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Viewing 1 to 30 of 6216
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0442
Harchetan Singh Aneja, Manas Tripathi, Harmeet Singh, Aashish Parmar
Abstract With the increasing expectation of customer for a quiet and comfortable ride, automobile manufacturers need to continuously work upon to improve automobile powertrain NVH. Today’s customer has become so aware of vehicle related noises that in-tank fuel pump noise is no exception to the checklist of evaluating cabin NVH. In-tank fuel pump, that is responsible for delivering the fuel from fuel storage tank to delivery rail, uses an electric driven motor. The rotating parts such as rotor, etc. produce vibrations that may traverse to tank body & subsequently vehicle body. Since noise is essentially an audible vibration at its root, these structure borne vibrations may be perceived as noise inside passenger cabin. Additionally, the noise may also be produced by fuel flow pulsations if transferred through piping to vehicle body. This paper focuses on various approaches to reduce the fuel pump generated noise heard inside passenger cabin.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1350
Jon Olson, Mark Fleming, Ram Krishnaswami, Robert Pellillo
Abstract The fuel filler tube check valve (FTCV) is an integral part of a vehicle’s refueling system. The primary function of this valve is to control the refueling characteristics in a manner that enables the vehicle to be refueled efficiently and under wide ranging conditions, while limiting the amount of fuel or fuel vapor emissions being released into the environment. These valves accomplish this function by allowing the flow of gasoline to pass through the valve and into the tank during the refueling process with minimal restriction while limiting the reverse flow as the fuel tank approaches full. The location of these valves varies from vehicle to vehicle but are generally located within the fuel filler or fuel tank system. They have been engineered and developed to ensure the vehicle will meet customer and industry refueling requirements as well as refueling emissions mandates from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0447
Zhe Li, Mike Dong, Dennis Harrigan, Michael Gardner
In gasoline Powertrain systems, the evaporative emission control (EVAP) system canister purge valve (CPV) can be actuated by pulse-width modulated (PWM) signals. The CPV is an electronically actuated solenoid. The PWM controlled CPV, when actuated, creates pressure pulsations in the system. This pulsation is sent back to the rest of the EVAP system. Given the right conditions, the fill limit vent valve (FLVV) inside the fuel tank can be excited. The FLVV internal components can be excited and produce noise. This noise can be objectionable to the occupants. Additional components within the EVAP system may also be excited in a similar way. This paper presents a bench test method using parts from vehicle’s EVAP system and other key fuel system components.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0652
Jose Claret, Thomas Lauer, Nikola Bobicic, Andreas Posselt, Joerg Schlerfer
Abstract This study presents a methodology to predict particle number (PN) generation on a naturally aspirated 4-cylinder gasoline engine with port fuel injection (PFI) from wall wetting, employing numerical CFD simulation and fuel film analysis. Various engine parameters concerning spray pattern, injection timing, intake valve timing, as well as engine load/speed were varied and their impact on wall film and PN was evaluated. The engine, which was driven at wide open throttle (WOT), was equipped with soot particle sampling technology and optical access to the combustion chamber of cylinder 1 in order to visualise non-premixed combustion. High-speed imaging revealed a notable presence of diffusion flames, which were typically initiated between the valve seats and cylinder head. Their size was found to match qualitatively with particulate number measurements. A validated CFD model was employed to simulate spray propagation, film transport and droplet impingement.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0774
Ehsan Faghani, Pooyan Kheirkhah, Christopher W.J. Mabson, Gordon McTaggart-Cowan, Patrick Kirchen, Steve Rogak
High-pressure direct-injection (HPDI) in heavy duty engines allows a natural gas (NG) engine to maintain diesel-like performance while deriving most of its power from NG. A small diesel pilot injection (5-10% of the fuel energy) is used to ignite the direct injected gas jet. The NG burns in a predominantly non-premixed combustion mode which can produce particulate matter (PM). Here we study the effect of injection strategies on emissions from a HPDI engine in two parts. Part-I will investigates the effect of late post injection (LPI) and Part II will study the effect of slightly premixed combustion (SPC) on emission and engine performance. PM reductions and tradeoffs involved with gas late post-injections (LPI) was investigated in a single-cylinder version of a 6-cylinder,15 liter HPDI engine. The post injection contains 10-25% of total fuel mass, and occurs after the main combustion event.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0694
Tae Joong Wang, Jong Yoon Lee, Seung Kwon Hwang, Ja Yun Cho, Jeong Keun Park, Woong Gun Lee, Tae Sub Kim, Sang Won Jeong, Tae Kuk Kim
Abstract Doosan Infracore Corporation has developed the combustion system of a brand-new DX12 heavy-duty diesel engine equipped for 38 ~ 50 tonnage excavators and 4.2 ~ 4.5 m3 bucket-size wheel loaders which are mainly targeted to emerging countries. A variety of advanced combustion technologies were incorporated in the design of the DX12 engine to meet Tier3 emission legislation even with a mechanically controlled fuel injection equipment while ensuring around 2 % improvement in fuel consumption as well as over 8 % increase in rated power than its Tier2 predecessor. Mechanical-type diesel engine has a couple of significant advantages especially in terms of cost and maintenance compared to electronic-type counterpart. In addition, mechanical fuel system is better able to tolerate a low fuel quality which is potentially possible in emerging countries.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0684
Vickey B. Kalaskar, Raphael Gukelberger, Bradley Denton, Thomas Briggs
Abstract Dedicated EGR has shown promise for achieving high efficiency with low emissions [1]. For the present study, a 4-cylinder turbocharged GDI engine which was modified to a D-EGR configuration was used to investigate the impact of valve phasing and different injection strategies on the reformate production in the dedicated cylinder. Various levels of positive valve overlap were used in conjunction with different approaches for dedicated cylinder over fueling using PFI and DI fuel systems. Three speed-load combinations were studied, 2000 rpm 4 bar IMEPg, 2000 rpm 12 bar IMEPg, and 4000 rpm 12 bar IMEPg. The primary investigation was conducted to map out the dedicated cylinders' performance at the operating limits of intake and exhaust cam phasing. In this case, the limits were defined as conditions that yielded either no reformate benefit or led to instability in the dedicated cylinder.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0861
Balasubramanian N., Karthick Durairaj, Jayabalan Sethuraman
Abstract Asian countries hold a vast majority of the global two-wheeler population. Currently majority of these two wheelers are fueled by carburetors owing to their low cost and ease of maintenance. As these countries try to adopt emission norms similar to that of Euro 6 in a few years from now, they will be migrating to an injection system like port fuel injection (PFI), as it offers good control over emissions by using closed loop corrections, based on the exhaust lambda feedback. Stanadyne R&D has developed an innovative injection system that can be applied for such port fuel injection in two-wheelers. In this innovative design, the pump and injector are integrated into a single unit, making the system simple, compact and less expensive. The integrated injector uses a solenoid and spring arrangement, for pressurizing the fuel in a small chamber, and consumes less current. The pressurized fuel is then injected through orifice to produce spray in the intake port.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0578
Pinaki Pal, Daniel Probst, Yuanjiang Pei, Yu Zhang, Michael Traver, David Cleary, Sibendu Som
Abstract Fuels in the gasoline auto-ignition range (Research Octane Number (RON) > 60) have been demonstrated to be effective alternatives to diesel fuel in compression ignition engines. Such fuels allow more time for mixing with oxygen before combustion starts, owing to longer ignition delay. Moreover, by controlling fuel injection timing, it can be ensured that the in-cylinder mixture is “premixed enough” before combustion occurs to prevent soot formation while remaining “sufficiently inhomogeneous” in order to avoid excessive heat release rates. Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) has the potential to offer diesel-like efficiency at a lower cost and can be achieved with fuels such as low-octane straight run gasoline which require significantly less processing in the refinery compared to today’s fuels.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0666
Zhenbiao Zhou, Yi Yang, Michael Brear, Joshua Lacey, Thomas G. Leone, James E. Anderson, Michael H. Shelby
Abstract Combustion in modern spark-ignition (SI) engines is increasingly knock-limited with the wide adoption of downsizing and turbocharging technologies. Fuel autoignition conditions are different in these engines compared to the standard Research Octane Number (RON) and Motor Octane Numbers (MON) tests. The Octane Index, OI = RON - K(RON-MON), has been proposed as a means to characterize the actual fuel anti-knock performance in modern engines. The K-factor, by definition equal to 0 and 1 for the RON and MON tests respectively, is intended to characterize the deviation of modern engine operation from these standard octane tests. Accurate knowledge of K is of central importance to the OI model; however, a single method for determining K has not been well accepted in the literature.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1317
Luis Felipe Blas Martinez, Rodolfo Palma, Francisco Gomez, Dhaval Vaishnav, Francisco Canales
Abstract Liquid sloshing is an important issue in ground transportation, aerospace and automotive applications. Effects of sloshing in a moving liquid container can cause various issues related to vehicle stability, safety, component fatigue, audible noise and, liquid level measurement. The sloshing phenomenon is a highly nonlinear oscillatory movement of the free-surface of liquid inside a container under the effect of continuous or momentarily excitation forces. These excitation forces can result from sudden acceleration, braking, sharp turning or pitching motions. The sloshing waves generated by the excitation forces can impact on the tank surface and cause additional vibrations. For the loads with the frequencies between 2 to 200 Hz, the structural fatigue failure is a major concern for automotive applications.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0707
Srinivas Padala, Minh Khoi Le, Yoshihiro Wachi, Yuji Ikeda
Abstract The effect of microwave enhanced plasma (MW Plasma) on diesel spray combustion was investigated inside a constant volume high pressure chamber. A microwave-enhanced plasma system, in which plasma discharge generated by a spark plug was amplified using microwave pulses, was used as plasma source. This plasma was introduced to the soot cloud after the occurrence of autoignition, downstream of the flame lift-off position to allow additional plasma-generated oxidizers to be entrained into the hot combustion products. Planar laser induced incandescence (PLII) diagnostics were performed with laser sheet formed from 532 nm Nd:YAG laser to estimate possible soot reduction effect of MW plasma. A semi-quantitative comparison was made between without-plasma conventional diesel combustion and with-plasma combustion; with LII performed at different jet cross-sections in the combustion chamber.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0840
Carlo Beatrice, Marianna Migliaccio, Alessandro Montanaro, Valentina Fraioli, Pierpaolo Napolitano, Luigi Allocca
Abstract In the aim of reducing CO2 emissions and fuel consumption, the improvement of the diesel engine performance is based on the optimization of the whole combustion system efficiency. The focus of new technological solutions is devoted to the optimization of thermodynamic efficiency especially in terms of reduction of losses of heat exchange. In this context, it is required a continuous development of the engine combustion system, first of all the injection system and in particular the nozzle design. To this reason in the present paper a new concept of an open nozzle spray was investigated as a possible solution for application on diesel engines. The study concerns some experimental and numerical activities on a prototype of an open nozzle. An external supplier provided the prototypal version of the injector, with a dedicated piezoelectric actuation system, and with an appropriate choice of geometrical design parameters.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0839
Luigi Allocca, Alessandro Montanaro, Amedeo Amoresano, Giuseppe Langella, Vincenzo Niola, Giuseppe Quaremba
Abstract The paper reports an innovative method of analysis based on an advanced statistical techniques applied to images captured by a high-speed camera that allows highlighting phenomena and anomalies hardly detectable by conventional optical diagnostic techniques. The images, previously elaborated by neural network tools in order for clearly identifying the contours, have been analyzed in their time evolution as pseudo-chaotic variables that may have internal periodic components. In addition to the Fourier analysis, tools as Lyapunov and Hurst exponents and average Kω permitted to detect the chaos level of the signals. The use of this technique has permitted to distinguish periodic oscillations from chaotic variations and to detect those parameters that actually determine the spray behavior.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0829
Gina M. Magnotti, Caroline L. Genzale
Abstract The atomization and initial spray formation processes in direct injection engines are not well understood due to the experimental and computational challenges associated with resolving these processes. Although different physical mechanisms, such as aerodynamic-induced instabilities and nozzle-generated turbulence and cavitation, have been proposed in the literature to describe these processes, direct validation of the theoretical basis of these models under engine-relevant conditions has not been possible to date. Recent developments in droplet sizing measurement techniques offer a new opportunity to evaluate droplet size distributions formed in the central and peripheral regions of the spray. There is therefore a need to understand how these measurements might be utilized to validate unobservable physics in the near nozzle-region.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0828
Dongwei Wu, Baigang Sun, Dan Xu, Xiaodong An, Yunshan Ge
Abstract The pressure fluctuation characteristics of a constant pressure fuel system has great influence on its fuel injection characteristics. It is, therefore important to understand the impacts of these fluctuations in order to better study and optimize the fuel injection characteristics. In this study, the pressure fluctuation characteristics of the high pressure common rail system have been investigated experimentally. The transient pressure at different positions in the high pressure common rail system have been measured. The phase of pressure fluctuation during the injection process has been analyzed and the corresponding fluctuating characteristic parameters have been characterized for each phase. The changes in pressure wave propagation velocity, fuel injection pressure drop amplitude, wave amplitude, period and decay time are obtained by studying the fluctuation characteristic parameters caused by fuel pressure and temperature change.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0819
David van Bebber, Uwe Reuter
Abstract The fuel consumption and emissions of diesel engines is strongly influenced by the injection rate pattern, which influences the in-cylinder mixing and combustion process. Knowing the exact injection rate is mandatory for an optimal diesel combustion development. The short injection time of no more than some milliseconds prevents a direct flow rate measurement. However, the injection rate is deduced from the pressure change caused by injecting into a fuel reservoir or pipe. In an ideal case, the pressure increase in a fuel pipe correlates with the flow rate. Unfortunately, real measurement devices show measurement inaccuracies and errors, caused by non-ideal geometrical shapes as well as variable fuel temperature and fuel properties along the measurement pipe. To analyze the thermal effect onto the measurement results, an available rate measurement device is extended with a flexible heating system as well as multiple pressure and temperature sensors.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0860
PengBo Dong, Jun Yamauchi, Keiya Nishida, Youichi Ogata
Abstract With the aim of improving engine performance, recent trend of fuel injection nozzle design followed by engineers and researchers is focusing on more efficient fuel break up, atomization, and fuel evaporation. Therefore, it is crucial to characterize the effect of nozzle geometric design on fuel internal flow dynamics and the consequent fuel-air mixture properties. In this study, the internal flow and spray characteristics generated by the practical multi-hole (10 holes) nozzles with different nozzle hole length and hole diameter were investigated in conjunction with a series of computational and experimental methods. Specifically, the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) commercial code was used to predict the internal flow variation inside different nozzle configurations, and the high-speed video observation method was applied to visualize the spray evolution processes under non-evaporating conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0856
Yanzhi Zhang, Ming Jia, Huiquan Duan, Pengfei Wang, Jianxiang Wang, Hong Liu, MaoZhao Xie
Abstract The phenomenon of a thin liquid film separation and atomization at expanding corners during the spray/wall interaction is usually encountered in premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) engines. However, detailed information about the film separation is very limited, especially under high injection pressure conditions. In this study, experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of injection pressure and impingement distance on the evolutions of the impinging spray and the adhered film at simplified geometries with an expanding corner by employing a high-speed camera. In addition, an improved hybrid film separation and atomization model was developed, which includes the sub-models of film separation criterion, film separation mass ratio, and the film atomization model based on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability theory.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0847
Ming Ge, Xingyu Liang, Hanzhengnan Yu, Yuesen Wang, Hongsheng Zhang
Abstract Spray impacting on a lube oil film with a finite thickness is a common phenomenon in IC engines and plays a critical role in the fuel-air mixture process and combustion. With the use of early injection strategy to achieve HCCI combustion mode in diesel engines, this phenomenon becomes more and more prominent. In addition, oxygenated fuels such as methanol and ethanol are regarded as alternative fuel and additives to improve the overall performance of HCCI engine. Therefore, a better understanding about the role of lube oil film thickness in methanol-diesel and ethanol-diesel blended fuels spray/wall impingement is helpful for accumulating experimental data to establish a more accurate spray/wall impingement model and optimize the combustion in HCCI engines. In this paper, the effect of lube oil film thickness on the characteristics of spray/wall impingement of different fuels are investigated in a constant volume bomb test system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0849
Chao Gong, Roland Baar
Abstract The present work involves the technical background of the field of Diesel injection systems of combustion engines and compares the effects of two kinds of remedies (Re-meshing Technique and Linear Interpolation Technique) on mesh deformation. Mathematical formulation of moving grids has been proposed to guide the change of cell volume before. In this study, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis was conducted to study the behaviors of the internal nozzle flow and the characteristics of the spray. An external library concept was introduced to couple the internal nozzle injection process with the spray formation. In addition, all dynamic simulations were performed under a double-axis system. A comparison between simulation and experimental results shows that the integration of the traditional mesh deformation technique with the re-meshing or the linear interpolation technique can repair mesh deformation and further contribute to better simulation results.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0846
Raul Payri, Gabriela Bracho, Pedro Marti-Aldaravi, Alberto Viera
In the present work a constant-pressure flow facility able to reach 15 MPa ambient pressure and 1000 K ambient temperature has been employed to carry out experimental studies of the combustion process at Diesel engine like conditions. The objective is to study the effect of orifice diameter on combustion parameters as lift-off length, ignition delay and flame penetration, assessing if the processing methodologies used for a reference nozzle are suitable in heavy duty applications. Accordingly, three orifice diameter were studied: a spray B nozzle, with a nominal diameter of 90 μm, and two heavy duty application nozzles (diameter of 194 μm and 228 μm respectively). Results showed that nozzle size has a substantial impact on the ignition event, affecting the premixed phase of the combustion and the ignition location.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1640
Peng Liu, Liyun Fan, Wenbo Peng, Xiuzhen Ma, Enzhe Song
Abstract A novel high-speed electromagnetic actuator for electronic fuel injection system (EFIS) of diesel engine is proposed in this paper. By using a permanent magnet and an annular flange, the design of the novel actuator aims to overcome the inherent drawbacks of the conventional solenoid electromagnetic actuator, such as high power consumption and so on. A method of multi-objective optimization combined with response surface methodology and Genetic Algorithm (GA) is employed to obtain the optimal design of the novel actuator. First, combined with design of experiments and finite element analysis, the second order polynomial response surface models (SOPRSM) of electromagnetic forces are produced by the least square principle. Second, the complete multi-objective optimization mathematical model (MOMM) of the novel actuator based on SOPRSM is built, aiming to maximize the net electromagnetic force on the armature and minimize the drive current.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0520
Gianluca Montenegro, Augusto Della Torre, Tarcisio Cerri, Angelo Onorati, Lorenzo Nocivelli, Marco Fiocco
Abstract In this work an integration between a 1D code (Gasdyn) with a CFD code (OpenFOAM®) has been applied to improve the performance of a Moto3 engine. The four-stroke, single cylinder S.I. engine was modeled, in order to predict the wave motion in the intake and exhaust systems and to study how it affects the cylinder gas exchange process. The engine considered was characterized by having an air induction system with integrated filter cartridge, air-box and intake runner, including two fuel injectors, resulting in a complex air-path from the intake mouth to the intake valves, which presents critical aspects when a 1D modeling is addressed. The exhaust and intake systems have been optimized form the point of view of the wave action. However, due to the high revolution speed reached by this type of engine, the interaction between the gas stream and the fuel spray becomes a key aspect to be addressed in order to achieve the best performance at the desired operating condition.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0543
Oliver Hofmann, Shijin Han, Daniel Rixen
Abstract This study discusses model-based injection rate estimation in common rail diesel injectors exhibiting aging phenomena. Since they result in unexpected injection behavior, aging effects like coking or cavitation may impair combustion performance, which justifies the need for new modeling and estimation approaches. To predict injection characteristics, a simulation model for the bottom section of the injector is introduced, with a main focus on modeling the hydraulic components. Using rail pressure and control piston lift as inputs, a reduced model is then derived in state-space representation, which may be used for the application of an observer in hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) environments. Both models are compared and validated with experimental data, with which they show good agreement. Aging effects and nozzle wear, which result in model uncertainties, are considered using a fault model in combination with an extended Kalman filter (EKF) observer scheme.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0537
Murat Ates, Ronald D. Matthews, Matthew J. Hall
Abstract A quasi-dimensional model for a direct injection diesel engine was developed based on experiments at Sandia National Laboratory. The Sandia researchers obtained images describing diesel spray evolution, spray mixing, premixed combustion, mixing controlled combustion, soot formation, and NOx formation. Dec [1] combined all of the available images to develop a conceptual diesel combustion model to describe diesel combustion from the start of injection up to the quasi-steady form of the jet. The end of injection behavior was left undescribed in this conceptual model because no clear image was available due to the chaotic behavior of diesel combustion. A conceptual end-of-injection diesel combustion behavior model was developed to capture diesel combustion throughout its life span. The compression, expansion, and gas exchange stages are modeled via zero-dimensional single zone calculations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0553
Lorenzo Sforza, Tommaso Lucchini, Angelo Onorati, Xiucheng Zhu, Seong-Young Lee
Abstract Objective of this work is the incorporation of the flame stretch effects in an Eulerian-Lagrangian model for premixed SI combustion in order to describe ignition and flame propagation under highly inhomogeneous flow conditions. To this end, effects of energy transfer from electrical circuit and turbulent flame propagation were fully decoupled. The first ones are taken into account by Lagrangian particles whose main purpose is to generate an initial burned field in the computational domain. Turbulent flame development is instead considered only in the Eulerian gas phase for a better description of the local flow effects. To improve the model predictive capabilities, flame stretch effects were introduced in the turbulent combustion model by using formulations coming from the asymptotic theory and recently verified by means of DNS studies. Experiments carried out at Michigan Tech University in a pressurized, constant-volume vessel were used to validate the proposed approach.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0548
Taehoon Kim, Sungwook Park
Abstract An important challenge for modeling Direct-Injection Spark-Ignition (DISI) gasoline engines is understanding flash boiling spray. Flash boiling occurs when the ambient pressure is lower than the vapor pressure of the fuel and affects the spray structure and mixture formation process inside an engine. Gasoline is a multi-component fuel and the effects of each component on flash boiling are difficult to estimate. As a preliminary study to investigate the mixture formation process of the flash boiling spray, a single-component fuel was used to validate the flash breakup model. The flash breakup model was applied to KIVA 3V release2. Bubble growth in the drop was modelled by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. When bubbles grow to satisfy the breakup criterion, breakup occurs and induces a smaller SMD for flash breakup cases. To investigate flash breakup modeling, simulations without the flash breakup model and with the flash breakup model was compared.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0571
Tim Lackmann, Tommaso Lucchini, Gianluca D'Errico, Alan Kerstein, Michael Oevermann
Abstract Many new combustion concepts are currently being investigated to further improve engines in terms of both efficiency and emissions. Examples include homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), lean stratified premixed combustion, stratified charge compression ignition (SCCI), and high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in diesel engines, known as low temperature combustion (LTC). All of these combustion concepts have in common that the temperatures are lower than in traditional spark ignition or diesel engines. To further improve and develop combustion concepts for clean and highly efficient engines, it is necessary to develop new computational tools that can be used to describe and optimize processes in nonstandard conditions, such as low temperature combustion.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0574
Ishan Verma, Ellen Meeks, Eric Bish, Martin Kuntz, Karthik Puduppakkam, Long Liang, Chitralkumar Naik
Abstract Emissions from Diesel engines have been a major concern for many years, particularly with regards to the impact of NOx and particulate matter on human health. Exhaust gas re-circulation (EGR) is a widely used method in diesel engines for controlling NOx production. While EGR rates can be varied to ensure engine performance and reduce NOx emissions, EGR also influences the ignition delay, reduces the peak combustion temperature and increases particulate emissions. Moreover, the injection timing directly affects NOx and particulate emissions under the broad and highly variable operating conditions. An effective CFD-based design tool for diesel engines must therefore include robust and accurate predictive capabilities for combustion and pollutant formation, to address the complex design tradeoffs. The objective of the present study is to evaluate CFD modeling of diesel engine combustion and emissions for various combinations of EGR rates and injection timings.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 6216