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Viewing 181 to 210 of 24143
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0606
Chaitanya Wadkar, Bassem H. Ramadan
Abstract A numerical and experimental study of the use of air motion control, piston bowl shape, and injector configuration on combustion and emissions in diesel engines has been conducted. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of flow control within the piston bowl during compression to enhance fuel air mixing to achieve a uniform air-fuel mixture to reduce soot and NO emissions. In addition to flow control different piston bowl geometries and injector spray angles have been considered and simulated using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and experiments. The results include cylinder pressure and emissions measurements and contour plots of fuel mass fraction, soot, and NO. The results show that soot and NO emissions can be reduced by proper flow control and piston bowl design.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0194
Yici Li, Wei Tian
Abstract The exhaust cooling is an important index which measures the performance of the flameproof diesel engine. In this paper, a modification model is built for enhancing the cooling performance of exhaust, based on the reference model of the dry cooling equipment. The annular nozzle direction, extend plate of guide, bellows and elbow are introduced and studied in the model as the modification way. Considering the Coanda and Venturi effects, the comprehensive comparison of fluid velocity, temperature, pressure and mixture coefficient is implemented, and the optimum horizontal dimension of throat is summarized. The simulation results indicate the modification model shows better performance in reducing exhaust temperature and pressure than the reference model.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0256
Hideaki Nagano, Kenji Tomita, Yasuhiro Tanoue, Yuji Kobayashi, Itsuhei Kohri, Shinsuke Kato
Abstract In the winter, windshield glass fogging must be prevented through the intake of outdoor air into a vehicle. However, the corresponding energy loss via the ventilation system cannot be ignored. In the present study, the defogging pattern on the windshield is evaluated and the water vapor transportation in the flow field in the vehicle is analyzed in order to investigate the ventilation load by means of a numerical simulation. Some examined cases involve new outlet positions. Additionally, a new, energy-saving air supply method for defogging, with so-called “double-layer ventilator”, is proposed. In this method, one air jet layer is obtained via a conventional defogging opening in the vicinity of the windshield, supplying an outdoor air intake. The other jet consists of recirculated air that covers the outdoor air, preventing it from mixing with the surrounding air.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0044
Sung Yul Chu, Sung Eun Jo, Kyoungbok Lee, Kwang Chul Oh, Jong Rim Lee
Abstract On-board diagnostics (OBD) of diesel vehicles require various sensors to detect system malfunctions. The Particulate Matter (PM) sensor is one of OBD devices which gather information which could be critical in determining a crack in the diesel particulate filters (DPFs). The PM sensor detects PM which penetrates cracked DPFs and converts the amount of PM into electrical values. The PM sensor control unit (SCU) receives those analog signals and converts them to digital values through hardware and software solutions. A capacitive sensing method would be a stable solution because it detects not raw analog signals but electrical charges or a time constant going through the capacitive load. Therefore, amount of PM would be converted reasonable value of capacitance even though there is a little amount of PM.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0698
Zheng Xu, Zhou Zhou, Tao Wu, Tong Li, Chuanhui Cheng, Haiting Yin
Abstract Engine downsizing has become a leading trend for fuel consumption reduction while maintaining the high specific power and torque output. Because of this, Turbo-charged Gasoline Direct Injection (TGDI) technology has been widely applied in passenger vehicles even though a number of technical challenges are presented during the engine development. This paper presents the investigation results of three key issues in the combustion development of a 2.0L TGDI engine at SAIC motor: fuel dilution, smoke emission and low speed stochastic pre-ignition(LSPI). The effect of the injection timing and injection strategy on fuel dilution and smoke emission, and LSPI are the focus of the experimental study.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0409
Fatih Unal, Cem Sorusbay
Abstract In an effort to support design and testing activities at product development lifecycle of the engine, proper duty cycle is required. However, to collect data and develop accurate duty cycles, there are not any vehicles equipped with prototype engines at customers. Therefore, in this paper, discrete duty cycle development methodology is studied to generate trailer truck engine usage profile which represents driving conditions in Turkey for engines in development phase. Cycles are generated using several vehicles equipped with prototype engines and professional drivers that can mimic customer usage. Methodology is based on defining real-world customer driving profile, discretizing real-world drives into separate events, collecting vehicle data from each discrete drive, determining the weight of events by conducting customer surveys and creating a representative reference usage profile with data analysis.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0246
Rupesh Sonu Kakade, Prashant Mer
Abstract Vehicle occupants, unlike building occupants, are exposed to continuously varying, non-uniform solar heat load. Automotive manufacturers use photovoltaic cells based solar sensor to measure intensity and direction of the direct-beam solar radiation. Use of the time of the day and the position - latitude and longitude - of a vehicle is also common to calculate direction of the direct-beam solar radiation. Two angles - azimuth and elevation - are used to completely define the direction of solar radiation with respect to the vehicle coordinate system. Although the use of solar sensor is common in today’s vehicles, the solar heat load on the occupants, because of their exposure to the direct-beam solar radiation remains the area of in-car subjective evaluation and tuning. Since the solar rays travel in parallel paths, application of the ray tracing method to determine solar insolation of the vehicle occupants is possible.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0241
Sina Shojaei, Simon Robinson, Andrew McGordon, James Marco
Abstract The power demand of air conditioning in PHEVs is known to have a significant impact on the vehicle’s fuel economy and performance. Besides the cooling power associated to the passenger cabin, in many PHEVs, the air conditioning system provides power to cool the high voltage battery. Calculating the cooling power demands of the cabin and battery and their impact on the vehicle performance can help with developing optimum system design and energy management strategies. In this paper, a representative vehicle model is used to calculate these cooling requirements over a 24-hour duty cycle. A number of pre-cooling and after-run cooling strategies are studied and effect of each strategy on the performance of the vehicle including, energy efficiency, battery degradation and passenger thermal comfort are calculated. Results show that after-run cooling of the battery should be considered as it can lead to significant reductions in battery degradation.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0224
Robin Y. Cash, Edward Lumsdaine, Apoorv Talekar, Bashar AbdulNour
Abstract To address the need of increasing fuel economy requirements, automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are increasing the number of turbocharged engines in their powertrain line-ups. The turbine-driven technology uses a forced induction device, which increases engine performance by increasing the density of the air charge being drawn into the cylinder. Denser air allows more fuel to be introduced into the combustion chamber, thus increasing engine performance. During the inlet air compression process, the air is heated to temperatures that can result in pre-ignition resulting and reduced engine functionality. The introduction of the charge air cooler (CAC) is therefore, necessary to extract heat created during the compression process. The present research describes the physics and develops the optimized simulation method that defines the process and gives insight into the development of CACs.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0216
Ramanand Singh, Remesh Kuzhikkali, Nitesh Shet, Sekarapandian Natarajan, Govind Kizhedath, Murugan Arumugam
Fogging (i.e. condensation of water vapor) in headlamps in severe weather conditions present both a performance and potential safety concern for automotive companies. Conventional headlamps are based on incandescent bulbs. In recent times, LED lighting has increasingly become the norm. However, LED based headlamps are prone to higher levels of fogging because they inherently produce less heat than the conventional incandescent or halogen bulbs. A headlamp design must be able to dispose all the formed condensate/fog in a fixed time even under severe thermal conditions. It is of great importance for the car manufacturer to be able to simulate the risk of condensation early in the design stage with an eye on the overall cost reduction. The combined use of experimental studies and numerical modelling is important to optimize headlamp design and to produce high-performance headlamps.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0213
Andrea Alessandro Piovano, Laura Maria Lorefice, Giuseppe Scantamburlo
Abstract The aim of this work has been to develop an advanced methodology to model the car cabin cool down test. It has been decided to focus the attention on the fluid dynamics and thermal dynamics aspects of the phenomenon, trying to catch the correct heat transfer between the outside environment and the internal cabin with a thermal tool, together with an internal flows CFD simulation. To start with, an experimental cool down test was conducted in the FCA Italy climatic wind tunnel on a L0 segment vehicle, to get the correlation data and the boundary conditions required for the simulation: panel ducts air transient temperatures, wind tunnel air temperature and velocity, solar array load. The simulation was divided into two steps: steady state soak with a finite difference based thermal solver and transient cool down, coupling the thermal solver with a CFD one. In particular an advanced CFD/thermal coupled approach has been applied, using STAR-CCM+® and TAITherm® tools.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0212
Paras Kaushal, Satishchandra C. Wani
Abstract TeamIndus is the only Indian participant in the Google Lunar X Prize (GLXP). GLXP, also referred to as Moon 2.0, is an inducement prize space competition organized by the X Prize Foundation, and sponsored by Google. The mission objective is to soft land a rover on moon, travel 500 meters and transmit HD videos and images to Earth. Team Indus’s strategy is to design and realize a lunar lander that will deliver a rover on to the surface of the moon which will accomplish GLXP mission objectives. The mission configuration comprises of four phases- Earth orbits, moon orbits, descent and surface operations. The lander during its interplanetary journey from earth to moon is exposed to different thermal loads viz. solar load, earth IR and albedo, moon IR and albedo, cold space at 4K and eclipse periods. The lander is also exposed to high temperatures of thruster nozzle during orbital transfer maneuvers.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0009
Soham Bakshi, Badih Jawad, Selin Arslan, Liping Liu, Kingman Yee
Today's strict fuel economy requirement produces the need for the cars to have really optimized shapes among other characteristics as optimized cooling packages, reduced weight, to name a few. With the advances in automotive technology, tight global oil resources, lightweight automotive design process becomes a problem deserving important consideration. It is not however always clear how to modify the shape of the exterior of a car in order to minimize its aerodynamic resistance. Air motion is complex and operates differently at different weather conditions. Air motion around a vehicle has been studied quite exhaustively, but due to immense complex nature of air flow, which differs with different velocity, the nature of air, direction of flow et cetera, there is no complete study of aerodynamic analysis for a car. Something always can be done to further optimize the air flow around a car body.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0664
Ahmed E. Hassaneen, Wael I. A. Aly, Gamal Bedair, Mohammed Abdussalam
Abstract The thermal performance of an ammonia-water-hydrogen absorption refrigeration system using the waste exhaust gases of an internal combustion diesel engine as energy source was investigated experimentally. An automotive engine was tested in a bench test dynamometer, with the absorption refrigeration system adapted to the exhaust pipe via a heat exchanger. The engine was tested for different torques (15 N.m, 30 N.m, and 45 N.m). The exhaust gas flow to the heat exchanger built on the generator was controlled manually using two control valves. The refrigerator reached a steady state temperature between 10 and 14.5°C about 3.5 hours after system start up, depending on engine load. The maximum coefficient of performance was 0.10 obtained for the controlled exhaust mass flow case at torque 30 Nm after 3hrs from system startup.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0571
Guillaume Bernard, Mark Scaife, Amit Bhave, David Ooi, Julian Dizy
Abstract Internal combustion (IC) engines that meet Tier 4 Final emissions standards comprise of multiple engine operation and control parameters that are essential to achieve the low levels of NOx and soot emissions. Given the numerous degrees of freedom and the tight cost/time constraints related to the test bench, application of virtual engineering to IC engine development and emissions reduction programmes is increasingly gaining interest. In particular, system level simulations that account for multiple cycle simulations, incylinder turbulence, and chemical kinetics enable the analysis of combustion characteristics and emissions, i.e. beyond the conventional scope of focusing on engine performance only. Such a physico-chemical model can then be used to develop Electronic Control Unit in order to optimise the powertrain control strategy and/or the engine design parameters.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0548
Estefanía Hervas-Blasco, Emilio Navarro-Peris, José Corberan, Alex Rinaldi
Abstract Nowadays, more than 50% of the fuel energy is lost in CNG Engines. While efforts to increase their efficiency have been focused mainly on the improvement of the combustion process, the combustion chamber and the reduction of friction losses, heat losses still remain the most important inefficient factor. A global strategy in which several energy recovery strategies are implemented could lead to engine improvements up to 15%. Therefore, the development of accurate models to size and predict the performance of the integrated components as well as to define an optimized control strategy is crucial. In this contribution, a model to analyze the potential of a new powertrain based on the electrification of the main auxiliaries, the integration of a kinetic energy recovery system and the exhaust gases heat recovery through a thermoelectric generator and a turbo-component is presented.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0320
Tejas Janardan Sarang, Mandar Tendolkar, Sivakumar Balakrishnan, Gurudatta Purandare
Abstract In the automotive industry, multiple prototypes are used for vehicle development purposes. These prototypes are typically put through rigorous testing, both under accelerated and real world conditions, to ensure that all the problems related to design, manufacturing, process etc. are identified and solved before it reaches the hands of the customer. One of the challenges faced in testing, is the low repeatability of the real world tests. This may be predominantly due to changes in the test conditions over a period of time like road, traffic, climate etc. Estimating the repeatability of a real world test has been difficult due to the complex and multiple parameters that are usually involved in a vehicle level test and the time correlation between different runs of a real world test does not exist. In such a scenario, the popular and the well-known univariate correlation methods do not yield the best results.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0315
Daniel Downs, Taylor Comer, Christopher Archibald, Cindy Bethel, Christopher Goodin, Phillip Durst
Abstract The ability to quickly and automatically evaluate vehicle designs is a critical tool in an efficient vehicle design process. This paper presents techniques for vehicle parameter estimation using automatic intelligent simulations. These techniques enable the efficient and automatic evaluation of many important aspects of vehicle designs. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by using vehicle tests that are commonly performed on military ground vehicles. Our simulation techniques are able to determine the relevant vehicle performance characteristics in a much more efficient manner than could be done previously. This is done automatically, once the user has specified the type of test to be performed. A terrain sample is automatically generated and the vehicle’s behavior on each terrain instance is evaluated until the specified test conditions are met.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0254
Gursaran D. Mathur
Field tests were conducted on a late full sized sedan with the HVAC unit operating in both Recirculation and OSA modes to monitor build-up of the CO2 concentration inside the cabin and its influence on occupant’s fatigue and alertness. These tests were conducted during 2015 summer on interstate highways with test durations ranging from 4 to 7 hours. During the above tests, fatigue or tiredness of the occupants (including CO2 levels) was monitored and recorded at 30 min intervals. Based on this investigation it is determined that the measured cabin concentration levels reaches ASHRAE (Standard 62-1999) specified magnitudes (greater than 700 ppm over ambient levels) with three occupants in the vehicle. Further, the occupants did show fatigue when the HVAC unit was operated in recirculation mode in excess of 5 hours. Further details have been presented in the paper.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0669
Shikhar Asthana, Shubham Bansal, Shubham Jaggi, Naveen Kumar
Abstract The Automobile industry is under great stress due to greenhouse gas emissions and health impacts of pollutants. The rapid decrease of fossil fuels has promoted the development of engine designs having higher fuel economy. At the same time, these designs keep the stringent emission standards in check without sacrificing brake power. Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) is one such measure. This work reviews the technological advancements in the design of a VCR engine. VCR engines can minimize possible risks of irregular combustion while optimizing Brake specific fuel consumption towards higher power and torque. An increase in fuel economy is seen for VCR naturally aspirated engines when coupled with downsizing. In addition to this, emissions of carbon dioxide decreases due to effective utilization of fuel at high loads. Since the first VCR design, there have been various modifications and improvements in VCR engine design.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0662
Mark Stuhldreher
Abstract As part of the midterm evaluation of the 2022-2025 light-duty GHG emissions rule, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been evaluating fuel efficiency data from tests on newer model engines and vehicles. The data is used as inputs to an EPA vehicle simulation model created to estimate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from light-duty vehicles. The Advanced Light Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis (ALPHA) model is a physics-based, full vehicle computer simulation capable of analyzing various vehicle types with different powertrain technologies and showing realistic vehicle behavior and auditing of all internal energy flows in the model. Under the new light-duty fuel economy standards vehicle powertrains must become significantly more efficient. Cylinder deactivation engine technology is capable of deactivating one or more of its combustion cylinders when not needed to meet power demand.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0691
Gurneesh S. Jatana, Brian C. Kaul, Robert Wagner
Abstract Spark-ignition (SI) engines can derive substantial efficiency gains from operation at high dilution levels, but sufficiently high-dilution operation increases the occurrence of misfires and partial burns, which induce higher levels of cyclic-variability in engine operation. This variability has been shown to have both stochastic and deterministic components, with residual fraction impacts on charge composition being the major source of the deterministic component through its non-linear effect on ignition and flame propagation characteristics. This deterministic coupling between cycles offers potential for next-cycle control approaches to allow operation near the edge of stability. This paper aims to understand the effect of spark strategies, specifically the use of a second spark (restrike) after the main spark, on the deterministic coupling between engine cycles by operating at high dilution levels using both excess air (i.e. lean combustion) and EGR.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0676
Mohamed Shaaban Khalef, Alec Soba, John Korsgren
Abstract An experimental study of EGR and turbocharging concepts has been performed on an experimental 2.0-litre 4-cylinder turbocharged Euro6 light-duty diesel engine. The purpose of the study was to investigate the emissions and fuel consumption trade-off for different concept combinations. The impact of low-pressure and high-pressure EGR was studied in terms of engine-out emissions and fuel consumption. Moreover, the influence of single-stage and two-stage turbocharging was investigated in combination with the EGR systems, and how the engine efficiency could be further improved after engine calibration optimization. During low load engine operation where throttling may be required to achieve the desired low-pressure EGR rate, the difference in fuel consumption impact was studied for exhaust throttling and intake throttling, respectively. The cooling impact on high-pressure EGR was compared in terms of emissions and fuel consumption.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0678
Haifeng Lu, Jun Deng, Zongjie Hu, Zhijun Wu, Liguang Li, Fangen Yuan, Degang Xie, Shuang Yuan, Yuan Shen
Abstract This research was concerned with the use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) improving the fuel economy over a wide operating range in a downsized boosted gasoline engine. The experiments were performed in a 1.3-Litre turbocharged PFI gasoline engine, equipped with a Low Pressure (LP) water-cooled EGR system. The operating conditions varied from 1500rpm to 4000rpm and BMEP from 2bar to 17bar. Meanwhile, the engine’s typical operating points in NEDC cycle were tested separately. The compression ratio was also changed from 9.5 to 10.5 to pursue a higher thermal efficiency. A pre-compressor throttle was used in the experiment working together with the EGR loop to keep enough EGR rate over a large area of the engine speed and load map. The results indicated that, combined with a higher compression ratio, the LP-EGR could help to reduce the BSFC by 9∼12% at high-load region and 3∼5% at low-load region.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0683
Kai Morganti, Abdullah Alzubail, Marwan Abdullah, Yoann Viollet, Robert Head, Junseok Chang, Gautam Kalghatgi
Abstract This paper is the second of a two part study which investigates the use of advanced combustion modes as a means of improving the efficiency and environmental impact of conventional light-duty vehicles. This second study focuses on drive cycle simulations and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for vehicles equipped with Octane-on-Demand combustion. Methanol is utilized as the high octane fuel, while three alternative petroleum-derived fuels with Research octane numbers (RONs) ranging from 61 to 90 are examined as candidates for the lower octane fuel. The experimental engine calibration maps developed in the previous study are first provided as inputs to a drive cycle simulation tool. This is used to quantify the total fuel consumption, octane requirement and tank-to-wheel CO2 emissions for a light-duty vehicle equipped with two alternative powertrain configurations.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0550
Zhijia Yang, Edward Winward, Gary O'Brien, Richard Stobart, Dezong Zhao
Abstract The intrinsic model accuracy limit of a commonly used Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) mass flow rate model in diesel engine air path control is discussed in this paper. This EGR mass flow rate model is based on the flow of a compressible ideal gas with unchanged specific heat ratio through a restriction cross-area within a duct. A practical identification procedure of the model parameters is proposed based on the analysis of the engine data and model structure. This procedure has several advantages which include simplicity, low computation burden and low engine test cost. It is shown that model tuning requires only an EGR valve sweep test at a few engine steady state operating points.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0553
Akira Miyamoto, Kenji Inaba, Yukiko Obara, Yukie Ishizawa, Emi Sato, Mai Sase, Patrick Bonnaud, Ryuji Miura, Ai Suzuki, Naoto Miyamoto, Nozomu Hatakeyama, Jun Hashimoto, Kazuhiro Akihama
Abstract Suppression or reduction of soot emissions is an important goal in the development of automotive engines for environmental and human health purposes. A better understanding at the molecular level of the formation process of soot particles resulting from collision and aggregation of smaller particles made of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) is needed. In addition to experiments, computational methods are efficient and valuable tools for this purpose. As a first step in our detailed computational chemistry study, we applied Ultra-Accelerated Molecular Dynamics (UAQCMD) and Canonical Monte-Carlo (CMC) methods to investigate the nucleation process. The UA-QCMD can calculate chemical reaction dynamics 107 times faster than conventional first principle molecular dynamics methods, while CMC can calculate equilibrium properties at various temperatures, pressures, and chemical compositions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0547
Andrea Piano, Federico Millo, Giulio Boccardo, Mahsa Rafigh, Alessandro Gallone, Marcello Rimondi
The predictive capabilities of an innovative multizone combustion model DIPulse, developed by Gamma Technologies, were assessed in this work for a last generation common rail automotive diesel engine. A detailed validation process, based on an extensive experimental data set, was carried out concerning the predicted heat release rate, the in-cylinder pressure trace, as well as NOx and soot emissions for several operating points including both part load and full load points. After a preliminary calibration of the model, the combustion model parameters were then optimized through a Latin Hypercube Design of Experiment (DoE), with the aim of minimizing the RMS error between the predicted and experimental burn rate of several engine operating points, thus achieving a satisfactory agreement between simulation and experimental engine combustion and emissions parameters.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0575
Konstantinos Siokos, Rohit Koli, Robert Prucka, Jason Schwanke, Shyam Jade
Abstract Low pressure (LP) and cooled EGR systems are capable of increasing fuel efficiency of turbocharged gasoline engines, however they introduce control challenges. Accurate exhaust pressure modeling is of particular importance for real-time feedforward control of these EGR systems since they operate under low pressure differentials. To provide a solution that does not depend on physical sensors in the exhaust and also does not require extensive calibration, a coupled temperature and pressure physics-based model is proposed. The exhaust pipe is split into two different lumped sections based on flow conditions in order to calculate turbine-outlet pressure, which is the driving force for LP-EGR. The temperature model uses the turbine-outlet temperature as an input, which is known through existing engine control models, to determine heat transfer losses through the exhaust.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0576
Chad Koci, Kenth Svensson, Christopher Gehrke
Abstract A two-zone NOx model intended for 1-D engine simulations was developed and used to model NOx emissions from a 2.5 L single-cylinder engine. The intent of the present work is to understand key aspects of a simple NOx model that are needed for predictive accuracy, including NOx formation and destruction phenomena in a DI Diesel combustion system. The presented two-zone model is fundamentally based on the heat release rate and thermodynamic incylinder data, and uses the Extended Zeldovich mechanism to model NO. Results show that the model responded very well to changes in speed, load, injection timing, and EGR level. It matched measured tail pipe NOx levels within 20%, using a single tuning setup. When the model was applied to varied injection rate shapes, it showed correct sensitivity to speed, load, injection timing, and EGR level, but the absolute level was well outside the target accuracy. The same limitation was seen when applying the Plee NOx model.
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