Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 71
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1411
Gary A. Davis
Abstract For at least 15 years it has been recognized that pre-crash data captured by event data recorders might help illuminate the actions of drivers prior to crashes. In left-turning crashes where pre-crash data are available from both vehicles it should be possible to estimate features such as the location and speed of the opposing vehicle at the time of turn initiation and the reaction time of the opposing driver. Difficulties arise however from measurement errors in pre-crash data and because the EDR data from the two vehicles are not synchronized so the resulting uncertainties should be accounted for. This paper describes a method for accomplishing this using Markov Chain Monte Carlo computation. First, planar impact methods are used to estimate the speeds at impact of the involved vehicles. Next, the impact speeds and pre-crash EDR data are used to reconstruct the vehicles’ trajectories during approximately 5 seconds preceding the crash.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1438
Felix Lee, Peter Xing, Mike Yang, Janice Lee, Craig Wilkinson, Gunter P. Siegmund
Abstract The repeatability and accuracy of front and rear speed changes reported by Toyota’s Airbag Control Modules (ACMs) have been previously characterized for low-severity collisions simulated on a linear sled. The goals of the present study are (i) to determine the accuracy and repeatability of Toyota ACMs in mid-severity crashes, and (ii) to validate the assumption that ACMs function similarly for idealized sled pulses and full-scale vehicle-to-barrier and vehicle-to-vehicle crashes. We exposed three Toyota Corollas to a series of full-scale aligned frontal and rear-end crash tests with speed changes (ΔV) of 4 to 12 km/h. We then characterized the response of another 16 isolated Toyota ACMs from three vehicle models (Corolla, Prius and Camry) and 3 generations (Gen 1, 2 and 3) using idealized sled pulses and replicated vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-barrier pulses in both frontal and rear-end crashes (ΔV = 9 to 17 km/h).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1436
Edward Fatzinger, Jon Landerville
Abstract Various electronic control units from Kawasaki Ninja 300 motorcycles were tested in-situ in order to heuristically examine the capabilities and behavior of the event data recorders (EDR). The relevant hexadecimal data was downloaded from the ECU and translated using known and historically proven applications. The hexadecimal translations were then confirmed using data acquisition systems as well as the Kawasaki Diagnostic Software (KDS). Numerous tests were performed to establish the algorithms which cause the EDR to record data. It was determined that the EDR recording “trigger” was caused by the activation of the tip-over sensor, which in turn shuts the engine off. In addition, specific conditions must be met with regards to the rear wheel rotation prior to engine shut-down.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1457
John M. Scanlon, Kerry Page, Rini Sherony, Hampton C. Gabler
Abstract There are over 4,500 fatal intersection crashes each year in the United States. Intersection Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (I-ADAS) are emerging active safety systems designed to detect an imminent intersection crash and either provide a warning or perform an automated evasive maneuver. The performance of an I-ADAS will depend on the ability of the onboard sensors to detect an imminent collision early enough for an I-ADAS to respond in a timely manner. One promising method for determining the earliest detection opportunity is through the reconstruction of real-world intersection crashes. After determining the earliest detection opportunity, the required sensor range, orientation, and field of view can then be determined through the simulation of these crashes as if the vehicles had been equipped with an I-ADAS.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1481
Gary A. Davis, Abhisek Mudgal
Abstract A continuing topic of interest is how to best use information from Event Data Recorders (EDR) to reconstruct crashes. If one has a model which can predict EDR data from values of the target variables of interest, such as vehicle speeds at impact, then in principle one can invert this model to estimate the target values from EDR measurements. In practice though this can require solving a system of nonlinear equations and a reasonably flexible method for carrying this out involves replacing the inverse problem with nonlinear least-squares (NLS) minimization. NLS has been successfully applied to two-vehicle planar impact crashes in order to estimate impact speeds from different combinations of EDR, crush, and exit angle measurements, but an open question is how to assess the uncertainty associated with these estimates. This paper describes how Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation can be used to quantify uncertainty in planar impact crashes.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1494
Peter Xing, Felix Lee, Thomas Flynn, Craig Wilkinson, Gunter Siegmund
Abstract The accuracy of the speed change reported by Generation 1 Toyota Corolla Event Data Recorders (EDR) in low-speed front and rear-end collisions has previously been studied. It was found that the EDRs underestimated speed change in frontal collisions and overestimated speed change in rear-end collisions. The source of the uncertainty was modeled using a threshold acceleration and bias model. This study compares the response of Generation 1, 2 and 3 Toyota EDRs from Toyota Corolla, Camry and Prius models. 19 Toyota airbag control modules (ACMs) were mounted on a linear sled. The ACMs underwent a series of frontal and rear-end haversine crash pulses of varying severity, duration and peak acceleration. The accuracy and trigger thresholds of the different models and generations of EDRs were compared. There were different accuracy trends found between the early Generation 1 and the more modern Generation 2 and 3 EDRs.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1493
Jeremy Daily, James Johnson, Amila Perera
Abstract Recovery of snapshot data recorded by Caterpillar engine control modules (ECMs) using Caterpillar Electronic Technician (CatET) software requires a complete snapshot record that contains information gathered both before and after an event. However, if an event is set and a crash ensues, or a crash creates an event, then it is possible for the ECM to lose power and not complete the recording. As such, the data may not be recoverable with CatET maintenance software. An examination of the J1708 network traffic reveals the snapshot data does exist and is recoverable. A motivational case study of a crash test between a Caterpillar powered school bus and a parked transit bus is presented to establish the hypothesis. Subsequently, a digital forensic recovery algorithm is detailed as it is implemented in the Synercon Technologies Forensic Link Adapter (FLA).
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1495
Motomi Iyoda, Tom Trisdale, Rini Sherony, Daniel Mikat, William Rose
Abstract An event data recorder (EDR) records the vehicle status at the timing of an accident. Toyota Motor Corporation began the sequential introduction of EDRs onto its vehicles from August 2000. Currently, about 70% of all Toyota’s vehicles in North America are equipped with an EDR, which is more than the average rate of EDR installation in vehicles in North America (around 50%). The U.S. has introduced regulations for EDRs. Toyota regards these as minimum requirements and also records additional data for accident analysis, including the following: (1) pre-crash data, (2) side crash data, (3) rollover data, (4) pedestrian protection pop-up hood (PUH) data, and (5) vehicle control history (VCH) data from a non-crash triggered recording system. The regulations stipulate that EDR data retrieval must be possible using a commercially available tool. The developed system uses the Crash Data Retrieval (CDR) tool manufactured by Bosch.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1496
Richard R. Ruth, Brad Muir
Abstract Earlier research1 suggests there may be positive offset in the longitudinal G sensor in Toyota Corolla Gen 02 EDR’s. This research tests if a similar offset is present in Toyota Gen 04 EDR’s in the 2007 Yaris. A series of low speed forward and rearward collisions into a stationary vehicle were conducted. In addition to the installed vehicle ACM, additional identical “ride along” ACM’s were installed back to back, one front facing and one rear facing. The vehicle was also instrumented with a video VBOX to record speed at impact, and with the high precision “IST” accelerometer reference instrumentation. ACM’s facing toward the crash under-reported the negative longitudinal Delta V. After the initial impact was over, these forward facing ACM’s had a positive slope and at the end of the 200 ms recording were reporting a positive net Delta V, indicating a G sensor bias. The ACM’s facing away from the crash over reported the positive longitudinal Delta V.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1497
William Bortles, Wayne Biever, Neal Carter, Connor Smith
Abstract This paper presents a comprehensive literature review of original equipment event data recorders (EDR) installed in passenger vehicles, as well as a summary of results from the instrumented validation studies. The authors compiled 187 peer-reviewed studies, textbooks, legal opinions, governmental rulemaking policies, industry publications and presentations pertaining to event data recorders. Of the 187 total references, there were 64 that contained testing data. The authors conducted a validation analysis using data from 27 papers that presented both the EDR and corresponding independent instrumentation values for: Vehicle velocity change (ΔV) Pre-Crash vehicle speed The combined results from these studies highlight unique observations of EDR system testing and demonstrate the observed performance of original equipment event data recorders in passenger vehicles.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1433
R. Matthew Brach, Raymond M. Brach, Richard A. Mink
This paper presents a reconstruction technique in which nonlinear optimization is used in combination with an impact model to quickly and efficiently find a solution to a given set of parameters and conditions to reconstruct a collision. These parameters and conditions correspond to known or prescribed collision information (generally from the physical evidence) and can be incorporated into the optimized collision reconstruction technique in a variety of ways including as a prescribed value, through the use of a constraint, as part of a quality function, or possibly as a combination of these means. This reconstruction technique provides a proper, effective, and efficient means to incorporate data collected by Event Data Recorders (EDR) into a crash reconstruction. The technique is presented in this paper using the Planar Impact Mechanics (PIM) collision model in combination with the Solver utility in Microsoft Excel.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1444
Ada H. Tsoi, John Hinch, H. Gabler
Abstract Event data recorders (EDRs) must survive regulatory frontal and side compliance crash tests if installed within a car or light truck built on or after September 1, 2012. Although previous research has shown that EDR data are surviving these tests, little is known about whether EDRs are capable of surviving collisions of higher delta-v, or crashes involving vehicle fire or immersion. The goal of this study was to determine the survivability of light vehicle EDRs in real world fire, immersion, and high change in velocity (delta-v) cases. The specific objective was to identify the frequency of these extreme events and to determine the EDR data download outcome when subject to damage caused by these events. This study was performed using three crash databases: the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), the National Automotive Sampling System / Crashworthiness Data System (NASS/CDS), and the National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Survey (NMVCCS).
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1450
Jeremy Daily, Andrew Kongs, James Johnson, Jose Corcega
Abstract The proper investigation of crashes involving commercial vehicles is critical for fairly assessing liability and damages, if they exist. In addition to traditional physics based approaches, the digital records stored within heavy vehicle electronic control modules (ECMs) are useful in determining the events leading to a crash. Traditional methods of extracting digital data use proprietary diagnostic and maintenance software and require a functioning ECM. However, some crashes induce damage that renders the ECM inoperable, even though it may still contain data. As such, the objective of this research is to examine the digital record in an ECM and understand its meaning. The research was performed on a Detroit Diesel DDEC V engine control module. The data extracted from the flash memory chips include: Last Stop Record, two Hard Brake events, and the Daily Engine Usage Log. The procedure of extracting and reading the memory chips is explained.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1448
Lee Carr, Robert Rucoba, Dan Barnes, Steven Kent, Aaron Osterhout
Abstract With commercial availability of the Bosch Crash Data Retrieval Tool (CDR), the information stored in vehicle Event Data Recorders (EDRs) has increasingly been used to supplement traditional traffic crash data collection and reconstruction methods, allowing enhanced confidence levels in transportation safety research. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and reliability of EDR data images obtained with the Bosch CDR tool by comparing them to a known crash impulse. Multiple EDRs and necessary sensor arrays were mounted on a HYGE™ acceleration-type crash simulation sled system at various orientations representing different principal direction of force (PDOF) angles and subjected to controlled “crash” impulses, simulating a “deployment event” (DE) and triggering data to be saved in the EDRs. The data included in each EDR's CDR report was compared to the known conditions of the impulse.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1449
Ada H. Tsoi, John Hinch, Michael Winterhalter, H. Gabler
Abstract Event data recorder (EDR) data are currently only required to survive the crash tests specified by Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 208 and FMVSS 214. Although these crash tests are severe, motor vehicles are also exposed to more severe crashes, fire, and submersion. Little is known about whether current EDR data are capable of surviving these events. The objective of this study was to determine the limits of survivability for EDR data for realistic car crash conditions involving heat, submersion, and static crush. Thirty-one (31) EDRs were assessed in this study: 4 in the pilot tests and 27 in the production tests. The production tests were conducted on model year (MY) 2011-2012 EDRs enclosed in plastic, metal, or a combination of both materials. Each enclosure type was exposed to 9 tests. The high temperature tests were divided into 3 oven testing conditions: 100°C, 150°C, and 200°C.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1446
Timothy P. Austin, David P. Plant, Joseph E. LeFevre
Abstract The use of Heavy Vehicle Event Data Recorders (HVEDRs) in collision analysis has been well recognized in past research. Numerous publications have been presented illustrating data accuracy both in normal operating conditions as well as under emergency braking conditions. These data recording devices are generally incorporated into Electronic Control Modules (ECMs) for engines or Electronic Control Units (ECUs) for other vehicular components such as the Anti-Lock Brake System. Other research has looked at after-market recorders, including publically-available Global Positioning System (GPS) devices and fleet management tools such as Qualcomm. In 2009, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) incorporated a Vehicle Data Recorder (VDR) component into their Standard for Automotive Fire Apparatus. The purpose of this was to “…capture data that can be used to promote safe driving and riding practices.”
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1447
Hirotoshi Ishikawa, Kunihiro Mashiko, Tetsuyuki Matsuda, Koichi Fujita, Asuka Sugano, Toru Kiuchi, Hirotsugu Tajima, Masaaki Yoshida, Isao Endou
Abstract Event Data Recorders (EDRs) record valuable data in estimating the occupant injury severity after a crash. Advanced Automatic Collision Notification (AACN) with the use of EDR data will determine the potential extent of injuries to those involved in motor vehicle accidents. In order to obtain basic information in injury estimation using EDR data, frontal collisions for 29 vehicles equipped with EDRs were analyzed as a pilot study by retrieving the EDR data from the accident vehicles and collecting the occupant injury data from the database of an insurance company. As a result, the severity of occupant injury was closely related to the Delta V recorded on an EDR. However, there were several cases in which the predicted injury level was overestimated or underestimated by the Delta V. Therefore, caution is required when predicting the level of injury in frontal collisions based upon the Delta V alone.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1445
Wesley Vandiver, Robert Anderson, Isaac Ikram, Bryan Randles, Christopher Furbish
Abstract The 2012 Kia Soul was manufactured with an Airbag Control Module (ACM) with an Event Data Recorder (EDR) function to record crash related data. However, 2013 is the first model year supported by the download tool and software manufactured for Kia vehicles and distributed by GIT America, Inc. Even with the same make and model, using the Kia EDR tool to image data from an unsupported model year calls into question whether some or any of the data has been properly translated. By way of example, a method for evaluating the usability of the crash related data obtained via coverage spoofing a 2012 Kia Soul is presented. Eight vehicle-to-barrier crash tests were conducted in a 2012 Kia Soul. The Kia EDR tool was utilized to retrieve crash data from the vehicle's EDR following each test by choosing the software translation settings for a 2013 Kia Soul. The recorded and translated crash data for those tests were analyzed and compared to on-board instrumentation.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1484
Daniel E. Toomey, Eric S. Winkel, Ram Krishnaswami
Abstract Since their inception, the design of airbag sensing systems has continued to evolve. The evolution of air bag sensing system design has been rapid. Electromechanical sensors used in earlier front air bag applications have been replaced by multi-point electronic sensors used to discriminate collision mechanics for potential air bag deployment in front, side and rollover accidents. In addition to multipoint electronic sensors, advanced air bag systems incorporate a variety of state sensors such as seat belt use status, seat track location, and occupant size classification that are taken into consideration by air bag system algorithms and occupant protection deployment strategies. Electronic sensing systems have allowed for the advent of event data recorders (EDRs), which over the past decade, have provided increasingly more information related to air bag deployment events in the field.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2388
Jeffrey K. Ball, Mark Kittel, Trevor Buss, Greg Weiss
Abstract Trucking fleets are increasingly installing video event recorders in their vehicles. The video event recorder system is usually mounted near the vehicle's rear view mirror, and consists of two cameras: one looking forward and one looking towards the driver. The system also contains accelerometers that record lateral and longitudinal g-loading, and some may record vehicle speed (in mph) based on GPS positions. The unit constantly monitors vehicle acceleration and speed, and also records video. However, the recorded data is only stored when a preset acceleration threshold is met. The primary use of the system is to assist fleets with driver training and education, but the recorded data is also being used as a tool to reconstruct accidents. By integrating the accelerometer data, the vehicle speed and distance traveled during the event can be calculated.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0505
Greg Webster, Harold Clyde, Barry Hare, Mark Jakstis, Robert Landis, Lance Lewis, Ryan Buetzer
Abstract Four Toyota vehicles were tested in 12 test conditions to compare the Event Data Recorder (EDR) results with data gathered from onboard test instrumentation and the test protocol. The four Toyota vehicles tested were 2013 Model Year (MY) vehicles with EDRs that meet 49 CFR CH. V Part 563. While the previous Toyota EDR versions captured four pre-crash parameters, this generation Toyota EDR (12EDR) includes additional operating parameters and a faster sampling rate before the event trigger, including additional parameters not required by Part 563. The main focus of this research was to analyze the recording of the following driver inputs: accelerator pedal application, brake pedal application, steering wheel angle, and cruise control activation. The EDR-recorded inputs were compared with the values on the HS-CAN. The test results indicate that the 12EDR accurately recorded these driver inputs.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0502
Richard R. Ruth, Ada Tsoi
Abstract Kia and Hyundai released publicly available tools in the spring of 2013 to read model year (MY) 2013 vehicle event data recorders (EDRs). By empirical testing, this study determined the tools also read data from some 2010-2012 models as EDRs were phased in by the manufacturer. Fifty-four (54) MY 2010-2012 airbag control module EDRs from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) crash tests were downloaded direct-to-module. The vehicles analyzed were exposed to frontal, side moving deformable barrier (MDB), and side pole tests. The EDR data was compared to the reference instrumentation for speed and Delta V data. Other data elements were also tabulated but are not evaluated for accuracy because they were not fully exercised during the crash tests, the reference instrumentation was not available, or they were outside the scope of this paper.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-0503
Ada Tsoi, Nicholas Johnson, H. Gabler
This study evaluated the accuracy of 75 Event Data Recorders (EDRs) extracted from model year 2010-2012 Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, Honda, Mazda, and Toyota vehicles subjected to side-impact moving deformable barrier crash tests. The test report and vehicle-mounted accelerometers provided reference values to assess the EDR reported change in lateral velocity (delta-v), seatbelt buckle status, and airbag deployment status. Our results show that EDRs underreported the reference lateral delta-v in the vast majority of cases, mimicking the errors and conclusions found in some longitudinal EDR accuracy studies. For maximum lateral delta-v, the average arithmetic error was −3.59 kph (−13.8%) and the average absolute error was 4.05 kph (15.9%). All EDR reports that recorded a seatbelt buckle status data element correctly recorded the buckle status at both the driver and right front passenger locations.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0504
Richard R. Ruth, Jeremy Daily
Abstract 2013 and 2014 Ford Flex vehicles and airbag control modules with event data recorders (EDRs) were tested to determine the accuracy of speed and other data in the steady state condition, to evaluate time reporting delays under dynamic braking conditions, and to evaluate the accuracy of the stability control system data that the module records. This recorder is from the Autoliv RC6 family and this is the first known external research conducted on post 49CFR Part 563 Ford EDRs. The vehicle was instrumented with a VBox and a CAN data logger to compare external GPS based speeds to CAN data using the same synchronized time base. The vehicle was driven in steady state, hard braking, figure 8 and yaw conditions. The Airbag Control Module (ACM) was mounted onto a moving linear sled. The CAN bus data from driving was replayed as the sled created recordable events and the EDR data was compared to the reference instrumentation.
2013-09-24
Technical Paper
2013-01-2402
Darrell Bowman, Andrew Marinik, H. Gabler
Heavy-vehicle event data recorders (HVEDRs) provide a source of temporal vehicle data just prior to, during, and for a short period after, an event. In the 1990s, heavy-vehicle (HV) engine manufacturers expanded the capabilities of engine control units (ECU) and engine control modules (ECM) to include the ability to record and store small amounts of parametric vehicle data. This advanced capability has had a significant impact on vehicle safety by helping law enforcement, engineers, and researchers reconstruct events of a vehicle crash and understand the details surrounding that vehicle crash. Today, EDR technologies have been incorporated into a wide range of heavy vehicle (HV) safety systems (e.g., crash mitigation systems, air bag control systems, and behavioral monitoring systems). However, the adoption of EDR technologies has not been uniform across all classes of HVs or their associated vehicle systems.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0778
Nathan A. Rose, Neal R. Carter, David Pentecost, William Bortles, Tilo Voitel
This paper reports a method for analyzing data from a DriveCam unit to determine impact speeds and velocity changes in vehicle-to-vehicle impacts. A DriveCam unit is an aftermarket, in-vehicle, event-triggered video and data recorder. When the unit senses accelerations over a preset threshold, an event is triggered and the unit records video from two camera views, accelerations along three directions, and the vehicle speed with a GPS sensor. In conducting the research reported in this paper, the authors ran four front-to-rear crash tests with two DriveCam equipped vehicles. For each test, the front of the bullet vehicle impacted the rear of the stationary target vehicle. Each of the test vehicles was impacted in the rear twice - once at a speed of around 10 mph and again at a speed around 25 mph. The accuracy of the DriveCam acceleration data was assessed by comparing it to the data from other in-vehicle instrumentation.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-0730
Kristofer D. Kusano, Hampton C. Gabler
Lane Departure Warning (LDW) is a production active safety system that can warn drivers of an unintended departure. Critical in the design of LDW and other departure countermeasures is understanding pre-crash driver behavior in crashes. The objective of this study was to gain insight into pre-crash driver behavior in departure crashes using Event Data Recorders (EDRs). EDRs are units equipped on many passenger vehicles that are able to store vehicle data, including pre-crash data in many cases. This study used 256 EDRs that were downloaded from GM vehicles involved in real-world lane departure collisions. The crashes were investigated as part of the NHTSA's NASS/CDS database years 2000 to 2011. Nearly half of drivers (47%) made little or no change to their vehicle speed prior to the collision and slightly fewer decreased their speed (43%). Drivers who did not change speed were older (median age 41) compared to those who decreased speed (median age 27).
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1264
Aaron Diacon, Jeremy Daily, Richard Ruth, Carsten Mueller
Prior EDR testing methodologies required setting events in the airbag control module in the vehicle during controlled driving behavior. Duplicating events was nearly impossible, and it was difficult to separate how much differences in recorded speeds to reference speeds was due to measurement error, wheel slip, reporting time delays, or data truncation within the EDR. Recording thresholds have also increased making non-deployment and deployment events closer in magnitude, increasing the risk of accidentally exceeding the deployment threshold while setting events. The new methodology eliminates the risk of accidentally deploying airbags while gathering GPS and CAN bus data in the test vehicle. The techniques presented in this paper also allows gathering of data in vehicle without tampering with the airbag control module, which reduces the potential liability to testers using rental or borrowed test vehicles.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1263
Wesley Vandiver, Isaac Ikram, Bryan Randles
The accuracy of pre-crash data recorded in an Airbag Control Module (ACM) with Event Data Recorder (EDR) functionality has been studied and quantified for vehicles from several vehicle manufacturers. Most published research has involved vehicles with accessible data that can be downloaded via commercially available crash data retrieval equipment. Some Mitsubishi vehicles, including the 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS, are capable of recording crash data that can be accessed only by the manufacturer. The accuracy of such data becomes important when it is intended to be used as part of a collision analysis. The pre-crash speed data recorded by a 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer vehicle was evaluated by generating artificial deployment events while running the vehicle on a 4-wheel dynamometer and simultaneously capturing data through the OBDII port. The tests were run at speeds up to approximately 145 kilometers per hour (90 miles per hour).
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1267
David Plant, Timothy Cheek, Timothy P. Austin, John C. Steiner, Michael Farrell, Heath Spivey
It is well recognized that Heavy Vehicle Event Data Recorder (HVEDR) technology has been incorporated in the Electronic Control Modules (ECMs) on many on-highway commercial motor vehicles. The dynamic time-series data recorded by these HVEDRs typically include vehicle speed, engine speed, brake and clutch pedal status, and accelerator pedal position. With specific respect to Detroit Diesel ECMs, data are recorded surrounding certain events at a rate of 1.0 Hz. In this research, controlled testing was conducted to determine the time differences between the values being generated by the sourcing sensors and the interpreted data being broadcast on the vehicle's SAE J1939 controller area network (CAN). To accomplish this, raw sensor data as provided to the ECM was monitored, as were the subsequent J1939 CAN transmissions from the ECM.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 71

Filter