Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Content:
Display:

Results

Viewing 181 to 210 of 713
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/12A
In the design of spacecraft, heat transfer becomes a criterion of operation to maintain structural and equipment integrity over long periods of time. The spacecraft thermal balance between cold space and solar, planetary, and equipment heat sources is the means by which the desired range of equipment and structural temperatures are obtained. With the total spacecraft balance set, subsystem and component temperatures can be analyzed for their corresponding thermal requirements. This section provides the means by which first-cut approximations of spacecraft surface, structure, and equipment temperatures may be made, using the curves of planetary and solar heat flux in conjunction with the desired coating radiative properties. Once the coating properties have been determined, the material to provide these requirements may be selected from the extensive thermal radiative properties tables and curves.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/2A
Heat transfer is the transport of thermal energy from one point to another. Heat is transferred only under the influence of a temperature gradient or temperature difference. The direction of heat transfer is always from the point at the higher temperature to the point at the lower temperature, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The fundamental modes of heat transfer are conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the net transfer of energy within a fluid or solid occurring by the collisions of molecules, atoms, or electrons. Convection is the transfer of energy resulting from fluid motion. Convection involves the processes of conduction, fluid motion, and mass transfer. Radiation is the transfer of energy from one point to another in the absence of a transporting medium. In practical applications several modes of heat transfer occur simultaneously.
CURRENT
2011-07-19
Standard
ARP1256D
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes the continuous sampling and analysis of gaseous emissions from aircraft gas turbine engines. The measured gas species include carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), hydrocarbons (HC) and water vapor (H2O). This ARP excludes engine operating procedures and test modes, and is not intended for in-flight testing, nor does it apply to engines operating in the afterburning mode. It is recognized that there will probably be major advances in the gas analysis measurement technology. It is not the intent of this ARP to exclude other analysis techniques, but to form the basis of the minimum amount of conventional instruments (those in common industry usage over the last fifteen years) required for the analysis of aircraft engine exhaust.
CURRENT
2011-07-19
Standard
ARP1179D
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) standardizes test equipment and procedures for the measurement of smoke emission from aircraft gas turbine engines. The procedures included are for determining and reporting the amount of smoke emission. Tests have indicated that the practically achievable precision of the smoke number is within ±3 when the system is properly used as outlined herein. This procedure is not intended for in-flight testing, nor does it apply to engines operating in the afterburning mode.
CURRENT
2011-07-07
Standard
AS25064A
CURRENT
2011-06-27
Standard
AS8034B
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) specifies minimum performance standards for all types of Electronic Displays and Electronic Display Systems that are intended for use in the flight deck by the flightcrew in all 14 CFR Part 23, 25, 27, and 29 aircraft. The requirements and recommendations in this document are intended to apply to all installed electronic displays and electronic display systems within the flight deck, regardless of intended function, criticality, or location within the flight deck, but may also be used for non-installed electronic displays. This document provides baseline requirements and recommendations (see section 2.3 for definitions of “shall” and “should”). This document primarily addresses hardware requirements, such as electrical, mechanical, optical, and environmental. It does not address system specific functions.
CURRENT
2011-06-10
Standard
J254_201106
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes uniform laboratory techniques for the continuous and bag-sample measurement of various constituents in the exhaust gas of the gasoline engines installed in passenger cars and light-duty trucks. The report concentrates on the measurement of the following components in exhaust gas: hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). NOx is the sum of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). A complete procedure for testing vehicles may be found in SAE J1094. This document includes the following sections: 1. Scope 2. References 3. Emissions Sampling Systems 4. Emissions Analyzers 5. Data Analysis 6. Associated Test Equipment 7. Test Procedures
CURRENT
2011-05-26
Standard
J1990_201105
The purpose of this SAE Standard is to provide equipment specifications for CFC-12 (R-12) recycling equipment. This information applies to equipment used to service automobiles, light trucks, and other vehicles with similar CFC-12 (R-12) air-conditioning (A/C) systems. Systems used on mobile vehicles for refrigerating cargo that have hermetically sealed systems are not covered in this document. The equipment in this document is intended for use with refrigerant that has been directly removed from, and intended to be returned to, a mobile A/C system. Should other revisions due to operational or technical requirements occur, this document may be amended.
HISTORICAL
2011-05-20
Standard
AIR6130
14-day material test to determine the cyclic effects of runway deicing compounds on cadmium plated parts.
CURRENT
2011-05-16
Standard
J1961_201105
This test method specifies the operating procedures for using a solar fresnel reflector apparatus for the accelerated exposure of various automotive materials.
HISTORICAL
2011-05-02
Standard
J1555_201105
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to all portions of the vehicle, but design efforts should focus on components and systems with the highest contribution to the overall average repair cost (see 3.7). The costs to be minimized include not only insurance premiums, but also out-of-pocket costs incurred by the owner. Damageability, repairability, serviceability and diagnostics are inter-related. Some repairability, serviceability and diagnostics operations may be required for collision or comprehensive loss-related causes only, some operations for non-collision-related causes only (warranty, scheduled maintenance, non-scheduled maintenance, etc.), and some for both causes. The scope of this document deals with only those operations that involve collision and comprehensive insurance loss repairs.
2011-04-15
WIP Standard
J2766
This recommended best practice outlines a method for estimating CO₂-Equivalent emissions using the GREEN-MAC-LCCP© (Global Refrigerants Energy and ENvironmental - Mobile Air Conditioning - Life Cycle Climate Performance) model (also referred to as "the model" in this standard).
2011-03-21
WIP Standard
AIR6183
This standard should provide accurate fuel consumption prediction methods throughout the flight regime. The standard should apply to any fixed-wing, turbofan or turbojet-powered airplane.
CURRENT
2011-02-18
Standard
J2233_201102
This SAE Recommended Practice establishes uniform cold weather test procedures and performance requirements for engine coolant type heating systems of bus that are all vehicles designed to transport 10 or more passengers. The intent is to provide a test that will ensure acceptable comfort for bus occupants. It is limited to a test that can be conducted on uniform test equipment in commercially available laboratory facilities. Required test equipment, facilities, and definitions are included. There are two options for producing hot coolant in this recommended practice. Testing using these two approaches on the same vehicle will not necessarily provide identical results. Many vehicle models are offered with optional engines, and each engine has varying coolant temperatures and flow rates. If the test is being conducted to compare the performance of one heater design to another heater design, then the external coolant source approach (Test A) will yield the most comparable results.
CURRENT
2011-02-08
Standard
AS5258/3A
The complete requirements for acquiring the molded components described herein shall consist of this document and the latest issue of AS5258.
CURRENT
2011-02-08
Standard
AS5258/4A
The complete requirements for acquiring the molded components described herein shall consist of this document and the latest issue of AS 5258.
CURRENT
2011-02-08
Standard
AS5258/5A
The complete requirements for acquiring the molded components described herein shall consist of this document and the latest issue of AS5258.
CURRENT
2011-02-08
Standard
AS5258/6A
The complete requirements for acquiring the molded components described herein shall consist of this document and the latest issue of AS 5258.
CURRENT
2011-02-08
Standard
AS5258/7A
The complete requirements for acquiring the molded components described herein shall consist of this document and the latest issue of AS5258.
CURRENT
2011-02-08
Standard
AS5258/8A
The complete requirements for acquiring the molded components described herein shall consist of this document and the latest issue of AS5258.
CURRENT
2011-02-08
Standard
AS5258/9A
The complete requirements for acquiring the molded components described herein shall consist of this document and the latest issue of AS5258.
CURRENT
2011-02-08
Standard
AS5258/10A
The complete requirements for acquiring the molded components described herein shall consist of this document and the latest issue of AS5258.
CURRENT
2011-02-08
Standard
AS5258/2A
The complete requirements for acquiring the molded components described herein shall consist of this document and the latest issue of AS 5258.
CURRENT
2011-02-08
Standard
AS5258/1A
The complete requirements for acquiring the molded components described herein shall consist of this document and the latest issue of AS 5258.
HISTORICAL
2011-02-04
Standard
J2773_201102
This Standard describes methods to understand the risks associated with vehicle mobile air conditioning [MAC] systems in all aspects of a vehicle’s lifecycle including design, production, assembly, operation and end of life. Information for input to the risk assessment is provided in the Appendices of this document. This information should not be considered to be complete, but only a reference of some of the data needed for a complete analysis of the risk associated with the use of refrigerants in MAC systems.
HISTORICAL
2011-02-04
Standard
J2099_201102
This SAE Standard applies to: • recycled R-134a refrigerant, used in servicing of motor vehicle air conditioning (A/C) systems that were designed for use with R-12 and have been retrofitted for use with R-134a; • recycled R-134a refrigerant, used in servicing of motor vehicle air conditioning (A/C) systems that were designed for use with R-134a; • recycled R-1234yf refrigerant, used in servicing of motor vehicle air conditioning (A/C) systems that were designed for use with R-1234yf. Hermetically sealed, refrigerated cargo systems are not covered by this document.
CURRENT
2011-02-04
Standard
J2772_201102
This Standard is restricted to refrigeration circuits that provide air-conditioning for the passenger compartments of passenger and commercial vehicles. This Standard includes analytical and physical test procedures to evaluate concentration inside the passenger compartment. In the early phases of vehicle evaluation, usage of the analytical approach may be sufficient without performing physical tests. The physical test procedure involves releasing refrigerant from an external source to a location adjacent to the evaporator core (inside the HVAC-Module). An apparatus is used to provide a repeatable, calibrated leak rate. If the system has multiple evaporators, leakage could be simulated at any of the evaporator locations. This standard gives detail information on the techniques for measuring R-744 [CO2] and R-1234yf [HFO-1234yf], but the general techniques described here can be used for other refrigerants as well.
HISTORICAL
2011-02-04
Standard
J2842_201102
The intent of this standard is to establish a framework to assure that all evaporators for R-744 and R-1234yf mobile air conditioning (MAC) systems meet appropriate testing and labeling requirements. SAE J639 requires vehicle manufacturers to perform assessments to minimize reasonable risks in production MAC systems. The evaporator (as designed and manufactured) shall be part of that risk assessment and it is the responsibility of the vehicle manufacturer to assure all relevant aspects of the evaporator are included. It is the responsibility of all vehicle or evaporator manufacturers to comply with the standards of this document at a minimum. (Substitution of specific test procedures by vehicle manufactures that correlate well to field return data is acceptable.) As appropriate, this standard can be used as a guide to support risk assessments.
CURRENT
2011-01-06
Standard
ARP5660A
The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for the standardization of safe operating procedures to be used in performing the services and maintenance at Designated Deicing Facilities (Central Deicing Facilities/Remote Deicing Facilities) that are necessary for proper deicing/anti-icing of aircraft on the ground and performing of associated checks in accordance with the various approved ground icing programs, while considering applicable local environmental, operational and economic requirements. This document should be used by regulators and airport authorities to develop and standardize approvals and permits for the establishment and operation of a DDF. The coordination of stakeholders is required prior to the approval of design plans for a deicing facility. Operating procedures must be agreed to, in writing, by all air operators, airport authorities, regulators and service providers prior to commencing deicing operations.
2010-12-10
WIP Standard
J2711
This SAE Recommended Practice was established to provide an accurate, uniform and reproducible procedure for simulating use of heavy-duty hybrid- electric vehicles (HEVs) and conventional vehicles on dynamometers for the purpose of measuring emissions and fuel economy. Although the recommended practice can be applied using any driving cycle, the practice recommends three cycles: the Manhattan cycle, representing low-speed transit bus operation; the Orange County Transit Cycle, representing intermediate-speed bus operation; and the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) cycle representing high-speed operation for buses and tractor-trailers. This document does not specify which emissions constituents to measure (e.g., HC, CO, NOx, PM, CO 2 ), as that decision will depend on the objectives of the tester.
Viewing 181 to 210 of 713