Display:

Results

Viewing 181 to 210 of 22380
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Haichun Yao, Baigang Sun, Huayu Tian, Qinghe Luo, Hongyang Tang
Abstract NOx are the only harmful emissions of hydrogen internal combustion engine. EGR is one of the effective methods to reduce NOx. The traditional EGR is not suitable for hydrogen internal combustion engine. Therefore, the study of influence of hot EGR on hydrogen internal combustion engine is important. A 2.0L hydrogen internal combustion engine with hot EGR system model is employed to optimize the diameter and position of hot EGR based on a simulation analysis. The result shows that both of the combustion temperature and NOx increase as EGR increases due to the rise of intake temperature for low load condition, for heavy load, with the increase of EGR rate, NOx emissions decreases slightly before the mixture equivalence ratio comes to 1and then dropped significantly after the mixture equivalence ratio greater than 1. Unburned hydrogen in TWC has the effect of reducing NOx after catalysts decrease largely. Hydrogen engine combustion characteristics with hot EGR was analyzed, it suggests that EGR hasn't any benefit on combustion and NOx emission under low load condition; however, a significant amount reduce of NOx can be achieved under a rich condition (equivalence ratio greater than 1) by adjusting the EGR rate for high load condition with sacrificing power output slightly.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Thomas Wallner, Andrew Ickes, Jeff Wasil, James Sevik, Scott Miers
Abstract This study evaluates iso-butanol as a pathway to introduce higher levels of alternative fuels for recreational marine engine applications compared to ethanol. Butanol, a 4-carbon alcohol, has an energy density closer to gasoline than ethanol. Isobutanol at 16 vol% blend level in gasoline (iB16) exhibits energy content as well as oxygen content identical to E10. Tests with these two blends, as well as indolene as a reference fuel, were conducted on a Mercury 90 HP, 4-stroke outboard engine featuring computer controlled sequential multi-port Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI). The test matrix included full load curves as well as the 5-mode steady-state marine engine test cycle. Analysis of the full load tests suggests that equal full load performance is achieved across the engine speed band regardless of fuel at a 15-20°C increase in exhaust gas temperatures for the alcohol blends compared to indolene. This increase as well as the observed 2.5-3% point improvement in brake thermal efficiency of both alcohol blends compared to the reference fuel are caused by changes in air/fuel ratio; an effect ultimately attributable to the open loop engine control strategy.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Donald Selmanaj, Harald Waschl, Michael Schinnerl, Sergio Savaresi, Luigi del Re
Abstract Especially in view of more and more stringent emission legislation in passenger cars it is required to reduce the amount of pollutants. In the case of Diesel engines mainly NOx and PM are emitted during engine operation. The main influence factors for these pollutants are the in-cylinder oxygen concentration and the injected fuel amount. Typically the engine control task can be divided into two separate main parts, the fuel and the air system. Commonly air system control, consisting of a turbocharger and exhaust gas recirculation control, is used to provide the required amount of oxygen and address the emission targets, whereas the fuel is used to provide the desired torque. Especially in transient maneuvers the different time scales of both systems can lead to emission peaks which are not desired. Against this background in this work instead of the common way to address the air system, the fuel system is considered to reduce emission peaks during transients. The idea is to start from a base calibration and adapt the injection parameters, like start and amount of pilot and main injection, to reduce transient emission peaks.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yong-Wha Kim, Michiel Van Nieuwstadt, Greg Stewart, Jaroslav Pekar
Abstract This paper presents the application of model predictive control (MPC) to DOC temperature control during DPF regeneration. The model predictive control approach is selected for its advantage - using a model to optimize control moves over horizon while handling constraints. Due to the slow thermal dynamics of the DOC and DPF, computational bandwidth is not an issue, allowing for more complex calculations in each control loop. The control problem is formulated such that all the engine control actions, other than far post injection, are performed by the existing production engine controller, whereas far post injection is selected as the MPC manipulated variable and DOC outlet temperature as the controlled variable. The Honeywell OnRAMP Design Suite (model predictive control software) is used for model identification, control design and calibration. The paper includes description of the DPF regeneration process, model identification and validation results, control design and trade-off analysis and experimental validation of the controller on a Ford Superduty diesel truck.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jean-Claude Habumuremyi
Since 2004, INERGY is working on the development of SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) system Components and controls to enable the reduction of NOx (Nitrogen Oxides) in the exhaust gas using an aqueous urea solution. This paper is focused on the pump control strategy. In this paper, we modelled an INERGY SCR pump system (gear pump, DC motor, line and injector) used. Then we considered PID (Proportional-Integral-Derivative) controllers since they are common in the automotive industry. We developed 4 controllers to achieve the necessary system function which include: line filling, pressure build-up, pressure hold-up, and purge. Windup introduced by saturation of the motor command and transition between the controllers were taken into account during development. We tested different anti-windup approaches on this model. We derived lessons regarding the overshoot, the rise time and the performance of the different anti-windup techniques. Then we showed the results of anti-windup methods applied on INERGY 1st and 2nd generation SCR systems
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Karthikeyan N, Anish Gokhale, Narendra Bansode
Abstract The Continuous Variable Transmission (CVT) in scooters is used to transmit the power from the engine to the wheels. The CVT transmission consists of a drive pulley and a driven pulley connected to each other through a belt. The centrifugal clutch is attached to the rear pulley which transmits the power to the wheel. The engagement and disengagement of the clutch generates heat and friction heat is generated between the belt and pulley, thereby requiring continuous external cooling for its safe operation. A centrifugal fan is employed for cooling of the CVT belt. Since the cooling fan takes air from atmosphere, there is always a possibility of dust from the atmosphere entering the system, which might cause wear of pulley and belt, thereby decreasing the performance of the transmission system. The objective of the work is to analyze the dust ingress pattern in to CVT housing. The work aims at simulating the possible conditions for dust entry into the CVT housing for a complete scooter and the study of different design proposals to minimize the dust entry without compromising the cooling requirement of CVT.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Lennert Sterken, Lennart Lofdahl, Simone Sebben, Tim Walker
Abstract Under a global impulse for less man-made emissions, the automotive manufacturers search for innovative methods to reduce the fuel consumption and hence the CO2-emissions. Aerodynamics has great potential to aid the emission reduction since aerodynamic drag is an important parameter in the overall driving resistance force. As vehicles are considered bluff bodies, the main drag source is pressure drag, caused by the difference between front and rear pressure. Therefore increasing the base pressure is a key parameter to reduce the aerodynamic drag. From previous research on small-scale and full-scale vehicles, rear-end extensions are known to have a positive effect on the base pressure, enhancing pressure recovery and reducing the wake area. This paper investigates the effect of several parameters of these extensions on the forces, on the surface pressures of an SUV in the Volvo Cars Aerodynamic Wind Tunnel and compares them with numerical results. To decrease the dependency of other effects within the engine bay and underbody, the SUV has been investigated in a closed-cooling configuration with upper and lower grille closed and with a smoothened underbody.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Essam F. Abo-Serie, Mohamed Sherif, Dario Pompei, Adrian Gaylard
Abstract A potentially important, but inadequately studied, source of passengers' exposure to pollutants when a road vehicle is stationary, with an idling engine, results from the ingestion of a vehicle's own exhaust into the passenger compartment through the HVAC intake. We developed and applied a method to determine the fraction of a vehicle's exhaust entering the cabin by this route. Further the influence of three parameters: ambient tail-wind speed, vehicle ground clearance and tail pipe angle, is assessed. The study applies Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulation to the distribution of exhaust gasses around a vehicle motorized with a 2.2 liter Diesel engine. The simulation employs efficient meshing techniques and realistic loading conditions to develop a general knowledge of the distribution of the gasses in order to inform engineering design. The results show that increasing tail-wind velocity, tail-pipe angle and ground clearance reduces the presence of CO and NO at the HVAC intake.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Prashant Khapane, Uday Ganeshwade
Abstract Vehicle water wading capability refers to vehicle functional part integrity (e.g. engine under-tray, bumper cover, plastic sill cover etc.) when travelling through water. Wade testing involves vehicles being driven through different depths of water at various speeds. The test is repeated and under-body functional parts are inspected afterwards for damage. Lack of CAE capability for wading equates to late detection of failure modes which inevitably leads to expensive design change, and potentially affects program timing. It is thus of paramount importance to have a CAE capability in this area to give design loads to start with. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is used to model a vehicle travelling through water at various speeds. A non-classical CFD approach was deemed necessary to model this. To validate the method, experimental testing with a simplified block was done and then verified with CFD modelling. The simple rectangular block at two different speeds and three immersion depths in water was utilized for the purpose.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kelly Daly Flynn, Ionut C. Harta, J. David Schall
Tribological performance of tungsten sulfide (WS2) nanoparticles, microparticles and mixtures of the two were investigated. Previous research showed that friction and wear reduction can be achieved with nanoparticles. Often these improvements were mutually exclusive, or achieved under special conditions (high temperature, high vacuum) or with hard-to-synthesize inorganic-fullerene WS2 nanoparticles. This study aimed at investigating the friction and wear reduction of WS2 of nanoparticles and microparticles that can be synthesized in bulk and/or purchased off the shelf. Mixtures of WS2 nanoparticles and microparticles were also tested to see if a combination of reduced friction and wear would be achieved. The effect of the mixing process on the morphology of the particles was also reported. The microparticles showed the largest reduction in coefficient of friction while the nanoparticles showed the largest wear scar area reduction. Mixtures of nanoparticles and microparticles did not provide the desired combination of significant friction and wear reductions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Aaron Williams, Robert McCormick, Michael Lance, Chao Xie, Todd Toops, Rasto Brezny
Small impurities in the fuel can have a significant impact on the emissions control system performance over the lifetime of the vehicle. Of particular interest in recent studies has been the impact of sodium, potassium, and calcium that can be introduced either through fuel constituents, such as biodiesel, or as lubricant additives. In a collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a series of accelerated aging studies have been performed to understand the potential impact of these metals on the emissions control system. This paper explores the effect of the rate of accelerated aging on the capture of fuel-borne metal impurities in the emission control devices and the subsequent impact on performance. Aging was accelerated by doping the fuel with high levels of the metals of interest. Three separate evaluations were performed, each with a different rate of accelerated aging. The aged emissions control systems were evaluated through vehicle testing and then dissected for a more complete analysis of the devices.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Achombili Asango, Antonino La Rocca, Paul Shayler
Abstract The influence of size and concentration of carbon nanoparticle on the viscosity of an SAE 5W-30 lubricant oil has been investigated experimentally. Data were collected for oil samples drawn from sump of light duty automotive diesel engines. The average size of soot particles in the used oil samples was in the range of 180-320nm with concentrations ranging from 0 to 2 percentage by weight (wt. %.). A Brookfield DV-II Pro rotary viscometer was used to measure dynamic viscosity at low shear rates and temperatures of 40°C and 90°C. Nanoparticle concentration and particle size distribution were evaluated using Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) respectively. The viscosity of suspensions of graphite powder in lubricant oil was also investigated for concentrations ranging from 0 to 2 wt. %. The results show that dynamic viscosity increases with increasing soot content and decreasing temperature. Particle size effects are more significant for high soot content.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Alessandro Libriani
Abstract Synthetic rubber is used in automobiles for various applications. Tires, seals, gaskets, engine mounts, wiring cables and under the hood hoses are just a few examples. Synthetic rubber is a man-made material that uses several components as polymers, resins, carbon black, fillers, vulcanizing agents, reinforcement agents. It is a material that heavily depends on oil for its constituency, therefore it has a large carbon footprint. This study proposes the use of natural filler for automotive seals using synthetic rubber in order to reduce the impact on the environment. Calcium carbonate is the most preponderant choice as material filler because it is abundant in nature and is mined extensively. Calcium carbonate is also present in several structures in nature. Oyster shells have a great amount of it as well as egg shells. Egg shells also constitute an environmental bio-hazard when discarded in a landfill due to the organic inner membrane. The use of discarded egg shells is limited to few applications, mainly pharmaceutical.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tingting Zhang, Xiaomin Xie, Zhen Huang
Abstract The aim of this study is to evaluate the land requirement, energy consumption and GHG (greenhouse gases) emissions of microalgal biodiesel (M-BD) and Jatropha curcas seeds (J-BD) based biodiesel from the perspective of life cycle assessment (LCA). Mass and energy balance was used through the whole LCA calculation for each process. Two types of biodiesel (100% biodiesel: BD100, and 20% blends of biodiesel: BD20) were assumed to be combusted in the suitable diesel engine. Displacement method was adopted to measure the co-products credits. The results showed that the land requirement of producing 1 kg biodiesel from microalgae was about 1/31 of that from Jatropha curcas seeds. The well to pump (WTP) stage for microalgal biodiesel had higher fossil energy requirement but lower petroleum energy consumption and GHG emissions compared to Jatropha curcas and conventional diesel (CD). The WTP energy efficiency for J-BD100 and M-BD 100 were 26% and 17.4%, respectively. The feedstock growing stage of microalgae and Jatropha curcas was found to be the most fossil energy-intensive stage.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Atsushi Mizutani
Abstract This paper describes the development of high efficiency and compact bumper recycling equipment for facilitating bumper recycling globally. Various equipment to remove paint coat from bumper has been developed since 90s', using mechanical, physical or chemical method. However, it is difficult to promote bumper recycling without realizing cost effective overall system from paint coat removal to pelletizing. Our company jointly developed method of mechanically removing paint coat and has committed to bumper recycling in the form of outsourcing since 2000. In 2010, a dedicated plant for recycling bumpers was launched on the premises of our Oppama Assembly Plant in Japan. In the future, promoting bumper recycling at other overseas assembly plants is necessary as vehicle production will expand globally. Having more compact and cost effective recycling system compared to the one at the Oppama plant is required since the scale of the system including bumper crushing, paint coat removal, and pelletizing has to match processing capacity at these plants rather than equipping large one like Oppama's.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kenneth Rose, Heather Hamje, Liesbeth Jansen, Corrado Fittavolini, Richard Clark, Maria Dolores Cardenas Almena, Dimitris Katsaounis, Christos Samaras, Savas Geivanidis, Zissis Samaras
Modern diesel vehicles utilize two technologies, one fuel based and one hardware based, that have been motivated by recent European legislation: diesel fuel blends containing Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME) and Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF). Oxygenates, like FAME, are known to reduce PM formation in the combustion chamber and reduce the amount of soot that must be filtered from the engine exhaust by the DPF. This effect is also expected to lengthen the time between DPF regenerations and reduce the fuel consumption penalty that is associated with soot loading and regeneration. This study investigated the effect of FAME content, up to 50% v/v (B50), in diesel fuel on the DPF regeneration frequency by repeatedly running a Euro 5 multi-cylinder bench engine over the European regulatory cycle (NEDC) until a specified soot loading limit had been reached. The results verify the expected reduction of engine-out particulate mass (PM) emissions with increasing FAME content and the reduction in fuel economy penalty associated with reducing the frequency of DPF regenerations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Stephen Johnson, Peter Croswell, Michael Smith
Abstract “Zoning” a catalytic converter involves placing higher concentrations of platinum group metals (PGM) in the inlet portion of the substrate. This is done to optimize the cost-to-performance tradeoff by increasing the reaction rate at lower temperatures while minimizing PGM usage. A potentially useful application of catalyst zoning is to improve performance using a constant PGM mass. A study was performed to assess what the optimum ratio of front to rear palladium zone length is to achieve the highest performance in vehicle emission testing. Varying the zone ratio from 1:1 to 1:9 shows a clear hydrocarbon performance optimum at a 1:5.66 (15%/85%) split. This performance optimum shows as both a minimum in FTP75 non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions as well as a minimum in hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxide light-off temperature. Overall, an improvement of 18%, or 11 mg/mi of combined NMOG+NOx emissions was obtained without using additional PGM. This study shows how the competing forces of active PGM site concentration and available surface area interact in modern three way catalyst design.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tae-il Yoo, Hanhee Park, Gubae Kang, Seongyeop Lim
Abstract Development of eco-friendly vehicles have risen in importance due to fossil fuel depletion and the strengthened globalized emission control regulatory requirements. A lot of automotive companies have already developed and launched various types of eco-friendly vehicles which include hybrid vehicles (HEVs) or electric vehicles (EVs) to reduce fuel consumption. To maximize fuel economy Hyundai-Kia Motor Company has introduced eco-friendly vehicles which have downsized or eliminated vibration damping components such as a torque converter. Comparing with Internal Combustion Engine(ICE) powered vehicles, one issue of the electric motor propulsion system with minimized vibration damping components is NVH (Noise, Vibration and Harshness). The NVH problem is caused by output torque fluctuation of the motor system, resulting in the degradation of ride comfort and drivability. Therefore, accomplishing both fuel economy and good NVH performance has become a significantly challenging task in eco-friendly vehicles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hai Wu, Wen Chen, Meng-Feng Li, Xinlei Wang
Abstract A hot and cold water mixing process with a steam condenser and a chilled water heat exchanger is set up for an engine EGR fouling test. The test rig has water recycled in the loop of a pump, heat exchangers, a three-way mixing valve, and a test EGR unit. The target unit temperature is controlled by a heating, cooling and mixing process with individual valves regulating the flow-rate of saturated steam, chilled water and mixing ratio. The challenges in control design are the dead-time, interaction, nonlinearity and multivariable characteristics of heat exchangers, plus the flow recycle in the system. A systems method is applied to extract a simple linear model for control design. The method avoids the nonlinearity and interaction among different temperatures at inlet, outlet and flow-rate. The test data proves the effectiveness of systems analysis and modeling methodology. As a result, the first-order linear model facilitates the controller design. The simulation studies with internal recycle processes produced promising results.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yiqun Huang, John Colvin, Asanga Wijesinghe, Meng Wang, Deyang Hou, Zuhua Fang
Abstract Dual loop EGR systems (having both a high pressure loop EGR and a low pressure loop EGR) have been successfully applied to multiple light-duty diesel engines to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 and Euro 5/6 emissions regulations [1, 2], including the 2009 model year VW Jetta 2.0TDI. Hyundai and Toyota also published their studies with dual loop EGR systems [3, 4]. More interest exists on the low pressure loop EGR effects on medium to heavy duty applications [5]. Since the duty cycles of light duty diesel and heavy duty diesel applications are very different, how to apply the dual loop EGR systems to heavy duty applications and understanding their limitations are less documented and published. As a specific type of heavy duty application, this paper studied the dual loop EGR effects on the retrofit applications of heavy duty diesel for delivery and drayage applications. The reduction of NOx emissions and the impact on fuel economy and controls are discussed. The dual loop EGR systems were fully developed and demonstrated over the full engine speed and load range including transient conditions with a nearly 50% NOx reduction over light to medium loads for drayage truck applications relative to the 2004 emissions level.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, Alberto Vassallo, Richard C. Peterson, Joaquin De la Morena
Abstract Future diesel combustion systems may operate with significantly higher levels of boost and EGR than used with present systems. The potential benefits of higher boost and EGR were studied experimentally in a single-cylinder diesel engine with capability to adjust these parameters independently. The objective was to study the intake and exhaust conditions with a more optimum combustion phasing to minimize fuel consumption while maintaining proper constraints on emissions and combustion noise. The engine was tested at four part-load operating points using a Design of Experiments (DOE) approach. Two of the operating points correspond to low-speed and low-load conditions relevant for the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). The other two points focus on medium load conditions representative of the World-wide harmonized Light-duty Test Procedures (WLTP). For the NEDC relevant conditions, improved fuel consumption was not achievable due to combustion noise constraints and the requirement for a very high turbocharger efficiency improvement of more than 20%.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Scott Skeen, Julien Manin, Lyle Pickett, Kristine Dalen, Anders Ivarsson
Abstract Quantitative measurements of the total radiative heat transfer from high-pressure diesel spray flames under a range of conditions will enable engine modelers to more accurately understand and predict the effects of advanced combustion strategies on thermal loads and efficiencies. Moreover, the coupling of radiation heat transfer to soot formation processes and its impact on the temperature field and gaseous combustion pollutants is also of great interest. For example, it has been shown that reduced soot formation in diesel engines can result in higher flame temperatures (due to less radiative cooling) leading to greater NOx emissions. Whereas much of the previous work in research engines has evaluated radiation based on two- or three-color detection with limited spatial resolution, this work uses an imaging spectrometer in conjunction with a constant volume pre-burn vessel to quantify soot temperatures, optical thickness, and total radiation with spatial and spectral (360-700 nm) resolution along the flame axis.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tadanori Yanai, Xiaoye Han, Meiping Wang, Graham T. Reader, Ming Zheng, Jimi Tjong
Abstract The study investigated the characteristics of the combustion, the emissions and the thermal efficiency of a direct injection diesel engine fuelled with neat n-butanol. Engine tests were conducted on a single cylinder four-stroke direct injection diesel engine. The engine ran at 6.5 bar IMEP and 1500 rpm engine speed. The intake pressure was boosted to 1.0 bar (gauge), and the injection pressure was controlled at 60 or 90 MPa. The injection timing and the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate were adjusted to investigate the engine performance. The effect of the engine load on the engine performance was also investigated. The test results showed that the n-butanol fuel had significantly longer ignition delay than that of diesel fuel. n-Butanol generally led to a rapid heat release pattern in a short period, which resulted in an excessively high pressure rise rate. The pressure rise rate could be moderated by retarding the injection timing and lowering the injection pressure. The applicable window of the injection timing for the n-butanol fuel was much narrower than that of the conventional diesel fuel because of the constraints of misfiring and excessive pressure rise rate.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Erica King, David Wallace, E. Robert Becker
Abstract Platinum Group Metal (PGM) use is dominated by the automotive industry. The PGM market is sensitive to shifts in the drivers for emission control and the delicate supply-demand balance. Technology shifts in the emission control industry are particularly impactful because of the automotive market's dominance and the consequent ability to significantly affect metal prices. On the supply side, evolving ore ratios of platinum, palladium and rhodium, production ramp-up times, geopolitical factors, and labor relations contribute to a challenging production environment. This is mitigated by a growing above-ground supply from spent autocatalysts. The availability of spent autocatalyst is critical to alleviate the pressure on primary supply and is especially important in light of the hurdles primary PGM producers face. This paper reviews technology developments, legislative drivers, and consumer trends in the automotive industry and their impact on PGM demand. Evolving emission regulations for criteria pollutants around the world put pressure on catalyst performance and durability while greenhouse gas standards bring new challenges to the operating environment of these catalysts.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Anne Marie Lewis, Gregory Keoleian, Jarod Kelly
Abstract As lightweight materials and advanced combustion engines are being used in both conventional and electrified vehicles with diverse fuels, it is necessary to evaluate the individual and combined impact of these technologies to reduce energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This work uses life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the total energy and GHG emissions for baseline and lightweight internal combustion vehicles (ICVs), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) when they are operated with baseline and advanced gasoline and ethanol engines. Lightweight vehicle models are evaluated with primary body-in-white (BIW) mass reductions using aluminum and advanced/high strength steel (A/HSS) and secondary mass reductions that include powertrain re-sizing. Advanced engine/fuel strategies are included in the vehicle models with fuel economy maps developed from single cylinder engine models. Results show that while the ethanol engine has the highest efficiency and therefore, highest MPGe, the increased energy required to produce ethanol outweighs this benefit.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Susanna Paz, Rosa Delgado, David Riba
Abstract Currently, regulations on vehicle evaporative emissions only focus on the sum of Total Hydrocarbons (THC) without taking into account either the detailed hydrocarbon composition nor other chemicals besides hydrocarbons emitted from gasoline evaporation. As a consequence, this composition, also known as speciation, is not always noted and is even more unknown when biofuels such as ethanol are introduced in the market. Furthermore, these regulations do not differentiate the source of these emissions in the vehicle. The programme described in this paper is designed to investigate the influence of the addition of ethanol to gasoline on evaporative emissions. It has tried to go one step ahead of these directives obtaining more detailed characterization of these evaporative emissions. The programme has enabled a list of compounds (methanol, ethanol, aldehydes, ketones and hydrocarbons) to be determined in evaporative emissions among different ethanol-gasoline fuels (E0, E5-S, E10 and E85), applied to Euro 4 and Flexifuel vehicles by three chromatographic methods based on California Air Resources Board (CARB).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Francesco Catapano, Silvana Di Iorio, Paolo Sementa, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Abstract The objective of this paper is the evaluation of the effect of the fuel properties and the comparison of a PFI and GDI injection system on the performances and on particle emission in a Spark Ignition engine. Experimental investigation was carried out in a small single cylinder engine for two wheel vehicles. The engine displacement was 250 cc. It was equipped with a prototype GDI head and also with an injector in the intake manifold. This makes it possible to run the engine both in GDI and PFI configurations. The engine was fuelled with neat gasoline and ethanol, and ethanol/gasoline blends at 10% v/v, 50% v/v and 85% v/v. The engine was equipped of a quartz pressure transducer that was flush-mounted in the region between intake and exhaust valves. Tests were carried out at 3000 rpm and 4000 rpm full load and two different lambda conditions. These engine points were chosen as representative of urban driving conditions. The gaseous emissions and particle concentration were measured at the exhaust by means of conventional instruments.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Claire Boland, Robb DeKleine, Aditi Moorthy, Gregory Keoleian, Hyung Chul Kim, Ellen Lee, Timothy J. Wallington
Abstract Automakers have the opportunity to utilize bio-based composite materials to lightweight cars while replacing conventional, nonrenewable resource materials. In this study, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is used to understand the potential benefits and tradeoffs associated with the implementation of bio-based composite materials in automotive component production. This cradle-to-grave approach quantifies the fiber and resin production as well as material processing, use, and end of life for both a conventional glass-reinforced polypropylene component as well as a cellulose-reinforced polypropylene component. The comparison is calculated for an exterior component on a high performance vehicle. The life cycle primary energy consumption and global warming potential (GWP) are evaluated. Reduced GWP associated with the alternative component are due to the use of biomass as process energy and carbon sequestration, in addition to the alternative material component's lightweighting effect.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Cheng Tan, Hongming Xu, He Ma, Akbar Ghafourian
Abstract Transient operation is frequently used by vehicle engines and the exhaust emissions from the engine are mostly higher than those under the steady station. An experimental study has been conducted to investigate the effect of various valve timings and spark timings on combustion characteristics and particle emissions from a modern 3.0-liter Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) passenger car engine. The transient condition was simulated by load increase from 5% to 15% at a constant engine speed with different settings of valve timings and spark timings. The transient particle emission measurement was carried out by a Cambustion DMS500 particulate analyser. The combustion characteristics of the engine during transient operation including cycle-by-cycle combustion variations were analyzed. The time-resolved particle number, particulate mass and particle size distribution were compared and analyzed between different engine settings. The existing transient lambda control cannot maintain stoichiometric combustion in the transition.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Teresa Donateo, Fabio Ingrosso, Daniele Bruno, Domenico Laforgia
Abstract This investigation describes the results of an experimental and numerical research project aimed at comparing mileage and CO2 emissions from two different commercial versions of Daimler AG Smart ForTwo car: conventional (gasoline) and electric (ED). The investigation includes numerical simulations with the AVL CRUISE software package and on-board acquisitions. A data acquisition system has been designed for this purpose and assembled on board of the Smart ED. The system is composed by a GPS antenna with USB interface, two current transducers, a NI-DAQ device and a netbook computer with a LabView-VI. This system provided on-board information about driving cycle and current flows, gathered simultaneously by GPS, transducers and NI-DAQ. The system was also used to evaluate the losses of energy during the recharge of the electric car. The two cars have been tested over a wide range of driving conditions related to different routes, traffic conditions and use of on-board accessories (i.e.
Viewing 181 to 210 of 22380

Filter

  • Article
    1042
  • Book
    74
  • Collection
    38
  • Magazine
    497
  • Technical Paper
    20119
  • Subscription
    2
  • Standard
    608