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Viewing 1 to 30 of 6098
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0263
Vikas Palve, Prashant Bhavsar, Shyamsundar Kumbhar, Gyanendra Roy
In fuel tank virtual validation, not much attention is given to the effect fluid-structure interaction which is very important in dynamic analysis of two-wheeler. Currently, in fuel tank analysis the fuel mass is represented by non-structural mass (NSM) or density adjusted elements of shell. This paper describes the suitability of FE analysis using the virtual fluid mass methodology in fuel tank validation. Using the VFM method modal analysis is performed keeping the fuel tank 90% filled and results are compared with physical testing. The VFM (using MFLUID) method is much more reliable and accurate than the NSM or density adjusted method. The modal frequencies obtained in VFM technique are in proximity with the physical testing results. Further, the fuel tank and its mountings are evaluated for frequency response analysis with excitation in vertical direction using VFM.
2016-11-16
Journal Article
2016-01-9048
Martin Theile, Egon Hassel, Dominique Thévenin, Bert Buchholz, Karsten Michels, Martin Hofer
Abstract Since the mechanisms leading to cyclic combustion variabilities in direct injection gasoline engines are still poorly understood, advanced computational studies are necessary to be able to predict, analyze and optimize the complete engine process from aerodynamics to mixing, ignition, combustion and heat transfer. In this work the Scale-Adaptive Simulation (SAS) turbulence model is used in combination with a parameterized lagrangian spray model for the purpose of predicting transient in-cylinder cold flow, injection and mixture formation in a gasoline engine. An existing CFD model based on FLUENT v15.0 [1] has been extended with a spray description using the FLUENT Discrete Phase Model (DPM). This article will first discuss the validation of the in-cylinder cold flow model using experimental data measured within an optically accessible engine by High Speed Particle Image Velocimetry (HS-PIV).
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0001
Franz Winkler, Roland Oswald, Oliver Schoegl, Nigel Foxhall
Abstract High performance engines are used in many different powersports applications. In several of these applications 2-stroke engines play an important role. The direct injection technology is a key technology for 2-stroke engines to fulfill both the customers’ request for high power and the environmental requirements concerning emissions and efficiency. As the load spectrum differs from one application to the other, it was interesting to find out if different injection technologies can answer the needs for different applications more efficiently regarding performance but also economic targets. Therefore, the results of the BRP Rotax 600 cm3 E-TEC (direct injection system) engine are compared to the same base engine but adopted with the LPDI (low pressure direct injection) technology developed by IVT at Graz University of Technology. The systems were compared on the engine testbench over 17 rpm / load points representing different product usage profiles.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0068
Joel Prince Lobo, James Howard Lee, Eric Oswald, Spenser Lionetti, Robert Garrick
Abstract The performance and exhaust emissions of a commercially available, propane fueled, air cooled engine with Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) were investigated by varying relative Air to Fuel Ratio (λ), ignition timing, and Compression Ratio (CR). Varying λ and ignition timing was accomplished by modifying the EFI system using TechniCAL Industries’ engine development software. The CR was varied through using pistons with different bowl sizes. Strong relationships were recorded between λ and ignition timing and the resulting effect these parameters have on engine performance and emissions. Lean operation (λ > 1) has the potential to significantly reduce NOx production (110 g/kW-hr down to 5 g/kW-hr). Unfortunately, it also reduces engine torque by up to an order of magnitude (31 Nm down to 3 Nm).
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0064
Keiya Nishida, Takeru Matsuo, Kang Yang, Youichi Ogata, Daisuke Shimo
Abstract The injection amount per stage in a multiple injection strategy is smaller than a conventional single-stage injection. In this paper, the effect of the injection amount (0.27mg, 0.89mg, 2.97mg) under 100MPa injection pressure and the effect of injection pressure (100MPa, 150MPa, 170MPa) under different injection amounts (0.27mg, 2.97mg) on the spray and mixture formation characteristics were studied by analyzing the vapor/liquid phase concentration distributions obtained under various conditions via using the tracer LAS technique. The spray was injected into a high-pressure and high-temperature constant volume vessel by using a single-hole nozzle with a diameter 0.133mm. The higher the injection pressure with a smaller injection amount is, the shorter the spray tip penetration and leaner air-fuel mixture occur. The combustion processes had been examined by a high-speed video camera with the two-color pyrometry method.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0062
Yusuke Miyata
Abstract Recently, large market of industrial machinery is formed across Asian countries due to the mechanization of industries. In China and India, where further economic growth is expected, stricter exhaust emissions regulations are phased in for industrial diesel engines with the rise of environmental consciousness. On the other hand, high durability, low fuel consumption and low cost are earnestly requested to those engines. In this paper, we introduce the techniques that we optimized fuel injection systems and both intake and exhaust systems to achieve low-fuel consumption, low-exhaust emissions and high-durability at the same time.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0081
Giovanni Vichi, Michele Becciani, Isacco Stiaccini, Giovanni Ferrara, Lorenzo Ferrari, Alessandro Bellissima, Go Asai
Abstract For the development of a very high efficiency engine, the continuous monitoring of the engine operating conditions is needed. Moreover, the early detection of engine faults is fundamental in order to take appropriate corrective actions and avoid malfunctioning and failures. The in-cylinder pressure is the most direct parameter associated to the engine thermodynamic cycle. The cost and the intrusiveness of the dynamic pressure sensor and the harsh operating condition that limits its life-time, make the direct measurement of the in-cylinder pressure not suitable for mass production applications. Consequently, research is oriented on the measurement of physical phenomena linked to the thermodynamic cycle to obtain useful information for the ICE control.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0065
Yoshinori Nakao, Yota Sakurai, Atsushi Hisano, Masahito Saitou, Masahide Kazari, Takahito Murase, Kozo Suzuki
In port injection, it is difficult to control in-cylinder fuel supply of each cycle in a transient state as cold start (in this paper, cold start is defined as several cycles from cranking at low engine temperature). Hence, THC, which is one of regulated emission gases, is likely to increase at cold start. As one of THC emission reduction approaches at cold start, the optimization of fuel injection specifications (including injection position and spray diameter) is expected to reduce THC emission. Setting injection position as downstream position is expected to secure the in-cylinder fuel supply amount at cold start because of small fuel adhesion amount on an intake port wall and a short distance between the injection position and in-cylinder. The position injection contributes to reduction of THC emission due to elimination of misfire.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0080
Christian Steinbrecher, Haris Hamedovic, Andreas Rupp, Thomas Wortmann
Abstract Engine management systems combined with fuel injectors allow a precise fuel metering for a robust combustion process. Stricter emission legislations increase the requirements for these port fuel injection systems (PFI), whereas the price is still the main driver in the emerging low cost 2-wheeler market. Therefore, a holistic mechatronic approach is developed by Bosch, which allows an improved fuel metering over life time and furthermore provides new possibilities for diagnosis without changing the injector itself. This example of an intelligent software solution provides the possibility to further improve the accuracy of the fuel metering of an injector. By use of the information contained in the actuation voltage and current, the opening and closing times of the injector are derivable.
2016-10-24
Journal Article
2016-01-9077
Patamaporn Chaikool, Kemwat Intravised, Prapan Patsin, Teerawat Laonapakul
Abstract Due to the need to reduce the use of fossil fuels, renewable fuels such as biodiesels are of interest. Biodiesels have different properties to pure diesel especially higher viscosity. This research studied the effect of using biodiesel on common-rail injection nozzles. Pure diesel and two biodiesel blends were supplied to the nozzles using a 1,800 bar injection pump with the same rotational speed of 2,200 rpm for 1,000 hours. The biodiesel blends were 5% palm oil based fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) biodiesel blended with 95% diesel (B5), and 10% palm oil based FAME biodiesel blended with 90% diesel (B10). Comparing with the petroleum-derived diesel (petrodiesel) fuel, the use of higher viscosity fuels such as B5 or B10 did not show the possibility to cause wearing around the injection nozzle holes.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2232
Yves Compera, Bernhard Penkert, Georg Wachtmeister
Abstract This paper presents a phenomenological and semi-empirical simulation model to predict the injection rate of a diesel solenoid valve injector based on a few injection quantity measurements and indications (EMI). The approximate injection rate will be used as the input data for a subsequent model, which simulates the rate of heat release (ROHR). The injection rate model encompasses algebraic relations and differential equations deviating from the equations of motion and conservation, which describes the characteristic processes in the injector by using modular submodules. The process and its assumptions are explained step by step for each submodule. In addition, the injection rate predictions are presented and compared with experimental results arising from the selected reference solenoid valve injector.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2307
Guillaume Bourhis, Jean-Pascal Solari, Roland DAUPHIN, Loic De Francqueville
Abstract Efficiency of spark ignition (SI) engines is limited towards high loads by the occurrence of knock, which is linked to the octane number of the fuel. Running the engine at its optimal efficiency requires a high octane number at high load whereas a low octane number can be used at low load. Current project aims at developing an “Octane on Demand” (OOD) concept: the fuel octane number is adjusted “on demand” to prevent knock occurrence by adapting the fuel RON injected in the combustion chamber. Thus, the engine cycle efficiency is increased by always keeping combustion phasing at optimum. This is achieved by a dual fuel injection strategy, involving a low-RON base-fuel and a high-RON octane booster. The ratio of fuel quantity on each injector is adapted to fit the RON requirement function of engine operating conditions. This OOD concept requires a good characterization of the octane requirement needed to run the engine at its optimal efficiency over the entire map.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2303
Changhwan Woo, Harsh Goyal, Sanghoon Kook, Evatt R. Hawkes, Qing Nian Chan
Abstract Ethanol has been selected as a fuel for gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines realising partially premixed charge combustion, considering its higher resistance to auto-ignition, higher evaporative cooling and oxygen contents than widely used gasoline, all of which could further improve already high efficiency and low smoke/NOx emissions of GCI engines. The in-cylinder phenomena and engine-out emissions were measured in a single-cylinder automotive-size common-rail diesel engine with a special emphasis on double injection strategies implementing early first injection near BDC and late second injection near TDC.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2300
Mengqin Shen, Martin Tuner, Bengt Johansson, Per Tunestal, Joakim Pagels
Abstract In order to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) and soot emissions while maintaining high thermal efficiency, more advanced combustion concepts have been developed over the years, such as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) and Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC), as possible combustion processes in commercial engines. Compared to HCCI, PPC has advantages of lower unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions; however, due to increased fuel stratifications, soot emissions can be a challenge when adding Exhaust-Gas Recirculation (EGR) gas. The current work presents particle size distribution measurements performed from HCCI-like combustion with very early (120 CAD BTDC) to PPC combustion with late injection timing (11 CAD BTDC) at two intake oxygen rates, 21% and 15% respectively. Particle size distributions were measured using a differential mobility spectrometer DMS500.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2174
Reza Golzari, Yuanping Li, Hua Zhao
Abstract As the emission regulations for internal combustion engines are becoming increasingly stringent, different solutions have been researched and developed, such as dual injection systems (combined port and direct fuel injection), split injection strategies (single and multiple direct fuel injection) and different intake air devices to generate an intense in-cylinder air motion. The aim of these systems is to improve the in-cylinder mixture preparation (in terms of homogeneity and temperature) and therefore enhance the combustion, which ultimately increases thermal efficiency and fuel economy while lowering the emissions. This paper describes the effects of dual injection systems on combustion, efficiency and emissions of a downsized single cylinder gasoline direct injection spark ignited (DISI) engine. A set of experiments has been conducted with combined port fuel and late direct fuel injection strategy in order to improve the combustion process.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2169
Carrie M. Hall, James Sevik, Michael Pamminger, Thomas Wallner
Abstract The high octane rating and more plentiful domestic supply of natural gas make it an excellent alternative to gasoline. Recent studies have shown that using natural gas in dual fuel engines provides one possible strategy for leveraging the advantages of both natural gas and gasoline. In particular, such engines been able to improve overall engine efficiencies and load capacity when they leverage direct injection of the natural gas fuel. While the benefits of these engine concepts are still being explored, differences in fuel composition, combustion process and in-cylinder mixing could lead to dramatically different emissions which can substantially impact the effectiveness of the engine’s exhaust aftertreatment system. In order to explore this topic, this study examined the variations in speciated hydrocarbon emissions which occur for different fuel blends of E10 and compressed natural gas and for different fuel injection strategies on a spark-ignition engine.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2185
Jialin Liu, Hu Wang, Zunqing Zheng, Zeyu Zou, Mingfa Yao
Abstract In this work, both the ‘SCR-only’ and ‘EGR+SCR’ technical routes are compared and evaluated after the optimizations of both injection strategy and turbocharging system over the World Harmonized Stationary Cycle (WHSC) in a heavy duty diesel engine. The exhaust emissions and fuel economy performance of different turbocharging systems, including wastegate turbocharger (WGT), variable geometry turbocharger (VGT), two-stage fixed geometry turbocharger (WGT+FGT) and two-stage variable geometry turbocharger (VGT+FGT), are investigated over a wide EGR range. The NOx reduction methods and EGR introduction strategies for different turbocharger systems are proposed to improve the fuel economy. The requirement on turbocharging system and their potential to meet future stringent NOx and soot emission regulations are also discussed in this paper.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2193
Gen Shibata, Hideyuki Ogawa, Fukei Sha, Kota Tashiro
Abstract Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are widely used in diesel engines, and forced regeneration is necessary to remove particulate matter (PM) accumulating on the DPF. This may be achieved with fuel injected after the main combustion is complete, the socalled “post fuel injection”, and supplied to the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) upstream of the DPF. This increases the exhaust gas temperature in the DOC and the DPF is regenerated with the high temperature gas flow. In most cases, the post fuel injection takes place at 30-90CA ATDC, and fuel may impinge on and adhere to the cylinder liner wall in some cases. Buddie and Pischinger [1] have reported a lubricant oil dilution with the post fuel injection by engine tests and simulations, and adhering fuel is a cause of worsening fuel consumption.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2196
Stefan Stojanovic, Andrew Tebbs, Stephen Samuel, John Durodola
Abstract With a push to continuously develop traditional engine technology efficiencies and meet stringent emissions requirements, there is a need to improve the precision of injection rate measurement used to characterise the performance of the fuel injectors. New challenges in precisely characterising injection rate present themselves to the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), with the additional requirements to measure multiple injection strategies, increased injection pressure and rate features. One commonly used method of measurement is the rate tube injection analyser; it measures the pressure wave caused by the injection within a column of stationary fluid. In a rate tube, one of the significant sources of signal distortion is a result of the injected fluid pressure waves reflected back from the tube termination.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2189
Bo Wang, Tawfik Badawy, Yanfei Li, Hongming Xu, Yizhou Jiang, Xinyu Zhang
Abstract Atomization of fuel sprays is a key factor in controlling the combustion quality in the direct-injection engines. In this present work, the effect of saturation ratio (Rs) on the near nozzle spray patterns of ethanol was investigated using an ultra-high speed imaging technique. The Rs range covered both flash-boiling and non-flash boiling regions. Ethanol was injected from a single-hole injector into an optically accessible constant volume chamber at a fixed injection pressure of 40 MPa with different fuel temperatures and back pressures. High-speed imaging was performed using an ultrahigh speed camera (1 million fps) coupled with a long-distance microscope. Under non-flash boiling conditions, the effect of Rs on fuel development was small but observable. Clear fuel collision can be observed at Rs=1.5 and 1.0. Under the flash boiling conditions, near-nozzle spray patterns were significant different from the non-flash boiling ones.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2191
Peter Deckelmann, Tina Dietrich
Abstract This paper will focus on a powertrain injector application solution for R&D and production. PIA is a product for triggering and analyzing current and newly developed injection valves (both solenoid and piezoelectric). The article examines an important obstacle of injection testing, which is creating realistic environmental conditions for injectors. It shows how PIA realizes this through high-end ECU simulation for current and new generations, creating different operating conditions. Berghof Testing combined control, performance and measuring technology into PIA. The compact, intelligent and economical device can be integrated into all existing injector test systems. In addition to the standard version the application offers enhancements such as intelligent injections, injector calibration, polarity detection and image processing for spray analyses.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2202
Naoya Ochiai, Jun Ishimoto, Akira Arioka, Nobuhiko Yamaguchi, Yuzuru Sasaki, Nobuyuki Furukawa
Abstract The advanced development and optimization of fuel atomization in port and direct injection systems for automobile engine is desired for the improvement of fuel combustion performance and thermal efficiency of the engine. Computational prediction and design of injector nozzle spray flow is an effective method for that. However, a practical simulation method of the continuous primary, secondary spray breakups and the spraying behavior have not been developed yet. In this study, we have developed the integrated computational method of the total fuel atomization process of the injector nozzle. This new computational approach is taking into account the nozzle internal flow to form the primary breakup using Volume of Fluid (VOF) method in connection with the spray flow characteristics to the engine cylinder using Discrete Droplet Model (DDM).
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2201
Meng Tang, Le Zhao, Seong-Young Lee, Jeffrey Naber
Abstract Extensive studies have addressed diesel sprays under non-vaporizing, vaporizing and combusting conditions respectively, but further insights into the mechanism by which combustion alters the macroscopic characteristics including the spray penetration and the shape of the spray under diesel engine conditions are needed. Contradictory observations are reported in the literature regarding the combusting diesel spray penetration compared to the inert conditions, and it is an objective of this study to provide further insights and analyses on the combusting spray characteristics by expanding the range of operating parameters. Parameters varied in the studies are charge gas conditions including oxygen levels of 0 %, 15%, 19%, charge densities of 22.8 & 34.8 kg/m3, and charge temperatures of 800, 900 & 1050 K for injection pressures of 1200, 1500, and 1800 bar with a single-hole injector with a nozzle diameter of 100 μm.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2199
Alessandro Montanaro, Luigi Allocca, Maurizio Lazzaro, Giovanni Meccariello
Abstract Mixture formation is fundamental for the development of the combustion process in internal combustion engines, for the energy release, the consumption, and the pollutant formation. Concerning the spark ignition engines, the direct injection technology is being considered as an effective mean to achieve the optimal air-to-fuel ratio distribution at each operating condition, either through charge stratification around the spark plug and stoichiometric mixture under the high power requirements. Due to the highest injection pressures, the impact of a spray on the piston or on the cylinder walls causes the formation of liquid film (wall-film) and secondary atomization of the droplets. The wall-film could have no negligible size, especially where the mixture formation is realized under a wall-guided mode. The present work aims to report the effects of the ambient pressure and wall temperature on the macroscopic parameters of the spray impact on a wall.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2200
Tobias Knorsch, Philipp Rogler, Maximilian Miller, Wolfram Wiese
Abstract To satisfy future emission classes, e.g. EU6c, the particulate number (PN) of Direct-Injection Spark-Ignition (DISI) engines must be reduced. For these engines, different components influence the combustion process and thus also the formation of soot particles and deposits. Along with other engine components, the injector nozzle influences the particulate number and deposits in both fuel spray behavior and nozzle “tip wetting”. In case of non-optimized nozzle layouts, fuel may impinge on the piston and the liner in an unfavorable way, which implies low-oxygen diffusive combustion by retarded vaporizing wall films. For the tip wetting, wall films are present on the actual surface of the nozzle tip, which is also caused by unadapted nozzles. For non-optimized nozzles, the latter effect can become quite dominant. This paper deals with systematic nozzle development activities towards low-deposit nozzle tips and thus decreasing PN values.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2198
Chikara Dodate, Sachio Mori, Masato Kawauchi, Rio Shimizu
Abstract Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) is widely used to develop engine combustion. Especially the in-cylinder spray calculation is important in order to resolve the issues of direct injection gasoline engines (e.g., particulate matter (PM) and oil dilution caused by fuel wetting on the cylinder walls). Conventional spray calculation methods require fitting based on measurements of spray characteristics such as penetration and droplet diameter (i.e., the Sauter mean diameter (SMD)). Particularly in the case of slit nozzle shapes that widen from the inlet to the outlet to form a fan-shaped spray, fitting the shape of spray is a complex procedure because the flow inside the nozzle is not uniform. In response, a new calculation method has been developed that eliminates the need for spray shape fitting by combining calculations of the Eulerian multiphase and the Lagrangian multiphase.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2284
Yuan Wen, Yinhui Wang, Chenling Fu, Wei Deng, Zhangsong Zhan, Yuhang Tang, Xuefei Li, Haichun Ding, Shijin Shuai
Abstract Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines have developed rapidly in recent years driven by fuel efficiency and consumption requirements, but face challenges such as injector deposits and particulate emissions compared to Port Fuel Injection (PFI) engines. While the mechanisms of GDI injector deposits formation and that of particulate emissions have been respectively revealed well, the impact of GDI injector deposits and their relation to particulate emissions have not yet been understood very well through systematic approach to investigate vehicle emissions together with injector spray analysis. In this paper, an experimental study was conducted on a GDI vehicle produced by a Chinese Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) and an optical spray test bench to determine the impact of injector deposits on spray and particulate emissions.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2278
Ashutosh Gupta, Huifang Shao, Joseph Remias, Joseph Roos, Yinhui Wang, Yan Long, Zhi Wang, Shi-Jin Shuai
Abstract A conceptual approach to help understand and simulate droplet induced pre-ignition is presented. The complex phenomenon of oil-fuel droplet induced pre-ignition has been decomposed to its elementary processes. This approach helps identify the key fluid properties and engine parameters that affect the pre-ignition phenomenon, and could be used to control LSPI. Based on the conceptual model, a 3D CFD engine simulation has been developed which is able to realistically model all of the elementary processes involved in droplet induced pre-ignition. The simulation was successfully able to predict droplet induced pre-ignition at conditions where the phenomenon has been experimentally observed. The simulation has been able to help explain the observation of pre-ignition advancement relative to injection timing as experimentally observed in a previous study [6].
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2306
Hideyuki Ogawa, Gen Shibata, Jun Goto, Lin Jiang
Abstract The engine performance and the exhaust gas emissions in a dual fuel compression ignition engine with natural gas as the main fuel and a small quantity of pilot injection of diesel fuel with the ultra-high injection pressure of 250 MPa as an ignition source were investigated at 0.3 MPa and 0.8 MPa IMEP. With increasing injection pressure the unburned loss decreases and the thermal efficiency improves at both IMEP conditions. At the 0.3 MPa IMEP the THC and CO emissions are significantly reduced when maintaining the equivalence ratio of natural gas with decreasing the volumetric efficiency by intake gas throttling, but the NOx emissions increase and excessive intake gas throttling results in a decrease in the indicated thermal efficiency. Under the 250 MPa pilot injection condition simultaneous reductions in the NOx, THC, and CO emissions can be established with maintaining the equivalence ratio of natural gas by intake gas throttling.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2261
Maira Alves Fortunato, Aurelie Mouret, Chrsitine Dalmazzone, Laurie Starck
Abstract The use of biodiesel has risen worldwide in the last decade. Different countries use different biodiesel feedstocks which will depend on the resources available locally. Some problems due to biodiesel content and feedstock quality have been pointed out in the literature, which include cold flow properties issues of several methyl esters, especially Palm Methyl Ester (PME). The present work was carried out on diesel-biodiesel blends from 0 to 30%v/vPME in order to evaluate the impact of crystals formation on fuel filter plugging using a rig test. The fuel was maintained at 5°C and 20°C during soaking. The crystal particles formation was evaluated by the Turbiscan™ technique (based on multiple light scattering with near infra-red light), followed by particles mass weight determination by filtration. The fuel was then evaluated in the test rig until performances degradation in terms of fuel flow rate and filter pressure drop.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 6098