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Viewing 271 to 300 of 16633
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0887
Dairene Uy, George Pranis, Anthony Morelli, Arup Gangopadhyay, Alexander Michlberger, Nicholas Secue, Mike Kinzel, Tina Adams, Kevin Streck, Michael Lance, Andrew Wereszczak
Abstract Deposit formation within turbocharger compressor housings can lead to compressor efficiency degradation. This loss of turbo efficiency may degrade fuel economy and increase CO2 and NOx emissions. To understand the role that engine oil composition and formulation play in deposit formation, five different lubricants were run in a fired engine test while monitoring turbocharger compressor efficiency over time. Base stock group, additive package, and viscosity modifier treat rate were varied in the lubricants tested. After each test was completed the turbocharger compressor cover and back plate deposits were characterized. A laboratory oil mist coking rig has also been constructed, which generated deposits having the same characteristics as those from the engine tests. By analyzing results from both lab and engine tests, correlations between deposit characteristics and their effect on compressor efficiency were observed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0464
Guang Wang, Xueyuan Nie, Jimi Tjong
Abstract Friction between the piston and cylinder accounts for large amount of the friction losses in an internal combustion (IC) engine. Therefore, any effort to minimize such a friction will also result in higher efficiency, lower fuel consumption and reduced emissions. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating is considered as a hard ceramic coating which can provide a dimpled surface for oil retention to bear the wear and reduce the friction from sliding piston rings. In this work, a high speed pin-on-disc tribometer was used to generate the boundary, mixed and hydrodynamic lubrication regimes. Five different lubricating oils and two different loads were applied to do the tribotests and the COFs of a PEO coating were studied. The results show that the PEO coating indeed had a lower COF in a lower viscosity lubricating oil, and a smaller load was beneficial to form the mixed and hydrodynamic lubricating regimes earlier.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1085
Todd Brewer, Cagri Sever, Ruichen Jin, Michael Herr, Xingfu Chen, Reda Adimi
Abstract In a separate SAE paper (Cylinder Head Design Process to Improve High Cycle Fatigue Performance), cylinder head high cycle fatigue (HCF) analysis approach and damage calculation method were developed and presented. In this paper, the HCF damage calculation method is used for risk assessment related to customer drive cycles. Cylinder head HCF damage is generated by repeated stress alternation under different engine operation conditions. The cylinder head high cycle fatigue CAE process can be used as a transfer function to translate engine operating conditions to cylinder head damage/life. There are many inputs, noises, and design parameters that contribute to the cylinder head HCF damage CAE transfer function such as cylinder pressure, component temperature, valve seat press fit, and cylinder head manufacturing method. Material properties and the variation in material properties are also important considerations in the CAE transfer function.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1182
Xin Guo, Xu Peng, Sichuan Xu
Abstract Startup from subzero temperature is one of the major challenges for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) to realize commercialization. Below the freezing point (0°C), water will freeze easily, which blocks the reactant gases into the reaction sites, thus leading to the start failure and material degradation. Therefore, for PEMFC in vehicle application, finding suitable ways to reach successful startup from subfreezing environment is a prerequisite. As it’s difficult and complex for experimental studies to measure the internal quantities, mathematical models are the effective ways to study the detailed transport process and physical phenomenon, which make it possible to achieve detailed prediction of the inner life of the cell. However, review papers only on cold start numerical models are not available. In this study, an extensive review on cold start models is summarized featuring the states and phase changes of water, heat and mass transfer.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0073
Andreas Barthels, Christian Ress, Martin Wiecker, Manfred Müller
Abstract Vehicle to Vehicle Communication use case performance heavily relies on market penetration rate. The more vehicles support a use case, the better the customer experience. Enabling these use cases with acceptable quality on vehicles without built-in navigation systems, elaborate map matching and highly accurate sensors is challenging. This paper introduces a simulation framework to assess system performance in dependency of vehicle positioning accuracy for matching approach path traces in Decentralized Environmental Notification Messages (DENMs) in absence of navigation systems supporting map matching. DENMs are used for distributing information about hazards on the road network. A vehicle without navigation system and street map can only match its position trajectory with the trajectory carried in the DENM.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1650
Jian Yang, Christian Poellabauer, Pramita Mitra
Abstract Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is an energy-efficient radio communication technology that is rapidly gaining popularity for various Internet of Things (IoT) applications. While BLE was not designed specifically with vehicular communications in mind, its simple and quick connection establishment mechanisms make BLE a potential inter-vehicle communication technology, either replacing or complementing other vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) technologies (such as the yet to be deployed DSRC). In this paper we propose a framework for V2V communication using BLE and evaluate its performance under various configurations. BLE uses two major methods for data transmission: (1) undirected advertisements and scanning (unconnected mode) and (2) using the central and peripheral modes of the Generic Attribute Profile (GATT) connection (connected mode).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1691
Aseim Elfrgani, C. J. Reddy
Abstract A low profile high directivity antenna is designed to operate at 5.9 GHz for Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) communications to ensure connectivity in different propagation channels. Patch antennas are still an ongoing topic of interest due to their advantages: low profile, low cost, and ease of fabrication. One disadvantage of the patch antenna is low directivity which results in low range performance. In this paper, we introduce an efficient and novel way to improve the directivity of patch antenna using topology optimization and design of experiments (DoE). Numerical simulations are done using Method of Moments (MoM) technique in the commercially available tool, FEKO. We use global response surface method (GRSM) for double objectives topology optimization. Numerical results show a promising use of topology optimization and DoE techniques for the systematic design of high directivity of low profile single element patch antennas.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0077
Scott E. Bogard, Shan Bao, David LeBlanc, Jun Li, Shaobo Qiu, Bin Liu
Abstract This paper provides an analysis of how communication performance between vehicles using Dedicated Short-range Communication (DSRC) devices varies by antenna mounting, vehicle relative positions and orientations, and between receiving devices. DSRC is a wireless technology developed especially for vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communications. A frequency band near 5.9 GHz has been set aside in the US and other countries for exploring safety and other uses for road vehicles. DSRC devices installed onboard vehicles broadcast their location using global navigation space systems (GNSS), speed, heading, and other information. This can be used to study communication performance in many scenarios including: car-following situations, rear-end crash avoidance, oncoming traffic situations, left turn advisory, head-on crash avoidance and do-not-pass warnings.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0865
Mark Walls, Michael Joo, Michael Ross
Abstract Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is commonly known as autogas when used as a fuel for internal combustion engines. In North America, autogas primarily consists of propane, but can contain small amounts of butane, methane and propylene. Autogas is not a new fuel for internal combustion engines, but as engine technology evolves, the properties of autogas can be utilized to improve engine and vehicle efficiency. With support from the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) performed testing to quantify efficiency differences with liquid autogas direct injection in a modern downsized and boosted direct-injected engine using the production gasoline fuel injection hardware. Engine dynamometer testing demonstrated that autogas produced similar performance characteristics to gasoline at part load, but could be used to improve brake thermal efficiency at loads above 9 bar Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0906
Thomas L. Darlington, Gary A. Herwick, Dennis Kahlbaum, Dean Drake
Abstract The Environmental Protection Agency, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and California Air Resources Board released the joint mid-term Technical Assessment Review of the light-duty GHG standards in July of 2016. The review generally asserted that the GHG standards adopted in calendar year 2012 for 2022-2025 model year vehicles were feasible. Although many different technologies were evaluated, the review did not assess the benefits of high compression ratio engines enabled by a high-octane low carbon fuel. This study fills in the gap in the Technical Assessment Review by examining the impacts of a 98-research octane number gasoline-ethanol blend with 25 percent ethanol. We find that this fuel would enable higher compression ratios to improve tailpipe greenhouse gas emissions by about 6 percent on most engines.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1179
Tatsuya Arai, Ozaki Takashi, Kazuki Amemiya, Tsuyoshi Takahashi
Abstract Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEFC) systems for fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) require both performance and durability. Carbon is the typical support material used for PEFC catalysts. However, hydrogen starvation at the anode causes high electrode potential states (e.g., 1.3 V with respect to the reversible hydrogen electrode) that result in severe carbon support corrosion. Serious damage to the carbon support due to hydrogen starvation can lead to irreversible performance loss in PEFC systems. To avoid such high electrode potentials, FCV PEFC systems often utilize cell voltage monitor systems (CVMs) that are expensive to use and install. Simplifying PEFC systems by removing these CVMs would help reduce costs, which is a vital part of popularizing FCVs. However, one precondition for removing CVMs is the adoption of a durable support material to replace carbon.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1189
Tsuyoshi Maruo, Masashi Toida, Tomohiro Ogawa, Yuji Ishikawa, Hiroyuki Imanishi, Nada Mitsuhiro, Yoshihiro Ikogi
Abstract Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) has been developing fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) since 1992. As part of a demonstration program, TMC launched the FCHV-adv in 2008, which established major technical improvements in key performance areas such as efficiency, driving range, durability, and operation in sub-zero conditions. However, to encourage commercialization and widespread adoption of FCVs, further improvements in performance were required. During sub-zero operating conditions, the FC system output power was lower than under normal operating conditions. The FC stack in the FCHV-adv needed to dry the electrolyte membrane to remove unneeded water from the stack. This increased the stack resistance and caused low output power. In December 2014, TMC launched the world’s first commercially available FCV named the Mirai, which greatly improved output power even after start-up in sub-zero conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0774
Ethan Faghani, Pooyan Kheirkhah, Christopher W.J. Mabson, Gordon McTaggart-Cowan, Patrick Kirchen, Steve Rogak
Abstract High-pressure direct-injection (HPDI) in heavy duty engines allows a natural gas (NG) engine to maintain diesel-like performance while deriving most of its power from NG. A small diesel pilot injection (5-10% of the fuel energy) is used to ignite the direct injected gas jet. The NG burns in a predominantly non-premixed combustion mode which can produce particulate matter (PM). Here we study the effect of injection strategies on emissions from a HPDI engine in two parts. Part-I will investigates the effect of late post injection (LPI) and Part II will study the effect of slightly premixed combustion (SPC) on emission and engine performance. PM reductions and tradeoffs involved with gas late post-injections (LPI) was investigated in a single-cylinder version of a 6-cylinder,15 liter HPDI engine. The post injection contains 10-25% of total fuel mass, and occurs after the main combustion event.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0766
Gary D. Neely, Radu Florea, Jason Miwa, Zainal Abidin
Abstract The CO2 advantage coupled with the low NOX and PM potential of natural gas (NG) makes it well-suited for meeting future greenhouse gas (GHG) and NOX regulations for on-road medium and heavy-duty engines. However, because NG is mostly methane, reduced combustion efficiency associated with traditional NG fueling strategies can result in significant levels of methane emissions which offset the CO2 advantage due to reduced efficiency and the high global warming potential of methane. To address this issue, the unique co-direct injection capability of the Westport HPDI fuel system was leveraged to obtain a partially-premixed fuel charge by injecting NG during the compression stroke followed by diesel injection for ignition timing control. This combustion strategy, referred to as DI2, was found to improve thermal and combustion efficiencies over fumigated dual-fuel combustion modes.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0764
Gabriele Di Blasio, Giacomo Belgiorno, Carlo Beatrice
Abstract The paper reports the results of an experimental campaign aimed to assess the impact of the compression ratio (CR) variation on the performance and pollutant emissions, including the particle size spectrum, of a single cylinder research engine (SCE), representatives of the engine architectures for automotive application, operated in dual-fuel methane-diesel mode. Three pistons with different bowl volumes corresponding to CR values of 16.5, 15.5 and 14.5 were adopted for the whole test campaign. The injection strategy was based on two injection pulses per cycle, as conventionally employed for diesel engines. The test methodology per each CR included the optimization of both 1st injection pulse quantity and intake air mass flow rate in order to lower as much as possible the unburned methane emissions (MHC).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0756
Zhenkuo Wu, Christopher Rutland, Zhiyu Han
Abstract Natural gas is a promising alternative fuel for internal combustion engines due to its rich reserves and low price, as well as good physical and chemical properties. Its low carbon structure and high octane number are beneficial for CO2 reduction and knock mitigation, respectively. Diesel and natural gas dual fuel combustion is a viable pathway to utilize natural gas in diesel engines. To achieve high efficiency and low emission combustion in a practical diesel engine over a wide range of operating conditions, understanding the performance responses to engine system parameter variations is needed. The controllability of two combustion strategies, diesel pilot ignition (DPI) and single injection reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI), were evaluated using the multi-dimension CFD simulation in this paper.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0758
Yaopeng Li, Ming Jia, Yachao Chang, Guangfu Xu
Abstract Multi-dimensional models coupled with a reduced chemical mechanism were used to investigate the effect of fuel on exergy destruction fraction and sources in a reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine. The exergy destruction due to chemical reaction (Deschem) makes the largest contribution to the total exergy destruction. Different from the obvious low temperature heat release (LTHR) behavior in gasoline/diesel RCCI, methanol has a negative effect on the LTHR of diesel, so the exergy destruction accumulation from LTHR to high temperature heat release (HTHR) can be avoided in methanol/diesel RCCI, contributing to the reduction of Deschem. Moreover, the combustion temperature in methanol/diesel RCCI is higher compared to gasoline/diesel RCCI, which is also beneficial to the lower exergy destruction fraction. Therefore, the exergy destruction of methanol/diesel RCCI is lower than that of gasoline/diesel RCCI at the same combustion phasing.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0734
Eshan Singh, Muhammad Waqas, Bengt Johansson, Mani Sarathy
Abstract The blending of ethanol with primary reference fuel (PRF) mixtures comprising n-heptane and iso-octane is known to exhibit a non-linear octane response; however, the underlying chemistry and intermolecular interactions are poorly understood. Well-designed experiments and numerical simulations are required to understand these blending effects and the chemical kinetic phenomenon responsible for them. To this end, HCCI engine experiments were previously performed at four different conditions of intake temperature and engine speed for various PRF/ethanol mixtures. Transfer functions were developed in the HCCI engine to relate PRF mixture composition to autoignition tendency at various compression ratios. The HCCI blending octane number (BON) was determined for mixtures of 2-20 vol % ethanol with PRF70. In the present work, the experimental conditions were considered to perform zero-dimensional HCCI engine simulations with detailed chemical kinetics for ethanol/PRF blends.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0727
Ida Truedsson, Christine Rousselle, Fabrice Foucher
Abstract The transportation sector adds to the greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. One way to decrease this impact from transportation is by using renewable fuels. Ethanol is a readily available blend component which can be produced from bio blend­stock, currently used blended with gasoline from low to high concentrations. This study focuses on a high octane (RON=97) gasoline blended with 0, 20, and 50, volume % of ethanol, respectively. The high ethanol blended gasoline was used in a light duty engine originally designed for diesel combustion. Due to the high octane rating and high ignition resistance of the fuel it required high intake temperatures of 443 K and higher to achieve stable combustion in in homogeneously charged compression ignition (HCCI) combustion operation at low load. To enable combustion with lower intake temperatures more commonly used in commercial vehicles, ozone was injected with the intake air as an ignition improver.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0568
Valentina Fraioli, Carlo Beatrice, Gabriele Di Blasio, Giacomo Belgiorno, Marianna Migliaccio
Abstract The adoption of gaseous fuels for Light Duty (LD) engines is considered a promising solution to efficiently reduce greenhouse gases emissions and diversify fuels supplies, while keeping pollutants production within the limits. In this respect, the Dual Fuel (DF) concept has already proven to be, generally speaking, a viable solution, industrially implemented for several applications in the Heavy-Duty (HD) engines category. Despite this, some issues still require a technological solution, preventing the commercialization of DF engines in wider automotive fields, including the release of high amounts of unburned species, possibility of engine knock, chance of thermal efficiency reduction. In this framework, numerical simulation can be a useful tool, not only to better understand specific characteristics of DF combustion, but also to explore specific geometrical modifications and engine calibrations capable to adapt current LD architectures to this concept.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0181
Benny Johnson William, Agathaman Selvaraj, Manjeet Singh Rammurthy, Manikandan Rajaraman, V. Srinivasa Chandra
Abstract The modern day automobile customers’ expectations are sky-high. The automotive manufacturers need to provide sophisticated, cost-effective comfort to stay in this competitive world. Air conditioning is one of the major features which provides a better comfort but also adds up to the increase in operating fuel cost of vehicle. According to the sources the efficiency of internal combustion engine is 30% and 70% of energy is wasted to atmosphere. The current Air conditioners in automobiles use Vapour compression system (VCS) which utilizes a portion of shaft power of the engine at its input; this in turn reduces the brake power output and increases the specific fuel consumption (SFC) of the engine. With the current depletion rate of fossil fuels, it is necessary to conserve the available resources and use it effectively which also contributes to maintain a good balance in greenhouse effect thus protecting the environment.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1232
Tsubasa Yamazakii, Hidekazu Uchiyama, Kazuaki Nakazawa, Tsubasa Isomura, Hisashi Ogata
Abstract Solar car races are held worldwide, aiming to promote vehicles that help reduce environmental loads on the roads. In order to gain superiority in solar car racing, it is essential to develop a high efficiency brushless direct drive motor that optimizes the energy use to the fullest and allows high speed driving when needed. To achieve these goals, two development approaches of solar car motors are proposed: the high efficiency motor which improves electrical characteristics and significantly reduces energy loss; and the variable field magnet motor that offers instant speed boost for a temporary period of time for overtaking opponents. We have developed a high efficiency motor through the application of an amorphous core and laminated magnets. Instead of the standard method of the W-EDM (Wire-Electric Discharge Machining) for amorphous cores, we utilized water jet cutting, through which we succeeded in achieving insulation between laminated cores.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0817
Remi Konagaya, Ken Naitoh, Kohta TSURU, Yasuo Takagi, Yuji Mihara
Abstract For various densities of gas jets including very light hydrogen and relatively heavy ones, the penetration length and diffusion process of a single high-speed gas fuel jet injected into air are computed by performing a large eddy simulation (LES) with fewer arbitrary constants applied for the unsteady three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equation. In contrast, traditional ensemble models such as the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation have several arbitrary constants for fitting purposes. The cubic-interpolated pseudo-particle (CIP) method is employed for discretizing the nonlinear terms. Computations of single-component nitrogen and hydrogen jets were done under initial conditions of a fuel tank pressure of gas fuel = 10 MPa and back pressure of air = 3.5 MPa, i.e., the pressure level inside the combustion chamber after piston compression in the engine.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0811
John Williams, Heather D. Hamje, David J. Rickeard, Andreas Kolbeck, Kalle Lehto, Elena Rebesco, Walter Mirabella, Carole A. Bontoft, Maria Dolores Cardenas
Abstract Research Octane Number (RON) and Motor Octane Number (MON) are used to describe gasoline combustion which describe antiknock performance under different conditions. Recent literature suggests that MON is less important than RON in modern cars and a relaxation in the MON specification could improve vehicle performance. At the same time, for the same octane number change, increasing RON appears to provide more benefit to engine power and acceleration than reducing MON. Some workers have advocated the use of an octane index (OI) which incorporates both parameters instead of either RON or MON to give an indication of gasoline knock resistance. Previous Concawe work investigated the effect of RON and MON on the power and acceleration performance of two Euro 4 gasoline passenger cars during an especially-designed acceleration test cycle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1004
Jan Czerwinski, Pierre Comte, Norbert Heeb, Andreas Mayer, Volker Hensel
Abstract In the present paper some results of investigations of nanoparticles from five DI gasoline cars are represented. The measurements were performed at vehicle tailpipe and in CVS-tunnel. Moreover, five variants of “vehicle - GPF” were investigated. These results originate from the project GasOMeP (Gasoline Organic & Metal Particulates), which focused on metal-nanoparticles (including sub 20nm) from gasoline cars with different engine technologies. The PN-emission level of the investigated GDI cars in WLTC without GPF is in the same range of magnitude very near to the actual limit value of 6.0 × 1012 #/km. With the GPF’s with better filtration quality, it is possible to lower the emissions below the future limit value of 6.0 × 1011 #/km. There is no visible nuclei mode and the ultrafine particle concentrations below 10mm are insignificant. Some of the vehicles show at constant speed operation a periodical fluctuation of the NP-emissions, as an effect of the electronic control.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1027
Yang Wang, Lixia Wei, Guorui Jia, Mingfa Yao
Abstract On-board fuel reforming offers a prospective clean combustion mode for the engines. The flexible cylinder engine strategy (FCE) is a new kind of such mode. In this paper, the combustion of the primary reference fuel of PRF90 was theoretically investigated in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine to validate the FCE mode, mainly focusing on the ignition delay time, the flame speed, and the emissions. The simulations were performed by using the CHEMKIN2.0 package to demonstrate the fuel reforming process in the flexible cylinder, the cooling effect on the reformed products, and the combustions of the mixture of the fresh fuel and the reformed products in the normal cylinders. It was found that the FCE mode decreased the ignition delay time of the fuel by about 35 crank angles at a typical engine condition.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1563
Abhijeet Behera, Murugan Sivalingam
Abstract Two and three wheeler vehicles are largely used in many developing and under developing countries because of their lower cost, better fuel economy and easy handling. Although, the construction of them is simpler than the four wheeler vehicle, they pose some problems related to instability. Wobbling is the main cause of instabilities in two wheeler and three wheeler vehicles. In this study, a mathematical model was proposed and developed to determine wobble instability of a two wheeler. Nonlinear equations were formulated by using kinematics and the D’Alembert’s principle with the help of multi body formalism. The non-linear equations found in the study were linearized with respect to rectilinear and upright motion, considering no rolling. It led to formation of matrix. The real part of the Eigen value of the matrix was found to be negative, implication of whose was an asymptotic stable motion.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1233
Mohamed A. Elshaer, Allan Gale, Chingchi Chen
Abstract Vehicle safety is of paramount importance when it comes to plugging the vehicle into the electric utility grid. The impact of high voltage ground fault has been neglected or, if not, addressed by guidelines extracted from general practices, written in international standards. The agile accretion in Electric Vehicle (EV) development deems an exhaustive study on safety risks pertaining to fault occurrence. While vehicle electrification offers a vital solution to oil scarcity, it is essential that the fast development of the number of electric vehicles on the road does not compromise safety. Meanwhile, the link between technology and demands of society must be governed by vehicle safety. In this paper, a comprehensive study on high voltage (HV) fault conditions occurring in an EV will be conducted. In the next decade, EVs are expected to be prevalent worldwide. Ground fault characteristics are significantly dependent on the earthing system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0160
Longjie Xiao, Tianming He, Gangfeng Tan, Bo Huang, Xianyao Ping
Abstract While the car ownership increasing all over the world, the unutilized thermal energy in automobile exhaust system is gradually being realized and valued by researchers around the world for better driving energy efficiency. For the unexpected urban traffic, the frequent start and stop processes as well as the acceleration and deceleration lead to the temperature fluctuation of the exhaust gas, which means the unstable hot-end temperature of the thermoelectric module generator (TEG). By arranging the heat conduction oil circulation at the hot end, the hot-end temperature’s fluctuation of the TEG can be effectively reduced, at the expense of larger system size and additional energy supply for the circulation. This research improves the TEG hot-end temperature stability by installing solid heat capacity material(SHCM) to the area between the outer wall of the exhaust pipe and the TEG, which has the merits of simple structure, none energy consumption and light weight.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0522
Jianning Zhao, Antonio Sciarretta
Abstract Fuel consumption is an essential factor that requires to be minimized in the design of a vehicle powertrain. Simple energy models can be of great help - by clarifying the role of powertrain dimensioning parameters and reducing the computation time of complex routines aiming at optimizing these parameters. In this paper, a Fully Analytical fuel Consumption Estimation (FACE) is developed based on a novel GRaphical-Analysis-Based fuel Energy Consumption Optimization (GRAB-ECO), both of which predict the fuel consumption of light- and heavy-duty series hybrid-electric powertrains that is minimized by an optimal control technique. When a drive cycle and dimensioning parameters (e.g. vehicle road load, as well as rated power, torque, volume of engine, motor/generators, and battery) are considered as inputs, FACE predicts the minimal fuel consumption in closed form, whereas GRAB-ECO minimizes fuel consumption via a graphical analysis of vehicle optimal operating modes.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 16633