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Viewing 181 to 210 of 24422
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0974
Timothy C. Watling, Maya R. Ravenscroft, Jason P.E. Cleeton, Ian D. Rees, David A.R. Wilkins
Abstract The development of a one-dimensional model for the prediction of backpressure across a gasoline or diesel particulate filter (PF) is presented. The model makes two innovations: Firstly, the term for momentum convection in the gas momentum balance equations includes the loss (or gain) of axial momentum in the direction perpendicular to the channels; neglecting this results in the momentum convection term being too large. Secondly, equations for the pressure change due to the abrupt contraction at the PF entrance and for abrupt expansion at the exit are derived which take into account the fact that the velocity profile across the channels is not flat; often workers have used equations appropriate for high Reynolds numbers which assume flat velocity profiles. The model has been calibrated/tested against cold flow data for more than one length of PF. The use of more than one length allows along-filter pressure losses to be separated from entrance and exit effects.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1639
Gerard W. Malaczynski, Gregory Roth
Abstract Onboard diagnostic regulations require performance monitoring of diesel particulate filters used in vehicle aftertreatment systems. Delphi has developed a particulate matter (PM) sensor to perform this function. The objective of this sensor is to monitor the soot (PM) concentration in the exhaust downstream of the diesel particulate filter which provides a means to calculate filter efficiency. The particulate matter sensor monitors the deposition of soot on its internal sensing element by measuring the resistance of the deposit. Correlations are established between the soot resistance and soot mass deposited on the sensing element. Currently, the sensor provides the time interval between sensor regeneration cycles, which, with the knowledge of the exhaust gas flow parameters, is correlated to the average soot concentration.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0388
Haeyoon Jung, MiYeon Song, Sanghak Kim
This paper proposes the Off-cycle credit alternative test methodology for Semi-transparent solar panel integrated on Automobile roof glass to achieve the CO2 credits from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) & the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Manufactures offer the option to put solar cells on the roof of a vehicle for reducing cabin ambient temperature. However, Hyundai Motors develops the semi-transparent solar roof with a controller to provide electric energy for vehicles. This electrical energy cannot be accounted for on the current EPA cycles either the two cycle test or the five-cycle test. Therefore, the manufacture has to establish the methodology based on solar system for vehicles. In order to improve the efficiency of our solar system and to calculate reduced CO2 emission, we studied useable solar energy in driving condition other than peak power in standard test condition(@ 25℃, 1Sun).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0608
Qilun Zhu, Robert Prucka, Michael Prucka, Hussein Dourra
This paper proposes a control system for Spark Ignition (SI) engines with external Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) based on model predictive control and disturbance observer. The proposed Economic Nonlinear Model Predictive Controller (E-NMPC) tries to minimize fuel consumption for a number of engine cycles into the future given an Indicate Mean Effective Pressure (IMEP) tracking reference and abnormal combustion constraints like knock and combustion variability. A nonlinear optimization problem is formulated and solved in real time using Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) to obtain the desired control actions. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) based observer is applied to estimate engine states, combining both air path and cylinder dynamics. The EKF engine state(s) observer is augmented with disturbance estimation to account for modeling errors and sensor/actuator offset. The complete control system demonstrated strong disturbance rejection and close loop stability.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0920
Jean P. Roy, Ahmed Ghoniem, Robert Panora, Joseph Gehret, Bruce Falls, David Wallace, Daniel Ott
All vehicles sold today are required to meet emissions standards based on specific driving cycles. A dual stage catalyst system, with exhaust temperature control, can provide a robust solution to meet challenging modes of operation such as rapid acceleration and other heavy duty transients. The Ultera technology, developed and successfully implemented on stationary natural gas CHP engines, introduces a second stage oxidation catalyst downstream of a three-way catalyst. Air is injected between the two catalyst stages to provide oxygen required for the second stage reaction that removes additional CO and NMOG. Critical to the process is to avoid the reformation of NOx, a common consequence with similar air injection concepts that have been tried in the past. This is achieved by cooling the exhaust gas prior to the second stage to a temperature range in which CO and NMOG oxidation is extremely effective while no new NOx is created.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1316
Dhaval Vaishnav, Mohsen Ehteshami, Vylace Collins, Syed Ali, Alan Gregory, Matthew Werner
A jet pump, or an ejector, functions on the ability of a high velocity jet to entrain surrounding stationary fluid. When a high pressure flow from a primary inlet passes through a nozzle, it creates low pressure zone due to venturi effect. The low pressure zone allows flow entrainment from a secondary inlet. For a given pressure at primary inlet, it is desired to entrain maximum flow from secondary inlet. Jet pumps have been used in automobiles for a variety of applications such as: transferring liquid fuel between two halves of the saddle type fuel tank and entraining fresh coolant in the cooling circuit. Recently, jet pumps have been used in evaporative emission control system to remove gaseous hydrocarbons stored in carbon canister and supply it to intake manifold (canister purging). Naturally aspirated engines use vacuum pressure inside the intake manifold for canister purging. However, turbocharged engines operate at or above atmospheric pressure.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1511
Anton Kabanovs, Graham Hodgson, Andrew Garmory, Martin Passmore, Adrian Gaylard
The motivation for this paper is to consider the effect of rear end geometry on rear soiling using a representative generic SUV body. In particular the effect of varying the top slant angle is considered using both experiment and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Previous work has shown that slant angle has a significant effect on wake shape and drag and here we extend this to investigate the effect on rear soiling. It is hoped that this work can provide an insight into the likely effect of such geometry changes on the soiling of similarly shaped road vehicles. To increase the generality of results, and to allow comparison with previously obtained aerodynamic data, a 25% scale generic SUV model is used in the Loughborough University Large Wind Tunnel. UV doped water is sprayed from a position located at the bottom of the left rear tire to simulate the creation of spray from this tire.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1327
Prashant Khapane, Vivek Chavan, Uday Ganeshwade
Physical testing of a vehicle wading through water is performed to gauge the capability of a vehicle to traverse through shallow to deep levels of water; wherein various vehicle performance parameters are observed, recorded and analysed. Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) has instigated and established a comprehensive CAE test procedure for the assessing the same, which makes use of overset mesh (in a CFD environment) for a non-traditional approach to vehicle motion. An extended simulation methodology, making use of the passive scalar model has been established to understand water impingement and splashing in a greater detail, which are the two critical performance parameters during vehicle wading. A passive scalar acts as a pseudo catalyst in the target fluid phase of the multiphase CFD simulation.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0531
Rani Kiwan, Anna Stefanopoulou, Jason Martz, Gopichandra Surnilla, Imtiaz Ali, Daniel Styles
Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) promises fuel economy benefits at high loads in turbocharged SI engines as it allows better combustion phasing and reduces the need for fuel enrichment. Precise estimation and control of in-cylinder EGR concentration is crucial to avoiding misfire. Unfortunately, EGR flow rate estimation using an orifice model based on the EGR valve ΔP measurement can be challenging given pressure pulsations, flow reversal and the inherently low pressure differentials across the EGR valve. Using a GT-Power model of a 1.6~L GDI turbocharged engine with LP-EGR, this study investigates the effects of the ΔP sensor gauge-line lengths and measurement noise on LP-EGR estimation accuracy. Gauge-lines can be necessary to protect the ΔP sensor from high exhaust temperatures, but unfortunately can produce acoustic resonance and distort the ΔP signal measured by the sensor.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0587
Cetin Gurel, Elif Ozmen, Metin Yilmaz, Didem Aydin, Kerem Koprubasi
Emissions and fuel economy optimization of internal combustion engines is becoming more challenging as the stringency of worldwide emission regulations are constantly increasing. Aggressive transient characteristics of new emission test cycles result in transient operation where the majority of soot is produced for turbocharged diesel engines. Therefore soot optimization has become a central component of the engine calibration development process. Steady state approach for air-fuel ratio limitation calibration development is insufficient to capture the dynamic behavior of soot formation and torque build-up during transient engine operation. This paper presents a novel methodology which uses transient maneuvers to optimize the air-fuel ratio limitation calibration, focusing on the trade-off between vehicle performance and engine-out soot emissions. The proposed methodology features a procedure for determining candidate limitation curves with smoothness criteria considerations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0601
Huayi Li, Kenneth Butts, Kevin Zaseck, Dominic Liao-McPherson, Ilya Kolmanovsky
The development of advanced model-based engine control strategies, such as economic model predictive control (eMPC) for diesel engine fuel economy and emission optimization, requires accurate and low-complexity models for online prediction and controller validation. This paper presents the NOx and smoke emissions modeling of a light duty diesel engine equipped with a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) and a high pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. Such emission models can be integrated with an existing air path model into a complete engine mean value model (MVM), which can predict engine behavior at different operating conditions for controller design and validation before physical engine tests. The NOx and smoke emission models adopt an artificial neural network (ANN) approach with multi-layer perceptron (MLP) architectures. The networks are trained and validated using experimental data collected from engine bench tests.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0602
Vladimir Vasilije Kokotovic, Colby Buckman
Abstract – Vehicle accessories electrification trend comes with new control concepts that in many cases frees up the direct engine drives. Considering that direct engine drives do not have as much flexibility as independent electric drives, it is apparent that several advantages are to be expected form electric drives. New developed high efficient electric drives can be implemented with the consideration of better fuel economy, end better performance in different engines operating regimes. In some cases that is achieved with better Start up procedure, Pressure, Flow, ”On Demand” features, or more intensive cooling when is needed (cooling “On demand”), power “On Demand”,… Electrification trend should be seen as an opportunity not only for better performance but also for better fuel economy.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0603
Vicente Cuapio Espino, Akshay Bichkar, Joycer D. Osorio
Software development for automotive application requires several iterations in order to tune parameters and strategy logic to operate accordantly with optimal performance. Thus, in this paper is presented an optimizer method and tool used to tune calibration parameters related to torque estimation for a hybrid automatic transmission application. This optimizer aims to minimize the time invested during the software calibration and software development phases that could take significant time in order to cover the different driving conditions under which a hybrid automatic transmission can operate. For this reason, an optimization function based on the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm using Matlab software helps to find optimized calibration values based on a cost function (square sum error minimization).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0605
Anthony D'Amato, Yan Wang, Dimitar Filev, Enrique Remes
Government regulations for fuel economy and emission standards have driven the development of technologies that improve engine performance and efficiency. These technologies are enabled by an increased number of actuators and increasingly sophisticated control algorithms. As a consequence, engine control calibration time, which entails sweeping all actuators at each speed-load point to determine the actuator combination that meets constraints and delivers ideal performance, has increased significantly. In this work we present two adaptive optimization methods, both based on an indirect adaptive control framework, which improve calibration efficiency by searching for the optimal process inputs without visiting all input combinations explicitly. The difference between the methods is implementation of the algorithm in steady-state vs dynamic operating conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0588
Adithya P Reddy Ranga, Gopichandra Surnilla, Joseph Thomas, Ethan Sanborn, Mark Linenberg
Dual fuel injection systems, like PFI+DI (port fuel injection + direct injection system) are being increasingly used in gasoline engine applications to increase the engine performance, fuel efficiency and reduce emissions. At a given engine operating condition, the air/fuel error is a function of the fraction of fuel injected by each of the fuel systems. If the fraction of fuel from each of the fuel system is changed at a given operating condition, the fuel system error will change as well making it challenging to learn the fuel system errors. This paper aims at describing the adaptive fueling control algorithm to estimate the fuel error contribution from each individual fuel system. Considering the fuel injection system slope errors to be the significant cause for air-fuel errors, a model structure was developed to calculate the fuel system adaptive correction factor as a function of changing fraction of fueling between the fuel systems.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0592
Robin Holmbom, Bohan Liang, Lars Eriksson
Turbocharging plays an important role in the downsizing of engines. Model-based approaches for boost control are going to increasing the necessity for controlling the wastegate flow more accurately. In today’s cars, the wastegate is usually only controlled with a duty cycle and without position feedback. Due to nonlinearities and varying disturbances a duty cycle does not correspond to a certain position. Currently the most frequently used feedback controller strategy is to use the boost pressure as the controller reference. This means that there is a large time constant from actuation command to effect in boost pressure, which can impair dynamic performance. In this paper, the performance of an electrically controlled vacuum-actuated wastegate, subsequently referred to as vacuum wastegate, is compared to an electrical servo-controlled wastegate, also referred to as electric wastegate.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0599
Yichao Guo
Misfire is generally defined as be no or partial combustion during the power stroke of internal combustion engine. Because a misfired engine will dramatically increase the exhaust emission and potentially cause permanent damage to the catalytic converters, California Air Resources Board (CARB), as well as most of other countries’ on-board diagnostic regulations mandates the detection of misfire. Currently almost all the OEMs utilize crankshaft position sensors as the main input to their misfire detection algorithm. The detailed detection approaches vary among different manufacturers. For example, some chooses the crankshaft angular velocity calculated from the raw output of the crankshaft position sensor as the measurement to distinguish misfires from normal firing events, while others use crankshaft angular acceleration or the associated torque index derived from the crankshaft position sensor readings as the measurement of misfire detection.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0594
Baitao Xiao, Erik Hellstrom, Yan Wang, Julia Buckland, Mario Santillo
Downsizing and turbocharging yield considerable improvements in part-load fuel economy for gasoline engines while maintaining or exceeding the power output of conventional naturally-aspirated engines. Turbocharger compressors are, however, susceptible to surge – the instability phenomena that impose limitations on the operation of turbocharged engines because of undesired noise, engine torque capability constraints, and hardware strain. Turbocharged engines are typically equipped with a binary compressor recirculation valve (CRV) whose primary function is to prevent compressor surge. Calibration of the associated control strategy requires in-vehicle tests and usually employs subjective criteria. This work aims to reduce the calibration effort for the strategy by developing a test procedure and data processing algorithms. This work develops an automated calibration for CRV control that will generate a baseline calibration that avoids surge events.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0607
Nahid Pervez, Ace Koua Kue, Adarsh Appukuttan, John Bogema, Michael Van Nieuwstadt
Designing a control system that can robustly detect faulted emission control devices under any environmental and driving conditions is a very challenging task for any OEM. To gain confidence in the control strategy and the values of tunable parameters requires that the test vehicles are subjected to their limits during the development process. Complexity of modern powertrain systems along with the On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) monitors with multidimensional thresholds make it very difficult to anticipate all the possible worst case situations. To find the optimum solution of this problem in traditional calibration process can be very time and resource intensive. One possible solution is to take a data driven calibration approach. In this method, large amount of data is collected by collaboration of different groups working on same powertrain. Later the collected data is mined to find the optimum values of tunable parameters for respective vehicle functions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0609
Pan Song, Shugang Xie, Yuan Zhong, Bolin Gao
This paper presents a unified creep-speed controller specifically designed for the automated parking system of an automated manual transmission vehicle, whereby the engine management system, transmission control unit, and electronic stability control system can work cooperatively and harmoniously within the same control framework. First, a novel reference speed generator is designed and employs sinusoidal functions to produce the speed profile based on the maneuver-dependent distances computed by a path planner, such that the lag in vehicle response during start-up can be effectively reduced. Second, a well-tuned PID controller is adopted to determine the resultant longitudinal force in attempt to follow the reference speed and eliminate the distance error during the parking maneuvers.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0611
Viktor Leek, Kristoffer Ekberg, Lars Eriksson
Today’s need for fuel efficient vehicles, together with increasing engine component complexity, makes optimal control a valuable tool in the process of finding the most fuel efficient control strategies. To efficiently calculate the solution to optimal control problems a gradient based optimization technique is desirable, making continuously differentiable models preferable. Many existing control-oriented Diesel engine models do not fully posses this property, often due to signal saturations or discrete conditions. This paper offers a continuously differentiable, mean value engine model, of a heavy-duty diesel engine equipped with VGT and EGR, suitable for optimal control purposes. The model is developed from an existing, validated, engine model, but adapted to be continuously differentiable and therefore tailored for usage in an optimal control environment. The changes due to the conversion are quantified and presented.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0586
Hayato Shirai, Hayato Nakada, Akio Matsunaga, Hiroyuki Tominaga
Abstract In real-world automotive control, there are many constraints to be considered. In order to explicitly treat the constraints, we introduce a model-prediction-based algorithm called a reference governor (RG). The RG generates modified references so that predicted future variables in a closed-loop system satisfy their constraints. One merit of introducing the RG is that effort required in control development and calibration would be reduced. In the preceding research work by Nakada et al., only a single reference case was considered. However, it is difficult to extend the previous work to more complicated systems with multiple references such as the air path control of a diesel engine due to interference between the boosting and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) systems. Moreover, in the air path control, multiple constraints need to be considered to ensure hardware limits.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0610
Nicolo Cavina, Francesco Ranuzzi, Matteo De Cesare, Enrico Brugnoni
Abstract The most recent European regulations for two- and three-wheelers (Euro 5) are imposing an enhanced combustion control in motorcycle engines to respect tighter emission limits, and Air-Fuel Ratio (AFR) closed-loop control has become a key function of the engine management system also for this type of applications. In a multi-cylinder engine, typically only one oxygen sensor is installed on each bank, so that the mean AFR of two or more cylinders rather than the single cylinder one is actually controlled. The installation of one sensor per cylinder is normally avoided due to cost, layout and reliability issues. In the last years, several studies were presented to demonstrate the feasibility of an individual AFR controller based on a single sensor. These solutions are based on the mathematical modelling of the engine air path dynamics, or on the frequency analysis of the lambda probe signal.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0796
J. Felipe Rodriguez, Wai K. Cheng
Abstract The NOx emissions during the crank-start and cold fast-idle phases of a GDI engine are analyzed in detail. The NOx emissions of the first 3 firing cycles are studied under a wide set of parameters including the mass of fuel injected, start of injection, and ignition timing. The results show a strong dependence of the NOx emissions with injection timing; they are significantly reduced as the mixture is stratified. The impact of different valve timings on crank-start NOx emissions was analyzed. Late intake and early exhaust timings show similar potential for NOx reduction; 26-30% lower than the baseline. The combined strategy, resulting in a large symmetric negative valve overlap, shows the greatest reduction; 59% lower than the baseline. The cold fast-idle NOx emissions were studied under different equivalence ratios, injection strategies, combustion phasing, and valve timings. Slightly lean air-fuel mixtures result in a significant reduction of NOx.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0447
Zhe Li, Mike Dong, Dennis Harrigan, Michael Gardner
In gasoline Powertrain systems, the evaporative emission control (EVAP) system canister purge valve (CPV) can be actuated by pulse-width modulated (PWM) signals. The CPV is an electronically actuated solenoid. The PWM controlled CPV, when actuated, creates pressure pulsations in the system. This pulsation is sent back to the rest of the EVAP system. Given the right conditions, the fill limit vent valve (FLVV) inside the fuel tank can be excited. The FLVV internal components can be excited and produce noise. This noise can be objectionable to the occupants. Additional components within the EVAP system may also be excited in a similar way. This paper presents a bench test method using parts from vehicle’s EVAP system and other key fuel system components.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0524
Lei Liang, Huaqi Ge, Haiwen Ge, Peng Zhao
Abstract The thermal efficiency of spark-ignition engines can be enhanced by increasing the rate of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) such that the low temperature combustion regime could be achieved. However, there is an upper limit on the amount of EGR rate, beyond which flame speed becomes slow and unstable, and local quenching starts to hurt the combustion stability, efficiency, and emission. To resolve this issue, the concept of dedicated EGR has been proposed previously to be an effective way to enhance flame propagation under lean burn condition with even higher levels of EGR with reformate hydrogen and carbon monoxide. In this study, the effects of thermochemical fuel reforming on the reformate composition under rich conditions (1.0 < ϕ < 2.0) have been studied using detailed chemistry for iso-octane, as the representative component for gasoline.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0535
Chih-Kuang Kuan, Daniel Styles, Mitchell Bieniek, John Hoard
Abstract Thermal effectiveness of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) coolers used in diesel engines can progressively decrease and stabilize over time due to inner fouling layer of the cooler tubes. Thermophoretic force has been identified as the major cause of diesel exhaust soot fouling, and models are proposed in the literature but improvements in simulation are needed especially for the long-term trend of soot deposition. To describe the fouling stabilization behavior, a removal mechanism is required to account for stabilization of the soot layer. Observations from previous experiments on surrogate circular tubes suggest there are three primary factors to determine removal mechanisms: surface temperature, thickness, and shear velocity. Based on this hypothesis, we developed a 1D CFD fouling model for predicting the thermal effectiveness reduction of real EGR coolers. The model includes the two competing mechanisms mentioned that results in fouling balance.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0581
Stephen C. Burke, Matthew Ratcliff, Robert McCormick, Robert Rhoads, Bret Windom
Abstract In some studies, a relationship has been observed between increasing ethanol content in gasoline and increased particulate matter (PM) emissions from vehicles equipped with spark ignition engines. The fundamental cause of the PM increase seen for moderate ethanol concentrations is not well understood. Ethanol features a greater heat of vaporization (HOV) than gasoline and also influences vaporization by altering the liquid and vapor composition throughout the distillation process. A droplet vaporization model was developed to explore ethanol’s effect on the evaporation of aromatic compounds known to be PM precursors. The evolving droplet composition is modeled as a distillation process, with non-ideal interactions between oxygenates and hydrocarbons accounted for using UNIFAC group contribution theory. Predicted composition and distillation curves were validated by experiments.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0596
Vittorio Ravaglioli, Federico Stola, Matteo De Cesare, Fabrizio Ponti, Stefano Sgatti
Abstract Upcoming more stringent emission regulations throughout the world pose a real challenge, especially in regard to Diesel systems for passenger cars, where the need of additional after-treatment has a big impact in terms of additional system costs and available packaging space. Therefore, the need for strategies that allow managing combustion towards lower emissions, that require a precise control of the combustion outputs, is definitely increasing. Acoustic emission of internal combustion engines contains a large amount of information related to engine behavior and working conditions. Mechanical noise and combustion noise are usually the main contributions to the noise produced by an engine. In particular, recent research from the same authors of this paper demonstrated that combustion noise can be used as an indicator of the combustion that is taking place inside the combustion chamber and therefore as a reference for the control strategy.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0598
Mohammad Reza Amini, Meysam Razmara, Mahdi Shahbakhti
Electronic throttle control is an integral part of an engine electronic control unit (ECU) that directly affects vehicle fuel economy, drivability, and engine-out emissions by managing engine torque and air-fuel ratio through adjusting intake charge flow to the engine. The highly nonlinear dynamics of the throttle body call for nonlinear control techniques that can be implemented in real-time and are also robust to controller implementation imprecision. Discrete sliding mode control (DSMC) is a computationally efficient controller design technique which can handle systems with high degree of nonlinearity. In this paper, a generic robust discrete sliding mode controller design is proposed and experimentally verified for the throttle position tracking problem. In addition, a novel method is used to predict and incorporate the sampling and quantization imprecisions into the DSMC structure. First, a nonlinear physical model for an electromechanical throttle body is derived.
Viewing 181 to 210 of 24422

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