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Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Qi Jiao, Rolf D. Reitz
Abstract 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations have been performed to study particulate formation in a Spark-Ignition (SI) engine under premixed conditions. A semi-detailed soot model and a chemical kinetic model, including poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation, were coupled with a spark ignition model and the G equation flame propagation model for SI engine simulations and for predictions of soot mass and particulate number density. The simulation results for in-cylinder pressure and particle size distribution (PSDs) are compared to available experimental studies of equivalence ratio effects during premixed operation. Good predictions are observed with regard to cylinder pressure, combustion phasing and engine load. Qualitative agreements of in-cylinder particle distributions were also obtained and the results are helpful to understand particulate formation processes.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gabriele Di Blasio, Mauro Viscardi, Michela Alfè, Valentina Gargiulo, Anna Ciajolo, Carlo Beatrice
Abstract Nowadays, alcohol fuels are of increasing interest as alternative transportation biofuels even in compression ignition engines because they are oxygenated and producible in a sustainable way. In this paper, the experimental research activity was conducted on a single cylinder research engine provided with a modern architecture and properly modified in a dual-fuel (DF) configuration. Looking at ethanol the as one of the future environmental friendly biofuels experimental campaign was aimed to evaluate in detail the effect of the use of the ethanol as port injected fuel in diesel engine on the size, morphology, reactivity and chemical features of the exhaust emitted soot particles. The engine tests were chosen properly in order to represent actual working conditions of an automotive light-duty diesel engine. A proper engine Dual-Fuel calibration was set-up respecting prefixed limits on in-cylinder peak firing pressure, cylinder pressure rise, fuel efficiency and gaseous emissions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Donghui Qi, Chia-Fon Lee, Yilu Lin
Abstract Biodiesel is considered one of the most promising alternative fuels to petrol fuels. In this study, an attempt has been made to investigate and compare the effect of fuel injection pressure, injection timing, and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) ratio on the particle size distributions and exhaust emissions of the diesel and biodiesel produced from waste cooking oil (WCO) used in a common rail direct injection (CRDI) diesel engine. The engine tests were conducted at two injection pressures (800 and 1600 bar), two injection timings (25 and 5 deg before top dead center (bTDC) and three EGR ratios (10%, 20% 30%) at a constant fuel injection energy per stroke and engine speed (1200 r/min). The results indicated that carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions of biodiesel were slightly lower, but nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions were slightly higher, than those of diesel fuel under most operating conditions. Biodiesel engine emitted lower soot particle concentration than diesel engine.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Justin E. Ketterer, James S. Wallace, Greg J. Evans
Abstract Biodiesel and other renewable fuels are of interest due to their impact on energy supplies as well as their potential for carbon emissions reductions. Waste animal fats from meat processing facilities, which would otherwise be sent to landfill, have been proposed as a feedstock for biodiesel production. Emissions from biodiesel fuels derived from vegetable oils have undergone intense study, but there remains a lack of data describing the emissions implications of using animal fats as a biodiesel feedstock. In this study, emissions of NOx, unburned hydrocarbons and particulate matter from a compression ignition engine were examined. The particulate matter emissions were characterized using gravimetric analysis, elemental carbon analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The emissions from an animal fat derived B20 blend were compared to those from petroleum diesel and a soy derived B20 blend. No statistically significant differences were observed between the fuels in the gaseous emissions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Glenn Lucachick, Aaron Avenido, Winthrop Watts, David Kittelson, William Northrop
Abstract Diesel particulate filter (DPF) technology has proven performance and reliability. However, the addition of a DPF adds significant cost and packaging constraints leading some manufacturers to design engines that reduce particulate matter in-cylinder. Such engines utilize high fuel injection pressure, moderate exhaust gas recirculation and modified injection timing to mitigate soot formation. This study examines such an engine designed to meet US EPA Interim Tier 4 standards for off-highway applications without a DPF. The engine was operated at four steady state modes and aerosol measurements were made using a two-stage, ejector dilution system with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) equipped with a catalytic stripper (CS) to differentiate semi-volatile versus solid components in the exhaust. Gaseous emissions were measured using an FTIR analyzer and particulate matter mass emissions were estimated using SMPS data and an assumed particle density function. Though the tested engine is predicted to largely meet current US particle mass standards it has significantly higher particle number emissions compared to the Euro 6 solid particle number emissions standard.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Adam Dempsey, Scott Curran, John Storey, Mary Eibl, Josh Pihl, Vitaly Prikhodko, Robert Wagner, James Parks
Abstract Low temperature combustion (LTC) has been shown to yield higher brake thermal efficiencies with lower NOx and soot emissions, relative to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). However, while demonstrating low soot carbon emissions it has been shown that LTC operation does produce particulate matter whose composition appears to be much different than CDC. The particulate matter emissions from dual-fuel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) using gasoline and diesel fuel were investigated in this study. A four cylinder General Motors 1.9L ZDTH engine was modified with a port-fuel injection system while maintaining the stock direct injection fuel system. The pistons were modified for highly premixed operation and feature an open shallow bowl design. RCCI operation was carried out using a certification grade 97 research octane gasoline and a certification grade diesel fuel. To study the particulate matter emissions from RCCI operation, particle size distributions were measured with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and total particulate concentration in the exhaust was determined using membrane filters.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yang Li, Jian Xue, Kent Johnson, Thomas Durbin, Mark Villela, Liem Pham, Seyedehsan Hosseini, Zhongqing Zheng, Daniel Short, George Karavalakis, Akua Asa-Awuku, Heejung Jung, Xiaoliang Wang, David Quiros, Shaohua Hu, Tao Huai, Alberto Ayala
Abstract This study provides one of the first evaluations of the integrated particle size distribution (IPSD) method in comparison with the current gravimetric method for measuring particulate matter (PM) emissions from light-duty vehicles. The IPSD method combines particle size distributions with size dependent particle effective density to determine mass concentrations of suspended particles. The method allows for simultaneous determination of particle mass, particle surface area, and particle number concentrations. It will provide a greater understanding of PM mass emissions at low levels, and therefore has the potential to complement the current gravimetric method at low PM emission levels. Six vehicles, including three gasoline direct injected (GDI) vehicles, two port fuel injected (PFI) vehicles, and one diesel vehicle, were tested over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) driving cycle on a light-duty chassis dynamometer. PM mass emissions were determined by the gravimetric (MGravimetric) and IPSD (MIPSD) methods.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Benjamin Reuter, Daniel Gleyzes, Markus Lienkamp
Abstract In this analysis we assess the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of four types of vehicles which might play a role in achieving future emission reductions: vehicles using compressed natural gas (CNG), battery electric vehicles (BEVs), mild hybrid CNG vehicles and range extended BEVs. Our analysis covers the manufacturing processes of these vehicles and their use as a city taxi in Singapore. We also consider upstream emissions from fuel and electricity production. All necessary parameters are derived from an intensive literature review and the model for calculating the life cycle emissions is presented. The influence of data uncertainties is analyzed by parameter variations within different scenarios. The calculation results are found to be quite robust: The BEV and the mild hybrid CNG vehicle similarly show very low GHG emissions within all scenarios whereas the pure CNG vehicle always ranks the worst. In an additional scenario we also assessed the influence of an improved electricity generation with lower emissions in the future.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ivan Arsie, Andrea Cricchio, Cesare Pianese, Matteo De Cesare, Walter Nesci
Abstract In the last years the automotive industry has been involved in the development and implementation of CO2 reducing concepts such as the engines downsizing, stop/start systems as well as more costly full hybrid solutions and, more recently, waste heat recovery technologies. These latter include ThermoElectric Generator (TEG), Rankine cycle and Electric Turbo Compound (ETC) that have been practically implemented on few heavy-duty application but have not been proved yet as effective and affordable solutions for the automotive industry. The paper deals with the analysis of opportunities and challenges of the Electric Turbo Compound for automotive light-duty engines. In the ETC concept the turbine-compressor shaft is connected to an electric machine, which can work either as generator or motor. In the former case the power can satisfy the vehicle electrical demand to drive the auxiliaries or stored in the batteries. In the latter case the electric motor can assist the turbine and speed up the compressor when requested.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nehemiah Sabinus Alozie, David Peirce, Andreas Lindner, Wolfgang Winklmayr, Lionel Ganippa
Abstract The influence of dilution condition is known to affect the particle number size measurements of engine exhaust samples. However, it is preferable to understand how the dynamics of mixing and cooling controls the dilution scheme, rather than the dilution ratio alone as is commonly used. In this study, the effect of mixing and temperature of dilution gas on exhaust samples in a mixing-tube diluter was explored for two engine load conditions. The observed global trends of the particle number concentrations (PNC) using the mixing-tube diluter (MTD) are consistent with the findings published with different dilution systems. Relative to the two operating conditions, it was observed that, the PNC in the sub 30nm diameter were greater during the lower load operation compared to the higher load at all dilution ratios and dilution gas temperatures. Particles from the lower engine load operation were viewed to have more volatile fractions, compared to those measured under the higher load operation.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Stephan Adelberg, Friedemann Schrade, Peter Eckert, Lutz Kraemer
Abstract The development and calibration of exhaust aftertreatment (EAT) systems for the most diverse applications of diesel powertrain concepts requires EAT models, capable of performing concept analysis as well as control and OBD system development and calibration. On the concept side, the choice of an application-specific EAT layout from a wide technology selection is driven by a number of requirements and constraints. These include statutory requirements regarding emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHG), technical constraints such as engine-out emissions and packaging, as well as economic parameters such as fuel consumption, and EAT system and system development costs. Fast and efficient execution of the analysis and multi-criteria system optimization can be done by integrating the detailed EAT models into a total system simulation. On the control / OBD side, the software design, testing and calibration, of both EAT and engine, is efficiently supported by the integrated simulation approach.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sandeep Viswanathan, Stephen Sakai, David Rothamer
Abstract The Diesel Exhaust Filtration Analysis System (DEFA) developed at the University of Wisconsin Madison was modified to perform fundamental filtration experiments using particulate matter (PM) generated by a spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engine fueled with gasoline. The newly modified system, termed the Exhaust Filtration Analysis (EFA) system, enables small-scale fundamental studies of wall-flow filtration processes. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to characterize running conditions with unique particle size distributions (PSDs). The SMPS and an engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS) were used to simultaneously measure the PSD downstream of the EFA and the real-time particulate emissions from the SIDI engine, to determine the evolution of filtration efficiency during filter loading. Corrections were developed for each running condition to compare measured PSDs between the EEPS and the SMPS in the raw, as well as, filtered exhaust stream. Background losses in the EFA system (without a filter sample) were quantified for each operating condition.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kiran C. Premchand, Harsha Surenahalli, John H. Johnson
Abstract A numerical model to simulate the filtration and oxidation of PM as well as the oxidation of NO, CO and HC in a CPF was developed in reference [1]. The model consists of parameters related to filtration and oxidation of PM and oxidation of NO, CO and HC. One of the goals of this paper is to use the model to determine the PM and gaseous species kinetics for ULSD, B10 and B20 fuels using data from passive oxidation and active regeneration engine experimental studies. A calibration procedure to identify the PM cake and wall filtration parameters and kinetic parameters for the PM oxidation and NO, CO and HC oxidation was developed. The procedure was then used with the passive oxidation [2] and active regeneration [3] engine data. The tests were conducted on a 2007 Cummins ISL engine with a DOC and CPF aftertreatment system. The simulation results show good agreement with the experimental CPF pressure drop, PM mass retained measurements and the outlet NO, NO2, CO and HC concentrations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Peter Bonsack, Ross Ryskamp, Marc Besch, Daniel Carder, Mridul Gautam, John Nuszkowski
Abstract Due to tightening emission legislations, both within the US and Europe, including concerns regarding greenhouse gases, next-generation combustion strategies for internal combustion diesel engines that simultaneously reduce exhaust emissions while improving thermal efficiency have drawn increasing attention during recent years. In-cylinder combustion temperature plays a critical role in the formation of pollutants as well as in thermal efficiency of the propulsion system. One way to minimize both soot and NOx emissions is to limit the in-cylinder temperature during the combustion process by means of high levels of dilution via exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) combined with flexible fuel injection strategies. However, fuel chemistry plays a significant role in the ignition delay; hence, influencing the overall combustion characteristics and the resulting emissions. Therefore, the Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) Working Group of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) specified and formulated a matrix of nine test fuels for advanced combustion engines based on the variation of three properties: cetane number, aromatic content, and 90 percent distillation temperature.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xu Chen, Ashok Kumar, David Klippstein, Randy Stafford, Changsheng Su, Ying Yuan, James Zokoe, Paul McGinn
Abstract Experimental evaluation of soot trapping and oxidation behaviors of various diesel particulate filters (DPF) has been traditionally hampered by several experimental difficulties, such as the deposition of soot particles with well-characterized and consistent properties, and the tracking of the soot oxidation rate in real time. In the present study, an integrated bench flow-reactor system with a soot generator has been developed and its capabilities were demonstrated with regards to: Consistently and controllably loading soot on DPF samples; Monitoring the exhaust gas composition by FTIR, including quantification of the soot oxidation rate using CO and CO2; Measuring soot oxidation characteristics of various DPF samples. Soot particles were produced from a laminar propane co-flow diffusion flame. The production rate of particulate matter (PM) of the soot generator, which is tunable by adjusting the air to fuel ratio of the propane flame, can be set within a range from tens of mg to 400 mg per hour.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hidemasa Iwata, Athanasios Konstandopoulos, Kazuki Nakamura, Kazutake Ogyu, Kazushige Ohno
Abstract Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is an effective method to reduce Nitrogen Oxide emissions. In recent years the trend of increasing EGR rate in-cylinders is an integral part of most improvements in combustion technology developments. The object of this work is to study the influence of EGR rate on the physical and chemical properties of soot particles. Soot from several operating points of a diesel engine run were collected on a high temperature filters. The pressure drop behavior during the soot loading was monitored then the soot permeability was calculated. Afterwards, the soot primary size was calculated from the obtained data and it showed good correspondence to the actual measurement. It is confirmed that all the soot primary sizes were around 22 nm in diameter. In contrast, the soot aggregate sizes and the soot concentrations were found to increase with increasing EGR rate. Subsequently, Oxidation tests were conducted to evaluate the reactivity of the soot. It is observed that soot oxidation temperatures varied in the range of 500 to 600 degree Celsius (C).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tomohiro Minagawa, Daiji Nagaoka, Hiroyuki Yuza, Teruo Nakada, Takeyuki Kamimoto
Abstract The filtration efficiency of a DPF drops when it suffers a failure such as melting and cracks during regeneration. And then, on-board diagnostics (OBD) device has become needed worldwide to detect a DPF failure. In the development of an OBD soot sensor, evaluation of the sensor demands a portable instrument which can measure the soot concentration for on-board and in-field use. Some of the emission regulations require the in-field emission measurements under normal in-use operation of a vehicle. This study is intended to develop a high sensitivity and high response portable smoke meter for on-board soot measurements and a reference to OBD soot sensors under development. The smoke meter accommodates a 650 nm laser diode, and its principle is based on light extinction in high soot concentration range and backward light scattering for low soot concentration measurement. Raw exhaust sample flows through a thermo-controlled optical tube at a flow rate of 3 liter/min, and the total system unit weighs only 16 kg.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lokanath Mohanta, Suresh Iyer, Partha Mishra, David Klinikowski
Abstract This paper illustrates a method to determine the experimental uncertainties in the measurement of tailpipe emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, and particulates of medium-, and heavy-duty vehicles when tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer and full-scale dilution tunnel. Tests are performed for different chassis dynamometer driving cycles intended to simulate a wide range of operating conditions. Vehicle exhaust is diluted in the dilution tunnel by mixing with conditioned air. Samples are drawn through probes for raw exhaust, diluted exhaust and particulates and measured using laboratory grade emission analyzers and a microbalance. At the end of a driving cycle, results are reported for the above emissions in grams/mile for raw continuous, dilute continuous, dilute bag, and particulate measurements. An analytical method is developed in the present study to estimate the measurement uncertainties in emissions for a test cycle, due to the buildup of measurement uncertainties as they propagate through the system.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ryan Foley, Jeffrey Naber, John H. Johnson, Leigh Rogoski
Abstract Optimizing the performance of the aftertreatment system used on heavy duty diesel engines requires a thorough understanding of the operational characteristics of the individual components. Within this, understanding the performance of the catalyzed particulate filter (CPF), and the development of an accurate CPF model, requires knowledge of the particulate matter (PM) distribution throughout the substrate. Experimental measurements of the PM distribution provide the detailed interactions of PM loading, passive oxidation, and active regeneration. Recently, a terahertz wave scanner has been developed that can non-destructively measure the three dimensional (3D) PM distribution. To enable quantitative comparisons of the PM distributions collected under different operational conditions, it is beneficial if the results can be discussed in terms of the axial, radial, and angular directions. This paper focuses on the development of an analysis method and metrics that quantitatively describe the PM distribution in the aforementioned directions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nehemiah Sabinus Alozie, David Peirce, Lionel Ganippa
Abstract When assessing particulate emissions, diesel engine exhausts are usually diluted to suit the design limitations of the measurement devices. Particle number concentrations (PNC) are known to be sensitive to dilution conditions and must be considered when evaluating results. Laboratories employ various experimental techniques to dilute exhaust samples before measurements. The majority of measurement systems use air as dilution a gas, some employ filtered exhaust gas in a closed loop, while others employ nitrogen, where prevention of oxidation reaction is required. In this work, the effect of using air and nitrogen as dilution gases on the PNCs from diesel engine exhausts has been investigated. Our approach explored the use of carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration ratios in diluted and raw exhaust samples, evaluated by non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) analysers to determine dilution conditions of the measured sample. The comparative effect of using nitrogen and air as dilution gases was then assessed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jan Czerwinski, Yan Zimmerli, Andreas Mayer, Norbert Heeb, Jacques Lemaire, Giovanni D'Urbano
Abstract The combined exhaust gas aftertreatment systems (DPF+SCR) are the most efficient way and the best available technology (BAT) to radically reduce the critical Diesel emission components particles (PM&NP) and nitric oxides (NOx). SCR (selective catalytic reduction) is regarded as the most efficient deNOx-system, diesel particle filters are most efficient for soot abatement. Today, several suppliers offer combined systems for retrofitting of HD vehicles. Quality standards for those quite complex systems and especially for retrofit systems are needed to enable decisions of several authorities and to estimate the potentials of improvements of the air quality in highly populated agglomerations. The present paper informs about the VERTdePN *) quality test procedures, which were developed in an international network project with the same name 2007-2011 (VERT … Verification of Emission Reduction Technologies; dePN … decontamination, disposal of PM / NP and of NOx). Some interesting results of research on the engine dynamometer from the last test period 2011-2013 are given as a complement of the already published results.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Teresa Donateo, Fabio Ingrosso, Daniele Bruno, Domenico Laforgia
Abstract This investigation describes the results of an experimental and numerical research project aimed at comparing mileage and CO2 emissions from two different commercial versions of Daimler AG Smart ForTwo car: conventional (gasoline) and electric (ED). The investigation includes numerical simulations with the AVL CRUISE software package and on-board acquisitions. A data acquisition system has been designed for this purpose and assembled on board of the Smart ED. The system is composed by a GPS antenna with USB interface, two current transducers, a NI-DAQ device and a netbook computer with a LabView-VI. This system provided on-board information about driving cycle and current flows, gathered simultaneously by GPS, transducers and NI-DAQ. The system was also used to evaluate the losses of energy during the recharge of the electric car. The two cars have been tested over a wide range of driving conditions related to different routes, traffic conditions and use of on-board accessories (i.e.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Fernando Ortenzi, Giovanni Pede, Ennio Rossi
Abstract The adoption of composed (hybrid) lead acid battery-supercapacitor (SC) storage systems is able to improve performances (availability, durability, range) of an electric microcar. As a matter of fact, the supercapacitors extend the operation time not only by improving the energy efficiency (thanks to a higher contribution of regenerative braking), but also by reducing the power down caused by voltage drop at higher discharge rates. The integration of battery with supercapacitors requires careful analysis and calculation of the relationship between battery peak power and size of the SC bank, needed to have a balanced composition of the hybrid storage system. For this purpose, the optimization process, summarized here, is based on the combination of a conventional lead-acid battery and a commercial SC, with the vehicle running the ECE15 driving cycle. A Matlab/Simulink model has been developed in order to characterize the benefits of the adoption of such hybrid storage system and experimental tests have been used to calibrate it.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Anne Marie Lewis, Gregory Keoleian, Jarod Kelly
Abstract As lightweight materials and advanced combustion engines are being used in both conventional and electrified vehicles with diverse fuels, it is necessary to evaluate the individual and combined impact of these technologies to reduce energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This work uses life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the total energy and GHG emissions for baseline and lightweight internal combustion vehicles (ICVs), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) when they are operated with baseline and advanced gasoline and ethanol engines. Lightweight vehicle models are evaluated with primary body-in-white (BIW) mass reductions using aluminum and advanced/high strength steel (A/HSS) and secondary mass reductions that include powertrain re-sizing. Advanced engine/fuel strategies are included in the vehicle models with fuel economy maps developed from single cylinder engine models. Results show that while the ethanol engine has the highest efficiency and therefore, highest MPGe, the increased energy required to produce ethanol outweighs this benefit.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tingting Zhang, Xiaomin Xie, Zhen Huang
Abstract The aim of this study is to evaluate the land requirement, energy consumption and GHG (greenhouse gases) emissions of microalgal biodiesel (M-BD) and Jatropha curcas seeds (J-BD) based biodiesel from the perspective of life cycle assessment (LCA). Mass and energy balance was used through the whole LCA calculation for each process. Two types of biodiesel (100% biodiesel: BD100, and 20% blends of biodiesel: BD20) were assumed to be combusted in the suitable diesel engine. Displacement method was adopted to measure the co-products credits. The results showed that the land requirement of producing 1 kg biodiesel from microalgae was about 1/31 of that from Jatropha curcas seeds. The well to pump (WTP) stage for microalgal biodiesel had higher fossil energy requirement but lower petroleum energy consumption and GHG emissions compared to Jatropha curcas and conventional diesel (CD). The WTP energy efficiency for J-BD100 and M-BD 100 were 26% and 17.4%, respectively. The feedstock growing stage of microalgae and Jatropha curcas was found to be the most fossil energy-intensive stage.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Atsushi Mizutani
Abstract This paper describes the development of high efficiency and compact bumper recycling equipment for facilitating bumper recycling globally. Various equipment to remove paint coat from bumper has been developed since 90s', using mechanical, physical or chemical method. However, it is difficult to promote bumper recycling without realizing cost effective overall system from paint coat removal to pelletizing. Our company jointly developed method of mechanically removing paint coat and has committed to bumper recycling in the form of outsourcing since 2000. In 2010, a dedicated plant for recycling bumpers was launched on the premises of our Oppama Assembly Plant in Japan. In the future, promoting bumper recycling at other overseas assembly plants is necessary as vehicle production will expand globally. Having more compact and cost effective recycling system compared to the one at the Oppama plant is required since the scale of the system including bumper crushing, paint coat removal, and pelletizing has to match processing capacity at these plants rather than equipping large one like Oppama's.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Alessandro Libriani
Abstract Synthetic rubber is used in automobiles for various applications. Tires, seals, gaskets, engine mounts, wiring cables and under the hood hoses are just a few examples. Synthetic rubber is a man-made material that uses several components as polymers, resins, carbon black, fillers, vulcanizing agents, reinforcement agents. It is a material that heavily depends on oil for its constituency, therefore it has a large carbon footprint. This study proposes the use of natural filler for automotive seals using synthetic rubber in order to reduce the impact on the environment. Calcium carbonate is the most preponderant choice as material filler because it is abundant in nature and is mined extensively. Calcium carbonate is also present in several structures in nature. Oyster shells have a great amount of it as well as egg shells. Egg shells also constitute an environmental bio-hazard when discarded in a landfill due to the organic inner membrane. The use of discarded egg shells is limited to few applications, mainly pharmaceutical.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Claire Boland, Robb DeKleine, Aditi Moorthy, Gregory Keoleian, Hyung Chul Kim, Ellen Lee, Timothy J. Wallington
Abstract Automakers have the opportunity to utilize bio-based composite materials to lightweight cars while replacing conventional, nonrenewable resource materials. In this study, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is used to understand the potential benefits and tradeoffs associated with the implementation of bio-based composite materials in automotive component production. This cradle-to-grave approach quantifies the fiber and resin production as well as material processing, use, and end of life for both a conventional glass-reinforced polypropylene component as well as a cellulose-reinforced polypropylene component. The comparison is calculated for an exterior component on a high performance vehicle. The life cycle primary energy consumption and global warming potential (GWP) are evaluated. Reduced GWP associated with the alternative component are due to the use of biomass as process energy and carbon sequestration, in addition to the alternative material component's lightweighting effect.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tae-il Yoo, Hanhee Park, Gubae Kang, Seongyeop Lim
Abstract Development of eco-friendly vehicles have risen in importance due to fossil fuel depletion and the strengthened globalized emission control regulatory requirements. A lot of automotive companies have already developed and launched various types of eco-friendly vehicles which include hybrid vehicles (HEVs) or electric vehicles (EVs) to reduce fuel consumption. To maximize fuel economy Hyundai-Kia Motor Company has introduced eco-friendly vehicles which have downsized or eliminated vibration damping components such as a torque converter. Comparing with Internal Combustion Engine(ICE) powered vehicles, one issue of the electric motor propulsion system with minimized vibration damping components is NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness). The NVH problem is caused by output torque fluctuation of the motor system, resulting in the degradation of ride comfort and drivability. Therefore, accomplishing both fuel economy and good NVH performance has become a significantly challenging task in eco-friendly vehicles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Silvana Di Iorio, Paolo Sementa, Bianca Maria Vaglieco, Francesco Catapano
Abstract The use of methane as supplement to liquid fuel is one of the solution proposed for the reduction of the internal combustion engine pollutant emissions. Its intrinsic properties as the high knocking resistance and the low carbon content makes methane the most promising clean fuel. The dual fuel combustion mode allows improving the methane combustion acting mainly on the methane slow burning velocity and allowing lean burn combustion mode. An experimental investigation was carried out to study the methane-gasoline dual fuel combustion. Methane was injected in combustion chamber (DI fuel) while gasoline was injected in the intake manifold (PFI fuel). The measurements were carried out in an optically accessible small single-cylinder four-stroke engine. It was equipped with the cylinder head of a commercial 250 cc motorcycles engine representative of the most popular two-wheel vehicles in Europe. UV-visible spectroscopy measurements were performed to analyze the combustion process with high spatial and temporal resolution.
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