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Viewing 121 to 150 of 16633
2017-09-23
Journal Article
2017-01-1983
Bing Zhu, Shude Yan, Jian Zhao, Weiwen Deng, Ning Bian
Abstract Electric power steering (EPS) system is a kind of dynamic control system for vehicle steering, which can amplify the driver steering torque inputs to the vehicle to improve steering comfortable and performance, but the present EPS can’t cater to the driving habits of different people. In this paper, a personalized EPS controller is designed based on the driver behavior, which combines real-time driver behavior identification strategy with personalized assistance characteristic. Firstly, the driver behavior data acquisition system is designed and established, based on which, the input data of different kinds of drivers along with vehicle signals are collected under typical working conditions, then the identification of driver behavior online is realized using the BP neural network.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2135
Alex Thirkell, Rui Chen, Ian Harrington
Abstract Electrification of aircraft is on track to be a future key design principal due to the increasing pressure on the aviation industry to significantly reduce harmful emissions by 2050 and the increased use of electrical equipment. This has led to an increased focus on the research and development of alternative power sources for aircraft, including fuel cells. These alternative power sources could either be used to provide propulsive power or as an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). Previous studies have considered isolated design cases where a fuel cell system was tailored for their specific application. To accommodate for the large variation between aircraft, this study covers the design of an empirical model, which will be used to size a fuel cell system for any given aircraft based on basic design parameters. The model was constructed utilising aircraft categorisation, fuel cell sizing and balance of plant sub-models.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2136
Almuddin Rustum Sayyad, Pratik Salunke, Sangram Jadhav
Abstract The objective of this work is to optimize the operating parameters of the Direct Injection Single Cylinder (5.2 kw) CI engine with respect to Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE), Hydrocarbons (HC) and Carbon dioxide (CO2). For this investigation, we used Simarouba Biodiesel as an alternate fuel for diesel fuel which possesses low cetane number which is not sufficient to operate existing diesel engine. However, this could be combined with the diesel fuel in the form of blends. For this investigation four levels and four parameters were selected viz. Injection Pressure (IP), Fuel Fraction (FF), Compression Ratio (CR) and Injection Timing (Before TDC). Taguchi Method is used for minimizing the number of experiments and Multiple Regression Analysis is used to find the optimum condition. Three outputs variables such as; Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE), content of HC particles and CO2 in the emission are measured and considered its influence on CI Engine performance.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2137
Dnyaneshwar V. Kadam, Sangram D. Jadhav
Abstract Vibration is the most considerable factor in dynamics of machinery. Vibration causes an adverse effect on engine components and may reduce the life of the engine. The conventional fossil fuel sources are limited in the world. The dependency on diesel should be reduced by using biodiesel as an alternative fuel in next few years. The input parameters are affected on engine performance and emission. The present study mainly focuses on an optimization of vibrations, performance and emission using Taguchi and multiple regression analysis for biodiesel as a fuel. The test was performed on a single cylinder, four-stroke, diesel engine with VCR. Taguchi method is used to prepare the design of experiment of the L16 array to minimize the number of experiments and multiple regression analysis used for finding the best relationship between the input and output parameters. The selected input parameters are- fuel fraction, compression ratio, injection pressure and injection timing.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2017
Catherine Ninah, Brian Strevens, Cole Barcia, Isabelle Labbe, Michael Frenna, Austin Faulconer, Keon Habbaba, Katherine Loundy, Louis Schaefer, Alexa Frost, Andrew Foran, Robert Brown, Luis Rabelo
Abstract The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is preparing for a manned mission to Mars to test the sustainment of civilization on the planet Mars. This research explores the requirements and feasibility of autonomously producing fuel on Mars for a return trip back to Earth. As a part of NASA’s initiative for a manned trip to Mars, our team’s work creates and analyzes the allocation of resources necessary in deploying a fuel station on this foreign soil. Previous research has addressed concerns with a number individual components of this mission such as power required for fuel station and tools; however, the interactions between these components and the effects they would have on the overall requirements for the fuel station are still unknown to NASA. By creating a baseline discrete-event simulation model in a simulation software environment, the research team has been able to simulate the fuel production process on Mars.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2028
Steven Nolan, Patrick Norman, Graeme Burt, Catherine Jones
Abstract Turbo-electric distributed propulsion (TeDP) for aircraft allows for the complete redesign of the airframe so that greater overall fuel burn and emissions benefits can be achieved. Whilst conventional electrical power systems may be used for smaller aircraft, large aircraft (~300 pax) are likely to require the use of superconducting electrical power systems to enable the required whole system power density and efficiency levels to be achieved. The TeDP concept requires an effective electrical fault management and protection system. However, the fault response of a superconducting TeDP power system and its components has not been well studied to date, limiting the effective capture of associated protection requirements. For example, with superconducting systems it is possible that a hotspot is formed on one of the components, such as a cable. This can result in one subsection, rather than all, of a cable quenching.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2026
Narayanan Komerath, Shravan Hariharan, Dhwanil Shukla, Sahaj Patel, Vishnu Rajendran, Emily Hale
Abstract Our concept studies indicate that a set of reflectors floated in the upper atmosphere can efficiently reduce radiant forcing into the atmosphere. The cost of reducing the radiant forcing sufficiently to reverse the current rate of Global Warming, is well within reach of global financial resources. This paper summarizes the overall concept and focuses on one of the reflector concepts, the Flying Carpet. The basic element of this reflector array is a rigidized reflector sheet towed behind and above a solar-powered, distributed electric-propelled flying wing. The vehicle rises above 30,480 m (100,000 ft) in the daytime by solar power. At night, the very low wing loading of the sheets enables the system to stay well above the controlled airspace ceiling of 18,288 m (60,000 ft). The concept study results are summarized before going into technical issues in implementation. Flag instability is studied in initial wind tunnel experiments.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2022
Katherine Loundy, Louis Schaefer, Andrew Foran, Catherine Ninah, Khristopher Bandong, Robert Brown, Hunter Heston, John-Paul Steed, William Young, Mark Heinrich, Luis Rabelo
Abstract The future of human exploration in the solar system is contingent on the ability to exploit resources in-situ to produce mission consumables. Specifically, it has become clear that the success of a manned mission to Mars will likely depend on fuel components created on the Martian surface. While several architectures for an unmanned fuel production surface facility on Mars exist in theory, a simulation of the performance and operation of these architectures has not been created. In this paper, the framework describing a simulation of one such architecture is defined. Within this architecture, each component of the base is implemented as a state machine, with the ability to communicate with other base elements as well as a supervisor. An environment supervisor is also created which governs low level aspects of the simulation such as movement and resource distribution, in addition to higher-level aspects such as location selection with respect to operations specific behavior.
2017-09-19
Journal Article
2017-01-2036
William Schley
Abstract Of all aircraft power and thermal loads, flight controls can be the most challenging to quantify because they are highly variable. Unlike constant or impulsive loads, actuator power demands more closely resemble random processes. Some inherent nonlinearities complicate this even further. Actuation power consumption and waste heat generation are both sensitive to input history. But control activity varies considerably with mission segment, turbulence and vehicle state. Flight control is a major power consumer at times, so quantifying power demand and waste heat is important for sizing power and thermal management system components. However, many designers sidestep the stochastic aspects of the problem initially, leading to overly conservative system sizing. The overdesign becomes apparent only after detailed flight simulations become available. These considerations are particularly relevant in trade studies comparing electric versus hydraulic actuation.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2035
Eric C. Bauer, Nima Niassati, John Brothers, John Troth, Jeff Hensal, Jin Wang, Daniel Schweickart, Dennis Grosjean
Abstract As applications in aerospace, transportation and data centers are faced with increased electric power consumption, their dc operating voltages have increased to reduce cable weight and to improve efficiency. Electric arcs in these systems still cause dangerous fault conditions and have garnered more attention in recent years. Arcs can be classified as either low impedance or high impedance arcs and both can cause insulation damage and fires. Low impedance arcs release lots of energy when high voltage becomes nearly shorted to ground. High impedance arcs can occur when two current-carrying electrodes are separated, either by vibration of a loose connection or by cables snapping. The high impedance arc decreases load current due to a higher equivalent load impedance seen by the source. This complicates the differentiation of a high impedance arc fault from normal operation.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2034
Bailey Hall, Benjamin Palmer, Tyler Milburn, Luis Herrera, Bang Tsao, Joseph Weimer
Abstract Future aircraft will demand a significant amount of electrical power to drive primary flight control surfaces. The electrical system architecture needed to source these flight critical loads will have to be resilient, autonomous, and fast. Designing and ensuring that a power system architecture can meet the load requirements and provide power to the flight critical buses at all times is fundamental. In this paper, formal methods and linear temporal logic are used to develop a contactor control strategy to meet the given specifications. The resulting strategy is able to manage multiple contactors during different types of generator failures. In order to verify the feasibility of the control strategy, a real-time simulation platform is developed to simulate the electrical power system. The platform has the capability to test an external controller through Hardware in the Loop (HIL).
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2033
Minh-khoa. Lam, Christopher Buterhaugh, Luis Herrera, Bang Tsao
Abstract The amount of electrical power required for future aircraft is increasing significantly. In this paper, a comprehensive model of a drive shaft with multiple degrees of freedom was developed and integrated to detailed engine and electrical network models to study the impact of higher electrical loads. The overall system model is composed of the engine, shafts, gearbox, and the electric network. The Dynamic Dual Spool High Bypass JT9D engine was chosen for this study. The engine was modeled using NASA’s T-MATS (Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems) software. In the electrical side, one generator was connected to the Low Pressure (LP) shaft and the other to the High Pressure (HP) shaft. A modified model of the shafts between the engine and the accessory gearbox was created.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2032
Nisha Kondrath
Abstract Efficient, small, and reliable dc-dc power converters with high power density are highly desirable in applications such as aerospace and electric vehicles, where battery storage is limited. Bidirectional full-bridge (FB) dc-dc converters are very popular in medium and high-power applications requiring regenerative capabilities. Full-bridge topology has several advantages such as: Inherent galvanic isolation between input and output as well as high conversion ratio due to the transformer with a turns ratio n. Reduction in passive component sizes due to the increase in inductor current frequency to twice the switching frequency. Reduced voltage stresses on the low-voltage side switches and current stresses on the high-voltage side switches. However, due to the high number of switches, device losses increase.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2031
Nisha Kondrath, Dalvir Saini, Nathaniel Smith
Abstract In aerospace applications, it is important to have efficient, small, affordable, and reliable power conversion units with high power density to supply a wide range of loads. Use of wide-band gap devices, such as Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Gallium Nitride (GaN) devices, in power electronic converters is expected to reduce the device losses and needs for extensive thermal management systems in power converters, as well as facilitate high-frequency operation, thereby reducing the passive component sizes and increasing the power density. A novel hybrid SiC-GaN based full-bridge dc-dc buck converter with improved efficiency for high power applications will be presented in this paper. With the current device manufacturing technology, GaN devices can only handle breakdown voltages up to 650 V, while SiC devices can handle up to 1200 V. GaN devices exhibit remarkable switching performance compared to SiC devices.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2037
Daniel Schlabe, Dirk Zimmer, Alexander Pollok
Abstract The thermal inertia of aircraft cabins and galleys is significant for commercial aircraft. The aircraft cabin is controlled by the Environment Control System (ECS) to reach, among other targets, a prescribed temperature. By allowing a temperature band of ± 2 K instead of a fixed temperature, it is possible to use this thermal dynamic of the cabin as energy storage. This storage can then be used to reduce electrical peak power, increase efficiency of the ECS, reduce thermal cooling peak power, or reduce engine offtake if it is costly or not sufficiently available. In the same way, also the aircraft galleys can be exploited. Since ECS and galleys are among the largest consumers of electrical power or bleed air, there is a large potential on improving energy efficiency or reducing system mass to reduce fuel consumption of aircraft. This paper investigates different exploitation strategies of cabin and galley dynamics using modelling and simulation.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2062
Tushar Choudhary, Mithilesh Sahu, Shreya KRISHNA
Abstract Gas turbine technology has traditionally been used by the aviation industry for powering the aircraft including acting as APU. Operational unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) has a gas turbine which is used as Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) which generically have overall efficiency not exceeding 35% which limits the range in terms of time in the air for the same APU fuel carried onboard. Gas turbine exhaust heat energy is largely wasted and there is scope of its utilization by thermally coupling it with a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC). By coupling SOFC with the gas turbine (GT) based power system, a hybrid SOFC-GT based APU system has been proposed for thermodynamic analysis, and the thermal efficiency of the proposed system can be enhanced by 77%. This paper focuses on a thermodynamic cycle analysis of an internal reformed solid oxide fuel cell which is integrated with the gas turbine to form a hybrid APU system for an UAV.
2017-09-17
Journal Article
2017-01-2480
Roberto Dante, Andrea Sliepcevich, Marco Andreoni, Mario Cotilli
Abstract Tin sulfides (SnS and SnS2), represent a safer and greener alternative to other metal sulfides such as copper sulfides, and MoS2 etc. Their behavior is usually associated to that of solid lubricants such as graphite. A mixture of tin sulfides, with the 65 wt% of SnS2, has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). In order to investigate the effect of tin sulfides upon two crucial friction material ingredients, two mixtures were prepared: the former was made by mixing tin sulfides with a natural flake graphite and the latter was made mixing tin sulfides with a straight novolak. They were analyzed by TGA and differential thermal analysis (DTA) in both nitrogen and air. Some interferences were detected between tin sulfides and graphite in air.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0015
Luigi Teodosio, Vincenzo De Bellis, Fabio Bozza, Daniela Tufano
Abstract Nowadays different technical solutions have been proposed to improve the performance of internal combustion engines, especially in terms of Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC). Its reduction of course contributes to comply with the CO2 emissions legislation for vehicle homologation. Concerning the spark ignition engines, the downsizing coupled to turbocharging demonstrated a proper effectiveness to improve the BSFC at part load. On the other hand, at high load, the above solution highly penalizes the fuel consumption mainly because of knock onset, that obliges to degrade the combustion phasing and/or enrich the air/fuel mixture. A promising technique to cope with the above drawbacks consists in the Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) concept. An optimal Compression Ratio (CR) selection, in fact, allows for further improvements of the thermodynamic efficiency at part load, while at high load, it permits to mitigate knock propensity, resulting in more optimized combustions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0017
Emanuele Servetto, Andrea Bianco, Gennaro Caputo, Giuseppe Lo Iacono
Abstract Large pressure pulsations and a non-uniform distribution of charge air temperature along the intake manifold were detected on a large-bore marine Dual-Fuel engine. These two phenomena were found to impact negatively on the knock resistance of individual cylinders, when the engine is operated in gas-mode. As it happens with marine gas engines, the cylinder most prone to knocking drives the engine tuning for all the others, thus reducing the overall fuel conversion efficiency. In order to effectively tackle this issue, a comprehensive study was carried out, which included both experimental testing and fluid-dynamics simulation. A detailed GT-POWER 1D engine model was built, representing the laboratory 8L (i.e. inline eight-cylinder) engine configuration. The model was extensively correlated against measurements at different speeds and loads and it proved capable of closely reproducing both the pressure fluctuations and the temperature gradient along the intake manifold.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0034
Michele Battistoni, Carlo N. Grimaldi, Valentino Cruccolini, Gabriele Discepoli, Matteo De Cesare
Abstract Water injection in highly boosted gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines has become an attractive area over the last few years as a way of increasing efficiency, enhancing performance and reducing emissions. The technology and its effects are not new, but current gasoline engine trends for passenger vehicles have several motivations for adopting this technology today. Water injection enables higher compression ratios, optimal spark timing and elimination of fuel enrichment at high load, and possibly replacement of EGR. Physically, water reduces charge temperature by evaporation, dilutes combustion, and varies the specific heat ratio of the working fluid, with complex effects. Several of these mutually intertwined aspects are investigated in this paper through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, focusing on a turbo-charged GDI engine with port water injection (PWI). Different strategies for water injection timing, pressure and spray targeting are investigated.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0027
Nearchos Stylianidis, Ulugbek Azimov, Nobuyuki Kawahara, Eiji Tomita
Abstract A chemical kinetics and computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to evaluate the combustion of syngas derived from biomass and coke-oven solid feedstock in a micro-pilot ignited supercharged dual-fuel engine under lean conditions. For this analysis, a reduced syngas chemical kinetics mechanism was constructed and validated by comparing the ignition delay and laminar flame speed data with those obtained from experiments and other detail chemical kinetics mechanisms available in the literature. The reaction sensitivity analysis was conducted for ignition delay at elevated pressures in order to identify important chemical reactions that govern the combustion process. We have confirmed the statements of other authors that HO2+OH=H2O+O2, H2O2+M=OH+OH+M and H2O2+H=H2+HO2 reactions showed very high sensitivity during high-pressure ignition delay times and had considerable uncertainty.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0026
Davide Paredi, Tommaso Lucchini, Gianluca D'Errico, Angelo Onorati, Stefano Golini, Nicola Rapetto
Abstract The scope of the work presented in this paper was to apply the latest open source CFD achievements to design a state of the art, direct-injection (DI), heavy-duty, natural gas-fueled engine. Within this context, an initial steady-state analysis of the in-cylinder flow was performed by simulating three different intake ducts geometries, each one with seven different valve lift values, chosen according to an estabilished methodology proposed by AVL. The discharge coefficient (Cd) and the Tumble Ratio (TR) were calculated in each case, and an optimal intake ports geometry configuration was assessed in terms of a compromise between the desired intensity of tumble in the chamber and the satisfaction of an adequate value of Cd. Subsequently, full-cycle, cold-flow simulations were performed for three different engine operating points, in order to evaluate the in-cylinder development of TR and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) under transient conditions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0050
Anjan Rao Puttige, Robin Hamberg, Paul Linschoten, Goutham Reddy, Andreas Cronhjort, Ola Stenlaas
Abstract Improving turbocharger performance to increase engine efficiency has the potential to help meet current and upcoming exhaust legislation. One limiting factor is compressor surge, an air flow instability phenomenon capable of causing severe vibration and noise. To avoid surge, the turbocharger is operated with a safety margin (surge margin) which, as well as avoiding surge in steady state operation, unfortunately also lowers engine performance. This paper investigates the possibility of detecting compressor surge with a conventional engine knock sensor. It further recommends a surge detection algorithm based on their signals during transient engine operation. Three knock sensors were mounted on the turbocharger and placed along the axes of three dimensions of movement. The engine was operated in load steps starting from steady state. The steady state points of operation covered the vital parts of the engine speed and load range.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0039
Daniele Piazzullo, Michela Costa, Youngchul Ra, Vittorio ROCCO, Ankith Ullal
Abstract Bio-derived fuels are drawing more and more attention in the internal combustion engine (ICE) research field in recent years. Those interests in use of renewable biofuels in ICE applications derive from energy security issues and, more importantly, from environment pollutant emissions concerns. High fidelity numerical study of engine combustion requires advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to be coupled with detailed chemical kinetic models. This task becomes extremely challenging if real fuels are taken into account, as they include a mixture of hundreds of different hydrocarbons, which prohibitively increases computational cost. Therefore, along with employing surrogate fuel models, reduction of detailed kinetic models for multidimensional engine applications is preferred. In the present work, a reduced mechanism was developed for primary reference fuel (PRF) using the directed relation graph (DRG) approach.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0065
Helmut Ruhland, Thomas Lorenz, Jens Dunstheimer, Albert Breuer, Maziar Khosravi
Abstract An integral part of combustion system development for previous NA gasoline engines was the optimization of charge motion towards the best compromise in terms of full load performance, part load stability, emissions and, last but not least, fuel economy. This optimum balance may potentially be different in GTDI engines. While it is generally accepted that an increased charge motion level improves the mixture preparation in direct injection gasoline engines, the tradeoff in terms of performance seems to become less dominant as the boosting systems of modern engines are typically capable enough to compensate the flow losses generated by the more restrictive ports. Nevertheless, the increased boost level does not come free; increased charge motion generates higher pumping- and wall heat losses. Hence it is questionable and engine dependent, whether more charge motion is always better.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0064
En-Zhe Song, Shi-Chao Chu, Li-Ping Yang, Zhen-Ting Liu
Abstract A CFD model of natural gas engine was established, and working process from intake stroke to combustion stroke was simulated in this paper. Based on the validation of CFD model through experimental method, the combustion characteristics of lean-burn natural gas engine are studied under different ignition timings and different ignition energies. Results indicate that, the in-cylinder indicated mean effective pressure increases with the ignition timing advancing from 22°CA BTDC to 32°CA BTDC at the same load level. Meanwhile, the heat release rate is increased by 23.18J/°CA and its peak phase is advanced by 9°CA. The peak pressure is also increased by 45.95% and its phase is advanced by 4.5°CA. On the other hand, when the ignition energy decreases from 91.97mJ to 33.1mJ at the same load level, the in-cylinder indicated mean effective pressure decreases.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0063
Sebastiano Breda, Alessandro D'Adamo, Stefano Fontanesi, Marco Del Pecchia, Simona Merola, Adrian Irimescu
Abstract The recent interest in alternative non-fossil fuels has led researchers to evaluate several alcohol-based formulations. However, one of the main requirements for innovative fuels is to be compatible with existing units’ hardware, so that full replacement or smart flexible-fuel strategies can be smoothly adopted. n-Butanol is considered as a promising candidate to replace commercial gasoline, given its ease of production from bio-mass and its main physical and chemical properties similar to those of Gasoline. The compared behavior of n-butanol and gasoline was analyzed in an optically-accessible DISI engine in a previous paper [1]. CFD simulations explained the main outcomes of the experimental campaign in terms of combustion behavior for two operating conditions. In particular, the first-order role of the slower evaporation rate of n-butanol compared to gasoline was highlighted when the two fuels were operated under the same injection phasing.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0069
Hyunwook Park, Jugon Shin, Choongsik Bae
Abstract The spray and combustion of diesel fuel were investigated to provide a better understanding of the evaporation and combustion process under the simulated cold-start condition of a diesel engine. The experiment was conducted in a constant volume combustion chamber and the engine cranking period was selected as the target ambient condition. Mie scattering and shadowgraph techniques were used to visualize the liquid- and vapor-phase of the fuel under evaporating non-combustion conditions (oxygen concentration=0%). In-chamber pressure and direct flame visualization were acquired for spray combustion conditions (oxygen concentration=21%). The fuel was injected at an injection pressure of 30 MPa, which is the typical pressure during the cranking period.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0087
Maxime Pochet, Ida Truedsson, Fabrice Foucher, Hervé Jeanmart, Francesco Contino
Abstract Ammonia and hydrogen can be produced from water, air and excess renewable electricity (Power-to-fuel) and are therefore a promising alternative in the transition from fossil fuel energy to cleaner energy sources. An Homogeneous-Charge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engine is therefore being studied to use both fuels under a variable blending ratio for Combined Heat and Power (CHP) production. Due to the high auto-ignition resistance of ammonia, hydrogen is required to promote and stabilize the HCCI combustion. Therefore the research objective is to investigate the HCCI combustion of varying hydrogen-ammonia blending ratios in a 16:1 compression ratio engine. A specific focus is put on maximizing the ammonia proportion as well as minimizing the NOx emissions that could arise from the nitrogen contained in the ammonia.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0089
S. Vedharaj, R. Vallinayagam, Yanzhao An, Alaaeldin Dawood, Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi, Bart Somers, Junseok Chang, Bengt Johansson
Abstract The literature study on PPC in optical engine reveals investigations on OH chemiluminescence and combustion stratification. So far, mostly PRF fuel is studied and it is worthwhile to examine the effect of fuel properties on PPC. Therefore, in this work, fuel having different octane rating and physical properties are selected and PPC is studied in an optical engine. The fuels considered in this study are diesel, heavy naphtha, light naphtha and their corresponding surrogates such as heptane, PRF50 and PRF65 respectively. Without EGR (Intake O2 = 21%), these fuels are tested at an engine speed of 1200 rpm, fuel injection pressure of 800 bar and pressure at TDC = 35 bar. SOI is changed from late to early fuel injection timings to study PPC and the shift in combustion regime from CI to PPC is explored for all fuels. An increased understanding on the effect of fuel octane number, physical properties and chemical composition on combustion and emission formation is obtained.
Viewing 121 to 150 of 16633