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Viewing 1 to 30 of 710
2017-11-13
Tech Insights
TI-0002
While all-electric aircraft remain at the bleeding edge of the aviation industry, incorporating technologies like proton exchange membrane fuel cells into existing aircraft can result in considerable auxiliary capability with low environmental impact. However, proper consideration must be given to supporting systems to achieve a reliable balance of plant-especially when those systems interface with existing aircraft architectures. The scope of the BoP is to manage and condition the reactant flows to and from the fuel-cell module and to provide power to system components.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2062
Tushar Choudhary, Mithilesh Sahu, Shreya KRISHNA
Abstract Gas turbine technology has traditionally been used by the aviation industry for powering the aircraft including acting as APU. Operational unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) has a gas turbine which is used as Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) which generically have overall efficiency not exceeding 35% which limits the range in terms of time in the air for the same APU fuel carried onboard. Gas turbine exhaust heat energy is largely wasted and there is scope of its utilization by thermally coupling it with a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC). By coupling SOFC with the gas turbine (GT) based power system, a hybrid SOFC-GT based APU system has been proposed for thermodynamic analysis, and the thermal efficiency of the proposed system can be enhanced by 77%. This paper focuses on a thermodynamic cycle analysis of an internal reformed solid oxide fuel cell which is integrated with the gas turbine to form a hybrid APU system for an UAV.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2135
Alex Thirkell, Rui Chen, Ian Harrington
Abstract Electrification of aircraft is on track to be a future key design principal due to the increasing pressure on the aviation industry to significantly reduce harmful emissions by 2050 and the increased use of electrical equipment. This has led to an increased focus on the research and development of alternative power sources for aircraft, including fuel cells. These alternative power sources could either be used to provide propulsive power or as an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). Previous studies have considered isolated design cases where a fuel cell system was tailored for their specific application. To accommodate for the large variation between aircraft, this study covers the design of an empirical model, which will be used to size a fuel cell system for any given aircraft based on basic design parameters. The model was constructed utilising aircraft categorisation, fuel cell sizing and balance of plant sub-models.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1180
Stefan Brandstätter, Michael Striednig, David Aldrian, Alexander Trattner, Manfred Klell, Tomas Dehne, Christoph Kügele, Michael Paulweber
Abstract The limitation of global warming to less than 2 °C till the end of the century is regarded as the main challenge of our time. In order to meet COP21 objectives, a clear transition from carbon-based energy sources towards renewable and carbon-free energy carriers is mandatory. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) allow an energy-efficient, resource-efficient and emission-free conversion of regenerative produced hydrogen. For these reasons fuel cell technologies emerge in stationary, mobile and logistic applications with acceptable cruising ranges as well as short refueling times. In order to perform applied research in the area of PEMFC systems, a highly integrated fuel cell analysis infrastructure for systems up to 150 kW electric power was developed and established within a cooperative research project by HyCentA Research GmbH and AVL List GmbH in Graz, Austria. A novel open testing facility with hardware in the loop (HiL) capability is presented.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1187
Tatsuya Sugawara, Takuma Kanazawa, Naoki Imai, Yu Tachibana
Abstract This paper describes the motorized turbo compressor, which is a key technology for reducing the size of the fuel cell system for the Clarity Fuel Cell. The oxygen needed for fuel cell power generation is sent into the fuel cell by compressing the air from the atmosphere by a compressor. The conventionally used Lysholm compressor needed numerous sound absorbers, such as silencers and covers, to help achieve quietness when driving. Therefore, changing to a turbo compressor enhanced quietness and helped to eliminate or reduce the size of these auxiliary sound absorbers. Furthermore, a two-stage supercharging structure was used and the air pressure supplied to the fuel cell was increased to 1.7 times the previous air pressure. This increased the fuel cell power, which enabled to reduce the number of cells needed, and reduced the needed humidification amount which enabled to reduce the size of the humidifier. These enhancements helped to reduce the system size.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1189
Tsuyoshi Maruo, Masashi Toida, Tomohiro Ogawa, Yuji Ishikawa, Hiroyuki Imanishi, Nada Mitsuhiro, Yoshihiro Ikogi
Abstract Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) has been developing fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) since 1992. As part of a demonstration program, TMC launched the FCHV-adv in 2008, which established major technical improvements in key performance areas such as efficiency, driving range, durability, and operation in sub-zero conditions. However, to encourage commercialization and widespread adoption of FCVs, further improvements in performance were required. During sub-zero operating conditions, the FC system output power was lower than under normal operating conditions. The FC stack in the FCHV-adv needed to dry the electrolyte membrane to remove unneeded water from the stack. This increased the stack resistance and caused low output power. In December 2014, TMC launched the world’s first commercially available FCV named the Mirai, which greatly improved output power even after start-up in sub-zero conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1188
Daisuke Hayashi, Atsushi Ida, Shota Magome, Takahisa Suzuki, Satoshi Yamaguchi, Ryosuke Hori
Abstract The key challenge in designing a high power density fuel cell is to reduce oxygen transport loss due to liquid water. However, liquid water transport from catalyst layers to channels under operating conditions is not completely understood. Toyota developed a high resolution space and time liquid water visualization technique using synchrotron x-ray (Spring-8) radiography. In addition, a simulation method was created based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to identify the cell performance relationship to water distribution. The relationship among gas diffusion layer (GDL) parameters, water distribution, and fuel cell performance was clarified by combining the techniques Toyota developed.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1182
Xin Guo, Xu Peng, Sichuan Xu
Abstract Startup from subzero temperature is one of the major challenges for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) to realize commercialization. Below the freezing point (0°C), water will freeze easily, which blocks the reactant gases into the reaction sites, thus leading to the start failure and material degradation. Therefore, for PEMFC in vehicle application, finding suitable ways to reach successful startup from subfreezing environment is a prerequisite. As it’s difficult and complex for experimental studies to measure the internal quantities, mathematical models are the effective ways to study the detailed transport process and physical phenomenon, which make it possible to achieve detailed prediction of the inner life of the cell. However, review papers only on cold start numerical models are not available. In this study, an extensive review on cold start models is summarized featuring the states and phase changes of water, heat and mass transfer.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1179
Tatsuya Arai, Ozaki Takashi, Kazuki Amemiya, Tsuyoshi Takahashi
Abstract Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEFC) systems for fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) require both performance and durability. Carbon is the typical support material used for PEFC catalysts. However, hydrogen starvation at the anode causes high electrode potential states (e.g., 1.3 V with respect to the reversible hydrogen electrode) that result in severe carbon support corrosion. Serious damage to the carbon support due to hydrogen starvation can lead to irreversible performance loss in PEFC systems. To avoid such high electrode potentials, FCV PEFC systems often utilize cell voltage monitor systems (CVMs) that are expensive to use and install. Simplifying PEFC systems by removing these CVMs would help reduce costs, which is a vital part of popularizing FCVs. However, one precondition for removing CVMs is the adoption of a durable support material to replace carbon.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1184
Kiyoshi Handa, Shigehiro Yamaguchi, Kazuya Minowa, Steven Mathison
Abstract A new hydrogen fueling protocol named MC Formula Moto was developed for fuel cell motorcycles (FCM) with a smaller hydrogen storage capacity than those of light duty FC vehicles (FCV) currently covered in the SAE J2601 standard (over than 2kg storage). Building on the MC Formula based protocol from the 2016 SAE J2601 standard, numerous new techniques were developed and tested to accommodate the smaller storage capacity: an initial pressure estimation using the connection pulse, a fueling time counter which begins the main fueling time prior to the connection pulse, a pressure ramp rate fallback control, and other techniques. The MC Formula Moto fueling protocol has the potential to be implemented at current hydrogen stations intended for fueling of FCVs using protocols such as SAE J2601. This will allow FCMs to use the existing and rapidly growing hydrogen infrastructure, precluding the need for exclusive dispensers or stations.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0015
Bernhard Schweighofer, Hannes Wegleiter, Michael Zisser, Paul Rieger, Christian Zinner, Stephan Schmidt
Abstract The hybrid-electric drivetrain permits a multitude of new control strategies like brake energy recuperation, engine start-stop operation, shifting of engine working point, as well as in some situations pure electric driving. Overall this typically allows a reduction of fuel consumption and therefore of carbon dioxide emissions. During the development process of the vehicle various drivetrain configurations have to be considered and compared. This includes decisions regarding the topology - like the position of the electrical machine in the drivetrain (e.g. at the gearbox input or output shaft), as well as the selection of the needed components based on their parameters (nominal power, energy content of the battery, efficiency etc.). To compare the chosen variants, typically the calculated fuel consumption for a given driving cycle is used.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0016
Maryam Sadeghi Reineh, Faryar Jabbari
Abstract This papers aims at using anti-windup augmentation to an existing high performance controller to increase the range of net-power that can be obtained from a solid oxide fuel cell. The power drawn by the fan/blower is kept limited by a software/controller enforced bound that acts similar to a saturation bound. Anti-windup augmentation is then used to ensure stability and recovery of performance. The be-havior of the controller, particularly the effects of the anti-windup loops on the second actuator (cathode inlet temperature), is then investigated to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed approach.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0529
Michitaro Itoga, Shigetaka Hamada, Seiji Mizuno, Hiroaki Nishiumi, Kazuya Murata, Toshiyuki Tonuma
Abstract The fuel cell (FC) stack that was developed for a new FCV achieves a power density of 3.1 kW/L (one of the highest in the world) by the use of an innovative cell flow field structure, electrodes, and a simplified stack tightening structure. These innovations allow the FC stack to be installed under the floor of a sedan-type fuel cell vehicle (FCV). Underfloor installation also required excellent impact resistance, waterproofing, and rustproofing performance. These items were quantified and analyzed during the development of the FC stack, resulting in an optimized structure capable of enduring a wide range of possible underfloor inputs.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0317
Yuanzhan Wang, Jason B. Siegel, Anna G. Stefanopoulou
Abstract This paper addresses scheduling of quantized power levels (including part load operation and startup/shutdown periods) for a propane powered solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) hybridized with a lithium-ion battery for a tracked mobile robot. The military requires silent operation and long duration missions, which cannot be met by batteries alone due to low energy density or with combustion engines due to noise. To meet this need we consider an SOFC operated at a few discrete power levels where maximum system efficiency can be achieved. The fuel efficiency decreases during transients and resulting thermal gradients lead to stress and degradation of the stack; therefore switching power levels should be minimized. Excess generated energy is used to charge the battery, but when it’s fully charged the SOFC should be turned off to conserve fuel.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1185
Takahiko Hasegawa, Hiroyuki Imanishi, Mitsuhiro Nada, Yoshihiro Ikogi
Abstract Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) has been developing fuel cell (FC) system technology since 1992. In 2008 the Toyota "FCHV-adv" was released as part of a demonstration program. It established major improvements in key performance areas such as cold start/drive capability, efficiency, driving range, and durability. However, in order to facilitate the commercial widespread adoption of fuel cell vehicles (FCVs), improvements in performance and further reductions in size and cost were required.In December 2014, Toyota launched the world’s first commercially available fuel cell vehicle (FCV) the "Mirai" powered by the Toyota Fuel Cell System (TFCS). Simplicity, reliability and efficiency have been significantly improved within the Toyota TFCS. As a result, the Mirai has become an attractive vehicle which could lead the way towards full-scale popularization of FCVs.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1186
Dong Hao, Yongping Hou, Jianping Shen, Liying Ma
Abstract The vehicular fuel cell stack is unavoidably impacted by the vibration in the real-world usage due to the road unevenness. However, effects of vibration on stacks have yet to be completely understood. In this work, the mechanical integrity and gas-tightness of the stack were investigated through a strengthen road vibration test with a duration of 200 h. The excitation signals applied in the vibration test were simulated by the acceleration of the stack, which were previously measured in a vehicle vibration test. The load signals of the vehicle vibration test were iterated through a road simulator from vehicle acceleration signals which were originally sampled in the proving ground. Frequency sweep test was conducted before and after the vibration test. During the vibration test, mechanical structure inspection and pressure maintaining test of the stack were conducted at regular intervals.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1191
Saher Al Shakhshir, Torsten Berning
Abstract Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and waste heat. One critical technical problem of these fuel cells is still the water management: the proton exchange membrane in the center of these fuel cells has to be hydrated in order to stay proton-conductive while on the other hand excessive liquid water can lead to cell flooding and increased degradation rates. Clearly, a fundamental understanding of all aspects of water management in PEMFC is imperative. This includes the fuel cell water balance, i.e. which fraction of the product water leaves the fuel cell via the anode channels versus the cathode channel.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0909
John Thomas
Abstract A major driving force for change in light-duty vehicle design and technology is the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) joint final rules concerning Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for model years 2017 (MY17) through 2025 (MY25) passenger cars and light trucks. The chief goal of this current study is to compare the already rapid pace of fuel economy improvement and technological change over the previous decade to the required rate of change to meet regulations over the next decade. EPA and NHTSA comparisons of the model year 2005 (MY05) US light-duty vehicle fleet to the model year 2015 (MY15) fleet shows improved fuel economy (FE) of approximately 26% using the same FE estimating method mandated for CAFE regulations. Future predictions by EPA and NHTSA concerning ensemble fleet fuel economy are examined as an indicator of required vehicle rate-of-change.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0902
Patrick Phlips
Abstract An analytic model of powertrain efficiency on a drive cycle was developed and evaluated using hundreds of cars and trucks from the US EPA ‘Test Car Lists’. The efficiency properties of naturally aspirated and downsized turbocharged engines were compared for vehicles with automatic transmissions on the US cycles. The resulting powertrain cycle efficiency model is proportional to the powertrain marginal energy conversion efficiency K, which is also its upper limit. It decreases as the powertrain matching parameters, the displacement-to-mass ratio (D/M) and the gearing ratio (n/V), increase. The inputs are the powertrain fuel consumption, the vehicle road load, and the cycle work requirement. They could be modeled simply with only minor approximations through the use of absolute inputs and outputs, and systematic use of scaling. On the Highway test, conventional automatic transmission vehicles of moderate performance achieve between 25% and 30% powertrain efficiency.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0901
Richard Barney Carlson, Jeffrey Wishart, Kevin Stutenberg
Abstract Laboratory and on-road vehicle evaluation is conducted on four vehicle models to evaluate and characterize the impacts to fuel economy of real-world auxiliary loads. The four vehicle models in this study include the Volkswagen Jetta TDI, Mazda 3 i-ELOOP, Chevrolet Cruze Diesel, and Honda Civic GX (CNG). Four vehicles of each model are included in this; sixteen vehicles in total. Evaluation was conducted using a chassis dynamometer over standard drive cycles as well as twelve months of on-road driving across a wide range of road and environmental conditions. The information gathered in the study serves as a baseline to quantify future improvements in auxiliary load reduction technology.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1234
Toshikazu Sugiura, Atsushi Tanida, Kazutaka Tamura
Abstract The adoption of silicon carbide (SiC) power semiconductors is regarded as a promising means of improving the fuel efficiency of all types of electrically powered vehicles, including plug-in, electric, fuel cell, and hybrid vehicles (PHVs, EVs, FCVs, and HVs). For this reason, adoption in a wide variety of vehicles is currently being studied, including in the fuel cell (FC) boost converter of an FC bus. The FC boost converter controls the output voltage of the FC up to 650 V. In this research, SiC Schottky barrier diodes (SiC-SBDs) were adopted in the upper arm of an FC boost converter. Since the forward voltage (Vf) of SiC-SBDs is smaller than conventional Si-PiN diodes (Si-PiNDs), the conduction loss of SiC-SBDs is correspondingly smaller. Recovery loss can also be reduced by at least 90% compared to Si-PiNDs since the recovery current of SiC-SBDs is substantially smaller.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2406
Hendrik Strummel, Frank Thielecke
Abstract Fuel cell technology will play a decisive role in the process of achieving the ambitious ecological goals of the aviation industry. However, apart from its obvious environmental advantages, the integration of fuel cell technology into commercial aircraft represents a challenging task in terms of operational and economical aspects. Since fuel cell systems are currently exposed to an intense competition with well-established power sources onboard an aircraft, engineers are in pursuit of highly efficient and particularly lightweight fuel cell systems. Supported by model-based design in conjunction with elaborate optimization techniques this pursuit has led to highly specialized systems. These systems tend to use their components to full capacity, which typically implies marginal system robustness.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2472
Tom Owen
Abstract SUAV is a 4 year investigation with the aim of designing, manufacturing and integrating a 3kg Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) into an existing 11kg fixed wing UAV which is already in commercial service. The project comprises of a collaboration of ten partners, each having a commercial or scientific interest in the design. Individual partners provide specific specialist knowledge at system component level. This paper will present an overview of the problem space and show the methods used to generate the system level requirements. A top level overview of the resultant system design is also given.
2015-09-01
Journal Article
2015-01-1779
Raphael Hans, Ferdinand Panik, Hans-Christian Reuss
As part of a system model, a PEM fuel cell stack model is presented for functional tests and pre-calibration of control units on hardware-in-the-loop (HiL) test benches. From the basic idea to couple a 1-D membrane model with a spatially distributed abstraction of the gas channel, a real-time capable 1-D+1-D PEM FC stack model is constructed. Fundament for the HiL usage is an explicit formulation of the commonly implicit model equations. With that, not only calculation time can be reduced, but also model accuracy is preserved. A validation using test bench data emphasizes the accuracy of the model. Finally, a runtime and eigenvalue analysis of the stack model proves the real-time capability.
2015-09-01
Journal Article
2015-01-9004
Sarath Ramachan Dran
Abstract Space exploration is the present inevitable challenge for researchers. Various theoretical propulsion concepts have been evolved over the past years for space missions. Their potential remains as a key factor for the spacecraft to travel deeper into space in a shorter mission duration. The propulsion concept UNIT is an integrated nuclear propulsion technique that provides high entry, descent and landing (EDL) performance in such short duration to conquer other galaxies. This paper describes the theoretical approach of the UNIT propulsion system in detail. UNIT produces the highest energy possible by consuming nuclear fuel and possess the highest potential that opens new opportunities for space exploration. The principle is that the neutrons from the fusion are deliberately allowed to induce fission. It uses National Ignition Facility's laser beam for inertial confinement fusion followed by utilizing the power from tubular solid fuel cell.
2015-09-01
Journal Article
2015-01-1777
Mike Petch, S. Burton, A. Hodgkinson, R. O'Malley, W. Turner
Hydrogen PEM fuel cells offer a viable way of providing the electrical energy to power a vehicle. With rapid refueling and acceptable range on a tank of fuel, they provide a complementary technology to battery-powered EVs that will ultimately offer a route to decarbonising transport. However, the demands on an automotive fuel cell stack provide a challenging environment for key components within the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). Frequent start-up shut-down events and freeze starts can create conditions that cause corrosion within the fuel cell. The risk of fuel starvation to individual cells within a large stack of several hundred cells is also a potential cause of corrosion which will inevitably lead to degradation and reduced stack lifetime. While there are system-level mitigation strategies that can be employed in terms of design, controls and interventions, the most efficient solution is to improve the intrinsic stability of the key cell components themselves.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1170
Yoshinobu Hasuka, Hiroyuki Sekine, Koji Katano, Yasuhiro Nonobe
Abstract Reducing the size, weight, and cost of components is a critical part of the widespread adoption of fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). The new FCV, “MIRAI” developed by Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) features a compact fuel cell (FC) and shares the power control unit (PCU), motor, and battery adopted on mass-production hybrid vehicles (HVs). It also incorporates a newly developed boost converter that steps up the voltage from the FC, called the FC DC-DC converter (FDC). The role of FDC is to pass the high power generated by the FC to the motor. Because of the high power requirement, a major challenge was developing countermeasures to limit component size. This was achieved by adopting a multi-phase converter and an innovative cooling structure. Several other refinements were made to FDC, including enabling highly efficient drive by optimizing the number of drive phases in accordance with the load and randomly varying the switching frequency to reduce noise and vibration (NV).
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1171
Hyun Suk Choo, Dae Kuen Chun, Jae Hyuk Lee, Hwan Soo Shin, Sung Kuen Lee, Yong Sun Park, Byung Ki Ahn
Abstract This paper proposes the several methods for recovering the performance of degraded fuel cell stack for FCEV. Recovery procedure is focused on the reduction of oxidized layer and desorption of sulfonated anion formed on the surface of platinum catalyst during automotive operation at cathode side. As a result of application of recovering methods, it is possible to partially rehabilitate the performance of fuel cell stack by ca. 20-30%. In additions, it is expected that the durability of fuel cell can be improved ultimately with an application of recovery process.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0155
Sami H. Karaki, Rafika Dinnawi, Rabih Jabr, Riad Chedid, Ferdinand Panik
Abstract An optimal design methodology is developed in this paper for fuel cell hybrid electric vehicles (FCHEV) based on ordinal optimization (OO) and dynamic programming (DP); the optimal design aims to determine the appropriate sizes of the hydrogen tank, fuel cell, battery, and motor for the purpose of minimizing investment and operational cost given some specification of the car range, the road type and its gradeability. The DP simulates the operation of the vehicle for a set of specified components' sizes for given driving cycles and provides the total vehicle cost per year. The OO method offers an efficient approach for optimization by focusing on ranking and selecting a finite set of “good enough” alternatives through two models: a simple model and an accurate model. The OO program uses the specified sizes of the components that uniformly sample the search space and evaluates these designs using a simple but fast model.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1172
Wan Yu, Xu Sichuan, HuaiSheng Ni
Abstract Even though air compressors for traditional vehicles and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) share many similarities, a fuel cell vehicle cannot directly employ the effective and mass-produced traditional vehicles' air compressors. This is because the fuel cell vehicles have special requirements, such as oil free, low flow rate with high pressure ratio, high efficiency, and low weight and volume. In order to find suitable air compressors to match the fuel cell system (FCS)'s requirements, different air compressors' performance and physical characteristics are compared. These air compressors include screw compressor with expander, roots compressor with expander, turbocompressor, and scroll compressor with expander. The comparison and analysis is both theoretical and practical. Results show that the turbocompressor and the roots compressor/expander have higher performance compared to the others in the aspects of input power, system efficiency, weight, and volume.
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