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Viewing 211 to 240 of 22368
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ryan Foley, Jeffrey Naber, John Johnson, Leigh Rogoski
Abstract Optimizing the performance of the aftertreatment system used on heavy duty diesel engines requires a thorough understanding of the operational characteristics of the individual components. Within this, understanding the performance of the catalyzed particulate filter (CPF), and the development of an accurate CPF model, requires knowledge of the particulate matter (PM) distribution throughout the substrate. Experimental measurements of the PM distribution provide the detailed interactions of PM loading, passive oxidation, and active regeneration. Recently, a terahertz wave scanner has been developed that can non-destructively measure the three dimensional (3D) PM distribution. To enable quantitative comparisons of the PM distributions collected under different operational conditions, it is beneficial if the results can be discussed in terms of the axial, radial, and angular directions. This paper focuses on the development of an analysis method and metrics that quantitatively describe the PM distribution in the aforementioned directions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shaohua Hu, Suiyun Zhang, Satya Sardar, Shiyan Chen, Inna Dzhema, Shiou-Mei Huang, David Quiros, Huaiwei Sun, Christopher Laroo, L. James Sanchez, James Watson, M.-C. Oliver Chang, Tao Huai, Alberto Ayala
Abstract The California Air Resources Board (CARB) adopted the Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) III regulations in January 2012, which lowered the particulate matter (PM) emissions standards for light-duty vehicles (LDVs) from 10 milligrams per mile (10 mg/mile) to 3 mg/mile beginning with model year (MY) 2017 and 1 mg/mile beginning with MY 2025. To confirm the ability to measure PM emissions below 1 mg/mile, a total of 23 LDVs (MY pre-2004 to 2009) were tested at CARB's Haagen-Smit Laboratory (HSL) (10 LDVs) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA) National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory (NVEFL) (13 LDVs) using the federal test procedure (FTP) drive schedule. One LDV with PM emissions ranging from 0.6 - 0.8 mg/mile was tested at three CARB HSL test cells to investigate intra-lab and inter-lab variability. Reference, trip, and tunnel filter blanks were collected as part of routine quality control (QC) procedures. Reference and trip blanks showed the well-documented filter weighing and handling process had negligible impact on final test values.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael Robinson, Z. Gerald Liu, Michael Olson, James Schauer
Light absorbing components of aerosols, often called black carbon (BC), are emitted from combustion sources and are believed to play a considerable role in direct atmospheric radiative forcing by a number of climate scientists. In addition, it has been shown that BC is associated with adverse health effects in a number of epidemiological studies. Although the optical properties (both absorbing and scattering) of combustion aerosols are needed in order to accurately assess the impact of emissions on radiative forcing, many models use radiative properties of diesel particulate matter that were determined over two decades ago. In response to concerns of the human health impacts of particulate matter (PM), regulatory bodies around the world have significantly tightened PM emission limits for diesel engines. These requirements have resulted in considerable changes in engine technology requiring updated BC measurements from modern engines equipped with aftertreatment systems. In this study, a variety of common ambient monitoring techniques were used to characterize the light absorbing properties of diesel aerosol.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tomohiro Minagawa, Daiji Nagaoka, Hiroyuki Yuza, Teruo Nakada, Takeyuki Kamimoto
Abstract The filtration efficiency of a DPF drops when it suffers a failure such as melting and cracks during regeneration. And then, on-board diagnostics (OBD) device has become needed worldwide to detect a DPF failure. In the development of an OBD soot sensor, evaluation of the sensor demands a portable instrument which can measure the soot concentration for on-board and in-field use. Some of the emission regulations require the in-field emission measurements under normal in-use operation of a vehicle. This study is intended to develop a high sensitivity and high response portable smoke meter for on-board soot measurements and a reference to OBD soot sensors under development. The smoke meter accommodates a 650 nm laser diode, and its principle is based on light extinction in high soot concentration range and backward light scattering for low soot concentration measurement. Raw exhaust sample flows through a thermo-controlled optical tube at a flow rate of 3 liter/min, and the total system unit weighs only 16 kg.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jan Czerwinski, Yan Zimmerli, Andreas Mayer, Norbert Heeb, Jacques Lemaire, Giovanni D'Urbano
Abstract The combined exhaust gas aftertreatment systems (DPF+SCR) are the most efficient way and the best available technology (BAT) to radically reduce the critical Diesel emission components particles (PM&NP) and nitric oxides (NOx). SCR (selective catalytic reduction) is regarded as the most efficient deNOx-system, diesel particle filters are most efficient for soot abatement. Today, several suppliers offer combined systems for retrofitting of HD vehicles. Quality standards for those quite complex systems and especially for retrofit systems are needed to enable decisions of several authorities and to estimate the potentials of improvements of the air quality in highly populated agglomerations. The present paper informs about the VERTdePN *) quality test procedures, which were developed in an international network project with the same name 2007-2011 (VERT … Verification of Emission Reduction Technologies; dePN … decontamination, disposal of PM / NP and of NOx). Some interesting results of research on the engine dynamometer from the last test period 2011-2013 are given as a complement of the already published results.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nehemiah Sabinus Alozie, David Peirce, Lionel Ganippa
Abstract When assessing particulate emissions, diesel engine exhausts are usually diluted to suit the design limitations of the measurement devices. Particle number concentrations (PNC) are known to be sensitive to dilution conditions and must be considered when evaluating results. Laboratories employ various experimental techniques to dilute exhaust samples before measurements. The majority of measurement systems use air as dilution a gas, some employ filtered exhaust gas in a closed loop, while others employ nitrogen, where prevention of oxidation reaction is required. In this work, the effect of using air and nitrogen as dilution gases on the PNCs from diesel engine exhausts has been investigated. Our approach explored the use of carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration ratios in diluted and raw exhaust samples, evaluated by non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) analysers to determine dilution conditions of the measured sample. The comparative effect of using nitrogen and air as dilution gases was then assessed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nic van Vuuren
Abstract The implementation of stringent nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions reduction legislation in Europe and North America is driving the introduction of new exhaust aftertreatment systems, including those that treat NOx under the high-oxygen conditions typical of lean-burn engines. One increasingly common solution, referred to as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), comprises a catalyst that facilitates the reactions of ammonia (NH3) with the exhaust nitrogen oxides (NOx) to produce nitrogen (N2) and water (H2O). It is customary with these systems to use a liquid aqueous urea solution, typically at a 32% concentration of urea (CO(NH2)2). The solution is referred to as AUS-32, and is also known under its commercial name of AdBlue® in Europe, and DEF - Diesel Exhaust Fluid - in the USA. The urea solution is injected into the exhaust and transformed to NH3 by various mechanisms for the SCR reactions. Urea injection systems using AUS-32 are now in production and becoming a widespread mature technology on many on-road automotive and off-road vehicle applications.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Zakwan Skaf, Timur Aliyev, Leo Shead, Thomas Steffen
Abstract Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is a leading aftertreatment technology for the removal of nitrogen oxide (NOx) from exhaust gases (DeNOx). It presents an interesting control challenge, especially at high conversion, because both reagents (NOx and ammonia) are toxic, and therefore an excess of either is highly undesirable. Numerous system layouts and control methods have been developed for SCR systems, driven by the need to meet future emission standards. This paper summarizes the current state-of-the-art control methods for the SCR aftertreatment systems, and provides a structured and comprehensive overview of the research on SCR control. The existing control techniques fall into three main categories: traditional SCR control methods, model-based SCR control methods, and advanced SCR control methods. For each category, the basic control technique is defined. Further techniques in the same category are then explained and appreciated for their relative advantages and disadvantages.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Joel Op de Beeck, Kevin Slusser, Neall Booth
Abstract Automotive SCR systems are dimensioned to reduce NOx efficiently in normal driving conditions. In markets such as North America and Europe, extreme winter conditions are common over a period of many weeks where temperatures are usually below DEF (Diesel Exhaust Fluid) freezing temperatures at −11°C (12°F). In previous studies and applications, DEF was heated in the tank in a dedicated pot or alternatively by a standardized central heater. Due to the local character of these heating solutions, it was not possible to thaw the full tank volume. The objective of this study is to demonstrate how to significantly improve performance of the SCR system in cold weather conditions for passenger car, light commercial vehicles and SUV applications. The performance improvement is demonstrated by sustainability testing showing how much of the full tank content can be thawed and made available for injection in the exhaust system. Based on maximum average dosing rates of 250 g/h, external temperatures down to −40°C and depending on the tank shape the heater is designed to optimize tank heating performance.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Joel Michelin, Frederic Guilbaud, Alain Guil, Ian Newbigging, Emmanuel Jean, Martina Reichert, Mario Balenovic, Zafar Shaikh
Abstract Future Diesel emission standards for passenger cars, light and medium duty vehicles, require the combination of a more efficient NOx reduction performance along with the opportunity to reduce the complexity and the package requirements to facilitate it. With the increasing availability of aqueous urea, DEF or AdBlue® at service stations, and improved package opportunities, the urea SCR technical solution has been demonstrated to be very efficient for NOx reduction; however the complexity in injecting and distributing the reductant remains a challenge to the industry. The traditional exhaust system contains Diesel Oxidation Catalysts (DOC), Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), all require additional heat to facilitate each of their specific functions. With some particular package scenarios the SCR catalyst maybe found after the particulate filter where elaborate light-off strategies need to be deployed to ensure activation under many different driving regimes.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shun Hong Long, Lianhua Tang, Guodong Yan, Ben Niu, Guanyu Zheng, Fengshuang Wang, Suying Zhang, Jianhua Zhang, Jianzhong Tao
Abstract To satisfy China IV emissions regulations, diesel truck manufacturers are striving to meet increasingly stringent Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) reduction standards. Heavy duty truck manufacturers demand compact urea SCR NOx abatement designs, which integrate injectors, NOx sensors and necessary components on SCR can in order to save packaging space and system cost. To achieve this goal, aftertreatment systems need to be engineered to achieve high conversion efficiencies, low back pressure, no urea deposit risks and good mechanical durability. Initially, a baseline Euro IV Urea SCR system is evaluated because of concerns on severe deposit formation. Systematic enhancements of the design have been performed to enable it to meet multiple performance targets, including emission reduction efficiency and low urea deposit risks via improved reagent mixing, evaporation, and distribution. Acoustic performance has been improved from the baseline system as well. The optimized system improved ammonia uniformity, eliminated urea deposits, improved NOx conversion efficiency while satisfying existing EU III installation packing space.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hongsuk Kim, Cheon Yoon, Junho Lee, Hoyeol Lee
Abstract One of most effective NOx control technology of modern diesel engines is SCR with ammonia. Current NOx reduction systems are designed to use a solution of urea dissolved in water as a source of ammonia. However, the liquid urea systems have technical difficulties, such as a freezing point below −11°C and solid deposit formation in the exhaust temperature below 200°C. The objective of this study is to investigate the possibility of a new ammonia generation system that uses low-cost solid ammonium salt, such as solid urea and ammonium carbonate. The result shows that ammonium carbonate is more suitable than solid urea because of low decomposition temperature and no change to the other ammonium salt during the decomposition process. This paper also shows the NOx reduction capability of the new ammonia delivery system that uses ammonium carbonate.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael Andrew Smith, Krishna Kamasamudram, Tamas Szailer, Ashok Kumar, Aleksey Yezerets
Abstract The ammonia slip catalyst (ASC), typically composed of Pt oxidation catalyst overlaid with SCR catalyst, is employed for the mitigation of NH3 slip originating from SCR catalysts. Oxidation and SCR functionalities in an ASC can degrade through two key mechanisms i) irreversible degradation due to thermal aging and ii) reversible degradation caused by sulfur-oxides. The impact of thermal aging is well understood and it mainly degrades the SCR function of the ASC and increases the NH3 conversion to undesired products [1]. This paper describes the impact of sulfur-oxides on critical functions of ASC and on NH3 oxidation activity and selectivity towards N2, NOx and N2O. Furthermore impact of desulfation under selected conditions and its extent of ASC performance recovery is explained.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Krishna Kamasamudram, Ashok Kumar, Jinyong Luo, Neal Currier, Aleksey Yezerets, Thomas Watkins, Larry Allard
Abstract An operational challenge associated with SCR catalysts is the NH3 slip control, particularly for commercial small pore Cu-zeolite formulations as a consequence of their significant ammonia storage capacity. The desorption of NH3 during increasing temperature transients is one example of this challenge. Ammonia slipping from SCR catalyst typically passes through a platinum based ammonia oxidation catalyst (AMOx), leading to the formation of the undesired byproducts NOx and N2O. We have discovered a distinctive characteristic, an overlapping NH3 desorption and oxidation, in a state-of-the-art Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst that can minimize NH3 slip during temperature transients encountered in real-world operation of a vehicle. In this work we show new insights, gained from NH3 temperature programmed desorption and oxidation experiments, into the Cu-zeolite catalyst functions responsible for the overlap of NH3 desorption and oxidation characteristics and the impact of hydrothermal treatment on these functions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mai Huong Tran, Yoshinori Yamashita, Norihiko Aono
Abstract Recently, there has been increasing interest in catalysts with smaller volume for a Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system especially for use in heavy duty vehicles. In this study, several new concepts were developed in order to improve the deNOx performance of the SCR catalysts over a wide range of operating temperatures and this resulted in a compact SCR system. First, the urea decomposition process in diesel exhaust gas was elucidated. Several kinds of urea decomposition catalysts were investigated and the material which showed the best performance in NH3 (ammonia) formation was used to improve the low temperature performance of Cu-zeolite catalysts. Second, the method of reducing the amount of NH3 slip was investigated. It is well known that the amount of ammonia slip after the Urea-SCR system must be under 10 ppm and therefore materials with lower NH3 slip are preferred. The smaller the amount of NH3 slip, the larger the amount of urea that can be injected into the system and this leads to higher NOx conversion.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Stephan Adelberg, Friedemann Schrade, Peter Eckert, Lutz Kraemer
Abstract The development and calibration of exhaust aftertreatment (EAT) systems for the most diverse applications of diesel powertrain concepts requires EAT models, capable of performing concept analysis as well as control and OBD system development and calibration. On the concept side, the choice of an application-specific EAT layout from a wide technology selection is driven by a number of requirements and constraints. These include statutory requirements regarding emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHG), technical constraints such as engine-out emissions and packaging, as well as economic parameters such as fuel consumption, and EAT system and system development costs. Fast and efficient execution of the analysis and multi-criteria system optimization can be done by integrating the detailed EAT models into a total system simulation. On the control / OBD side, the software design, testing and calibration, of both EAT and engine, is efficiently supported by the integrated simulation approach.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Wanyu Sun, Shufen Wang, Shanheng Yan, Lei Guo, Yuanjing Hou
Abstract Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has become one of the primary technologies to reduce internal combustion engine (ICE) emission. The installation angle of urea injector plays an important role during the SCR process. The urea injector is often vertically mounted to the exhaust pipe for on road heavy duty truck because of its good performance and general packaging convenience, and this type of installation has been the focus of previous research. However, due to certain packaging constraints or responsiveness considerations, the injector is installed with an inclined acute angle to the exhaust pipe under some circumstance. To evaluate the underlying benefits and risks of this type of installation angle, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model based on the Renolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver from AVL Fire is used to simulate the injection process of urea for an acute-angled 3-hole injector, through which, the urea spray's formation and motion, wallfilm accumulation and NH3 distribution uniformity characteristics are studied.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Guanyu Zheng, Fengshuang Wang, Suying Zhang, Jianhua Zhang, Jianzhong Tao, Zhiguo Zhao, Jianqing Fan
Abstract In order to satisfy China IV (equivalent to EU IV) emission regulations, an unconventional design concept was proposed with injector closely coupled with SCR can body. The benefit of this design is that the urea decomposition pipe was removed or drastically shortened, resulting in much smaller packaging space and lower cost of the whole system. However, the resulting short urea mixing distance generates concerns on low urea mixing efficiency and risks of urea deposits. In particular, airless urea injectors tend to generate incomplete evaporation of urea water solution, resulting in high risks of urea deposits. New aftertreatment mixing structures need to be developed to resolve these technical challenges. To this end, stepwise and systematic enhancements of the design have been employed, resulting in multiple designs to eventually meet a set of performance targets, including emission reduction efficiency, reagent mixing, urea evaporation, ammonia and velocity distribution, back pressure, and urea deposits.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kiran C. Premchand, Harsha Surenahalli, John Johnson
Abstract A numerical model to simulate the filtration and oxidation of PM as well as the oxidation of NO, CO and HC in a CPF was developed in reference [1]. The model consists of parameters related to filtration and oxidation of PM and oxidation of NO, CO and HC. One of the goals of this paper is to use the model to determine the PM and gaseous species kinetics for ULSD, B10 and B20 fuels using data from passive oxidation and active regeneration engine experimental studies. A calibration procedure to identify the PM cake and wall filtration parameters and kinetic parameters for the PM oxidation and NO, CO and HC oxidation was developed. The procedure was then used with the passive oxidation [2] and active regeneration [3] engine data. The tests were conducted on a 2007 Cummins ISL engine with a DOC and CPF aftertreatment system. The simulation results show good agreement with the experimental CPF pressure drop, PM mass retained measurements and the outlet NO, NO2, CO and HC concentrations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lokanath Mohanta, Suresh Iyer, Partha Mishra, David Klinikowski
Abstract This paper illustrates a method to determine the experimental uncertainties in the measurement of tailpipe emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, and particulates of medium-, and heavy-duty vehicles when tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer and full-scale dilution tunnel. Tests are performed for different chassis dynamometer driving cycles intended to simulate a wide range of operating conditions. Vehicle exhaust is diluted in the dilution tunnel by mixing with conditioned air. Samples are drawn through probes for raw exhaust, diluted exhaust and particulates and measured using laboratory grade emission analyzers and a microbalance. At the end of a driving cycle, results are reported for the above emissions in grams/mile for raw continuous, dilute continuous, dilute bag, and particulate measurements. An analytical method is developed in the present study to estimate the measurement uncertainties in emissions for a test cycle, due to the buildup of measurement uncertainties as they propagate through the system.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
John Hoard, Nandagopalan Venkataramanan, Barbara Marshik, William Murphy
Abstract Ammonia, often present in exhaust gas samples, is a polar molecule gas that interacts with walls of the gas sampling and analysis equipment resulting in delayed instrument response. A set of experiments quantified various materials and process parameters of a heated sample line system for ammonia (NH3) response using a Fourier Transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). Response attenuation rates are due to mixing and diffusion during transport as well as NH3 wall storage. Mixing/diffusion effects cause attenuation with a time constant 1-10 seconds. Wall storage attenuation has a time constant 10-200 seconds. The effects of sample line diameter and length, line temperature, line material, hydrated versus dry gas, and flow rate were examined. All of these factors are statistically significant to variation of at least one of the time constants. The NH3 storage on the sample system walls was calculated as a function of the experimental test as well. In this case, line length and diameter were not statistically significant, but line temperature, flow rate, and material were.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Peter Bonsack, Ross Ryskamp, Marc Besch, Daniel Carder, Mridul Gautam, John Nuszkowski
Abstract Due to tightening emission legislations, both within the US and Europe, including concerns regarding greenhouse gases, next-generation combustion strategies for internal combustion diesel engines that simultaneously reduce exhaust emissions while improving thermal efficiency have drawn increasing attention during recent years. In-cylinder combustion temperature plays a critical role in the formation of pollutants as well as in thermal efficiency of the propulsion system. One way to minimize both soot and NOx emissions is to limit the in-cylinder temperature during the combustion process by means of high levels of dilution via exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) combined with flexible fuel injection strategies. However, fuel chemistry plays a significant role in the ignition delay; hence, influencing the overall combustion characteristics and the resulting emissions. Therefore, the Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) Working Group of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) specified and formulated a matrix of nine test fuels for advanced combustion engines based on the variation of three properties: cetane number, aromatic content, and 90 percent distillation temperature.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Damien Aubagnac-Karkar, Jean-Baptiste Michel, Olivier Colin, Ludovic Noël, Nasser Darabiha
Abstract In this paper, a sectional soot model coupled to a tabulated combustion model is compared with measurements from an experimental engine database. The sectional soot model, based on the work of Vervisch-Klakjic (Ph.D. thesis, Ecole Centrale Paris, Paris, 2011) and Netzell et al. (P. Combust. Inst., 31(1):667-674, 2007), has been implemented into IFPC3D (Bohbot et al., Oil Gas Sci Technol, 64(3):309-335, 2009), a 3D RANS solver. It enables a complex modeling of soot particles evolution, in a 3D Diesel simulation. Five distinct source terms are applied to each soot section at any time and any location of the flow. The inputs of the soot model are provided by a tabulated combustion model derived from the Engine Approximated Diffusion Flame (EADF) one (Michel and Colin, Int. J. Engine Res., 2013) and specifically modified to include the minor species required by the soot model. An experimental database has been built, using both commercial Diesel fuel and the computed surrogate (30% alpha-methylnaphthalene and 70% decane in volume) to compare result between the Diesel fuel and the surrogate and to validate the models against the experiment.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hidemasa Iwata, Athanasios Konstandopoulos, Kazuki Nakamura, Kazutake Ogyu, Kazushige Ohno
Abstract Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is an effective method to reduce Nitrogen Oxide emissions. In recent years the trend of increasing EGR rate in-cylinders is an integral part of most improvements in combustion technology developments. The object of this work is to study the influence of EGR rate on the physical and chemical properties of soot particles. Soot from several operating points of a diesel engine run were collected on a high temperature filters. The pressure drop behavior during the soot loading was monitored then the soot permeability was calculated. Afterwards, the soot primary size was calculated from the obtained data and it showed good correspondence to the actual measurement. It is confirmed that all the soot primary sizes were around 22 nm in diameter. In contrast, the soot aggregate sizes and the soot concentrations were found to increase with increasing EGR rate. Subsequently, Oxidation tests were conducted to evaluate the reactivity of the soot. It is observed that soot oxidation temperatures varied in the range of 500 to 600 degree Celsius (C).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Adam Dempsey, Scott Curran, John Storey, Mary Eibl, Josh Pihl, Vitaly Prikhodko, Robert Wagner, James Parks
Abstract Low temperature combustion (LTC) has been shown to yield higher brake thermal efficiencies with lower NOx and soot emissions, relative to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). However, while demonstrating low soot carbon emissions it has been shown that LTC operation does produce particulate matter whose composition appears to be much different than CDC. The particulate matter emissions from dual-fuel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) using gasoline and diesel fuel were investigated in this study. A four cylinder General Motors 1.9L ZDTH engine was modified with a port-fuel injection system while maintaining the stock direct injection fuel system. The pistons were modified for highly premixed operation and feature an open shallow bowl design. RCCI operation was carried out using a certification grade 97 research octane gasoline and a certification grade diesel fuel. To study the particulate matter emissions from RCCI operation, particle size distributions were measured with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and total particulate concentration in the exhaust was determined using membrane filters.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Glenn Lucachick, Aaron Avenido, Winthrop Watts, David Kittelson, William Northrop
Abstract Diesel particulate filter (DPF) technology has proven performance and reliability. However, the addition of a DPF adds significant cost and packaging constraints leading some manufacturers to design engines that reduce particulate matter in-cylinder. Such engines utilize high fuel injection pressure, moderate exhaust gas recirculation and modified injection timing to mitigate soot formation. This study examines such an engine designed to meet US EPA Interim Tier 4 standards for off-highway applications without a DPF. The engine was operated at four steady state modes and aerosol measurements were made using a two-stage, ejector dilution system with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) equipped with a catalytic stripper (CS) to differentiate semi-volatile versus solid components in the exhaust. Gaseous emissions were measured using an FTIR analyzer and particulate matter mass emissions were estimated using SMPS data and an assumed particle density function. Though the tested engine is predicted to largely meet current US particle mass standards it has significantly higher particle number emissions compared to the Euro 6 solid particle number emissions standard.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yoshinori Otsuki, Kenji Takeda, Kazuhiko Haruta, Nobuhisa Mori
Abstract The particle number (PN) emission regulation has been implemented since 2011 in Europe. PN measurement procedure defined in ECE regulation No. 83 requires detecting only solid particles by eliminating volatile particles, the concentrations of which are highly influenced by dilution conditions, using a volatile particle remover (VPR). To measure PN concentration after the VPR, a particle number counter (PNC) which has detection threshold at a particle size of 23 nm is used, because most solid particles generated by automotive engines are considered to be larger than 23 nm. On the other hand, several studies have reported the existence of solid and volatile particles smaller than 23 nm in engine exhaust. This paper describes investigation into a measurement method for ultrafine PNCs with thresholds of below 23 nm and evaluation of the VPR performance for the particles in this size range. The detection efficiency of an ultrafine PNC was verified by following the ECE regulation procedure.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Robert Anthony Giannelli, Ryan Stubleski, Anthony Saunders
Automobile time-resolved emissions of CO, CO2, HC, and NOx during engine and catalyst warm-up have been analyzed by fitting the emissions to the product of vehicle tractive power and a series of gaussian functions whose relative magnitudes were allowed to vary in time. From this analysis the emissions were discerned into four components : (1.) the emissions due to vehicle power demand, (2.) key-on emissions, (3.) a catalyst warm-up emissions function, and (4.) a fast idle emissions function. Both the emissions associated with the engine and the catalyst warm-up decline exponentially with time. Two additional characteristics (a.) emissions occurring during idling and (b.) emissions due to catalyst cooling during idle were observed, but not quantified. Also, a semi-empirical formula to approximate cold start emissions for light duty cars which includes the vehicle tractive power, time constants which define the emissions decrease in time, and the power demand characteristics has been developed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Romaeo Dallanegra, Rinaldo Caprotti
Abstract The use of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) as a means to meet ever more stringent worldwide Particulate Matter/ Particle Number (PM/ PN) emissions regulations is increasing. Fuel Borne Catalyst (FBC) technology has now been successfully used as an effective system for DPF regeneration in factory and service fill as well as retrofit applications for several years. The use of such a technology dictates that it be stable in long term service and that it remains compatible with new and emerging diesel fuel grades. In order to ensure this, neat additive stability data have been generated in a very severe and highly transient temperature cycle and a large selection of current (Winter 2012) market fuels have been evaluated for stability with this FBC technology. Results indicate that FBC technology remains suitable. The incidence of Internal Diesel Injector Deposits (IDIDs) is increasing, particularly for advanced FIE systems. These deposits generate a variety of field issues that can, in extreme cases, require the fitting of a new set of injectors.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yosuke Goto, Naohiro Kato, Shota Kawashima, Yoshiyuki Hayashi, Hideki Goto, Masao Hori
The diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) having high purification performance to the exhaust gas at low temperatures were investigated. In this paper two main technological improvements from conventional DOC are shown. First is forming Pt/Pd composite particles in order to suppress sintering of precious metal under high thermal aging condition. This generating Pt/Pd composite and the effect were exemplified by TEM-EDS and XRD analysis. Second is adjusting electric charge of Pt/Pd surface to reduce interaction between Pt/Pd and carbon monoxide (CO) by modifying the support material components. Adjusting electric charge of Pt/Pd surface by applying new support material could cancel CO poisoning at Pt/Pd surface. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) studies suggested that improved support material is more suitable for CO oxidation at a low temperature based on the concept. In this study, the fundamental function of DOC such as oxidation activity at a low temperature and heat-up property by fuel injection were eventually evaluated using diesel engine.
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