyzed Continuously Regeneration Trap) on the particulate matter emissions, the particulate matter emissions from an urban bus with and without CCRT burning BD0 and BD10 respectively was tested and analyzed using electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI). The operation conditions included steady state conditions and transient conditions. Results showed that the particulate number-size distribution of BD10 and BD0 both had two peaks in nuclei mode and accumulation mode at the conditions of idle, low speed and medium speed while at high speed condition the particulate number-size distribution only had one peak.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0932
Nehemiah S I Alozie, George Fern, David Peirce, Lionel Ganippa
Abstract The use of diesel particulate filter [DPF] has become a standard in modern diesel engine after treatment technology. However pressure drop develops across the filter as PM accumulates and this requires quick periodic burn-out without incurring thermal runaway temperatures that could compromise DPF integrity during operation. Adequate understanding of soot oxidation is needed for design and manufacture of efficient filter traps for the engine system. In this study, we have examined the impact of blending biodiesel on oxidation of PM generated from a high speed direct injection [HSDI] diesel engine, which was operated with 20% [B20] and 40% [B40] blends of two biodiesel fuels. The PM samples were collected from the engine exhaust using a Pall Tissuquartz filter, the oxidation characteristics of the samples were carried out using thermogravimetric analyzer [TGA]. The biodiesel oxidation data obtained from pure petrodiesel was compared against the fuel blends.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1016
Charles Schenk, Paul Dekraker
Abstract EPA has been benchmarking engines and transmissions to generate inputs for use in its technology assessments supporting the Midterm Evaluation of EPA’s 2017-2025 Light-Duty Vehicle greenhouse gas emissions assessments. As part of an Atkinson cycle engine technology assessment of applications in light-duty vehicles, cooled external exhaust gas recirculation (cEGR) and cylinder deactivation (CDA) were evaluated. The base engine was a production gasoline 2.0L four-cylinder engine with 75 degrees of intake cam phase authority and a 14:1 geometric compression ratio. An open ECU and cEGR hardware were installed on the engine so that the CO2 reduction effectiveness could be evaluated. Additionally, two cylinders were deactivated to determine what CO2 benefits could be achieved. Once a steady state calibration was complete, two-cycle (FTP and HwFET) CO2 reduction estimates were made using fuel weighted operating modes and a full vehicle model (ALPHA) cycle simulation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1019
Bentolhoda Torkashvand, Andreas Gremminger, Simone Valchera, Maria Casapu, Jan-Dierk Grunwaldt, Olaf Deutschmann
Abstract The effect of increased pressure relevant to pre-turbine catalyst positioning on catalytic oxidation of methane over a commercial Pd-Pt model catalyst under lean conditions is investigated both experimentally and numerically. The possible gas phase reactions due to high temperature and pressure were tested with an inert monolith. Catalyst activity tests were conducted for both wet and dry gas mixtures and the effect of pressure was investigated at 1, 2 and 4 bar. Aside from the water in the inlet stream, the water produced by oxidation of methane in dry feed inhibited the activity of the catalyst as well. Experiments were carried out to check the effect of added water in the concentration range of water produced by methane oxidation on the catalyst activity. Based on the experimental results, a global oxidation rate equation is proposed. The reaction rate expression is first order with respect to methane and -1.15 with respect to water.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1000
Jong Lee, Yu Zhang, Tom Tzanetakis, Michael Traver, Melanie Moses-DeBusk, John Storey, William Partridge, Michael Lance
Abstract Greenhouse gas regulations and global economic growth are expected to drive a future demand shift towards diesel fuel in the transportation sector. This may create a market opportunity for cost-effective fuels in the light distillate range if they can be burned as efficiently and cleanly as diesel fuel. In this study, the emission performance of a low cetane number, low research octane number naphtha (CN 34, RON 56) was examined on a production 6-cylinder heavy-duty on-highway truck engine and aftertreatment system. Using only production hardware, both the engine-out and tailpipe emissions were examined during the heavy-duty emission testing cycles using naphtha and ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuels. Without any modifications to the hardware and software, the tailpipe emissions were comparable when using either naphtha or ULSD on the heavy duty test cycles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1002
Daisuke Tanaka, Ryo Uchida, Toru Noda, Andreas Kolbeck, Sebastian Henkel, Yannis Hardalupas, Alexander Taylor, Allen Aradi
Abstract The purpose of this work was to gain a fundamental understanding of which fuel property parameters are responsible for particulate emission characteristics, associated with key intermediate behavior in the engine cylinder such as the fuel film and insufficient mixing. Accordingly, engine tests were carried out using various fuels having different volatility and chemical compositions under different coolant temperature conditions. In addition, a fundamental spray and film visualization analysis was also conducted using a constant volume vessel, assuming the engine test conditions. As for the physical effects, the test results showed that a low volatility fuel displayed high particulate number (PN) emissions when the injection timing was advanced. The fundamental test clearly showed that the amount of fuel film on the impingement plate increased under such operating conditions with a low volatility fuel.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1034
Ben Zhao, Liangjun Hu, Abraham Engeda, Harold Sun
Abstract As the variable nozzle turbine(VNT) becomes an important element in engine fuel economy and engine performance, improvement of turbine efficiency over wide operation range is the main focus of research efforts for both academia and industry in the past decades. It is well known that in a VNT, the nozzle endwall clearance has a big impact on the turbine efficiency, especially at small nozzle open positions. However, the clearance at hub and shroud wall sides may contribute differently to the turbine efficiency penalty. When the total height of nozzle clearance is fixed, varying distribution of nozzle endwall clearance at the hub and shroud sides may possibly generate different patterns of clearance leakage flow at nozzle exit that has different interaction with and impact on the main flow when it enters the inducer.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1042
Eric J. Passow, Paras Sethi, Max Maschewske, Jason Bieneman, Kimm Karrip, Paul Truckel
Abstract Current market demands in conjunction with increasingly stringent emission legislation have vehicle manufactures striving to improve fuel economy and reduce CO2 emissions. One way to meet these demands is through engine downsizing. Engine downsizing allows for reduced pumping and frictional losses. To maintain acceptable drivability and further increase efficiency, power density increase through the addition of boosting is employed. Furthermore, efficiencies have been realized through the use of high gear count transmissions, providing an opportunity for manufactures to effectively down speed the engine whilst still achieving the desired drivability characteristics. As a result of these efficiency improvements, gasoline turbo charged direct injected (GTDI) engines are developed for and tend to operate in low engine speed, high torque conditions .
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1287
Markus Sartory, Markus Justl, Patrick Salman, Alexander Trattner, Manfred Klell, Ewald Wahlmüller
Abstract Hydrogen as carbon-free energy carrier, produced from renewable sources like wind, solar or hydro power, is a promising option to overcome the impacts of the anthropogenic climate change. Recently, great advances regarding the early market introduction of FCVs have been achieved. As the availability of hydrogen refueling stations is highly limited, a modular, scalable and highly efficient hydrogen supply infrastructure concept is presented in this paper. The focus lies on cost-effectiveness and flexibility for the utilization in different applications and for growing markets. Based on the analysis of different use cases, the requirements for the newly developed concept are elaborated. The modular system design, utilizing a standardized high pressure PEM electrolysis module, allows a scalable hydrogen production of up to several hundred kilograms per day.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1283
Valentin Soloiu, Remi Gaubert, Martin Muinos, Jose Moncada, Thomas Beyerl, Gustavo Molina, Johnnie Williams
Abstract This study investigates the use of a natural gas derived fuel, synthetic Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) paraffinic kerosene, in both it’s neat form and blended with ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD#2), in a naturally aspirated indirect injected engine. A blend of a mass ratio with 20% of the F-T fuel and 80% ULSD#2 was studied for its combustion characteristics, emissions, and efficiency compared to conventional ULSD#2 at a constant speed of 2400 RPM and operating at IMEP range from 4.5 to 6.5 bar. The F-T blend produced ignition delays 17% shorter than ULSD#2 resulting in slightly lower peak apparent heat release rates (AHRR) along with decreased peak combustion temperatures, by up to 50°C. Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) emissions of the F-T blend decreased by 4.0% at 4.5 bar IMEP and at negligible amounts at 6.5 bar IMEP. The F-T blend decreased soot significantly at 5.4 bar IMEP by 40%. Efficiencies of the F-T blend were similar to ULSD#2.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1292
Saiful Bari, Idris Saad
Abstract Diesel engine can be run with biodiesel which has the potential to supplement the receding supply of crude oil. As biodiesel possess similar physiochemical properties to diesel, most diesel engines can run with biodiesel with minimum modifications. However, the viscosity of biodiesel is higher, and the calorific value is lower than diesel. Therefore, when biodiesel is used in diesel engines, it is usually blended with diesel at different proportions. Use of 100% biodiesel in diesel engines shows inferior performance of having lower power and torque. Improving in-cylinder airflow characteristic to break down higher viscous biodiesel and to improve air-fuel mixing are the aims of this research. Therefore, guide vanes in the intake runner were used in this research to improve the performance of diesel engine run with biodiesel.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1288
Noriko Shisa, Shinsuke Ishihara, Yougui Huang, Mikio Asai, Katsuhiko Ariga
Abstract Despite the fact that methanol is toxic to human health and causes serious damage to automobile engines and fuel system components, methanol-containing gasoline is becoming popular in some areas. Methanol demonstrates similar chemical properties to ethanol (which is already established as an additive to gasoline), so that it is difficult to identify methanol-containing gasoline without performing proper chemical analysis. In this study, we report a low-cost, portable, and easy-to-operate sensor that selectively changes color in response to methanol contained in gasoline. The colorimetric sensor will be useful for automobile users to avoid methanol-containing gasoline upon refueling.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0133
Bin Xu, Adamu Yebi, Simona Onori, Zoran Filipi, Xiaobing Liu, John Shutty, Paul Anschel, Mark Hoffman
Abstract This paper presents the transient power optimization of an organic Rankine cycle waste heat recovery (ORC-WHR) system operating on a heavy-duty diesel (HDD). The optimization process is carried on an experimentally validated, physics-based, high fidelity ORC-WHR model, which consists of parallel tail pipe and EGR evaporators, a high pressure working fluid pump, a turbine expander, etc. Three different ORC-WHR mixed vapor temperature (MVT) operational strategies are evaluated to optimize the ORC system net power: (i) constant MVT; (ii) constant superheat temperature; (iii) fuzzy logic superheat temperature based on waste power level. Transient engine conditions are considered in the optimization. Optimization results reveal that adaptation of the vapor temperature setpoint based on evaporation pressure strategy (ii) provides 1.1% mean net power (MNP) improvement relative to a fixed setpoint strategy (i).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0462
Marcel Meuwissen, Jippe Van Ruiten, Thijs Besseling, Robbert van Sluijs, Maik Broda, Brian Pearce, Fenton I. O'Shea
Abstract Fuel economy improvement efforts in engines have focused on reducing parasitic losses. This paper addresses the friction losses in the valve train chain drive system where about half of the losses is caused by the chain sliding on plastic guide and tensioner arm faces (Figure 1). Efforts have been made to reduce these friction losses by optimizing the chain link profile, the geometry of the guide and tensioner arm rails, and developments towards low friction materials. This paper describes the approach taken for the development of new low-friction chain tensioner arm plastic materials. The approach is characterized by building an understanding of the friction mechanisms and identifying the most critical material’s properties. A lab-scale test is used for a first assessment of the friction performance of materials. The correlation between this lab-scale test and the actual chain-on-tensioner arm application is discussed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0532
Hoon Lee, Byungho Lee, Sejun Kim, Namdoo Kim, Aymeric Rousseau
Abstract Many leading companies in the automotive industry have been putting tremendous amount of efforts into developing new designs and technologies to make their products more energy efficient. It is straightforward to evaluate the fuel economy benefit of an individual technology in specific systems and components. However, when multiple technologies are combined and integrated into a whole vehicle, estimating the impact without building and testing an actual vehicle becomes very complex, because the efficiency gains from individual components do not simply add up. In an early concept phase, a projection of fuel efficiency benefits from new technologies will be extremely useful; but in many cases, the outlook has to rely on engineer’s insight since it is impractical to run tests for all possible technology combinations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0601
Huayi Li, Kenneth Butts, Kevin Zaseck, Dominic Liao-McPherson, Ilya Kolmanovsky
Abstract The development of advanced model-based engine control strategies, such as economic model predictive control (eMPC) for diesel engine fuel economy and emission optimization, requires accurate and low-complexity models for controller design validation. This paper presents the NOx and smoke emissions modeling of a light duty diesel engine equipped with a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) and a high pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. Such emission models can be integrated with an existing air path model into a complete engine mean value model (MVM), which can predict engine behavior at different operating conditions for controller design and validation before physical engine tests. The NOx and smoke emission models adopt an artificial neural network (ANN) approach with Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) architectures. The networks are trained and validated using experimental data collected from engine bench tests.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0593
Ivan Arsie, Rocco Di Leo, Cesare Pianese, Matteo De Cesare
Abstract The development of more affordable sensors together with the enhancement of computation features in current Engine Management Systems (EMS), makes the in-cylinder pressure sensing a suitable methodology for the on-board engine control and diagnosis. Since the 1960’s the in-cylinder pressure signal was employed to investigate the combustion process of the internal combustion engines for research purposes. Currently, the sensors cost reduction in addition to the need to comply with the strict emissions legislation has promoted a large-scale diffusion on production engines equipment. The in-cylinder pressure signal offers the opportunity to estimate with high dynamic response almost all the variables of interest for an effective engine combustion control even in case of non-conventional combustion processes (e.g. PCCI, HCCI, LTC).
Viewing 151 to 180 of 16434