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Viewing 271 to 300 of 16604
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0780
Dongwei Wu, Baigang Sun, Qinghe Luo, Xi Wang, Yunshan Ge
Abstract The combustion characteristics of hydrogen-air mixtures have significance significant impact on the performance and control of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and the combustion velocity is an important parameter in characterizing the combustion characteristics of the mixture. A four-cylinder hydrogen internal combustion engine was used to study hydrogen combustion; the combustion characteristics of a hydrogen mixture were experimentally studied in a constant-volume incendiary bomb, and the turbulent premixed combustion characteristics of hydrogen were calculated and analyzed. Turbulent hydrogen combustion comes under the folded laminar flame model. The turbulent combustion velocity in lean hydrogen combustion is related not only to the turbulent velocity and the laminar burning velocity, but also to the additional turbulence term caused by the instability of the flame.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0778
Vishnu Vijayakumar, P. Sakthivel, Bhuvenesh Tyagi, Amardeep Singh, Reji Mathai, Shyam Singh, Ajay Kumar Sehgal
Abstract In the light of major research work carried out on the detrimental health impacts of ultrafine particles (<50 nm), Euro VI emission standards incorporate a limit on particle number, of which ultrafine particles is the dominant contributor. As Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is a cheaper and cleaner fuel when compared to diesel, there has been a steady increase in the number of CNG vehicles on road especially in the heavy duty segment. Off late, there has been much focus on the nature of particle emissions emanating from CNG engines as these particles mainly fall under the ultrafine particle size range. The combustion of lubricant is considered to be the dominant source of particle emissions from CNG engines. Particle emission due to lubricant is affected by the oil transport mechanisms into the combustion chamber which in turn vary with engine operating conditions as well as with the physico chemical properties of the lubricant.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0876
Senthil Kumar Masimalai, Jai Kumar Mayakrishnan
Abstract Different methods to improve the performance of a WCO (waste cooking oil of sunflower) based mono cylinder compression ignition (CI) engine were investigated. Initially WCO was converted into its emulsion by emulsification process and tested as fuel. In the second phase, the engine intake system was modified to admit excess oxygen along with air to test the engine with WCO and WCO emulsion as fuels under oxygen enriched environment. In the third phase, the engine was modified to work in the dual fuel mode with hydrogen being used as the inducted fuel and either WCO or WCO emulsion used as the pilot fuel. All the tests were carried out at 100% and 40% of the maximum load (3.7 kW power output) at the rated speed of 1500 rpm. Engine data with neat diesel and neat WCO were used for comparison. WCO emulsion indicated considerable improvement in performance. The smoke and NOx values were noted to be less than neat WCO.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0874
Thorsten Langhorst, Felix Rosenthal, Thomas Koch
Abstract Throughout the world cost-efficient Naphtha streams are available in refineries. Owing to less processing, CO2 emissions emitted in the course of production of these fuels are significantly lower than with conventional fuels. In common CI/SI engines, however, the deployment of Naphtha is considerably restricted due to unfavourable fuel properties, e.g. low cetane/octane numbers. Former investigations illustrated high knocking tendency for SI applications and severe pressure rise for CI combustion. Moreover, the focus of past publications was on passenger vehicle applications. Hence, this paper centers on heavy-duty stationary engine applications. Consequently, measures to increase the technically feasible IMEP with regard to limitations in knocking behaviour and pressure rise were explored whilst maintaining efficient combustion and low emissions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0875
Valentin Soloiu, Jose Moncada, Martin Muinos, Aliyah Knowles, Remi Gaubert, Thomas Beyerl, Gustavo Molina
Abstract This paper investigates the performance of an indirect injection (IDI) diesel engine fueled with Bu25, 75% ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD#2) blended with 25% n-butanol by mass. N-butanol, derivable from biomass feedstock, was used given its availability as an alternative fuel that can supplement the existing limited fossil fuel supply. Combustion and emissions were investigated at 2000 rpm across loads of 4.3-7.2 bar indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP). Cylinder pressure was collected using Kistler piezoelectric transducers in the precombustion (PC) and main combustion (MC) chambers. Ignition delays ranged from 0.74 - 1.02 ms for both operated fuels. Even though n-butanol has a lower cetane number, the high swirl in the separate combustion chamber would help advance its premixed combustion. The heat release rate of Bu25 became initially 3 J/crank-angle-degree (CAD) higher than that of ULSD#2 as load increased to 7.2 bar IMEP.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0878
Julia Carrell, Tom Slatter, Uel Little, Roger Lewis
Abstract The interaction of three bio-lubricant base oil candidates with seventeen combinations of surface treatment was studied, comparing wear scar volumes and coefficient of friction results. Substrates were initially ground, then a combination of superfinished, Dymon-iC™ DLC, an impact technique of ultra-fine shot blasting method doped with Tin and Molybdenum Disulfide, a calcium based chemical dip containing calcium sulfate and nano fullerene, were used. DLC is well reported to reduce friction. Some reports suggest wear in coated contacts is independent of the type of lubricant used, whilst others report that bio-lubricants offer reduced friction and wear in combination with DLC. Shot blasting can also reduce wear and friction, due to the surface dimples acting as lubricant reservoirs, making hydrodynamic lubrication more likely.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0869
Job Immanuel Encarnacion, Edwin Quiros
Abstract The Philippine Biofuels Act of 2006 (RA 9367) requires commercial diesel fuel to be mixed with Coconut Methyl Ester (CME) in accordance with the Philippine Clean Air Act of 1999 (RA 8749). As of 2015, the blend percentage is at 2% CME v/v, contrary to the scheduled 5% as stipulated in the biofuels act. Researches done locally showing the performance and emissions of CME-fueled engines are few and thus the basis for the CME percentage increase is still questionable and hampers the drive for the further implementation of the policy. The study investigates the influence of varying percentages of CME blends (2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% v/v) to the performance and emissions of a heavy-duty turbocharged common rail direct injection (CRDI) engine. The engine is run at steady state at partial load (50Nm and 250 Nm) and at near full load (500Nm). Each run is set at three pedal positions, α (25%, 50% and 60%), controlled directly from the engine control unit.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0866
Edwin N. Quiros, Karl B.N. Vergel, Ernesto B. Abaya
Abstract This paper presents a preliminary study to estimate, using on-road and laboratory tests, the mileage range of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as an alternative fuel for diesel-fed public utility jeepneys in the Philippines. Data from the study would be used by the Philippine Department of Energy to formulate and implement alternative fuel programs for public transport. On-road fuel consumption, load factor, and GPS speed data from selected in-use LPG and diesel jeepneys plying a chosen urban route were gathered to develop corresponding drive cycles for chassis dynamometer testing at 100% load factor were conducted to estimate an upper limit for fuel consumption. Measured on-road diesel jeepney mileage was about 6.7 km/liter at 63.5% load factor while that for LPG jeepney was 3.8-4.2 km/liter at 59.8% load factor. Drive cycle tests yielded 5.2 km/liter for diesel and 2.6-3.1 km/liter for LPG.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0872
Sunil Kumar Pathak, Vineet sood, Yograj Singh, Shubham Gupta, Salim Abbasbhai Channiwala
Abstract In this study, A Gasoline Passenger car (Euro IV) was experimentally investigated for performance and emissions on three different fuels i.e. Gasoline, LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) and DME (Di-methyl ether) blend with a concentration of 20% by mass in LPG (DME20). In particular, emission characteristics (including Hydrocarbon, CO, NOx, and CO2) over the Modified Indian Driving Cycle (MIDC) and fuel economy were investigated at the Vehicle Emission Laboratory (VEL) at the CSIR- Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun, India. The experimental results showed that Vehicle complies with Euro IV legislation on gasoline and LPG fuel, however, showed higher NOx Emissions on DME 20 fuel. LPG kit was reconfigured for DME and LPG blend to bring down the emissions within the specified emission limits. The Emission values observed for DME20 were 0.635 g/km (CO), 0.044 g/km (THC), and 0.014 g/km (NOx) against the Euro IV limits of 1.0 g/km, 0.1 g/km and 0.08 g/km, respectively.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0873
Senthilkumar Masimalai, Jai Kumar Mayakrishnan, Natraj Ganesan
Abstract This paper presents a comprehensive study on using MO (Mahua oil) as fuel effectively in a diesel engine by adopting emulsification and TBC (Thermal Barrier Coating) techniques. A mono cylinder diesel engine was used for the study. Initially trials were made on the engine using neat diesel (ND), Neat Mahua oil (NMO) as fuels. In the second phase, NMO was converted into its stable emulsion (called as MOE) and tested in the engine. Finally thermal barrier coating of 0.2 mm was made on the piston, valves and cylinder head of the engine using the ceramic power of Al2O3 and the engine was tested using NMO and MOE as fuels in the TBC engine. Results indicated improvement in BTE (brake thermal efficiency) with MOE as compared to NMO mainly at high power outputs in the unmodified engine. The maximum BTE was found as 31.5% with ND, 27.2% with NMO and 30.4% with MOE at the peak power output.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0870
Yuanxu Li, Xiangyu Meng, Karthik Nithyanandan, Chia-Fon Lee, Zhi Ning
Abstract Due to the increasing consumption of fossil fuels, alternative fuels in internal combustion engines have attracted a lot of attention in recent years. Ethanol is the most common alternative fuel used in spark ignition (SI) engines due to its advantages of biodegradability, positively impacting emissions reduction as well as octane number improvement. Meanwhile, acetone is well-known as one of the industrial waste solvents for synthetic fibers and most plastic materials. In comparison to ethanol, acetone has a number of more desirable properties for being a viable alternative fuel such as its higher energy density, heating value and volatility.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0855
Rakesh Kale, R. Banerjee
Abstract Use of bio fuels in a regular spark ignition engine is becoming common in several countries to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and overall generation of green house emissions. Alcohols such as methanol and ethanol are blended with gasoline when SI engines are considered. Advanced direct injection stratified charge engine technology has gained lot of interest due to its merits over conventional port fuel injection engine. Since the technology is significantly spray controlled, fuel injection and spray behavior under different thermodynamic conditions plays a very important role in successful engine operation. Present work was carried out to understand the spray behavior of isooctane and three alcohols under engine-like pressure and temperature conditions. Selected alcohols were ethanol, isobutanol and n-butanol. A six holes solenoid injector was used for this study.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0861
Balasubramanian N., Karthick Durairaj, Jayabalan Sethuraman
Abstract Asian countries hold a vast majority of the global two-wheeler population. Currently majority of these two wheelers are fueled by carburetors owing to their low cost and ease of maintenance. As these countries try to adopt emission norms similar to that of Euro 6 in a few years from now, they will be migrating to an injection system like port fuel injection (PFI), as it offers good control over emissions by using closed loop corrections, based on the exhaust lambda feedback. Stanadyne R&D has developed an innovative injection system that can be applied for such port fuel injection in two-wheelers. In this innovative design, the pump and injector are integrated into a single unit, making the system simple, compact and less expensive. The integrated injector uses a solenoid and spring arrangement, for pressurizing the fuel in a small chamber, and consumes less current. The pressurized fuel is then injected through orifice to produce spray in the intake port.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1148
Toumadher Barhoumi, Hyunjun Kim, Dongsuk Kum
Abstract Finding optimal split hybrid configurations through exhaustive search is almost intractable, mainly due to the huge design space, e.g. 252 compound split configurations using two planetary gear sets (PG). Thus, a systematic exhaustive design methodology is required to find optimal configurations. While most of the prior studies proposed methodologies that assess the performance within the physical design space, i.e. based on the powertrain configurations, this paper proposes a compound lever-based comprehensive design methodology. The (virtual) compound lever is an attractive design tool defined by two design variables, i.e. α and β, that omits the redundancy existing within the physical design space, thus, reduces the computational load. The proposed method explores the entire (virtual) compound lever design space to find optimal compound split configurations with outstanding fuel economy and acceleration performance.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1184
Kiyoshi Handa, Shigehiro Yamaguchi, Kazuya Minowa, Steven Mathison
Abstract A new hydrogen fueling protocol named MC Formula Moto was developed for fuel cell motorcycles (FCM) with a smaller hydrogen storage capacity than those of light duty FC vehicles (FCV) currently covered in the SAE J2601 standard (over than 2kg storage). Building on the MC Formula based protocol from the 2016 SAE J2601 standard, numerous new techniques were developed and tested to accommodate the smaller storage capacity: an initial pressure estimation using the connection pulse, a fueling time counter which begins the main fueling time prior to the connection pulse, a pressure ramp rate fallback control, and other techniques. The MC Formula Moto fueling protocol has the potential to be implemented at current hydrogen stations intended for fueling of FCVs using protocols such as SAE J2601. This will allow FCMs to use the existing and rapidly growing hydrogen infrastructure, precluding the need for exclusive dispensers or stations.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1183
Kenneth Johnson, Michael J. Veenstra, David Gotthold, Kevin Simmons, Kyle Alvine, Bert Hobein, Daniel Houston, Norman Newhouse, Brian Yeggy, Alex Vaipan, Thomas Steinhausler, Anand Rau
Abstract Fuel cell vehicles are entering the automotive market with significant potential benefits to reduce harmful greenhouse emissions, facilitate energy security, and increase vehicle efficiency while providing customer expected driving range and fill times when compared to conventional vehicles. One of the challenges for successful commercialization of fuel cell vehicles is transitioning the on-board fuel system from liquid gasoline to compressed hydrogen gas. Storing high pressurized hydrogen requires a specialized structural pressure vessel, significantly different in function, size, and construction from a gasoline container. In comparison to a gasoline tank at near ambient pressures, OEMs have aligned to a nominal working pressure of 700 bar for hydrogen tanks in order to achieve the customer expected driving range of 300 miles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1180
Stefan Brandstätter, Michael Striednig, David Aldrian, Alexander Trattner, Manfred Klell, Tomas Dehne, Christoph Kügele, Michael Paulweber
Abstract The limitation of global warming to less than 2 °C till the end of the century is regarded as the main challenge of our time. In order to meet COP21 objectives, a clear transition from carbon-based energy sources towards renewable and carbon-free energy carriers is mandatory. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) allow an energy-efficient, resource-efficient and emission-free conversion of regenerative produced hydrogen. For these reasons fuel cell technologies emerge in stationary, mobile and logistic applications with acceptable cruising ranges as well as short refueling times. In order to perform applied research in the area of PEMFC systems, a highly integrated fuel cell analysis infrastructure for systems up to 150 kW electric power was developed and established within a cooperative research project by HyCentA Research GmbH and AVL List GmbH in Graz, Austria. A novel open testing facility with hardware in the loop (HiL) capability is presented.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1042
Eric J. Passow, Paras Sethi, Max Maschewske, Jason Bieneman, Kimm Karrip, Paul Truckel
Abstract Current market demands in conjunction with increasingly stringent emission legislation have vehicle manufactures striving to improve fuel economy and reduce CO2 emissions. One way to meet these demands is through engine downsizing. Engine downsizing allows for reduced pumping and frictional losses. To maintain acceptable drivability and further increase efficiency, power density increase through the addition of boosting is employed. Furthermore, efficiencies have been realized through the use of high gear count transmissions, providing an opportunity for manufactures to effectively down speed the engine whilst still achieving the desired drivability characteristics. As a result of these efficiency improvements, gasoline turbo charged direct injected (GTDI) engines are developed for and tend to operate in low engine speed, high torque conditions .
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1012
Sunil Kumar Pathak, Vineet sood, Yograj Singh, Salim Abbasbhai Channiwala
Abstract In developing countries like India, large numbers of portable gensets are used as a power source due to the scarcity of grid power supply. The portable gensets, ranging from 0.5 kW to 5 kW are very popular in the residential areas, for example, small restaurants, and shopping complexes, etc. These gensets are using various fuels like gasoline, diesel, LPG, and kerosene in small internal combustion engines. Such engines are the significant source of air pollution, as these are running in the vicinity of populated areas and higher human exposure to these pollutants.Theses gensets are regulated by exhaust and noise emissions norms, set by statutory bodies like the ministry of environment and forest and central pollution control board of India.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1016
Charles Schenk, Paul Dekraker
Abstract EPA has been benchmarking engines and transmissions to generate inputs for use in its technology assessments supporting the Midterm Evaluation of EPA’s 2017-2025 Light-Duty Vehicle greenhouse gas emissions assessments. As part of an Atkinson cycle engine technology assessment of applications in light-duty vehicles, cooled external exhaust gas recirculation (cEGR) and cylinder deactivation (CDA) were evaluated. The base engine was a production gasoline 2.0L four-cylinder engine with 75 degrees of intake cam phase authority and a 14:1 geometric compression ratio. An open ECU and cEGR hardware were installed on the engine so that the CO2 reduction effectiveness could be evaluated. Additionally, two cylinders were deactivated to determine what CO2 benefits could be achieved. Once a steady state calibration was complete, two-cycle (FTP and HwFET) CO2 reduction estimates were made using fuel weighted operating modes and a full vehicle model (ALPHA) cycle simulation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1019
Bentolhoda Torkashvand, Andreas Gremminger, Simone Valchera, Maria Casapu, Jan-Dierk Grunwaldt, Olaf Deutschmann
Abstract The effect of increased pressure relevant to pre-turbine catalyst positioning on catalytic oxidation of methane over a commercial Pd-Pt model catalyst under lean conditions is investigated both experimentally and numerically. The possible gas phase reactions due to high temperature and pressure were tested with an inert monolith. Catalyst activity tests were conducted for both wet and dry gas mixtures and the effect of pressure was investigated at 1, 2 and 4 bar. Aside from the water in the inlet stream, the water produced by oxidation of methane in dry feed inhibited the activity of the catalyst as well. Experiments were carried out to check the effect of added water in the concentration range of water produced by methane oxidation on the catalyst activity. Based on the experimental results, a global oxidation rate equation is proposed. The reaction rate expression is first order with respect to methane and -1.15 with respect to water.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1000
Jong Lee, Yu Zhang, Tom Tzanetakis, Michael Traver, Melanie Moses-DeBusk, John Storey, William Partridge, Michael Lance
Abstract Greenhouse gas regulations and global economic growth are expected to drive a future demand shift towards diesel fuel in the transportation sector. This may create a market opportunity for cost-effective fuels in the light distillate range if they can be burned as efficiently and cleanly as diesel fuel. In this study, the emission performance of a low cetane number, low research octane number naphtha (CN 34, RON 56) was examined on a production 6-cylinder heavy-duty on-highway truck engine and aftertreatment system. Using only production hardware, both the engine-out and tailpipe emissions were examined during the heavy-duty emission testing cycles using naphtha and ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuels. Without any modifications to the hardware and software, the tailpipe emissions were comparable when using either naphtha or ULSD on the heavy duty test cycles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1003
Ye Liu, Gang Lv, Chenyang Fan, Na Li, Xiaowei Wang
Abstract The evolution of surface functional groups (SFGs) and the graphitization degree of soot generated in premixed methane flames are studied and the correlation between them is discussed. Test soot samples were obtained from an optimized thermophoretic sampling system and probe sampling system. The SFGs of soot were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) after removing the soluble impurities from the soot samples, while the graphitization degree of soot was characterized by Raman spectrum and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The results reveal that the number of aliphatic C-H groups and C=O groups shows an initial increase and then decrease in the sooting history. The large amount of aliphatic C-H groups and small amount of aromatic C-H groups in the early stage of the soot mass growth process indicate that aliphatic C-H groups make a major contribution to the early stage of soot mass growth.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1004
Jan Czerwinski, Pierre Comte, Norbert Heeb, Andreas Mayer, Volker Hensel
Abstract In the present paper some results of investigations of nanoparticles from five DI gasoline cars are represented. The measurements were performed at vehicle tailpipe and in CVS-tunnel. Moreover, five variants of “vehicle - GPF” were investigated. These results originate from the project GasOMeP (Gasoline Organic & Metal Particulates), which focused on metal-nanoparticles (including sub 20nm) from gasoline cars with different engine technologies. The PN-emission level of the investigated GDI cars in WLTC without GPF is in the same range of magnitude very near to the actual limit value of 6.0 × 1012 #/km. With the GPF’s with better filtration quality, it is possible to lower the emissions below the future limit value of 6.0 × 1011 #/km. There is no visible nuclei mode and the ultrafine particle concentrations below 10mm are insignificant. Some of the vehicles show at constant speed operation a periodical fluctuation of the NP-emissions, as an effect of the electronic control.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1077
Nicolas Arnault, Nicolas Batailley, Arnaud Maria, Laurent Bechu
Abstract PSA Group, SOLVAY and SOGEFI have teamed-up to produce the first Plastic Diesel Fuel Filter fully made of recycled polyamide 66, ready for mass-production. This has been achieved by using the brand new plastic compound developed by SOLVAY Engineering Plastics. This material is 100% recycled from airbag wastes, providing a premium material able to stand demanding applications requirements supplied through circular economy, which is quite unusual in automotive industry yet. SOGEFI has used this material through its existing plastic injection process, and tested the parts on extensive bench validation tests. It confirmed that this material is fully compatible with standard injection process, and that all the tests have been passed successfully. Finally, PSA Group has driven the choice of the tested parts: DV engine 1.6l Euro6b application, homologated the material grade and evaluated the whole validation process.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1076
Mohammad Moetakef, Abdelkrim Zouani, Esra Demren
Abstract In this presentation, two cases of CAE simulations of oil pump-induced tonal noises are presented. The first case involves oil pump-induced whine in an I4engine during coast down. The second case addresses oil pan moan during hot idle and the effect of oil pump pick-up tube positioning inside the oil pan of an I5 engine. The investigations include several design modifications to the pump and the pick-up tube to prevent the tonal noise. Test data are also included to demonstrate the accuracy of the CAE simulation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1079
Suresh Kumar Kandreegula, Sayak Mukherjee, Rahul Jain, Shivdayal Prasad, Kamal Rohilla
Abstract Flex Connectors are intended for mitigating the relative movement of exhaust system components along the axis of the system arising from the thermal expansion due to intermittent engine operation. Flex connectors must not be installed in locations, where they will be subjected to destructive vibration. Hence, the stiffness of the flex connector plays an important role, while designing or selecting the right design. It consists of a multi-ply bellows combined with an inside and an outside steel braid. The liner is included to reduce the temperature of the bellows and improve flow conditions. The braid is included for mechanical protection and to limit the possible extension of the joint. It has only axial translational motion.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1078
Walid Ashraf, Sherif Khedr, Aya Diab, Hashim Elzaabalawy
Abstract A throttle valve is one of the main components of the intake system of a vehicle and is used to control the air flow rate into the combustion chamber at different engine speeds. Consequently, it has considerable effect on the engine power and performance especially at high engine speeds. The butterfly throttle valve is more common in commercial vehicles due to its simplicity. However, the butterfly throttle plate may affect the engine performance by incurring some pumping losses at high engine speeds even with the plate at wide open throttle (WOT) position. Hence it is proposed in this research work to replace and compare the performance of a spark ignition engine butterfly throttle valve to a newly designed barrel-shaped one with regards to the induced air mass flow rate. The main benefit of the proposed barrel-shaped throttle valve is the elimination of the flow restriction at WOT and high engine speeds.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1081
Chongzhi Zhong, Tieqiang Fu, Chunbei Dai, Taiyu Zhang, Ke Wu, Wangwen Gu
Abstract In order to study the single cavity and double cavity canister work performance, the L/D, as well as the similarities and differences among the diameter of the adsorption mouth, purge mouth and air mouth have been studied. At the same time, the work performance of ORVR canister and common canister is also studied. The results demonstrate that the similar of L/D, efficient work ability and efficient adsorption rate of the double cavity canister is better than the single cavity canister. The bigger of L/D, the stronger work ability of the canister. However, the excessive increase of the L/D is not conducive to the canister desorption, instead resulting in the increase of RARCP. The adsorption mouth diameter of common canister is generally smaller or similar to the purge mouth, while for ORVR canister the adsorption mouth diameter is bigger than the purge mouth and similar to air mouth.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1069
Igor Trevas, Adm José baeta, Charles Pimenta, Heder Fernandes, Matheus Carvalho, Raphael Montemor
Abstract Variable Valve Actuation system (VVA) is a technology developed for improving fuel economy, reducing emissions, and enhancing engine performance mainly by reducing pumping losses. Many automakers have used VVA in their engine projects with excellent results. Usually, VVA systems are built to control the valve events in four different ways: changing the amplitude of the valve lift, the valve opening angle, the valve closing angle or a combination of those modes. A special attention at the calibration activity is needed to reach the optimum performance of this system, beyond this, it was necessary to develop a different way to calibrate, much more focused on the development of the combustion and the gas exchange process requiring an intense use of a pressure indicating system. This work presents a comparison between different way of actuation in combustion analysis of a VVA system on a spark ignition engine.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 16604