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2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2369
Prakash Arunachalam, Martin Tuner, Per Tunestal, Marcus Thern
Abstract Humid air motor (HAM) is an engine operated with humidified inlet charge. System simulations study on HAM showed the waste heat recovery potential over a conventional system. An HAM setup was constructed, to comprehend the potential benefits in real-time, the HAM setup was built around a 13-litre six cylinder Volvo diesel engine. The HAM engine process is explained in detail in this paper. Emission analysis is also performed for all three modes of operation. The experiments were carried out at part load operating point of the engine to understand the effects of humidified charge on combustion, efficiency, and emissions. Experiments were conducted without EGR, with EGR, and with humidified inlet charge. These three modes of operation provided the potential benefits of each system. Exhaust heat was used for partial humidification process. Results show that HAM operation, without compromising on efficiency, reduces NOx and soot significantly over the engine operated without EGR.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2399
Jianyu Duan, Kai Sun, Lei Li
Abstract Particulate matter emissions have become a concern for the development of DISI engines. EGR has been extensively demonstrated as a beneficial technology to migrate knock performance, improve fuel economy and reduce NOX emissions. Recently, the effect of EGR on particulate matter emissions is attracting increased attention. This work investigates the effects of EGR on PN emissions with the variations of engine operating parameters and aims to understand the role of EGR in PN emissions for DISI engines. A 1.8liter turbocharged engine with cooled EGR is used for this study. The engine is operated at steady-state conditions with EGR under various operating parameters including injection timing, excess air ratio, and spark timing to characterize the particle number emissions. The results indicates that there is a high sensitivity of PN emissions to EGR with the variations of those parameters.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2227
Wei Guan, Vinícius Pedrozo, Hua Zhao, Zhibo Ban, Tiejian Lin
Abstract In order to meet increasingly stringent emissions standards and lower the fuel consumption of heavy-duty (HD) vehicles, significant efforts have been made to develop high efficiency and clean diesel engines and aftertreatment systems. However, a trade-off between the actual engine efficiency and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission remains to minimize the operational costs. In addition, the conversion efficiency of the diesel aftertreatment system decreases rapidly with lower exhaust gas temperatures (EGT), which occurs at low load operations. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the optimum combustion and engine control strategies that can lower the vehicle’s running costs by maintaining low engine-out NOx emissions while increasing the conversion efficiency of the NOx aftertreament system through higher EGTs.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2235
Ting Liu, Fuyuan Zhang, Yuedong Chao, Zongjie Hu, Liguang Li
Abstract In order to investigate the impacts of recirculated exhaust gas temperature on gasoline engine combustion and emissions, an experimental study has been conducted on a turbocharged PFI gasoline engine. The engine was equipped with a high pressure cooled EGR system, in which different EGR temperatures were realized by using different EGR coolants. The engine ran at 2000 r/min and 3000 r/min, and the BMEP varied from 0.2MPa to 1.0MPa with the step of 0.2MPa. At each case, there were three conditions: 0% EGR, 10% LT-EGR, 10% HT-EGR. The results indicated that LT-EGR had a longer combustion duration compared with HT-EGR. When BMEP was 1.0 MPa, CA50 of HT-EGR advanced about 5oCA. However, CA50 of LT-EGR could still keep steady and in appropriate range, which guaranteed good combustion efficiency. Besides, LT-EGR had lower exhaust gas temperature, which could help to suppress knock. And its lower exhaust gas temperature could reduce heat loss.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2244
Shui Yu, Xiao Yu, Zhenyi Yang, Meiping Wang, Xiaoye Han, Jimi Tjong, Ming Zheng
Abstract In this work, a spatially distributed spark ignition strategy was employed to improve the ignition process of well-mixed ultra-lean dilute gasoline combustion in a high compression ratio (13.1:1) single cylinder engine at partial loads. The ignition energy was distributed in the perimeter of a 3-pole igniter. It was identified that on the basis of similar total spark energy, the 3-pole ignition mode can significantly shorten the early flame kernel development period and reduce the cyclic variation of combustion phasing, for the spark timing sweep tests at λ 1.5. The effect of ignition energy level on lean-burn operation was investigated at λ 1.6. Within a relatively low ignition energy range, i.e. below 46 mJ per pole, the increase in ignition energy via ether 1 pole or 3 pole can improve the controllability over combustion phasing and reduce the variability of lean burn combustion.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2249
Chen Wang, Tianyou Wang, Kai Sun, Zhen Lu, Yong Gui
Abstract Clean combustion is critical for marine engines to meet the Tier III emission regulation. In this paper, the effects of EGR and injection strategies (including injection pressure, injection timing as well as multiple injection technology) on the performance and emissions of a 2-stroke, low speed marine diesel engine were investigated by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to reach the IMO Tier III NOx emissions target and reduce the fuel consumption rate. Due to the large length scale of the marine engine, RANS simulation was performed in combination with the CTC-SHELL combustion model. Based on the simulation model, the variation of the cylinder pressure curve, the average temperature in the cylinder, the combustion heat release rate and the emission characteristics were studied.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2267
Erik Svensson, Lianhao Yin, Per Tunestal, Martin Tuner
Abstract The concept of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) in internal combustion engines has shown to yield high gross indicated efficiencies, but at the expense of gas exchange efficiencies. Most of the experimental research on partially premixed combustion has been conducted on compression ignition engines designed to operate on diesel fuel and relatively high exhaust temperatures. The partially premixed combustion concept on the other hand relies on dilution with high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates to slow down the combustion which results in low exhaust temperatures, but also high mass flows over cylinder, valves, ports and manifolds. A careful design of the gas exchange system, EGR arrangement and heat exchangers is therefore of utter importance. Experiments were performed on a heavy-duty, compression ignition engine using a fuel consisting of 80 volume % 95 RON service station gasoline and 20 volume % n-heptane.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2312
Raouf Mobasheri, Rahman Akbari
Abstract The scope of this work is to investigate the simultaneous effects of injection pressure and Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on mixture formation and engine performance in a High Speed Direct Injection (HSDI) diesel engine. For this, the computational results have been firstly compared to the measured data and a good agreement has been achieved in order to predict the in-cylinder pressure, heat release rate and the amount of NOx and soot emissions. Then, various injection pressures have been studied to explore its benefits to achieve the low exhaust emission at different EGR rates. The results show, while no EGR has been applied, decreasing the nozzle diameter causes the reduction of Indicate Specific Fuel Consumption (ISFC) with an increase in Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEP).
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2232
Liming Cao, Ho Teng, Ruigang Miao, Xuwei Luo, Tingjun Hu, Xianlong Huang
Abstract The present paper is Part III of an investigation on the influences of the late intake valve closing (LIVC) and the early intake valve closing (EIVC) on the engine fuel consumptions at different loads and speeds. The investigation was conducted with two 1.5L turbo-charged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engines, one with a low-lift intake cam (the Miller engine) and the other with a high-lift intake cam (the Atkinson engine). This paper focuses on the influence of the intake-valve-closing timing on the fuel economy with and without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). It was found that the Miller engine had a lower friction than the Atkinson engine; however, the impact of the difference in engine frictions on the fuel economy was mainly for low-speed operations. Across the engine speed range, the Miller engine had longer combustion durations than the Atkinson engine as a result of the impact of EIVC on the cylinder charge motion.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2285
Eric Randolph, Raphael Gukelberger, Terrence Alger, Thomas Briggs, Christopher Chadwell, Antonio Bosquez Jr.
Abstract The primary focus of this investigation was to determine the hydrogen reformation, efficiency and knock mitigation benefits of methanol-fueled Dedicated EGR (D-EGR®) operation, when compared to other EGR types. A 2.0 L turbocharged port fuel injected engine was operated with internal EGR, high-pressure loop (HPL) EGR and D-EGR configurations. The internal, HPL-EGR, and D-EGR configurations were operated on neat methanol to demonstrate the relative benefit of D-EGR over other EGR types. The D-EGR configuration was also tested on high octane gasoline to highlight the differences to methanol. An additional sub-task of the work was to investigate the combustion response of these configurations. Methanol did not increase its H2 yield for a given D-EGR cylinder equivalence ratio, even though the H:C ratio of methanol is over twice typical gasoline.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0009
Federico Millo, Giulio Boccardo, Andrea Piano, Luigi Arnone, Stefano Manelli, Giuseppe Tutore, Andrea Marinoni
Abstract To comply with Stage IV emission standard for off-road engines, Kohler Engines has developed the 100kW rated KDI 3.4 liters diesel engine, equipped with DOC and SCR. Based on this engine, a research project in collaboration between Kohler Engines, Ricardo, Denso and Politecnico di Torino was carried out to exploit the potential of new technologies to meet the Stage IV and beyond emission standards. The prototype engine was equipped with a low pressure cooled EGR system, two stage turbocharger, high pressure fuel injection system capable of very high injection pressure and DOC+DPF aftertreatment system. Since the Stage IV emission standard sets a 0.4 g/kWh NOx limit for the steady state test cycle (NRSC), that includes full load operating conditions, the engine must be operated with very high EGR rates (above 30%) at very high load.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0011
Giulio Boccardo, Federico Millo, Andrea Piano, Luigi Arnone, Stefano Manelli, Cristian Capiluppi
Abstract Nowadays stringent emission regulations are pushing towards new air management strategies like LP-EGR and HP/LP mix both for passenger car and heavy duty applications, increasing the engine control complexity. Within a project in collaboration between Kohler Engines EMEA, Politecnico di Torino, Ricardo and Denso to exploit the potential of EGR-Only technologies, a 3.4 liters KDI 3404 was equipped with a two stage turbocharging system, an extremely high pressure FIS and a low pressure EGR system. The LP-EGR system works in a closed loop control with an intake oxygen sensor actuating two valves: an EGR valve placed downstream of the EGR cooler that regulates the flow area of the bypass between the exhaust line and the intake line, and an exhaust flap to generate enough backpressure to recirculate the needed EGR rate to cut the NOx emission without a specific aftertreatment device.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0084
Giacomo Belgiorno, Nikolaos Dimitrakopoulos, Gabriele Di Blasio, Carlo Beatrice, Martin Tuner, Per Tunestal
Abstract In this paper, a parametric analysis on the main engine calibration parameters applied on gasoline Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is performed. Theoretically, the PPC concept permits to improve both the engine efficiencies and the NOx-soot trade-off simultaneously compared to the conventional diesel combustion. This work is based on the design of experiments (DoE), statistical approach, and investigates on the engine calibration parameters that might affect the efficiencies and the emissions of a gasoline PPC. The full factorial DoE analysis based on three levels and three factors (33 factorial design) is performed at three engine operating conditions of the Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Cycles (WLTC). The pilot quantity (Qpil), the crank angle position when 50% of the total heat is released (CA50), and the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) factors are considered. The goal is to identify an engine calibration with high efficiency and low emissions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0148
Srinivas Padala, Shashank Nagaraja, Yuji Ikeda, Minh Khoi Le
Abstract Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) has proven to be beneficial for not only fuel economy improvement but also knock and emissions reduction. Combined with lean burning, it can assist gasoline engines to become cleaner, more efficient and to meet the stringent emissions limit. However, there is a practical limit for EGR percentage in current engines due to many constraints, one of which being the ignition source. The Microwave Discharge Igniter (MDI), which generates, enhances and sustains plasma discharge using microwave (MW) resonance was tested to assess its ability in extending the dilution limit. A combination of high-speed Schlieren imaging and pressure measurements were performed for propane-air mixture combustion inside a constant volume chamber to compare the dilution limits between MDI and conventional spark plug. Carbon dioxide addition was carried out during mixture preparation to simulate the dilution condition of EGR and limit the oxygen fraction.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0033
Priyanka Dnyaneshwar Jadhav, J M Mallikarjuna
Abstract Future stringent emission norms are impelling researchers to look for new emission control techniques. Today, gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines are becoming more popular because of high potential to reduce exhaust emissions over a wide operating load range, unlike conventional port fuel injection (PFI) engines. Also, turbocharged GDI engines allow engine downsizing with a certain restriction on compression ratio (CR) due to knocking tendency, thereby limiting the fuel economy. However, use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) delays combustion and lowers the knocking tendency which will aid in improving the fuel economy. Therefore, this study is aimed to evaluate the effect of EGR rate on the performance and emission characteristics of a two-liter turbocharged four-stroke GDI engine by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. For the analysis, the CR of 9.3 and the engine speed of 1000 rev/min., are selected.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0070
Stefano D'Ambrosio, Daniele Iemmolo, Alessandro Mancarella, Nicolò Salamone, Roberto Vitolo, Gilles Hardy
Abstract A precise estimation of the recirculated exhaust gas rate and oxygen concentration as well as a predictive evaluation of the possible EGR unbalance among cylinders are of paramount importance, especially if non-conventional combustion modes, which require high EGR flow-rates, are implemented. In the present paper, starting from the equation related to convergent nozzles, the EGR mass flow-rate is modeled considering the pressure and the temperature upstream of the EGR control valve, as well as the pressure downstream of it. The restricted flow-area at the valve-seat passage and the discharge coefficient are carefully assessed as functions of the valve lift. Other models were fitted using parameters describing the engine working conditions as inputs, following a semi-physical and a purely statistical approach. The resulting models are then applied to estimate EGR rates to both conventional and non-conventional combustion conditions.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0061
James P. Szybist, Scott W. Wagnon, Derek Splitter, William J. Pitz, Marco Mehl
Abstract Numerous studies have demonstrated that exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) can attenuate knock propensity in spark ignition (SI) engines at naturally aspirated or lightly boosted conditions [1]. In this study, we investigate the role of cooled EGR under higher load conditions with multiple fuel compositions, where highly retarded combustion phasing typical of modern SI engines was used. It was found that under these conditions, EGR attenuation of knock is greatly reduced, where EGR doesn’t allow significant combustion phasing advance as it does under lighter load conditions. Detailed combustion analysis shows that when EGR is added, the polytropic coefficient increases causing the compressive pressure and temperature to increase. At sufficiently highly boosted conditions, the increase in polytropic coefficient and additional trapped mass from EGR can sufficiently reduce fuel ignition delay to overcome knock attenuation effects.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1950
J Suresh Kumar, Sakthivel B, Srinivasan B, Ramalingam Sivanantham
The automotive industry in world is facing the problem of reduction of emissions coming out of the engine. Also, the stringent emission norms imposed by the regulating body for transition from BS IV to BS VI urges the auto makers to concentrate on new technologies to reduce the emissions. One of the major emissions coming out of the diesel engine is oxides of nitrogen (NOx) which is detrimental to human health. This NOx emission is formed when the combustion temperature of engine exceeds the threshold limit. There are several methods available to reduce these NOx emissions formed in-cylinder. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is one such system, which reduces the NOx emission formed inside the engine by supplying a portion of the exhaust gases. By re-circulating exhaust gases, the air admitted to the engine is diluted. Further, due to the high latent heat of vaporization of water, water vapor tends to absorb more amount of heat that is generated during combustion.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1945
Jyotirmoy Barman, Himanshu Gambhir, Rizwan Khan
Abstract During the last few decades, concerns have grown on the negative effects that diesel particulate matter has on health. Because of this, particulate emissions were subjected to restrictions and various emission-reduction technologies were developed. It is ironic that some of these technologies led to reductions in the legislated total particulate mass while neglecting the number of particles. Focusing on the mass is not necessarily correct, because it might well be that not the mass but the number of particles and the characteristics of them (size, composition) have a higher impact on health. During the diesel engine combustion process, soot particles are produced which is very harmful for the atmosphere. Particulate matter is composed of much organic and inorganic composition which was analyzed after the optimization of SCR and EGR engine out.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0127
Norimitsu Matsudaira, Mitsuru Iwasaki, Junichiro Hara, Tomohiko Furuhata, Tatsuya Arai, Yasuo Moriyoshi, Naohiro Hasegawa
Abstract Among the emerging technologies in order to meet ever stringent emission and fuel consumption regulations, Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system is becoming one of the prerequisites particularly for diesel engines. Although EGR cooler is considered to be an effective measure for further performance enhancement, exhaust gas soot deposition may cause degradation of the cooling. To address this issue, the authors studied the visualization of the soot deposition and removal phenomena to understand its behavior. Based on thermophoresis theory, which indicates that the effect of thermophoresis depends on the temperature difference between the gas and the wall surface exposed to the gas, a visualization method using a heated glass window was developed. By using glass with the transparent conductive oxide: tin-doped indium oxide, temperature of the heated glass surface is raised.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0531
Rani Kiwan, Anna Stefanopoulou, Jason Martz, Gopichandra Surnilla, Imtiaz Ali, Daniel Styles
Abstract Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) promises fuel economy benefits at high loads in turbocharged SI engines as it allows better combustion phasing and reduces the need for fuel enrichment. Precise estimation and control of in-cylinder EGR concentration is crucial to avoiding misfire. Unfortunately, EGR flow rate estimation using an orifice model based on the EGR valve ΔP measurement can be challenging given pressure pulsations, flow reversal and the inherently low pressure differentials across the EGR valve. Using a GT-Power model of a 1.6 L GDI turbocharged engine with LP-EGR, this study investigates the effects of the ΔP sensor gauge-line lengths and measurement noise on LP-EGR estimation accuracy. Gauge-lines can be necessary to protect the ΔP sensor from high exhaust temperatures, but unfortunately can produce acoustic resonance and distort the ΔP signal measured by the sensor.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0636
Vijai Shankar Bhavani Shankar, Nhut Lam, Arne Andersson, Bengt Johansson
Abstract The concept of double compression, and double expansion engine (DCEE) for improving the efficiency of piston reciprocating engines was introduced in SAE Paper 2015-01-1260. This engine configuration has separate high, and low pressure units thereby effectively reducing friction losses for high effective compression ratios. The presence of an additional expander stage also theoretically allows an extra degree of freedom to manipulate the combustion heat release rate so as to achieve better optimum between heat transfer, and friction losses. This paper presents a 1-D modeling study of the engine concept in GT-Power for assessing the sensitivity of engine losses to heat release rate. The simulations were constrained by limiting the maximum pressure to 300 bar.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0638
Neerav Abani, Nishit Nagar, Rodrigo Zermeno, Michael chiang, Isaac Thomas
Abstract Heavy-duty vehicles, currently the second largest source of fuel consumption and carbon emissions are projected to be fastest growing mode in transportation sector in future. There is a clear need to increase fuel efficiency and lower emissions for these engines. The Opposed-Piston Engine (OP Engine) has the potential to address this growing need. In this paper, results are presented for a 9.8L three-cylinder two-stroke OP Engine that shows the potential of achieving 55% brake thermal efficiency (BTE), while simultaneously satisfying emission targets for tail pipe emissions. The two-stroke OP Engines are inherently more cost effective due to less engine parts. The OP Engine architecture presented in this paper can meet this performance without the use of waste heat recovery systems or turbo-compounding and hence is the most cost effective technology to deliver this level of fuel efficiency.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0135
Jose Grande, Julio Abraham Carrera, Manuel Dieguez Sr
Abstract Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is an effective technique for reducing NOx emissions in order to achieve the ever more stringent emissions standards. This system is widely used in commercial vehicle engines in which thermal loads and durability are a critical issue. In addition, the development deadlines of the new engine generations are being considerably reduced, especially for validation test phase in which customers usually require robust parts for engine validation in the first stages of the project. Some of the most critical issues in this initial phases of program development are heavy boiling and thermal fatigue. Consequently it has been necessary to develop a procedure for designing EGR coolers that are sufficiently robust against heavy boiling and thermal fatigue in a short period of time, even when the engine calibration is not finished and the working conditions of the EGR system are not completely defined.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0645
Jeremy Galpin, Thierry Colliou, Olivier Laget, Fabien Rabeau, Gaetano De Paola, Pascal Rahir
Abstract In spite of the increasingly stringent emission standards, the constant growth of road traffic contributes to climate change and induces detrimental effects on the environment. The European REWARD project (REal World Advanced Technologies foR Diesel Engines) aims to develop a new generation of Diesel engines complying with stricter post Euro 6 legislation and with lower CO2 emissions. Among the different technologies developed, a fuel-efficient two-stroke Diesel engine suited for C-segment passenger cars will be designed and experimentally evaluated. One major challenge for two-stroke engines is the achievement of an efficient scavenging. As the emptying of the in-cylinder burnt gases and the filling by fresh gases is performed at the same time, the challenge consists in removing as much burnt gases as possible while avoiding the by-pass of fresh air toward the exhaust line.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1016
Charles Schenk, Paul Dekraker
Abstract EPA has been benchmarking engines and transmissions to generate inputs for use in its technology assessments supporting the Midterm Evaluation of EPA’s 2017-2025 Light-Duty Vehicle greenhouse gas emissions assessments. As part of an Atkinson cycle engine technology assessment of applications in light-duty vehicles, cooled external exhaust gas recirculation (cEGR) and cylinder deactivation (CDA) were evaluated. The base engine was a production gasoline 2.0L four-cylinder engine with 75 degrees of intake cam phase authority and a 14:1 geometric compression ratio. An open ECU and cEGR hardware were installed on the engine so that the CO2 reduction effectiveness could be evaluated. Additionally, two cylinders were deactivated to determine what CO2 benefits could be achieved. Once a steady state calibration was complete, two-cycle (FTP and HwFET) CO2 reduction estimates were made using fuel weighted operating modes and a full vehicle model (ALPHA) cycle simulation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1282
Ashish Jaiswal, Tarun Mehra, Monis Alam, Jatin Agarwal, Harshil Kathpalia
Abstract Dependency and increase in use of fossil fuels is leading to its depletion and raises serious environmental concerns. There are international obligations to reduce emissions and requirements to strengthen security of fuel supply which is pressuring the automobile industry to use cleaner and more sustainable fuels. Hydrogen fits these criteria as it is not just an abundant alternative but also a clean propellant and Hydrogen engines represent an economic alternative to fuel cells. In the present investigation, EGR has been used on hydrogen boosted SI engine running on gasoline-methanol and ethanol-gasoline blends to determine the additional advantages of the same compared to pure gasoline operation and gasoline-methanol and ethanol-gasoline blends without EGR.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0741
Xinlei Liu, Laihui Tong, Hu Wang, Zunqing Zheng, Mingfa Yao
Abstract In this work the gasoline compression ignition (GCI) combustion characterized by both premixed gasoline port injection and gasoline direct injection in a single-cylinder diesel engine was investigated experimentally and computationally. In the experiment, the premixed ratio (PR), injection timing and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate were varied with the pressure rise rate below 10 bar/crank angle. The experimental results showed that higher PR and earlier injection timing resulted in advanced combustion phasing and improved thermal efficiency, while the pressure rise rates and NOx emissions increased. Besides, a lowest ISFC of 176 g/kWh (corresponding to IMEP =7.24 bar) was obtained, and the soot emissions could be controlled below 0.6 FSN. Despite that NOx emission was effectively reduced with the increase of EGR, HC and CO emissions were high. However, it showed that GCI combustion of this work was sensitive to EGR, which may restrict its future practical application.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0675
Kenichiro Ogata
Low pressure cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to suppress engine knocking is increasingly being used to downsize engines and increase the compression ratio to improve thermal efficiency. This study aims to develop an ignition system to extend the EGR limit and EGR operation area. The ignition system must be improved to enhance ignitability of a mixture of fuel and air. In this paper, we focus on ignition energy of the ignition coil and summarize experimental results on a test dyno obtained by using reinforced conventional ignition coil on the basis of ignition energy and engine speed. As engine speed (mixture flow velocity between ignition plug electrode-gap) and EGR ratio were increased, the secondary energy requirement of the ignition coil was increased. This increase was considered to be caused by an increase of mixture flow velocity at the plug gap and a decrease of laminar flame velocity as EGR ratio increased.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0679
Kelvin Xie, Shui Yu, Xiao Yu, Geraint Bryden, Ming Zheng, Mengzhu Liu
Abstract In order to meet the future carbon dioxide legislation, advanced clean combustion engines are tending to employ low temperature diluted combustion strategies along with intensified cylinder charge motion. The diluted mixtures are made by means of excess air admission or exhaust gas recirculation. A slower combustion speed during the early flame kernel development because of the suppressed mixture reactivity will reduce the reliability of the ignition process and the overall combustion stability. In an effort to address this issue, an ignition strategy using a multi-pole spark igniter is tested in this work. The igniter uses three electrically independent spark gaps to allow three spatially distributed spark discharges. The multi-pole spark strategy displayed more advanced combustion phasing and lower phasing variability compared to single spark discharges.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 1165

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