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Viewing 16411 to 16433 of 16433
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190045
JOSEPH E POGUE
The engine-fuel situation has changed almost overnight. Oil-consuming activities have taken on an accelerated expansion and the situation has shifted from excess supply to a position where demand is assuming the lead and is seeking a supply. A gasoline stringency, accompanied presumably by a marked rise in price, is a prospect to be anticipated. The production of gasoline is increasing more rapidly than the production of its raw material, crude petroleum. The available supply of the latter is very limited in view of the size of the demand. As a direct result of the situation, gasoline is changing in character and becoming progressively less volatile. The low thermal efficiency of the prevailing type of automotive apparatus contributes strongly to the demand for gasoline as engine fuel and has a bearing upon the quantity and the price of this specialized fuel.
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180037
C W STRATFORD
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180027
W G CLARK
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180030
C W STRATFORD
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180028
J L MOWRY
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180043
E B BLAKELY
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180035
C E Sargent
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180007
E W DEAN
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170021
F. C. MOCK
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170046
HENRI G. CHATAIN
The author states that the objects of the paper are to define and trace the development of the various processes of carburetion, and to offer such suggestions along these lines as may assist the investigator in developing motorboats, automobiles and self-contained unit motor cars for railway purposes. The surface carburetor is mentioned chiefly as of historic interest. In considering the jet carbureter the author discusses the proportion of gas desired, the effect of the varying inertia of the air and the liquid gasoline and the breaking up of the combustible needed. Following sections review the devices for using kerosene, such as gasoline jet carbureters to which heat is applied, devices of the fixed gas type, the introduction of combustible directly into the cylinder, forcing combustible directly upon a hot surface in the cylinder and devices which raise the combustible to the boiling point.
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170047
W. P. DEPPÉ
The author first compares mineral oils with certain other liquids in order to point out clearly certain of their characteristics. He then shows the economic benefits that would result from making more of the crude available for use as fuels. He discusses such topics as cracking methods in use, advantages of dry gas, initial flame propagation, gas producers, hot mixtures, wet mixtures and difficulties of correcting existing engines. He concludes by proposing as a solution of the gasoline problem the more general use of superheated homogeneous fixed dry gases made in vaporizing devices independent of engine cylinders, and outlines means for attaining this end. Performance data covering the use of mixtures of kerosene and gasoline on several cars are included in a table, and several charts throughout the paper illustrate many of the topics discussed.
1916-01-01
Technical Paper
160016
E. S. FOLJAMBE
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150027
C. W. STRATFORD
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130038
HARRY TIPPER
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130018
HARRY TIPPER
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130017
A. E. POTTER
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130019
JOHN A. SECOR
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130005
N. B. POPE
1911-01-01
Technical Paper
110008
FRANK HARRIS FLOYD
1911-01-01
Technical Paper
110009
Henry Hess
1909-01-01
Technical Paper
090011
FRANK H. FLOYD
1908-01-01
Technical Paper
080014
H. VANDERBEEK
1907-01-01
Technical Paper
070002
THOMAS L. WHITE
Viewing 16411 to 16433 of 16433