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Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mojghan Naseri, Raymond Conway, Howard Hess, Ceren Aydin, Sougato Chatterjee
Abstract Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems have been demonstrated as effective solutions for controlling NOx emissions from Heavy Duty diesel engines. Future HD diesel engines are being designed for higher engine out NOx to improve fuel economy, which will require increasingly higher NOx conversion to meet emission regulations. For future aftertreatment designs, advanced technologies such as SCR coated on filter (SCRF®) and SCR coated on high porous flow through substrates can be utilized to achieve high NOx conversion. In this work, different options were evaluated for achieving high NOx conversion. First, high performance NOx control catalysts were designed by using SCRF unit followed by additional SCR on high porosity substrates. Second, different control strategies were evaluated to understand the effect of reductant dosing strategy and thermal management on NOx conversion. Tests were carried out on a HD engine under transient test cycles. The results indicated that NOx conversion can be significantly improved using the proposed design of SCRF component along with SCR on high porosity substrates.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Keld Johansen, Henrik Bentzer, Arkady Kustov, Kenneth Larsen, Ton V.W. Janssens, Rasmus G. Barfod
Abstract Today, the DPF and SCR catalysts are combined sequentially in diesel exhaust systems. However, such sequential system configuration has several drawbacks: 1) large volume; 2) insufficient temperature for the SCR catalyst during cold start when DPF is placed in front of SCR; and 3) unfavorable conditions for passive soot regeneration if SCR is placed upstream of the DPF. The problems can potentially be solved by integrating the SCR catalyst into the particulate filter as one multifunctional unit. The study indicates that SCRonDPF based on Cu-zeolite type as SCR material can achieve the NOx conversion levels close to flow-through SCR catalysts for LDV (Light Duty Vehicles) using forced regenerations. Forced soot regeneration solves potential sulfur poisoning. For HDV (Heavy Duty Vehicles) applications with full managed passive soot regenerations, integration of V-based SCR formulations on DPF represents an attractive solution due to high sulfur resistance accompanied by low-temperature fuel economy.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Homayoun Ahari, Michael Zammit, Luis Cattani, Jason Jacques, Thomas Pauly
Abstract To meet TierII/LEVII emissions standards, light duty diesel (LDD) vehicles require high conversion efficiencies from the Aftertreatment Systems (ATS) for the removal of both Hydrocarbon (HC) and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) species. The most populous configuration for LDD ATS have the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst positioned on the vehicle behind the close coupled Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) and Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter (CDPF). This SCR position may require active heating measures which rely on the DOC/CDPF to provide heat through the combustion of HC and CO in the exhaust. Although DOCs are always impacted by their aging conditions, some aging conditions are shown to be both reversible and irreversible. Under continuous, high speed and high mileage conditions such as experienced in a modified Standard Road Cycle (SRC) or as it is better known, the High Speed Cycle (HSC), it is shown that the DOC's activity can deteriorate initially but significantly recover over repeated FTP-75 test cycles on fully aged catalysts.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kihong Kim, Rahul Mital, Takehiro Higuchi, Seomoon Chan, Chang Hwan Kim
Abstract Diesel particulate filter (DPF) is a widely used emission control device on diesel vehicles. The DPF captures the particulate matter coming from the engine exhaust and periodically burns the collected soot via the regeneration process. There are various trigger mechanisms for this regeneration, such as distance, time, fuel and simulation. Another method widely used in the industry is the pressure drop across the filter. During calibration, relation between the pressure sensor reading and soot mass in the filter is established. This methodology is highly effective in successful DPF operation as pressure sensor is a live signal that can account for any changes in engine performance over time or any unforeseen hardware failures. On the other hand, any erroneous feedback from the sensor can lead to inaccurate soot mass prediction causing unnecessary regenerations or even needless DPF plugging concerns. A similar phenomenon was observed on certain vehicles where the DPF pressure reading jumped inexplicably leading to DPF plugging concerns.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kazuki Nakamura, Athanasios Konstandopoulos, Margaritis Kostoglou, Toshiaki Shibata, Yuki Hashizume
Abstract Diesel particulate filters (DPFs) equipped with diesel vehicles have become indispensable components to capture the soot emitted from the engines from a viewpoint of both human health and global warming problems as well as the prevailing regulations. Meanwhile, the pressure drop caused by them leads to a direct increase of fuel consumption. In order to reduce it guaranteeing the sufficient soot filtration efficiency, we have developed the new concept of asymmetric plugging layout for the DPF design, so-called Valuable Plugging Layout (VPL), on the basis of octosquare (OS) structure and have clarified the advantage of the pressure drop reduction both experimentally and theoretically. The VPL-DPF consists of two kinds of octagonal/square inlet channels and octagonal outlet channels, and there are thought to be five filtration velocity modes as well as four kinds of soot deposit layers on each side of the inlet channel walls. No deterioration of the soot filtration performance and the reduction of the transient pressure drop of the VPL-DPF during the soot loading have been confirmed through the engine bench tests compared to those of the OS-DPF.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
C. Scott Sluder, John M.E. Storey, Michael J. Lance
Abstract Fouling in EGR coolers occurs because of the presence of soot and condensable species (such as hydrocarbons) in the gas stream. Fouling leads to one of two possible outcomes: stabilization of effectiveness and plugging of the gas passages within the cooler. Deposit formation in the cooler under high-temperature conditions results in a fractal deposit that has a characteristic thermal conductivity of ∼0.033 W/m*K and a density of 0.0224 g/cm3. Effectiveness becomes much less sensitive to changes in thermal resistance as fouling proceeds, creating the appearance of “stabilization” even in the presence of ongoing, albeit slow, deposit growth. Plugging occurs when the deposit thermal resistance is several times lower because of the presence of large amounts of condensed species. The deposition mechanism in this case appears to be soot deposition into a liquid film, which results in increased packing efficiency and decreased void space in the deposit relative to high-temperature deposits.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael J. Lance, John Storey, Sam Lewis, C. Scott Sluder
Abstract All high-pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) coolers become fouled during operation due to thermophoresis of particulate matter and condensation of hydrocarbons present in diesel exhaust. In some EGR coolers, fouling is so severe that deposits form plugs strong enough to occlude the gas passages thereby causing a complete failure of the EGR system. In order to better understand plugging and means of reducing its undesirable performance degradation, EGR coolers exhibiting plugging were requested from and provided by industry EGR engineers. Two of these coolers contained glassy, brittle, lacquer-like deposits which were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) which identified large amounts of oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Another cooler exhibited similar species to the lacquer but at a lower concentration with more soot. The authors propose that lacquer deposits form when oxygenated PAHs present in the exhaust condense on the cooler walls subsequently experience nitric acid catalyzed polymerization in the presence of aldehydes.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael J. Lance, Hassina Bilheux, Jean-Christophe Bilheux, Sophie Voisin, C. Scott Sluder, Joseph Stevenson
Abstract Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler fouling has become a significant issue for compliance with NOx emissions standards. Exhaust gas laden with particulate matter flows through the EGR cooler which causes deposits to form through thermophoresis and condensation. The low thermal conductivity of the resulting deposit reduces the effectiveness of the EGR system. In order to better understand this phenomenon, industry-provided coolers were characterized using neutron tomography. Neutrons are strongly attenuated by hydrogen but only weakly by metals which allows for non-destructive imaging of the deposit through the metal heat exchanger. Multiple 2-D projections of cooler sections were acquired by rotating the sample around the axis of symmetry with the spatial resolution of each image equal to ∼70 μm. A 3-D tomographic set was then reconstructed, from which slices through the cooler sections were extracted across different planes. High concentrations of hydrocarbon is necessary for imaging deposits and only those coolers which exhibited large organic fractions or hydrated sulfate phases were successfully characterized.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Charles Sprouse III, Christopher Depcik
Abstract Significant progress towards reducing diesel engine fuel consumption and emissions is possible through the simultaneous Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) and Particulate Matter (PM) filtration in a novel device described here as a Diesel Particulate Filter Heat Exchanger (DPFHX). This original device concept is based on the shell-and-tube heat exchanger geometry, where enlarged tubes contain DPF cores, allowing waste heat recovery from engine exhaust and allowing further energy capture from the exothermic PM regeneration event. The heat transferred to the working fluid on the shell side of the DPFHX becomes available for use in a secondary power cycle, which is an increasingly attractive method of boosting powertrain efficiency due to fuel savings of around 10 to 15%. Moreover, these fuel savings are proportional to the associated emissions reduction after a short warm-up period, with startup emissions relatively unchanged when implementing a WHR system. Due to the absence of prior DPFHX research and the unique heat transfer process present, this effort describes construction of a prototype DPFHX and subsequent WHR experiments in a single cylinder diesel engine test cell with a comparison between heat exchanger performance with and without DPF cores installed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Paul B. Dickinson, Kieran Hegarty, Nick Collings, Tashiv Ramsander
Abstract The control of NOX emissions by exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is of widespread application. However, despite dramatic improvements in all aspects of engine control, the subtle mixing processes that determine the cylinder-to-cylinder distribution of the recirculated gas often results in a mal-distribution that is still an issue for the engine designer and calibrator. In this paper we demonstrate the application of a relatively straightforward technique for the measurement of the absolute and relative dilution quantity in both steady state and transient operation. This was achieved by the use of oxygen sensors based on standard UEGO (universal exhaust gas oxygen) sensors but packaged so as to give good frequency response (∼ 10 ms time constant) and be completely insensitivity to the sample pressure and temperature. Measurements can be made at almost any location of interest, for example exhaust and inlet manifolds as well as EGR path(s), with virtually no flow disturbance. At the same time, the measurements yield insights into air-path dynamics.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jim Barker, Colin Snape, David Scurr
Abstract The nature of internal diesel injector deposits (IDID) continues to be of importance to the industry, with field problems such as injector sticking, loss of power, increased emissions and fuel consumption being found. The deposits have their origins in the changes in emission regulations that have seen increasingly severe conditions experienced by fuels because of high temperatures and high pressures of modern common rail systems and the introduction of low sulphur fuels. Furthermore, the effect of these deposits is amplified by the tight engineering tolerances of the moving parts of such systems. The nature and thus understanding of such deposits is necessary to both minimising their formation and the development of effective diesel deposit control additives (DCA). The focused ion beam technique coupled with time of flight secondary -ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has the ability to provide information on diesel engine injector deposits as a function of depth for both organic and inorganic constituents.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Chitralkumar V. Naik, Long Liang, Karthik Puduppakkam, Ellen Meeks
Abstract 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations have been performed using a detailed reaction mechanism to capture the combustion and emissions behavior of an IFP Energies nouvelles optical gasoline direct injection engine. Simulation results for in-cylinder soot volume fraction have been compared to experimental data provided by Pires da Cruz et al. [1] The engine was operated at low-load and tests were performed with parametric variations of the operating conditions including fuel injection timing, inlet temperature, and addition of fuel in the intake port. Full cycle simulations were performed including intake and exhaust ports, valve and piston motion. A Cartesian mesh was generated using automatic mesh generation in the FORTÉ CFD software. For the simulations, a 7-component surrogate blend was used to represent the chemical and physical properties of the European gasoline used in the engine tests. A validated detailed combustion mechanism containing 230 species and 1740 reactions was employed to model the chemistry of the fuel surrogate combustion and emissions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yunlong Li, Yiqiang Pei, Jing Qin, Shaozhe Zhang, Yu Shang, Le Yang, Xuesong Wu
Abstract The effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), late intake valve closure (LIVC) and high compression ratio (HCR) on the performance of a 1.6L multi-point injection (MPI) gasoline engine at 2000rpmwere investigated in this paper. Compared to the baseline engine, The improvement of fuel consumption is about 1.4%∼4.5% by using EGR only because of a reduction of pumping loss(PMEP). Nevertheless deterioration of combustion is introduced at the same time for high specific heat of EGR. The maximum EGR rate introduced in this system is limited by cyclic variations of indicate mean effective pressure (COVIMEP) at low load and fresh charge to achieve enough output power at high load. After combined LIVC and HCR, the improvement of fuel consumption is about 3.5%∼9.6% compared with the baseline engine at the same operation conditions because of significant PMEP reduction, increasing of effective compression ratio (ECR). LIVC&HCR&EGR can improve BSFC further, however, for getting stable combustion process and sufficient power, the combined technology is mainly suitable for medium load.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daisuke Takaki, Hirofumi Tsuchida, Tetsuya Kobara, Mitsuhiro Akagi, Takeshi Tsuyuki, Morihiro Nagamine
Abstract This paper presents a study of a cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system applied to a turbocharged gasoline engine for improving fuel economy. The use of a higher compression ratio and further engine downsizing have been examined in recent years as ways of improving the fuel efficiency of turbocharged gasoline engines. It is particularly important to improve fuel economy under high load conditions, especially in the turbocharged region. The key points for improving fuel economy in this region are to suppress knocking, reduce the exhaust temperature and increase the specific heat ratio. There are several varieties of cooled EGR systems such as low-pressure loop EGR (LP-EGR), high-pressure loop EGR (HP-EGR) and other systems. The LP-EGR system was chosen for the following reasons. It is possible to supply sufficient EGR under a comparatively highly turbocharged condition at low engine speed. It is important for knocking suppression to remove nitrogen oxides (NOx) from the EGR gas, which means using EGR gas from the catalyst downstream.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kengo Kumano, Shiro Yamaoka
Abstract The cooled EGR system has been focused on as a method for knocking suppression in gasoline engines. In this paper, the effect of cooled EGR on knocking suppression that leads to lower fuel consumption is investigated in a turbo-charged gasoline engine. First, the cooled EGR effect is estimated by combustion simulation with a knock prediction model. It shows that the ignition timing at the knocking limit can be advanced by about 1 [deg. CA] per 1% of EGR ratio, combustion phasing (50% heat release timing) at the knocking limit can be advanced by about 0.5 [deg. CA] per 1% of EGR ratio, and the fuel consumption amount can be decreased by about 0.4% per 1% of EGR ratio. Second, the effect of cooled EGR is verified in an experimental approach. By adding inert gas (N2/CO2) as simulated EGR gas upstream of the intake pipe, the effect of EGR is investigated when EGR gas and fresh air are mixed homogeneously. As a result, the ignition timing at the knocking limit is advanced by 7 [deg.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Zhimin Liu, David Cleary
Abstract A 2.0L twin-scroll turbocharged SIDI engine was used to evaluate low-pressure loop water-cooled external EGR at operating conditions between 1000 rpm 75 Nm and 3000 rpm 250 Nm. The engine compression ratio was increased from 9.3 to 10.9. The maximum fuel consumption reduction potential, the boost pressure requirements, and the optimized external EGR calibration were determined. Combination of higher compression ratio and external EGR achieved 5-7% better fuel economy over mid-load region when using the twin-scroll turbocharger. A similar (4-6%) better fuel economy was observed over much of the higher-load region, including peak torque condition at 1000rpm, when the required boost pressure was provided by an externally-driven auxiliary boost system (not connected to the engine). The power consumption of auxiliary boost system (supercharger loss) was estimated and considered in fuel economy assessment. The fuel consumption reduction mechanisms of EGR were also analyzed. This study shows that reduced pumping loss attributed to about 0.5% fuel consumption reduction per 10% EGR, heat loss reduction and better mixture properties offered above 2% fuel consumption reduction per 10% EGR.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiao Ma, Yunliang Qi, Zhi Wang, Hongming Xu, Jian-Xin Wang
Abstract Using EGR instead of throttle to control the load of a stoichiometric dual-fuel dieseline (diesel and gasoline) compression ignition (SDCI) engine with three-way catalyst (TWC) aftertreatment is considered a promising technology to address the challenges of fuel consumption and emissions in future internal combustion engines. High-speed imaging is used to record the flame signal in a single-cylinder optical engine with a PFI+DI dual injection system. The premixed blue flame is identified and separated using green and blue channels in RGB images. The effects of injection timing on SDCI combustion are studied. An earlier injection strategy is found to be ideal for soot reduction; however, the ignition-injection decoupling problem results in difficulties in combustion control. It is also found that a split injection strategy has advantages in soot reduction and thermal efficiency. Only 10% of the total diesel fuel for the main injection can advance the combustion phase significantly and the combustion duration can be reduced by approximate 50%.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mufaddel Dahodwala, Satyum Joshi, Erik W. Koehler, Michael Franke
Abstract The advantages of applying Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) as a fuel for internal combustion engines are well known. In addition to a significant operating cost savings due to a lower fuel price relative to diesel, there is an opportunity to reduce the engine's emissions. With CNG combustion, some emissions, such as Particulate Matter (PM) and Carbon Dioxide (CO2), are inherently reduced relative to diesel fueled engines due to the nature of the combustion and the molecular makeup of the fuel. However, it is important to consider the impact on all emissions, including Total Hydrocarbons (THC) and Carbon Monoxide (CO), which can increase with the use of CNG. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) emission is often reported to decrease with the use of CNG, but the ability to realize this benefit is significantly impacted by the control strategy and calibration applied. FEV has investigated the emissions and performance impact of operating a heavy-duty diesel engine with CNG in a dual fuel mode. The CNG was introduced via injectors mounted to an inlet pipe located upstream of the intake manifold.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nassim Khaled, Michael Cunningham, Jaroslav Pekar, Adrian Fuxman, Ondrej Santin
Abstract In this paper we consider the issues facing the design of a practical multivariable controller for a diesel engine with dual exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) loops. This engine architecture requires the control of two EGR valves (high pressure and low pressure), an exhaust throttle (ET) and a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT). A systematic approach suitable for production-intent air handling control using Model Predictive Control (MPC) for diesel engines is proposed. Furthermore, the tuning process of the proposed design is outlined. Experimental results for the performance of the proposed design are implemented on a 2.8L light duty diesel engine. Transient data over an LA-4 cycle for the closed loop performance of the controller are included to prove the effectiveness of the proposed design process. The MPC implementation process took a total of 10 days from the start of the data collection to build a calibrated engine model all the way through the calibration of the controller over the transient drive cycle.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ivan Arsie, Andrea Cricchio, Cesare Pianese, Matteo De Cesare, Walter Nesci
Abstract In the last years the automotive industry has been involved in the development and implementation of CO2 reducing concepts such as the engines downsizing, stop/start systems as well as more costly full hybrid solutions and, more recently, waste heat recovery technologies. These latter include ThermoElectric Generator (TEG), Rankine cycle and Electric Turbo Compound (ETC) that have been practically implemented on few heavy-duty application but have not been proved yet as effective and affordable solutions for the automotive industry. The paper deals with the analysis of opportunities and challenges of the Electric Turbo Compound for automotive light-duty engines. In the ETC concept the turbine-compressor shaft is connected to an electric machine, which can work either as generator or motor. In the former case the power can satisfy the vehicle electrical demand to drive the auxiliaries or stored in the batteries. In the latter case the electric motor can assist the turbine and speed up the compressor when requested.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Takahiro Umeno, Masaya Hanzawa, Yoshiyuki Hayashi, Masao Hori
Abstract In this study several NOx storage materials have been investigated to see their NOx storage properties. And sulfur release properties of these materials have been also investigated. Based on these findings, new LNT catalyst was developed. In this new LNT catalyst Barium is supported on one basic material, and Strontium is coated in the whole catalyst with high dispersion. And it shows higher NOx storage performance against conventional LNT one even though 10g/L of sulfur was introduced to the catalysts. According to analysis results of new LNT catalyst after sulfur poisoning, it was found that sulfur was mainly adsorbed on Strontium selectively, and then it formed sulfate compound as SrSO4. On the other hand, another sulfate compounds could be hardly observed. And regarding Barium on basic material some analysis measurement said that it has not only better NOx storage function, but also better sulfur release function. The assumption why new LNT catalyst has high sulfur resistance is that Strontium works like scavenger effect against sulfur, therefore it enables to keep higher NOx storage performance by Barium even if it contains much sulfur amount in the catalyst.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Alok Warey, Anil Singh Bika, Alberto Vassallo, Sandro Balestrino, Patrick Szymkowicz
Cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is widely used in diesel engines to control engine out NOx (oxides of nitrogen) emissions. A portion of the exhaust gases is re-circulated into the intake manifold of the engine after cooling it through a heat exchanger known as an EGR cooler. EGR cooler heat exchangers, however, tend to lose efficiency and have increased pressure drop as deposit forms on the heat exchanger surface due to transport of soot particles and condensing species to the cooler walls. In our previous work surface condensation of water vapor was shown to be successful in removing a significant portion of the accumulated deposit mass from various types of deposit layers typically encountered in EGR coolers. Significant removal of accumulated deposit mass was observed for “dry” soot only deposit layers, while little to no removal was observed for the deposit layers created at low coolant temperatures that consisted of both soot and condensed hydrocarbons (HC). The focus of this study was to explore the potential benefits of combining a pre-EGR cooler oxidation catalyst (OC) in the high pressure EGR loop with exposure to water vapor condensation.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Georgios Fontaras, Panagiota Dilara, Michael Berner, Theo Volkers, Antonius Kies, Martin Rexeis, Stefan Hausberger
Due to the diversity of Heavy Duty Vehicles (HDV), the European CO2 and fuel consumption monitoring methodology for HDVs will be based on a combination of component testing and vehicle simulation. In this context, one of the key input parameters that need to be accurately defined for achieving a representative and accurate fuel consumption simulation is the vehicle's aerodynamic drag. A highly repeatable, accurate and sensitive measurement methodology was needed, in order to capture small differences in the aerodynamic characteristics of different vehicle bodies. A measurement methodology is proposed which is based on constant speed measurements on a test track, the use of torque measurement systems and wind speed measurement. In order to support the development and evaluation of the proposed approach, a series of experiments were conducted on 2 different trucks, a Daimler 40 ton truck with a semi-trailer and a DAF 18 ton rigid truck. Two different torque measurement systems (wheel rim torque sensors and half shaft torque sensors) were used for the measurements and two different vehicle tracking approaches were investigated (high precision GPS and opto-electronic barriers).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Zhiming Gao, Tim J. LaClair, C. Stuart Daw, David E. Smith, Oscar Franzese
We present simulated fuel economy and emissions of city transit buses powered by conventional diesel engines and diesel-hybrid electric powertrains of varying size. Six representative city drive cycles were included in the study. In addition, we included previously published aftertreatment device models for control of CO, HC, NOx, and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Our results reveal that bus hybridization can significantly enhance fuel economy by reducing engine idling time, reducing demands for accessory loads, exploiting regenerative braking, and shifting engine operation to speeds and loads with higher fuel efficiency. Increased hybridization also tends to monotonically reduce engine-out emissions, but tailpipe (post-aftertreatment) emissions are affected by complex interactions between engine load and the transient catalyst temperatures, and the emissions results were found to depend significantly on motor size and details of each drive cycle.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jason D. Pless, Mojghan Naseri, Wassim Klink, Glen Spreitzer, Sougato Chatterjee, Penelope Markatou
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts have been demonstrated as an effective solution for controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines. There is a drive to reduce the overall packaging volume of the aftertreatment system for these applications. In addition, more active SCR catalysts will be needed as the applications become more challenging: e.g. lower temperatures and higher engine out NOx, for fuel consumption improvements. One approach to meet the challenges of reduced volume and/or higher NOx reduction is to increase the active site density of the SCR catalyst by coating higher amount of SCR catalyst on high porosity substrates (HPS). This approach could enable the reduction of the overall packaging volume while maintaining similar NOx conversion as compared to 2010/2013 systems, or improve the NOx reduction performance for equivalent volume and NH3 slip. In this work, systems consisting of SCR coated on high porosity substrates were evaluated in comparison to standard substrate based SCR systems used in typical 2010 applications.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Stefan Schmidt, Maurice Smeets, Roland Boehner, Robert Aas, Christian Winkler, Markus Schoenen, Peter Hermann, Julian Tan, Magdi Khair, Joern Bullert
Tighter emission limits are discussed and established around the world to improve quality of the air we breathe. In order to control global warming, authorities ask for lower CO2 emissions from combustion engines. Lots of efforts are done to reduce engine out emissions and/or reduce remaining by suitable after treatment systems. Watlow, among others, a manufacturer of high accurate, active temperature sensor ExactSense™, wanted to understand if temperature sensor accuracy can have an influence on fuel consumption (FC). For this purpose a numerical approach was chosen where several non-road driving cycles (NRTCs) were simulated with the data base of a typical Stage IV heavy duty diesel engine. The engine is equipped with an exhaust gas after treatment system consisting of a DOC, CDPF and an SCR. In this work scope, the investigations shall be restricted to the FC benefits obtained in the active and passive DPF regeneration. The numerical investigations were performed using DPF soot loading and oxidation models using a commercially available software program.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Usman Asad, Jimi Tjong
Abstract Modern diesel engines employ a multitude of strategies for oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission abatement, with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) being one of the most effective technique. The need for a precise control on the intake charge dilution (as a result of EGR) is paramount since small fluctuations in the intake charge dilution at high EGR rates may cause larger than acceptable spikes in NOx/soot emissions or deterioration in the combustion efficiency, especially at low to mid-engine loads. The control problem becomes more pronounced during transient engine operation; currently the trend is to momentarily close the EGR valve during tip-in or tip-out events. Therefore, there is a need to understand the transient EGR behaviour and its impact on the intake charge development especially under unstable combustion regimes such as low temperature combustion. This study describes a zero-dimensional EGR model that enables the estimation of transient (cycle-by-cycle) build-up of EGR and the time (engine cycles) required to reach steady-state EGR operation (intake/exhaust concentrations).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
René Wolf, Peter Eilts
When comparing automotive and large-bore diesel engines, the latter usually show lower specific fuel consumption values, while automotive engines are subject to much stricter emission standards. Within an FVV (Research Association for Combustion Engines) project these differences were identified, quantified and assigned to individual design and operation parameters. The approach was split in three different phases: 1 Comparison of different-sized diesel engines2 Correlation of differences in fuel consumption to design and operating parameters3 Further investigations under automotive boundary conditions The comparison in the first phase was made on the basis of operating data and energy balances as well as the separation of losses based on the thermodynamic analysis. To also determine the quantitative effects of each design and operating parameter, a 1D process calculation model of the passenger car engine was transformed gradually to a large-bore engine in the second phase. The advantage of the large-bore engines results basically from their higher combustion air ratio, shorter combustion duration, lower wall heat losses and high positive gas exchange work due to a high turbocharger efficiency.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Arnon Poran, Moris Artoul, Moshe Sheintuch, Leonid Tartakovsky
This paper describes a model for the simulation of the joint operation of internal combustion engine (ICE) with methanol reformer when the ICE is fed by the methanol steam reforming (SRM) products and the energy of the exhaust gases is utilized to sustain endothermic SRM reactions. This approach enables ICE feeding by a gaseous fuel with very favorable properties, thus leading to increase in the overall energy efficiency of the vehicle and emissions reduction. Previous modeling attempts were focused either on the performance of ICE fueled with SRM products or on the reforming process simulation and reactor design. It is clear that the engine performance is affected by the composition of the reforming products and the reforming products are affected by the exhaust gas temperature, composition and flow rate. Due to the tight interrelations between the two main parts of the considered ICE-reformer system, it is desirable to create a single model that simulates joint operation of the ICE and the SRM reactor.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daniele Farrace, Michele Bolla, Yuri M. Wright, Konstantinos Boulouchos
This paper presents numerical simulations of in-cylinder soot evolution in the optically accessible heavy-duty diesel engine of Sandia Laboratories performed with the conditional moment closure (CMC) model employing a reduced n-heptane chemical mechanism coupled with a two-equation soot model. The influence of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on in-cylinder processes is studied considering different ambient oxygen volume fractions (8 - 21 percent), while maintaining intake pressure and temperature as well as the injection configuration unchanged. This corresponds to EGR rates between 0 and 65 percent. Simulation results are first compared with experimental data by means of apparent heat release rate (AHRR) and temporally resolved in-cylinder soot mass, where a quantitative comparison is presented. The model was found to fairly well reproduce ignition delays as well as AHRR traces along the EGR variation with a slight underestimation of the diffusion burn portion. Subsequently, the impact of EGR on the mixture formation, spray characteristics and soot evolution is investigated numerically and governing processes are identified and discussed.
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