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Viewing 121 to 150 of 16433
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0884
Ken Hashimoto, Kenji Tomizawa, Yoichiro Nakamura, Takashi Hashimoto, Takahiro Tatani, Atsushi Akamatsu, Ryuji Aoki, JASO Diesel Engine Oil Standard Revision Task Force
Abstract This paper reviews the development of the first fuel economy engine test method for heavy duty diesel oil, as well as the new JASO DH-2F category introduced in April 2017 [1][2][3], which adds a fuel economy requirement to the JASO DH-2 requirements in the JASO M355:2015 standard. Recently, better fuel economy is required heavy duty diesel vehicles as well as gasoline vehicles. Therefore, advanced technologies have been applied to improve diesel engines, as well as diesel engine oils and additives, and achieve better fuel economy. However, the Automotive Diesel Engine Oil Standard (JASO M355) applied in Japan as a standard for diesel engine oils does not include any fuel economy requirements.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0808
Sebastian Henkel, Yannis Hardalupas, Alexander Taylor, Christopher Conifer, Roger Cracknell, Tor Kit Goh, Paul-Benjamin Reinicke, Marc Sens, Michael Rieß
Abstract In Gasoline Direct Injection engines, direct exposure of the injector to the flame can cause combustion products to accumulate on the nozzle, which can result in increased particulate emissions. This research observes the impact of injector fouling on particulate emissions and the associated injector spray pattern and shows how both can be reversed by utilising fuel detergency. For this purpose multi-hole injectors were deliberately fouled in a four-cylinder test engine with two different base fuels. During a four hour injector fouling cycle particulate numbers (PN) increased by up to two orders of magnitude. The drift could be reversed by switching to a fuel blend that contained a detergent additive. In addition, it was possible to completely avoid any PN increase, when the detergent containing fuel was used from the beginning of the test. Microscopy showed that increased injector fouling coincided with increased particulate emissions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0160
Longjie Xiao, Tianming He, Gangfeng Tan, Bo Huang, Xianyao Ping
Abstract While the car ownership increasing all over the world, the unutilized thermal energy in automobile exhaust system is gradually being realized and valued by researchers around the world for better driving energy efficiency. For the unexpected urban traffic, the frequent start and stop processes as well as the acceleration and deceleration lead to the temperature fluctuation of the exhaust gas, which means the unstable hot-end temperature of the thermoelectric module generator (TEG). By arranging the heat conduction oil circulation at the hot end, the hot-end temperature’s fluctuation of the TEG can be effectively reduced, at the expense of larger system size and additional energy supply for the circulation. This research improves the TEG hot-end temperature stability by installing solid heat capacity material(SHCM) to the area between the outer wall of the exhaust pipe and the TEG, which has the merits of simple structure, none energy consumption and light weight.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0121
Zhijia Yang, Jesus PradoGonjal, Matthew Phillips, Song Lan, Anthony Powell, Paz Vaqueiro, Min Gao, Richard Stobart, Rui Chen
Abstract Thermoelectric generator (TEG) has received more and more attention in its application in the harvesting of waste thermal energy in automotive engines. Even though the commercial Bismuth Telluride thermoelectric material only have 5% efficiency and 250°C hot side temperature limit, it is possible to generate peak 1kW electrical energy from a heavy-duty engine. If being equipped with 500W TEG, a passenger car has potential to save more than 2% fuel consumption and hence CO2 emission reduction. TEG has advantages of compact and motionless parts over other thermal harvest technologies such as Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) and Turbo-Compound (TC). Intense research works are being carried on improving the thermal efficiency of the thermoelectric materials and increasing the hot side temperature limit. Future thermoelectric modules are expected to have 10% to 20% efficiency and over 500°C hot side temperature limit.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0532
Hoon Lee, Byungho Lee, Sejun Kim, Namdoo Kim, Aymeric Rousseau
Abstract Many leading companies in the automotive industry have been putting tremendous amount of efforts into developing new designs and technologies to make their products more energy efficient. It is straightforward to evaluate the fuel economy benefit of an individual technology in specific systems and components. However, when multiple technologies are combined and integrated into a whole vehicle, estimating the impact without building and testing an actual vehicle becomes very complex, because the efficiency gains from individual components do not simply add up. In an early concept phase, a projection of fuel efficiency benefits from new technologies will be extremely useful; but in many cases, the outlook has to rely on engineer’s insight since it is impractical to run tests for all possible technology combinations.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0877
Shintaro Kusuhara, Kenichi Yoshimura, Kenichi Kunieda, Nozomu Suzuki, Shingo Matsuki, Yuji Shitara
Abstract In developing engine oils, it is crucial to consider their compatibility with the rubbers used for seals. Among the different seal rubbers, silicone rubber is particularly susceptible to attack by acids and bases, which means it would be more likely to be affected by certain engine oil additives. In this study, the effects of some major additives, namely detergents, zinc dialkyl-dithiophopshate (ZDDP) and molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC), on silicone rubber were investigated. Silicone rubber test specimens were immersed in sample oils containing these additives for a prescribed period at 150°C, then the physical properties of the test specimens were measured to compare the effects of the different additives. It was found that ZDDPs dramatically reduce the tensile strength of silicone rubber, with primary ZDDP having a greater effect than secondary ZDDP.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0033
Scott Stevens, Jeffrey Bellone, Philip Azeredo, Marisol Medri
Abstract This study is aimed at supporting left-turn assist (LTA) applications, which provide warnings to drivers making a left turn across the path of oncoming traffic (LTAP/OD scenarios). The primary goal was to provide much-needed information on typical or “baseline” driving in LTAP/OD scenarios that can be used to refine alert criteria to reduce false and nuisance alerts. A secondary goal was to provide performance data useful for informing practical test procedures, e.g., setting turning speed when evaluating LTA applications on a test track. To accomplish this, LTAP/OD events were identified in the databases of two large-scale naturalistic driving studies. For these events, we estimated the size of the gaps in oncoming traffic into which drivers chose to turn, what factors (environmental, demographic, etc.) affected the choice to turn into a gap of a given size, and the speed profiles throughout each turn.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0878
Julia Carrell, Tom Slatter, Uel Little, Roger Lewis
Abstract The interaction of three bio-lubricant base oil candidates with seventeen combinations of surface treatment was studied, comparing wear scar volumes and coefficient of friction results. Substrates were initially ground, then a combination of superfinished, Dymon-iC™ DLC, an impact technique of ultra-fine shot blasting method doped with Tin and Molybdenum Disulfide, a calcium based chemical dip containing calcium sulfate and nano fullerene, were used. DLC is well reported to reduce friction. Some reports suggest wear in coated contacts is independent of the type of lubricant used, whilst others report that bio-lubricants offer reduced friction and wear in combination with DLC. Shot blasting can also reduce wear and friction, due to the surface dimples acting as lubricant reservoirs, making hydrodynamic lubrication more likely.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0269
Doohyun Kim, Jason Martz, Angela Violi
Abstract The ignition delay time for direct injection compression ignition engines is determined by complex physical and chemical phenomena that prepare the injected liquid fuel for gas phase ignition. In this work, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a reacting spray within a constant volume spray chamber are conducted to investigate the relative importance of liquid fuel physical properties and oxidation chemistry on the ignition delay time. The simulations use multi-component surrogates that emulate the physical and chemical properties of petroleum-derived (Jet-A) and natural-gas-derived (S-8) jet fuels. Results from numerical experiments isolating the fuel physical property and chemistry effects show that fuel chemistry is significantly more important to ignition delay than fuel physical properties under the conditions studied.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0546
Sebastiano Breda, Alessandro D'Adamo, Stefano Fontanesi, Fabrizio D'Orrico, Adrian Irimescu, Simona Merola, Nicola Giovannoni
Abstract Conventional fossil fuels are more and more regulated in terms of both engine-out emissions and fuel consumption. Moreover, oil price and political instabilities in oil-producer countries are pushing towards the use of alternative fuels compatible with the existing units. N-Butanol is an attractive candidate as conventional gasoline replacement, given its ease of production from bio-mass and key physico-chemical properties similar to their gasoline counterpart. A comparison in terms of combustion behavior of gasoline and n-Butanol is here presented by means of experiments and 3D-CFD simulations. The fuels are tested on a single-cylinder direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) unit with an optically accessible flat piston. The analysis is carried out at stoichiometric undiluted condition and lean-diluted mixture for both pure fuels.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0800
Varun Gauba, Tushar Bera, Jannik Reitz, Gregory Hansen, Peter Lee, Craig Wileman, Edward Nelson
Piston ring and liner wear measurements and analyses were performed in a production 3.6L V6 gasoline engine with radiolabelled engine parts. Three isotopes were generated: one in the engine liner using surface layer activation; one each in the top ring face and top ring side using bulk activation. Real-time wear measurements and subsequent rates of these three surfaces were captured using the radioactive decay of the isotopes into the engine oiling system. In addition, surface roughness and wear profile measurements were carried out using white light interferometry. The results from Phase I provided insights on evolution of wear and wear rates in critical engine components in a gasoline engine. Phase II will extend this work further and focus on evaluating the fuel additive effects on engine wear.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0802
Michael D. Kass, Brian H. West
Abstract The compatibility of key fuel system infrastructure elastomers with promising bio-blendstock fuel candidates was examined using Hansen solubility analysis. Thirty-four candidate fuels were evaluated in this study including multiple alcohols, esters, ethers, ketones, alkenes and one alkane. These compounds were evaluated as neat molecules and as blends with the gasoline surrogate, dodecane and a mix of dodecane and 10% ethanol (E10D). The elastomer materials were fluorocarbon, acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene butadiene (SBR), neoprene, polyurethane and silicone. These materials have been rigorously studied with other fuel types, and their measured volume change results were found to correspond well with their predicted solubility levels. The alcohols showed probable compatibility with fluorocarbon and polyurethane, but are not likely to be compatible at low blend levels with NBR and SBR.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0882
Alexander Michlberger, Peter Morgan, Ewan E. Delbridge, Matthew D. Gieselman, Michael Kocsis
Abstract Fuel economy is not an absolute attribute, but is highly dependent on the method used to evaluate it. In this work, two test methods are used to evaluate the differences in fuel economy brought about by changes in engine oil viscosity grade and additive chemistry. The two test methods include a chassis dynamometer vehicle test and an engine dynamometer test. The vehicle testing was conducted using the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) testing protocol while the engine dynamometer test uses the proposed American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Sequence VIE fuel economy improvement 1 (FEI1) testing methodology. In an effort to improve agreement between the two testing methods, the same model engine was used in both test methods, the General Motors (GM) 3.6 L V6 (used in the 2012 model year Chevrolet™ Malibu™ engine). Within the lubricant industry, this choice of engine is reinforced because it has been selected for use in the proposed Sequence VIE fuel economy test.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0807
Stefan de Goede, Robert Barbour, Adrian Velaers, Brian Sword, Daniel Burton, Konrad Mokheseng
Abstract Internal diesel injector deposits (IDID) are now a well understood phenomenon and a standard test procedure has been developed and partially approved by the Coordinating European Council (CEC). The engine test procedure has been approved for simulation of sodium soap deposits by dosing the test fuel with a sodium salt and dodecenyl succinic acid (DDSA), whilst amide lacquer deposits simulation by dosing the test fuel with a low molecular weight (MWt) polyisobutylene succinimide (PIBSI) is still under development. The solubility of these contaminants in the base fuel should be reasonably constant to achieve consistent results. With the introduction of diesel from varying sources, this study focused on the effect of near-zero aromatics EN 15940 compliant gas-to-liquids GTL diesel, very similar to hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO), on IDID severity across two different engine platforms, and the response of a modern deposit control additive.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1229
Ken Yamamoto, Nobuyasu Sadakata, Hidetoshi Okada, Yusuke Fujita
Abstract Electric oil pumps (EOP) for automobiles are used to lubricate and cool moving parts and supply oil pressure to components. Conventional EOPs consist of two separate units including a motor driver and a pump system comprised of a motor and a pump, which impedes layout flexibility for vehicles. To overcome this shortcoming, we have developed an ECU (electronic control unit)-integrated oil pump in which a driver, a motor and a pump are incorporated as a single unit. In the course of the project, we focused on improving vibration resistance and developing a compact design. The first challenge was to improve vibration resistance because of the driver located in close proximity to the powertrain. Since the driver is installed on the motor unit via electrically welded bus bars, the joints of the driver and the bus bar become susceptible to vibration.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0903
Sarp Mamikoglu, Jelena Andric, Petter Dahlander
Abstract Many technological developments in automobile powertrains have been implemented in order to increase efficiency and comply with emission regulations. Although most of these technologies show promising results in official fuel economy tests, their benefits in real driving conditions and real driving emissions can vary significantly, since driving profiles of many drivers are different than the official driving cycles. Therefore, it is important to assess these technologies under different driving conditions and this paper aims to offer an overall perspective, with a numerical study in simulations. The simulations are carried out on a compact passenger car model with eight powertrain configurations including: a naturally aspirated spark ignition engine, a start-stop system, a downsized engine with a turbocharger, a Miller cycle engine, cylinder deactivation, turbocharged downsized Miller engine, a parallel hybrid electric vehicle powertrain and an electric vehicle powertrain.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1000
Jong Lee, Yu Zhang, Tom Tzanetakis, Michael Traver, Melanie Moses-DeBusk, John Storey, William Partridge, Michael Lance
Abstract Greenhouse gas regulations and global economic growth are expected to drive a future demand shift towards diesel fuel in the transportation sector. This may create a market opportunity for cost-effective fuels in the light distillate range if they can be burned as efficiently and cleanly as diesel fuel. In this study, the emission performance of a low cetane number, low research octane number naphtha (CN 34, RON 56) was examined on a production 6-cylinder heavy-duty on-highway truck engine and aftertreatment system. Using only production hardware, both the engine-out and tailpipe emissions were examined during the heavy-duty emission testing cycles using naphtha and ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuels. Without any modifications to the hardware and software, the tailpipe emissions were comparable when using either naphtha or ULSD on the heavy duty test cycles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1003
Ye Liu, Gang Lv, Chenyang Fan, Na Li, Xiaowei Wang
Abstract The evolution of surface functional groups (SFGs) and the graphitization degree of soot generated in premixed methane flames are studied and the correlation between them is discussed. Test soot samples were obtained from an optimized thermophoretic sampling system and probe sampling system. The SFGs of soot were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) after removing the soluble impurities from the soot samples, while the graphitization degree of soot was characterized by Raman spectrum and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The results reveal that the number of aliphatic C-H groups and C=O groups shows an initial increase and then decrease in the sooting history. The large amount of aliphatic C-H groups and small amount of aromatic C-H groups in the early stage of the soot mass growth process indicate that aliphatic C-H groups make a major contribution to the early stage of soot mass growth.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1009
Yajun Wang, Xingyu Liang, Yuesen Wang, Xiuxiu Sun, Hanzhengnan Yu, Xikai Liu
In this paper, the influences of metallic content of lubricating oils on diesel particles were investigated. Three lubricating oils with different levels of metallic content were used in a 2.22 Liter, two cylinders, four stroke, and direct injection diesel engine. 4.0 wt. % and 8 wt. % antioxidant and corrosion inhibitor (T202) were added into baseline lubricating oil to improve the performance respectively. Primary particle diameter distributions and particle nanostructure were compared and analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope. The graphitization degrees of diesel particles from different lubricating oils were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Conclusions drawn from the experiments indicate that the metallic content increases the primary particles diameter at 1600 rpm and 2200 rpm. The primary particles diameter ranges from 5 nm to 65 nm and the distribution conformed to Gaussian distribution.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0811
John Williams, Heather D. Hamje, David J. Rickeard, Andreas Kolbeck, Kalle Lehto, Elena Rebesco, Walter Mirabella, Carole A. Bontoft, Maria Dolores Cardenas
Abstract Research Octane Number (RON) and Motor Octane Number (MON) are used to describe gasoline combustion which describe antiknock performance under different conditions. Recent literature suggests that MON is less important than RON in modern cars and a relaxation in the MON specification could improve vehicle performance. At the same time, for the same octane number change, increasing RON appears to provide more benefit to engine power and acceleration than reducing MON. Some workers have advocated the use of an octane index (OI) which incorporates both parameters instead of either RON or MON to give an indication of gasoline knock resistance. Previous Concawe work investigated the effect of RON and MON on the power and acceleration performance of two Euro 4 gasoline passenger cars during an especially-designed acceleration test cycle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0594
Baitao Xiao, Erik Hellstrom, Yan Wang, Julia Buckland, Mario Santillo
Abstract Turbocharger compressors are susceptible to surge – the instability phenomena that impose limitations on the operation of turbocharged engines because of undesired noise, engine torque capability constraints, and hardware strain. Turbocharged engines are typically equipped with a binary compressor recirculation valve (CRV) whose primary function is to prevent compressor surge. Calibration of the associated control strategy requires in-vehicle tests and usually employs subjective criteria. This work aims to reduce the calibration effort for the strategy by developing a test procedure and data processing algorithms. An automated calibration for CRV control is developed that will generate a baseline calibration that avoids surge events. The effort to obtain the baseline calibration, which can be further fine-tuned, is thereby significantly reduced.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0592
Robin Holmbom, Bohan Liang, Lars Eriksson
1 Turbocharging plays an important role in the downsizing of engines. Model-based approaches for boost control are going to increasing the necessity for controlling the wastegate flow more accurately. In today’s cars, the wastegate is usually only controlled with a duty cycle and without position feedback. Due to nonlinearities and varying disturbances a duty cycle does not correspond to a certain position. Currently the most frequently used feedback controller strategy is to use the boost pressure as the controller reference. This means that there is a large time constant from actuation command to effect in boost pressure, which can impair dynamic performance. In this paper, the performance of an electrically controlled vacuum-actuated waste-gate, subsequently referred to as vacuum wastegate, is compared to an electrical servo-controlled wastegate, also referred to as electric wastegate.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0593
Ivan Arsie, Rocco Di Leo, Cesare Pianese, Matteo De Cesare
Abstract The development of more affordable sensors together with the enhancement of computation features in current Engine Management Systems (EMS), makes the in-cylinder pressure sensing a suitable methodology for the on-board engine control and diagnosis. Since the 1960’s the in-cylinder pressure signal was employed to investigate the combustion process of the internal combustion engines for research purposes. Currently, the sensors cost reduction in addition to the need to comply with the strict emissions legislation has promoted a large-scale diffusion on production engines equipment. The in-cylinder pressure signal offers the opportunity to estimate with high dynamic response almost all the variables of interest for an effective engine combustion control even in case of non-conventional combustion processes (e.g. PCCI, HCCI, LTC).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0591
Andreas Thomasson, Xavier Llamas, Lars Eriksson
1 In modern turbocharged engines the power output is strongly connected to the turbocharger speed, through the flow characteristics of the turbocharger. Turbo speed is therefore an important state for the engine operation, but it is usually not measured or controlled directly. Still the control system must ensure that the turbo speed does not exceed its maximum allowed value to prevent damaging the turbocharger. Having access to a turbo speed signal, preferably by a cheap and reliable estimation instead of a sensor, could be beneficial for over speed protection and supervision of the turbocharger. This paper proposes a turbo speed observer that only utilizes the conditions around the compressor and a model for the compressor map. These conditions are either measured or can be more easily estimated from available sensors compared the conditions on the turbine side.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0588
Adithya P Reddy Ranga, Gopichandra Surnilla, Joseph Thomas, Ethan Sanborn, Mark Linenberg
Abstract Dual fuel injection systems, like PFI+DI (port fuel injection + direct injection system) are being increasingly used in gasoline engine applications to increase the engine performance, fuel efficiency and reduce emissions. At a given engine operating condition, the air/fuel error is a function of the fraction of fuel injected by each of the fuel systems. If the fraction of fuel from each of the fuel system is changed at a given operating condition, the fuel system error will change as well making it challenging to learn the fuel system errors. This paper aims at describing the adaptive fueling control algorithm to estimate the fuel error contribution from each individual fuel system. Considering the fuel injection system slope errors to be the significant cause for air-fuel errors, a model structure was developed to calculate the fuel system adaptive correction factor as a function of changing fraction of fueling between the fuel systems.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0604
Christian Friedrich, Yves Compera, Matthias Auer, Gunnar Stiesch, Georg Wachtmeister
Abstract Improving fuel efficiency while meeting relevant emission limits set by emissions legislation is among the main objectives of engine development. Simultaneously the development costs and development time have to be steadily reduced. For these reasons, the high demands in terms of quality and validity of measurements at the engine test bench are continuously rising. This paper will present a new methodology for efficient testing of an industrial combustion engine in order to improve the process of decision making for combustion-relevant component setups. The methodology includes various modules for increasing measurement quality and validity. Modules like stationary point detection to determine steady state engine behavior, signal quality checks to monitor the signal quality of chosen measurement signals and plausibility checks to evaluate physical relations between several measurement signals ensure a high measurement quality over all measurements.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0601
Huayi Li, Kenneth Butts, Kevin Zaseck, Dominic Liao-McPherson, Ilya Kolmanovsky
Abstract The development of advanced model-based engine control strategies, such as economic model predictive control (eMPC) for diesel engine fuel economy and emission optimization, requires accurate and low-complexity models for controller design validation. This paper presents the NOx and smoke emissions modeling of a light duty diesel engine equipped with a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) and a high pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. Such emission models can be integrated with an existing air path model into a complete engine mean value model (MVM), which can predict engine behavior at different operating conditions for controller design and validation before physical engine tests. The NOx and smoke emission models adopt an artificial neural network (ANN) approach with Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) architectures. The networks are trained and validated using experimental data collected from engine bench tests.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0611
Viktor Leek, Kristoffer Ekberg, Lars Eriksson
1 ABSTRACT Today’s need for fuel efficient vehicles, together with increasing engine component complexity, makes optimal control a valuable tool in the process of finding the most fuel efficient control strategies. To efficiently calculate the solution to optimal control problems a gradient based optimization technique is desirable, making continuously differentiable models preferable. Many existing control-oriented Diesel engine models do not fully posses this property, often due to signal saturations or discrete conditions. This paper offers a continuously differentiable, mean value engine model, of a heavy-duty diesel engine equipped with VGT and EGR, suitable for optimal control purposes. The model is developed from an existing, validated, engine model, but adapted to be continuously differentiable and therefore tailored for usage in an optimal control environment. The changes due to the conversion are quantified and presented.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0606
Ashley Wiese, Anna Stefanopoulou, Julia Buckland, Amey Y. Karnik
Abstract Low-Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation (LP-EGR) has been shown to be an effective means of improving fuel economy and suppressing knock in downsized, boosted, spark ignition engines. LP-EGR is particularly beneficial at low-speed, high-load conditions, but can lead to combustion instability at lower loads. The transport delays inherent in LP-EGR systems slow the reduction of intake manifold EGR concentrations during tip-out events, which may lead to excessive EGR concentrations at low load. This paper explores leveraging Variable Valve Timing (VVT) as a means of improving the rate of reduction of intake manifold EGR concentration prior to tip-out. At higher boost levels, high valve overlap may result in intake manifold gas passing directly to the exhaust manifold. This short-circuiting behaviour could potentially improve EGR evacuation rates.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0874
Thorsten Langhorst, Felix Rosenthal, Thomas Koch
Abstract Throughout the world cost-efficient Naphtha streams are available in refineries. Owing to less processing, CO2 emissions emitted in the course of production of these fuels are significantly lower than with conventional fuels. In common CI/SI engines, however, the deployment of Naphtha is considerably restricted due to unfavourable fuel properties, e.g. low cetane/octane numbers. Former investigations illustrated high knocking tendency for SI applications and severe pressure rise for CI combustion. Moreover, the focus of past publications was on passenger vehicle applications. Hence, this paper centers on heavy-duty stationary engine applications. Consequently, measures to increase the technically feasible IMEP with regard to limitations in knocking behaviour and pressure rise were explored whilst maintaining efficient combustion and low emissions.
Viewing 121 to 150 of 16433