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Viewing 1 to 30 of 6057
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1798
Quentin Buisson, Jean-Louis Guyader, Serge Puvilland, Xavier Carniel, Maximilien Soenen
Abstract The goal of the present study is to provide a simple method to compare structure borne noise sources in order to choose the most efficient one, considering the transmission of dynamic forces. It is well known that mechanical sources are not only dependent of the source itself but also of the receiving structure, in addition real sources cannot be reduced to a transverse force acting on the structure but more complicated effect like moment excitation must be taken into account. The advantage of the reception plate method is to characterize the source globally by the level of vibration of the reception plate whatever the type of excitation, the idea is basically to characterize mechanical sources as it is done for acoustical sources in reverberant rooms. A reception plate test bench has been developed to determine the power injected by mechanical sources. Two prototype plates have been designed in order to have different receiving mobilities.
2016-05-18
Journal Article
2016-01-9043
Timo van Overbrueggen, Marco Braun, Michael Klaas, Wolfgang Schroder
Abstract The interaction of biofuel sprays from an outward opening hollow cone injector and the flow field inside an internal combustion engine is analyzed by Mie-Scattering Imaging (MSI) and high-speed stereoscopic particle-image velocimetry (stereo-PIV). Two fuels (ethanol and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)), four injection pressures (50, 100, 150, and 200 bar), three starting points of injection (60°, 277°, and 297° atdc), and two engine speeds (1,500 rpm and 2,000 rpm) define the parameter space of the experiments. The MSI measurements determine the vertical penetration length and the spray cone angle of the ethanol and MEK spray. Stereo-PIV is used to investigate the interaction of the flow field and the ethanol spray after the injection process for a start of injection at 60° atdc. These measurements are compared to stereo-PIV measurements without fuel injection performed in the same engine [19].
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0873
Saeed Jahangirian, Aleksandra Egelja, Huiying Li
Abstract Demands for higher power engines have led to higher pressures in fuel injectors. Internal nozzle flow plays a critical role in the near nozzle flow and subsequent spray pattern. The internal flow becomes more difficult to model when the injector pressure and internal shape make it more prone to cavitation. Two Bosch injectors, proposed for experimental and computational studies under the Engine Combustion Network (namely “Spray C” and “Spray D”) are modeled in the computational fluid dynamics code ANSYS Fluent. Both injectors operate with n-dodecane as fuel at 150 MPa inlet pressures. The computational model includes cavitation effects to characterize any cavitating regions. Including compressibility of both liquid and vapor is found to be critical. Also, due to high velocity gradients and stresses in the nozzle, turbulent viscous energy dissipation is considered along with pressure work resulting from significant pressure changes in the injector.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0874
Giuseppe Quaremba, Luigi Allocca, Amedeo Amoresano, Vincenzo Niola, Alessandro Montanaro, Giuseppe Langella
Abstract Advanced numerical techniques, such as fuzzy logic and neural networks have been applied in this work to digital images acquired on a mono-component fuel spray (iso-octane), in order to define, in a stochastic way, the gas-liquid interface evolution. The image is a numerical matrix and so it is possible to characterize geometrical parameters and the time evolution of the jet by using deterministic, statistical stochastic and other several kinds of approach. The algorithm used works with the fuzzy logic concept to binarize the shades gray of the pixel, depending them, by using the schlieren technique, on the gas density. Starting from a primary fixed threshold, the applied technique, can select the ‘gas’ pixel from the ‘liquid’ pixel and so it is possible define the first most probably boundary lines of the spray.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0877
Preetham Churkunti, Jonathan M. S. Mattson, Christopher Depcik
Abstract Biodiesel is a potential alternative to Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD); however, it often suffers from increased fuel consumption in comparison to ULSD when injection timings and/or pressures are similar. To decrease fuel consumption, increasing biodiesel injection pressure has been found to mitigate the issues associated with its relatively high viscosity and lower energy content. When doing so, the literature indicates decreased emissions, albeit with potentially greater nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions in contrast to ULSD. In order to better understand the trade-off between fuel consumption and NOx emissions, this study explores the influence of fuel injection pressure on ULSD, Waste Cooking Oil (WCO) biodiesel, and their blends in a single-cylinder compression ignition (CI) engine. In particular, fuel injection pressures and timings for WCO biodiesel and blended fuels are adjusted to attempt to mimic the in-cylinder pressure profile of operation using ULSD.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0994
Chetankumar Patel, Nikhil Sharma, Nachiketa Tiwari, Avinash Kumar Agarwal
Abstract Biodiesel made from Jatropha oil by transesterification process has viscosity and other important physical properties comparable to mineral diesel hence it can be used as an alternate fuel in conventional diesel engines. It is important to investigate the spray characteristics of biodiesel because emissions from the engines are dependent on fuel atomization process and resulting fuel-air mixing. This study focuses on the Jatropha biodiesel spray investigations using Phase Doppler Interferometry (PDI) for measurement of various microscopic spray parameters such as Sauter mean diameter (SMD) and spray droplet size and velocity distributions. The spray and engine experiments were carried out for Jatropha biodiesel (JB100) and their 20% blends (JB20) with mineral diesel as baseline. Fuel injection pressure during the spray experiments was maintained at 200 bars for all tests, quite similar to small horse power agricultural engines, and the fuel injection quantity was varied.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0991
Safwan Hanis Mohd Murad, Joseph Camm, Martin Davy, Richard Stone, Dave Richardson
Model M15 gasoline fuels have been created from pure fuel components, to give independent control of volatility, the heavy end content and the aromatic content, in order to understand the effect of the fuel properties on Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) fuel spray behaviour and the subsequent particulate number emissions. Each fuel was imaged at a range of fuel temperatures in a spray rig and in a motored optical engine, to cover the full range from non-flashing sprays through to flare flashing sprays. The spray axial penetration (and potential piston and liner impingement), and spray evaporation rate were extracted from the images. Firing engine tests with the fuels with the same fuel temperatures were performed and exhaust particulate number spectra captured using a DMS500 Mark II Particle Spectrometer.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1052
Adwitiya Dube, A Ramesh
Abstract Direct injection of fuel has been seen as a potential method to reduce fuel short circuiting in two stroke engines. However, most work has been on low pressure injection. In this work, which employed high pressure direct injection in a small two stroke engine (2S-GDI), a detailed study of injection parameters affecting performance and combustion has been presented based on experiments for evaluating its potential. Influences of injection pressure (IP), injection timing (end of injection - EOI) and location of the spark plug at different operating conditions in a 199.3 cm3 automotive two stroke engine using a real time open engine controller were studied. Experiments were conducted at different throttle positions and equivalence ratios at a speed of 3000 rpm with various sets of injection parameters and spark plug locations. The same engine was also run in the manifold injection (2S-MI) mode under similar conditions for comparison.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1014
Shyam K. Menon, Himakar Ganti, Chris Hagen
Abstract Natural gas is an attractive option for transportation applications in the United States due to its abundant availability and potential for reduced emissions. The scarcity of refueling resources imposes a barrier to widespread use of natural gas in internal combustion engines. A novel bi-modal engine under development is capable of operating in a compressor mode and provide refueling capabilities without any supplemental devices thus overcoming the infrastructure based limitations. As part of this development, a multi-cylinder production engine was acquired and the intake modified on one of the cylinders to perform air compression. This system was tested with accompanying plate heat exchangers that allow for cooling of the compressed air. To make the system self-contained, engine coolant and vehicle refrigerant are used as heat sinks in the heat exchangers.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1183
Hisham Al Ashkar, Ferdinand Panik, Waldemar Schneider, Thomas Rohrbach, Walter Czarnetzki, Sami Karaki
Abstract The University of Applied Sciences Esslingen (UASE) is a partner in the collaborative EU project PHAEDRUS (high Pressure Hydrogen All Electrochemical Decentralized RefUeling Station) as part of the EU work programme SP1-JTI-FCH.2011.1.8 Research and Development of 700 bar refueling concepts and technologies. The subtask of UASE is the simulation, sizing and analysis of a new concept for a 100 MPa hydrogen refueling station enabling self-sustained infrastructure roll-out for early vehicle deployment volumes, showing the applicability of the electrochemical hydrogen compression (EHC) technology in combination with an on-site anion exchange membrane electrolyser (AEMEC), storage units, precooling and a dispensing system. The electrolyser and the compressor are modeled using the electrochemical equations and the conservation of mole balance.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1346
Tomoyuki Hosaka, Taisuke Sugii, Eiji Ishii, Kazuhiro Oryoji, Yoshihiro Sukegawa
Abstract We developed the numerical simulation tool by using OpenFOAM® and in-house simulation codes for Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engine in order to carry out the precise investigation of the throughout process from the internal nozzle flow to the fuel/air mixture in engines. For the piston/valve motions, a mapping approach is employed and implemented in this study. In the meantime, the spray atomization including the liquid-columnbreakup region and the secondary-breakup region are simulated by combining the different numerical approaches applied to each region. By connecting the result of liquid-column-breakup simulation to the secondary-breakup simulation, the regions which have different physical phenomena with different length scales are seamlessly jointed; i.e., the velocity and position of droplets predicted by the liquid-column-breakup simulation is used in the secondary breakup simulation so that the initial velocity and position of droplets are transferred.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1379
Dhaval Vaishnav, Ilja Buerkle, Syed Ali, Mike Dong, Alexander Simpson
Abstract Fuel level sensors are used to indicate the amount of fuel in the tank of an automobile. The most common type of fuel level sensor is the float-arm sensor in which a float is connected to a resistance band via an arm. The fuel volume inside the tank sets the height of the float which in turn is converted to a resistance value. This resistance value is converted into gauge reading that is displayed on the dashboard. Whereas this method is widely popular due to its low cost and durability, fuel slosh phenomenon imposes a major challenge. The fuel slosh waves under numerous driving maneuvers impose dynamic drag/lift forces on the float which result into fluctuations in its position (i.e. float height). Under severe acceleration or braking maneuvers, the float can actually submerge inside the liquid and fail to predict location of the free surface. These fluctuations can cause erroneous fuel indication.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0017
Alessandro Biondi, Marco Di Natale, Youcheng Sun, Stefania Botta
Abstract Several application developers are currently faced with the problem of moving a complex system from a single-core to a multicore platform. The problem encompasses several issues that go from modeling issues (the need to represent the system features of interest with sufficient accuracy) to analysis and optimization techniques, to the selection of the right formulations for constraints that relate to time. We report on the initial findings in a case study in which the application of interest is a fuel injection system. We provide an analysis on the limitations of AUTOSAR and the existing modeling tools with respect to the representation of the parameters of interest for timing analysis, and we discuss applicable optimization methods and analysis algorithms.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0286
Changsheng Wang, Haijiang Liu, Tao Zhang, Zhiyong Zhu, Liang Liu
Abstract With the increasing development in automotive industry, finite element (FE) analysis with model bias prediction has been used more and more widely in the fields of chassis design, body weight reduction optimization and some components development, which reduced the development cycles and enhanced analysis accuracy significantly. However, in the simulation process of plastic fuel tank system, there is few study of model validation or verification, which results that non-risky design decisions cannot be enhanced due to too much consuming time. In this study, to correct the discrepancy and uncertainty of the simulated finite element model, Bayesian inference-based method is employed, to quantify model uncertainty and evaluate the simulated results based on collected data from real mechanical tests of plastic fuel tanks and FE simulations under the same boundary conditions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0311
Umashankar Mohan Chandra Joshi, Manan Jyotin Trivedi, Ziliang Zheng, Peter Schihl, Naeim A. Henein
All previous correlations of the ignition delay (ID) period in diesel combustion show a positive activation energy, which means that shorter ID periods are achieved at higher charge temperatures. This is not the case in the autoignition of most homogeneous hydrocarbons-air mixtures where they experience the NTC (Negative Temperature Coefficient ) regime in the intermediate temperature range, from about 800 K to 1000 K). Here, the autoignition reactions slow down and longer ID periods are experienced at higher temperatures. Accordingly the global activation energy for the autoignition reactions of homogeneous mixtures should vary from positive to negative values.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0787
Valentin Soloiu, Martin Muinos, Spencer Harp, Tyler Naes, Remi Gaubert
Abstract In this study, Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) was investigated with alternative fuels, S8 and n-butanol. The S8 fuel is a Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthetic paraffinic kerosene (SPK) produced from natural gas. PCCI was achieved with a dual-fuel combustion incorporating 65% (by mass) port fuel injection (PFI) of n-butanol and 35% (by mass) direct injection (DI) of S8 with 35% exhaust gas recirculation. The experiments were conducted at 1500 rpm and varied loads of 1-5 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). The PCCI tests were compared to an ultra-low sulfur diesel no. 2 (ULSD#2) baseline in order to determine how the alternative fuels effects combustion, emissions, and efficiencies. At 3 and 5 bar BMEP, the heat release in the PCCI mode exhibited two regions of high temperature heat release, one occurring near top dead center (TDC) and corresponds to the ignition of S8 (CN 62), and a second stage occurring ATDC from n-butanol combustion (CN 28).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0747
Vicente Bermudez, Raul Payri, J. Javier Lopez, Daniel Campos, Gilles Coma, Frederic Justet
Abstract Nowadays the main part of investigations in controlled auto-ignition (CAI) engines are centered on performance or some engine processes simulation, leaving aside particle number (PN) emission. The present work is focused on this last topic: PN emission analysis using two different injectors in a 2-stroke CAI engine, and a global comparison of PN emission of this engine with its homonymous 4-stroke engines at two operating conditions. The study was performed in a single-cylinder gasoline engine with 0.3 l displacement, equipped with an air-assisted direct-injection (DI) fuel injection system. Concerning the injectors evaluated, significant differences in PN emission have been found. When the I160X injector (narrow spray angle) was used, PN emissions were reduced. The spray cone angle during the injection event appears to be a key factor for PN emission reduction.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0752
Pranab Das, Mayur Selokar, P.M.V. Subbarao, J.P. Subrahmanyam
Abstract A single cylinder direct injection (DI) diesel engine is modified to run in HCCI-DI mode using a novel in-cylinder dual injection strategy. In this present investigation effect of 2nd injection timing, premixed equivalence ratio and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on combustion and emission behavior is studied. Based on the characteristics of combustion, performance and emission behavior, 2nd injection timing is optimized at a constant split ratio (80%) and engine speed (1500 rev/min). Premixed equivalence ratio was varied (up to 0.38) at the optimized 2nd injection timing condition. It is identified that 2nd injection timing and premixed equivalence ratio play an important role in controlling the occurrences of all combustion parameters of HCCI-DI combustion. EGR was introduced in the cylinder to understand its effect on various combustion parameters and emission behavior.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0740
Kazuhisa Inagaki, Jyunichi Mizuta, Kiyomi Kawamura, Yoshinori Idota, Takeshi Hashizume
Abstract 1 Recently, demand for small-bore compact vehicle engines has been increasing from the standpoint of further reducing CO2 emissions. The generalization and formulation of combustion processes, including those related to emissions formation, based on a certain similarity of physical phenomena regardless of engine size, would be extremely beneficial for the unification of development processes for various sizes of engines. The objective of this study is to clarify what constraints are necessary for engine/nozzle specifications and injection conditions to achieve the same combustion characteristics (such as heat release rate and emissions) in diesel engines with different bore sizes.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0742
Michael Szedlmayer, Chol-Bum M. Kweon
Abstract The objective of the study is to characterize combustion and performance of a multi-cylinder turbocharged direct-injection (DI) diesel engine at altitude conditions according to the International Standard Atmosphere (ISA). Experiments were performed on the 6.6-liter turbocharged DI diesel engine, a model similar to that of the Army’s Joint Light Tactical Vehicle. The engine was installed in the US Army Research Laboratory Small Engine Altitude Research Facility. Outside air temperature (OAT) and outside air pressure were independently controlled to match the ISA-OAT at selected altitude conditions: sea level, 1524, 3048, and 4572 m. The test engine is equipped with a single-stage variable nozzle turbocharger and Bosch CRIN 3 common-rail injection system. Three load conditions (i.e., low, mid, and high) were selected at 1400 rpm to investigate combustion and performance of the engine using Jet Propellant-8 (JP-8) fuel.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0741
Hideyuki Ogawa, Gen Shibata, Yuhei Sakane, Tatsuaki Arisawa, Tatstunori Obe
Abstract Characteristics of semi-premixed diesel combustion with a twin peak shaped heat release (twin combustion) were investigated under several in-cylinder gas conditions in a 0.55 L single cylinder diesel engine with common-rail fuel injection, super-charged, and with low pressure loop cooled EGR. The first-stage combustion fraction, the second injection timing, the intake oxygen concentration, and the intake gas pressure influence on thermal efficiency related parameters, the engine noise, and the exhaust gas emissions was systematically examined at a middle engine speed and load condition (2000 rpm, 0.7 MPa IMEP). The twin peak shaped heat release was realized with the first-stage premixed combustion with a sufficient premixing duration from the first fuel injection and with the second fuel injection taking place just after the end of the first-stage combustion.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0761
Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi, Nico Dam, Bart Somers, Bengt Johansson
Abstract Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is a promising combustion concept for future IC engines. However, controllability of PPC is still a challenge and needs more investigation. The scope of the present study is to investigate the ignition sensitivity of PPC to the injection timing at different injection pressures. To better understand this, high-speed shadowgraphy is used to visualize fuel injection and evaporation at different Start of Injections (SOI). Spray penetration and injection targeting are derived from shadowgraphy movies. OH* chemiluminescence is used to comprehensively study the stratification level of combustion which is helpful for interpretation of ignition sensitivity behavior. Shadowgraphy results confirm that SOI strongly affects the spray penetration and evaporation of fuel. However, spray penetration and ignition sensitivity are barely affected by the injection pressure.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0863
Alessandro Montanaro, Luigi Allocca, Maurizio Lazzaro, Giovanni Meccariello
Abstract In spark ignition engines, the nozzle design, fuel pressure, injection timing, and interaction with the cylinder/piston walls govern the evolution of the fuel spray inside the cylinder before the start of combustion. The fuel droplets, hitting the surface, may rebound or stick forming a film on the wall, or evaporate under the heat exchange effect. The face wetting results in a strong impact on the mixture formation and emission, in particular, on particulate and unburned hydrocarbons. This paper aims to report the effects of the injection pressure and wall temperature on the macroscopic behavior, atomization, and vaporization of impinging sprays on the metal surface. A mono-component fuel, iso-octane, was adopted in the spray-wall studies inside an optically-accessible quiescent vessel by imaging procedures using a Z-shaped schlieren-Mie scattering set-up in combination with a high-speed C-Mos camera.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0858
Piotr Strek, Daniel Duke, Andrew Swantek, Alan Kastengren, Christopher F. Powell, David P. Schmidt
Abstract The salient features of modern gasoline direct injection include cavitation, flash boiling, and plume/plume interaction, depending on the operating conditions. These complex phenomena make the prediction of the spray behavior particularly difficult. The present investigation combines mass-based experimental diagnostics with an advanced, in-house modeling capability in order to provide a multi-faceted study of the Engine Combustion Network’s Spray G injector. First, x-ray tomography is used to distinguish the actual injector geometry from the nominal geometry used in past works. The actual geometry is used as the basis of multidimensional CFD simulations which are compared to x-ray radiography measurements for validation under cold conditions. The influence of nozzle diameter and corner radius are of particular interest. Next, the model is used to simulate flash-boiling conditions, in order to understand how the cold flow behavior corresponds to flashing performance.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0860
Fredrik R. Westlye, Michele Battistoni, Scott A. Skeen, Julien Manin, Lyle M. Pickett, Anders Ivarsson
Abstract This work investigates the effects of cavitation on spray characteristics by comparing measurements of liquid and vapor penetration as well as ignition delay and lift-off length. A smoothed-inlet, converging nozzle (nominal KS1.5) was compared to a sharp-edged nozzle (nominal K0) in a constant-volume combustion vessel under thermodynamic conditions consistent with modern compression ignition engines. Within the near-nozzle region, the K0 nozzle displayed larger radial dispersion of the liquid as compared to the KS1.5 nozzle, and shorter axial liquid penetration. Moving downstream, the KS1.5 jet growth rate increased, eventually reaching a growth rate similar to the K0 nozzle while maintaining a smaller radial width. The increasing spreading angle in the far field creates a virtual origin, or mixing offset, several millimeters downstream for the KS1.5 nozzle.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0859
Fatemeh Salehi, Matthew J. Cleary, Assaad R. Masri
Abstract This paper presents a detailed sensitivity analysis of the sparse-Lagrangian multiple mapping conditioning (MMC) model to different parameters in simulations of n-dodecane flame A which is adopted by the engine combustion network (ECN). The model is fully coupled with a large eddy simulation (LES) approach. A gas-jet model is used for the fuel injection. The MMC-LES model is first examined for a non-reacting case and the sensitivity of the results to variations in the inlet turbulence intensity are examined. It is found that the mixture fraction profiles agree well with the experimental data. The vapour penetration is overpredicted but there is significant improvement by increasing the turbulence intensity of the inlet jet from 10% to 15%. The model sensitivities to inlet turbulence intensity, mixing model parameters and chemical kinetics is then investigated for reacting cases. Simulations are performed at various levels of ambient oxygen (13% - 21%).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0869
Jai Gopal Gupta, Avinash Kumar Agarwal
Abstract Fuel injection pressure (FIP) is one of the most important factors affecting diesel engine performance and particulate emissions. Higher FIP improves the fuel atomization, which results in lower soot formation due to superior fuel-air mixing. The objective of this spray study was to investigate macroscopic and microscopic spray parameters in FIP range of 500-1500 bar, using a solenoid injector for biodiesel blends (KB20 and KB40) and baseline mineral diesel. For these test fuels, effect of ambient pressure on macroscopic spray characteristics such as spray penetration, spray area and cone angle were investigated in a constant volume spray chamber (CVSC). Microscopic spray characteristics such as velocity distribution of droplets and spray droplet size distribution were measured in the CVSC at atmospheric pressure using Phase Doppler Interferometry (PDI).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0871
Sanjoy Biswas, Manish Bakshi, G Shankar, Achintya Mukhopadhyay
Abstract An emissions, combustion noise and performance study were conducted to explore the effects of two different multiple injections strategies on emissions, combustion noise and performances without altering EGR %. The experiments were done on a six cylinder inline CRDI diesel production engine. The aim of this study is to improve performances (brake specific fuel consumption [BSFC], torque) and combustion noise (reduction) using multiple injection strategies without violating emission regulations. The other objective of this carried-out analysis is to examine the influence of different operating parameters (Speed and Load) and main injection timing combined, on same multiple injection strategies (Pilot- main – after {PMA}and Early - pilot- main –after {EPMA}) by means of analyzing emissions/soot, combustion noise and performances data.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0865
R. Lockett, Mahesh Jeshani, Kassandra Makri, Richard Price
Abstract High-speed planar laser Mie scattering and Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) were employed for the determination of Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) distribution in non-evaporating diesel sprays. The effect of rail pressure, distillation profile, and consequent fuel viscosity on the drop size distribution developing during primary and secondary atomization was investigated. Samples of conventional crude-oil derived middle-distillate diesel and light distillate kerosene were delivered into an optically accessible mini-sac injector, using a customized high-pressure common rail diesel fuel injection system. Two optical channels were employed to capture images of elastic Mie and inelastic LIF scattering simultaneously on a high-speed video camera at 10 kHz. Results are presented for sprays obtained at maximum needle lift during the injection. These reveal that the emergent sprays exhibit axial asymmetry and vorticity.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0868
Nikhil Sharma, Avinash Kumar Agarwal
Abstract The development of advanced gasoline direct injection (GDI) injector requires in-depth investigations of macroscopic and microscopic spray characteristics. Over the years, GDI injectors have undergone exponential improvement to be able to deliver fuel at high injection pressure. High fuel injection pressure (FIP) leads to superior fuel atomization, and consequently superior fuel-air mixing. Present investigations aim to improve our fundamental knowledge of the furl-air mixture preparation mechanisms of different test fuels. Experiments were conducted to study spray breakup of GDI injector. This study focuses on the spray investigations using Phase Doppler Interferometry (PDI) for the measurement of various spray related studies such as determination of arithmetic mean diameter (AMD), sauter mean diameter (SMD) and spray droplet velocity distributions.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 6057