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Viewing 271 to 300 of 16480
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0462
Marcel Meuwissen, Jippe Van Ruiten, Thijs Besseling, Robbert van Sluijs, Maik Broda, Brian Pearce, Fenton I. O'Shea
Abstract Fuel economy improvement efforts in engines have focused on reducing parasitic losses. This paper addresses the friction losses in the valve train chain drive system where about half of the losses is caused by the chain sliding on plastic guide and tensioner arm faces (Figure 1). Efforts have been made to reduce these friction losses by optimizing the chain link profile, the geometry of the guide and tensioner arm rails, and developments towards low friction materials. This paper describes the approach taken for the development of new low-friction chain tensioner arm plastic materials. The approach is characterized by building an understanding of the friction mechanisms and identifying the most critical material’s properties. A lab-scale test is used for a first assessment of the friction performance of materials. The correlation between this lab-scale test and the actual chain-on-tensioner arm application is discussed.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0546
Sebastiano Breda, Alessandro D'Adamo, Stefano Fontanesi, Fabrizio D'Orrico, Adrian Irimescu, Simona Merola, Nicola Giovannoni
Abstract Conventional fossil fuels are more and more regulated in terms of both engine-out emissions and fuel consumption. Moreover, oil price and political instabilities in oil-producer countries are pushing towards the use of alternative fuels compatible with the existing units. N-Butanol is an attractive candidate as conventional gasoline replacement, given its ease of production from bio-mass and key physico-chemical properties similar to their gasoline counterpart. A comparison in terms of combustion behavior of gasoline and n-Butanol is here presented by means of experiments and 3D-CFD simulations. The fuels are tested on a single-cylinder direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) unit with an optically accessible flat piston. The analysis is carried out at stoichiometric undiluted condition and lean-diluted mixture for both pure fuels.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0581
Stephen C. Burke, Matthew Ratcliff, Robert McCormick, Robert Rhoads, Bret Windom
Abstract In some studies, a relationship has been observed between increasing ethanol content in gasoline and increased particulate matter (PM) emissions from vehicles equipped with spark ignition engines. The fundamental cause of the PM increase seen for moderate ethanol concentrations is not well understood. Ethanol features a greater heat of vaporization (HOV) than gasoline and also influences vaporization by altering the liquid and vapor composition throughout the distillation process. A droplet vaporization model was developed to explore ethanol’s effect on the evaporation of aromatic compounds known to be PM precursors. The evolving droplet composition is modeled as a distillation process, with non-ideal interactions between oxygenates and hydrocarbons accounted for using UNIFAC group contribution theory. Predicted composition and distillation curves were validated by experiments.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0687
Patrick Haenel, Henning Kleeberg, Rob de Bruijn, Dean Tomazic
Abstract Modern combustion engines must meet increasingly higher requirements concerning emission standards, fuel economy, performance characteristics and comfort. Especially fuel consumption and the related CO2 emissions were moved into public focus within the last years. One possibility to meet those requirements is downsizing. Engine downsizing is intended to achieve a reduction of fuel consumption through measures that allow reducing displacement while simultaneously keeping or increasing power and torque output. However, to reach that goal, downsized engines need high brake mean effective pressure levels which are well in excess of 20bar. When targeting these high output levels at low engine speeds, undesired combustion events with high cylinder peak pressures can occur that can severely damage the engine. These phenomena, typically called low speed pre-ignition (LSPI), set currently an undesired limit to downsizing.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0798
Nicholas J. Rounthwaite, Rod Williams, Catriona McGivery, Jun Jiang, Finn Giulliani, Ben Britton
Abstract Modern diesel passenger car technology continues to develop rapidly in response to demanding emissions, performance, refinement, cost and fuel efficiency requirements. This has included the implementation of high pressure common rail fuel systems employing high precision injectors with complex injection strategies, higher hydraulic efficiency injector nozzles and in some cases <100µm nozzle hole diameters. With the trend towards lower diameter diesel injector nozzle holes and reduced cleaning through cavitation with higher hydraulic efficiency nozzles, it is increasingly important to focus on understanding the mechanism of diesel injector nozzle deposit formation and growth. In this study such deposits were analysed by cross-sectioning the diesel injector along the length of the nozzle hole enabling in-depth analysis of deposit morphology and composition change from the inlet to the outlet, using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0799
Arjun Prakash, Chongming Wang, Andreas Janssen, Allen Aradi, Roger Cracknell
Modern spark ignition engines can take advantage of better fuel octane quality either towards improving acceleration performance or fuel economy via an active ignition management system. Higher fuel octane allows for spark timing advance and consequently higher torque output and higher engine efficiency. Additionally, engines can be designed with higher compression ratios if a higher anti-knock quality fuel is used. Due to historical reasons, Research Octane (RON) and Motor Octane Number (MON) are the metrics used to characterize the anti-knock quality of a fuel. The test conditions used to compute RON and MON correlated well with those in older engines designed about 20 years ago. But the correlation has drifted considerably in the recent past due to advances in engine infrastructures mainly governed by stringent fuel economy and emission standards.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0800
Varun Gauba, Tushar Bera, Jannik Reitz, Gregory Hansen, Peter Lee, Craig Wileman, Edward Nelson
Piston ring and liner wear measurements and analyses were performed in a production 3.6L V6 gasoline engine with radiolabelled engine parts. Three isotopes were generated: one in the engine liner using surface layer activation; one each in the top ring face and top ring side using bulk activation. Real-time wear measurements and subsequent rates of these three surfaces were captured using the radioactive decay of the isotopes into the engine oiling system. In addition, surface roughness and wear profile measurements were carried out using white light interferometry. The results from Phase I provided insights on evolution of wear and wear rates in critical engine components in a gasoline engine. Phase II will extend this work further and focus on evaluating the fuel additive effects on engine wear.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0801
Keith Vertin, Brent Schuchmann, William Studzinski, Richard S. Davis, Thomas G. Leone, James E. Anderson, Asim Iqbal
Abstract Automakers are designing smaller displacement engines with higher power densities to improve vehicle fuel economy, while continuing to meet customer expectations for power and drivability. The specific power produced by the spark-ignited engine is constrained by knock and fuel octane. Whereas the lowest octane rating is 87 AKI (antiknock index) for regular gasoline at most service stations throughout the U.S., 85 AKI fuel is widely available at higher altitudes especially in the mountain west states. The objective of this study was to explore the effect of gasoline octane rating on the net power produced by modern light duty vehicles at high altitude (1660 m elevation). A chassis dynamometer test procedure was developed to measure absorbed wheel power at transient and stabilized full power operation. Five vehicles were tested using 85 and 87 AKI fuels.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0802
Michael D. Kass, Brian H. West
Abstract The compatibility of key fuel system infrastructure elastomers with promising bio-blendstock fuel candidates was examined using Hansen solubility analysis. Thirty-four candidate fuels were evaluated in this study including multiple alcohols, esters, ethers, ketones, alkenes and one alkane. These compounds were evaluated as neat molecules and as blends with the gasoline surrogate, dodecane and a mix of dodecane and 10% ethanol (E10D). The elastomer materials were fluorocarbon, acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene butadiene (SBR), neoprene, polyurethane and silicone. These materials have been rigorously studied with other fuel types, and their measured volume change results were found to correspond well with their predicted solubility levels. The alcohols showed probable compatibility with fluorocarbon and polyurethane, but are not likely to be compatible at low blend levels with NBR and SBR.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0808
Sebastian Henkel, Yannis Hardalupas, Alexander Taylor, Christopher Conifer, Roger Cracknell, Tor Kit Goh, Paul-Benjamin Reinicke, Marc Sens, Michael Rieß
Abstract In Gasoline Direct Injection engines, direct exposure of the injector to the flame can cause combustion products to accumulate on the nozzle, which can result in increased particulate emissions. This research observes the impact of injector fouling on particulate emissions and the associated injector spray pattern and shows how both can be reversed by utilising fuel detergency. For this purpose multi-hole injectors were deliberately fouled in a four-cylinder test engine with two different base fuels. During a four hour injector fouling cycle particulate numbers (PN) increased by up to two orders of magnitude. The drift could be reversed by switching to a fuel blend that contained a detergent additive. In addition, it was possible to completely avoid any PN increase, when the detergent containing fuel was used from the beginning of the test. Microscopy showed that increased injector fouling coincided with increased particulate emissions.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0807
Stefan de Goede, Robert Barbour, Adrian Velaers, Brian Sword, Daniel Burton, Konrad Mokheseng
Abstract Internal diesel injector deposits (IDID) are now a well understood phenomenon and a standard test procedure has been developed and partially approved by the Coordinating European Council (CEC). The engine test procedure has been approved for simulation of sodium soap deposits by dosing the test fuel with a sodium salt and dodecenyl succinic acid (DDSA), whilst amide lacquer deposits simulation by dosing the test fuel with a low molecular weight (MWt) polyisobutylene succinimide (PIBSI) is still under development. The solubility of these contaminants in the base fuel should be reasonably constant to achieve consistent results. With the introduction of diesel from varying sources, this study focused on the effect of near-zero aromatics EN 15940 compliant gas-to-liquids GTL diesel, very similar to hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO), on IDID severity across two different engine platforms, and the response of a modern deposit control additive.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0809
James E. Anderson, Travis R. Collings, Sherry A. Mueller, James C. Ball, Timothy J. Wallington
Abstract An experimental study of the effects of partially-oxidized biodiesel fuel on the degradation of fresh fuel was performed. A blend of soybean oil fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) in petroleum diesel fuel (30% v:v biodiesel, B30) was aged under accelerated conditions (90°C with aeration). Aging conditions focused on three different degrees of initial oxidation: 1) reduced oxidation stability (Rancimat induction period, IP); 2) high peroxide values (PV); and 3) high total acid number (TAN). Aged B30 fuel was mixed with fresh B30 fuel at two concentrations (10% and 30% m:m) and degradation of the mixtures at the above aging conditions was monitored for IP, PV, TAN, and FAME composition. Greater content of aged fuel carryover (30% m:m) corresponded to stronger effects. Oxidation stability was most adversely affected by high peroxide concentration (Scenario 2), while peroxide content was most reduced for the high TAN scenario (Scenario 3).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0868
Robert L. McCormick, Gina Fioroni, Lisa Fouts, Earl Christensen, Janet Yanowitz, Evgueni Polikarpov, Karl Albrecht, Daniel J. Gaspar, John Gladden, Anthe George
Abstract We describe a study to identify potential biofuels that enable advanced spark ignition (SI) engine efficiency strategies to be pursued more aggressively. A list of potential biomass-derived blendstocks was developed. An online database of properties and characteristics of these bioblendstocks was created and populated. Fuel properties were determined by measurement, model prediction, or literature review. Screening criteria were developed to determine if a bioblendstock met the requirements for advanced SI engines. Criteria included melting point (or cloud point) < -10°C and boiling point (or T90) <165°C. Compounds insoluble or poorly soluble in hydrocarbon were eliminated from consideration, as were those known to cause corrosion (carboxylic acids or high acid number mixtures) and those with hazard classification as known or suspected carcinogens or reproductive toxins.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0863
Bader Almansour, Sami Alawadhi, Subith Vasu
Abstract The biofuel and engine co-development framework was initiated at Sandia National Labs. Here, the synthetic biologists develop and engineer a new platform for drop-in fuel production from lignocellulosic biomass, using several endophytic fungi. Hence this process has the potential advantage that expensive pretreatment and fuel refining stages can be optimized thereby allowing scalability and cost reduction; two major considerations for widespread biofuel utilization. Large concentrations of ketones along with other volatile organic compounds were produced by fungi grown over switchgrass media. The combustion and emission properties of these new large ketones are poorly known.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0882
Alexander Michlberger, Peter Morgan, Ewan E. Delbridge, Matthew D. Gieselman, Michael Kocsis
Abstract Fuel economy is not an absolute attribute, but is highly dependent on the method used to evaluate it. In this work, two test methods are used to evaluate the differences in fuel economy brought about by changes in engine oil viscosity grade and additive chemistry. The two test methods include a chassis dynamometer vehicle test and an engine dynamometer test. The vehicle testing was conducted using the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) testing protocol while the engine dynamometer test uses the proposed American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Sequence VIE fuel economy improvement 1 (FEI1) testing methodology. In an effort to improve agreement between the two testing methods, the same model engine was used in both test methods, the General Motors (GM) 3.6 L V6 (used in the 2012 model year Chevrolet™ Malibu™ engine). Within the lubricant industry, this choice of engine is reinforced because it has been selected for use in the proposed Sequence VIE fuel economy test.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0883
Mitsuhiro Soejima, Yasuo Harigaya, Toshiro Hamatake, Yutaro Wakuri
Abstract It is effective in engine fuel economy to reduce the viscous friction by applying lubricating oil with low viscosity. The lower viscosity such as SAE0W20, however, increase lubricating oil consumption, LOC. In addition, it has become urgent to reduce the LOC because the emission of the sulfide ash, phosphorous and sulfur contents degrades the diesel particulate filter and the de-NOx catalyst, in addition to which the emission of metal oxide contents from oil additives can cause pre-ignition in highly supercharged spark ignition engines. In order to clarify the LOC mechanism of low viscosity oils, the LOC rates were measured with a supercharged diesel engine under various operating conditions when lubricated with SAE30 or SAE10W30 test oil, and the resulting data have been compared with the rates of the evaporation from the oil-film on the cylinder wall, LOE, as predicted by the devised analysis method for multi-species component oils.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0877
Shintaro Kusuhara, Kenichi Yoshimura, Kenichi Kunieda, Nozomu Suzuki, Shingo Matsuki, Yuji Shitara
Abstract In developing engine oils, it is crucial to consider their compatibility with the rubbers used for seals. Among the different seal rubbers, silicone rubber is particularly susceptible to attack by acids and bases, which means it would be more likely to be affected by certain engine oil additives. In this study, the effects of some major additives, namely detergents, zinc dialkyl-dithiophopshate (ZDDP) and molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC), on silicone rubber were investigated. Silicone rubber test specimens were immersed in sample oils containing these additives for a prescribed period at 150°C, then the physical properties of the test specimens were measured to compare the effects of the different additives. It was found that ZDDPs dramatically reduce the tensile strength of silicone rubber, with primary ZDDP having a greater effect than secondary ZDDP.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0881
Takumaru Sagawa, Seiichi Nakano, Yohei Bito, Yusuke Koike, Sachiko Okuda, Rika Suzuki
Abstract A low viscosity API SN 0W-16 engine oil was developed to achieve a 0.5% improvement in fuel efficiency over the current GF-5/API SN 0W-20 oil. Oil consumption and engine wear are the main roadblocks to the development of low viscosity engine oils. However, optimization of the base oil and additives successfully prevent oil consumption and wear. First, it was confirmed in engine tests that NOACK volatility is still an effective indicator of oil consumption even for a low viscosity grade like 0W-16. As a result of base oil volatility control, the newly developed oil achieves the same level of oil consumption as the current GF-5/API SN 0W-20 oil. Second, it was found that the base oil viscosity and molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC) had a significant effect on chain wear in rig testing that simulated silent chain wear. For the same base oil viscosity, the new oil maintains the same oil film thickness under high surface pressure.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0891
Gregory Hunt
Abstract Modern automotive transmissions contain copper and copper alloys in the form of washers, bushings, brazes and electrical components. Corrosion that occurs with any of these components especially with electrical contacts can result in a malfunction of the vehicle control systems and loss of vehicle drivability. The compatibility of transmission lubricants with copper and copper alloys is an increasingly important consideration in the design of new additive technology. Traditional methods for monitoring corrosion processes and mechanisms in real time can be both time consuming and challenging to interpret, especially when evaluations at multiple temperatures are required. This work challenges some of the industry-held beliefs around lubricant additive corrosion processes, especially at elevated temperature (>130 °C).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0892
Eric Wood, Jeffrey Gonder, Forrest Jehlik
Abstract On-road fuel economy is known to vary significantly between individual trips in real-world driving conditions. This work introduces a methodology for rapidly simulating a specific vehicle’s fuel economy over the wide range of real-world conditions experienced across the country. On-road test data collected using a highly instrumented vehicle is used to refine and validate this modeling approach. Model accuracy relative to on-road data collection is relevant to the estimation of “off-cycle credits” that compensate for real-world fuel economy benefits that are not observed during certification testing on a chassis dynamometer.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0884
Ken Hashimoto, Kenji Tomizawa, Yoichiro Nakamura, Takashi Hashimoto, Takahiro Tatani, Atsushi Akamatsu, Ryuji Aoki, JASO Diesel Engine Oil Standard Revision Task Force
Abstract This paper reviews the development of the first fuel economy engine test method for heavy duty diesel oil, as well as the new JASO DH-2F category introduced in April 2017 [1][2][3], which adds a fuel economy requirement to the JASO DH-2 requirements in the JASO M355:2015 standard. Recently, better fuel economy is required heavy duty diesel vehicles as well as gasoline vehicles. Therefore, advanced technologies have been applied to improve diesel engines, as well as diesel engine oils and additives, and achieve better fuel economy. However, the Automotive Diesel Engine Oil Standard (JASO M355) applied in Japan as a standard for diesel engine oils does not include any fuel economy requirements.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0889
Adam Brandt, Allen Comfort, Edwin Frame
Abstract For existing fleets such as the U.S. military ground vehicle fleet, there are few ways to reduce vehicle fuel consumption that don’t involve expensive retrofitting. Replacing standard lubricants with those that can achieve higher vehicle efficiencies is one practical and inexpensive way to improve fleet fuel efficiency. In an effort to identify axle gear lubricants that can reduce the fuel consumption of its fleet, the U.S. Army is developing a stationary axle efficiency test stand and procedure. In order to develop this capability, on-track vehicle fuel consumption testing was completed using light, medium, and heavy tactical wheeled vehicles following a modified SAE J1321 type test procedure. Tested lubricants included a baseline SAE 80W-90, a fuel efficient SAE 75W-90, and a fuel efficient SAE 75W-140. Vehicle testing resulted in reductions in fuel consumption of up to 2%.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0897
Gregory Pannone, Brian Betz, Michael Reale, John Thomas
Abstract1
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0895
Patrick Phlips, Thomas Megli
Abstract The drive cycle average powertrain efficiency of current US vehicles is studied by applying a first principles model to the EPA Test Car List database. The largest group of vehicles has naturally aspirated engines and six speed planetary automatic transmissions, and defines the base technology level. For this group the best cycle average powertrain efficiency is independent of vehicle size and is achieved by the lowest power-to-weight vehicles. For all segments of the EPA test, the fuel required per unit of vehicle work (the inverse of powertrain efficiency), is found to increase linearly with a basic powertrain matching parameter. The parameter is (D/M)(n/V), where D is engine displacement, M vehicle mass, and (n/V) the top gear engine speed over the vehicle speed. The fuel consumption penalties in the City segments due to powertrain warm-up, aftertreatment warm-up, stop-and-go operation, and power-off operation are estimated.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0896
Philip Griefnow, Jakob Andert, Dejan Jolovic
Abstract The range of tasks in automotive electrical system development has clearly grown and now includes goals such as achieving efficiency requirements and complying with continuously reducing CO2 limits. Improvements in the vehicle electrical system, hereinafter referred to as the power net, are mandatory to face the challenges of increasing electrical energy consumption, new comfort and assistance functions, and further electrification. Novel power net topologies with dual batteries and dual voltages promise a significant increase in efficiency with moderate technological and financial effort. Depending on the vehicle segment, either an extension of established 12 V micro-hybrid technologies or 48 V mild hybridization is possible. Both technologies have the potential to reduce fuel consumption by implementing advanced stop/start and sailing functionalities.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0901
Alex Pink, Adam Ragatz, Lijuan Wang, Eric Wood, Jeffrey Gonder
Abstract Vehicles continuously report real-time fuel consumption estimates over their data bus, known as the controller area network (CAN). However, the accuracy of these fueling estimates is uncertain to researchers who collect these data from any given vehicle. To assess the accuracy of these estimates, CAN-reported fuel consumption data are compared against fuel measurements from precise instrumentation. The data analyzed consisted of eight medium/heavy-duty vehicles and two medium-duty engines. Varying discrepancies between CAN fueling rates and the more accurate measurements emerged but without a vehicular trend-for some vehicles the CAN under-reported fuel consumption and for others the CAN over-reported fuel consumption. Furthermore, a qualitative real-time analysis revealed that the operating conditions under which these fueling discrepancies arose varied among vehicles.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1289
Zinong Zuo, Yiqiang Pei, Jing Qin, Ruoyu Jia, Xiang Li, Zhang Song ZHAN, Bin Liu, Tie Gang Hu, Jing Zhong
Abstract This research presents an experimental study of the laminar burning combustion and emission characteristics of premixed methane -dissociated methanol-air mixtures in a constant volume combustion chamber. All experiments were conducted at 3 bar initial pressure and 373K initial temperature. The dissociated methanol fractions were from 20% to 80% with 20% intervals, and the equivalence ratio varied from 0.6 to 1.8 with 0.2 intervals. The images of flame propagation were visualized by using a schlieren system. The combustion pressure data were measured and exhaust emissions were sampled with a portable exhaust gas analyzer. The results show that the unstretched laminar burning velocities increased significantly with dissociated methanol enrichment. The Markstein length decreased with increasing dissociated methanol fraction and decreasing equivalence ratio.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0664
Mohd Asif, Karl Giles, Andrew Lewis, Sam Akehurst, Niall Turner
Abstract The causes of engine knock are well understood but it is important to be able to relate these causes to the effects of controllable engine parameters. This study attempts to quantify the effects of a portion of the available engine parameters on the knock behavior of a 60% downsized, DISI engine running at approximately 23 bar BMEP. The engines response to three levels of coolant flow rate, coolant temperature and exhaust back pressure were investigated independently. Within the tested ranges, very little change in the knock limited spark advance (KLSA) was observed. The effects of valve timing on scavenge flow and blow through (the flow of fresh air straight into the exhaust system during the valve overlap period) were investigated at two conditions; at fixed inlet/exhaust manifold pressures, and at fixed engine torque. For both conditions, a matrix of 8 intake/exhaust cam combinations was tested, resulting in a wide range of valve overlap conditions (from 37 to -53°CA).
2017-03-14
Journal Article
2017-01-9277
Stefano D'Ambrosio, Alessandro Ferrari
Abstract The present paper illustrates an investigation about the potentialities of injection rate shaping coupled with an after injection. A pilot shot can either be absent or present before the rate-shaped boot injection. The experimental tests have been performed on a partial PCCI Euro 5 diesel engine endowed with direct-acting piezoelectric injectors. Starting from optimized triple pilot-main-after injection strategies, boot injection was implemented by maintaining the direct-acting piezo injector needle open at part lift. The results of two steady state working conditions have been presented in terms of engine-out emissions, combustion noise and brake specific fuel consumption. In addition, in-cylinder analyses of the pressure, heat-release rate, temperature and emissions have been evaluated. Considering the in-cylinder pressure traces and the heat release rate curves, the injection rate shaping proved to influence combustion in the absence of a pilot injection to a great extent.
2017-03-14
Journal Article
2016-01-9080
Yong-Yuan Ku, Jau-Huai Lu, Ko Wei Lin
Due to the rising price of crude oil, biofuel is being considered as a global alternative for fossil fuels to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. Diesel blended with bio fuel is currently being widely adopted in many countries. The Taiwanese government has been enforcing the adoption of B2 since 2010. However, there have remained consistent concerns about engine durability related to the use of biofuel, especially regarding after-treatment systems. A selective catalytic reduction system (SCR) has been utilized recently to reduce NOX emission in order to meet the Euro IV and V emission standards. To evaluate the impact of biodiesel on the durability of engines equipped with the SCR system, a long-term testing program was organized for the purposes of this study. The results can be used as a reference for the development of marketing promotion strategies as well as government policies in Taiwan.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 16480