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Viewing 151 to 180 of 24422
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1328
Yoshiteru Tanaka, Jun Yamamura, Atsushi Murakawa, Hiroshi Tanaka, Tsuyoshi Yasuki
Abstract When vehicles run on the flooded road, water enters to the engine compartment and sometimes reaches the position of the air intake duct and electrical parts and causes the reliability problems. Numerical simulation is an effective tool for this phenomenon because it can not only evaluate the water level before experiment but also identify the intrusion route. Recently, the gap around the engine cooling modules tends to become smaller and the undercover tends to become bigger than before in order to enhance the vehicle performance (e.g., aerodynamics, exterior noise). Leakage tightness around the engine compartment becomes higher and causes an increase of the buoyancy force from the water. Therefore the vehicle attitude change is causing a greater impact on the water level. This paper describes the development of a water level prediction method in engine compartment while running on the flooded road by using the coupled multibody and fluid dynamics.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1327
Prashant Khapane, Vivek Chavan, Uday Ganeshwade
Physical testing of a vehicle wading through water is performed to gauge the capability of a vehicle to traverse through shallow to deep levels of water; wherein various vehicle performance parameters are observed, recorded and analysed. Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) has instigated and established a comprehensive CAE test procedure for the assessing the same, which makes use of overset mesh (in a CFD environment) for a non-traditional approach to vehicle motion. An extended simulation methodology, making use of the passive scalar model has been established to understand water impingement and splashing in a greater detail, which are the two critical performance parameters during vehicle wading. A passive scalar acts as a pseudo catalyst in the target fluid phase of the multiphase CFD simulation.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1322
Kunihiko Yoshitake, Hiroyuki Tateyama, Atsushi Ogawa
Abstract Vehicles are required durability in various environments all over the world. Especially water resistance on flooded roads is one of the important issues. To solve this kind of problem, a CFD technology was established in order to predict the water resistance performance of the vehicle at the early development stage. By comparison with vehicle tests on flooded roads, it is clarified the following key factors are required for accurate prediction; the vehicle velocity change, the vehicle height change and the air intake flow rate. Moreover, these three key factors should be appropriately determined from vehicle and engine specification to predict water intrusion for flooded roads at the early stage of development. In this paper, a methodology which determines appropriate analysis conditions mentioned above for flooding simulation from vehicle and engine specification is described. The methodology enables us to determine whether the vehicle provides sufficient waterproofness.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1511
Anton Kabanovs, Graham Hodgson, Andrew Garmory, Martin Passmore, Adrian Gaylard
The motivation for this paper is to consider the effect of rear end geometry on rear soiling using a representative generic SUV body. In particular the effect of varying the top slant angle is considered using both experiment and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Previous work has shown that slant angle has a significant effect on wake shape and drag and here we extend this to investigate the effect on rear soiling. It is hoped that this work can provide an insight into the likely effect of such geometry changes on the soiling of similarly shaped road vehicles. To increase the generality of results, and to allow comparison with previously obtained aerodynamic data, a 25% scale generic SUV model is used in the Loughborough University Large Wind Tunnel. UV doped water is sprayed from a position located at the bottom of the left rear tire to simulate the creation of spray from this tire.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0604
Christian Friedrich, Yves Compera, Matthias Auer, Gunnar Stiesch, Georg Wachtmeister
Abstract Improving fuel efficiency while meeting relevant emission limits set by emissions legislation is among the main objectives of engine development. Simultaneously the development costs and development time have to be steadily reduced. For these reasons, the high demands in terms of quality and validity of measurements at the engine test bench are continuously rising. This paper will present a new methodology for efficient testing of an industrial combustion engine in order to improve the process of decision making for combustion-relevant component setups. The methodology includes various modules for increasing measurement quality and validity. Modules like stationary point detection to determine steady state engine behavior, signal quality checks to monitor the signal quality of chosen measurement signals and plausibility checks to evaluate physical relations between several measurement signals ensure a high measurement quality over all measurements.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0535
Chih-Kuang Kuan, Daniel Styles, Mitchell Bieniek, John Hoard
Thermal effectiveness of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) coolers used in diesel engines can progressively decrease and stabilize over time due to inner fouling layer of the cooler tubes. Thermophoretic force has been identified as the major cause of diesel exhaust soot fouling, and models are proposed in the literature but improvements in simulation are needed especially for the long-term trend of soot deposition. To describe the fouling stabilization behavior, a removal mechanism is required to account for stabilization of the soot layer. Observations from previous experiments on surrogate circular tubes suggest there are three primary factors to determine removal mechanisms: surface temperature, thickness, and shear velocity. Based on this hypothesis, we developed a 1D CFD fouling model for predicting the thermal effectiveness reduction of real EGR coolers. The model includes the two competing mechanisms mentioned that results in fouling balance.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1221
Shingo Soma, Haruhiko shimizu, Eiji Shirado, Satoshi Fujishiro
There have been calls for the automotive industry to reduce CO2 emissions in consideration of the impact on the global environment, and increasing efforts are being made to develop electric vehicles. Heavy rare earth - iron - boron magnets (neodymium magnets) have the largest maximum energy product (BH)max among current magnets, and are used in the driving motors of hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles. However, these operating environments have high temperatures and strong diamagnetic fields, so magnets need high heat resistance, or high coercive force (Hcj). To support this need, heavy rare earth elements (Dy, Tb) with high anisotropic magnetic fields are added to increase Hcj. However, deposits of these elements are unevenly distributed around the world and the ratio of heavy rare earth elements in ores is one tenth or less that of light rare earth elements.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1249
Masahiro Seguchi
Compact, high efficiency and high reliability is required for an xEV motor generator. IPM rotors with neodymium magnet are widely applied for xEV motors to achieve these requirements. However, the neodymium magnet material has a big impact on motor cost and there is supply chain risk due to increased usage of these rare earth materials for future automotive xEV’s. On the other hand, a wound-field rotor does not need magnets and can achieve equivalent performance to an IPM rotor. However, brushes are required in order to supply current to the winding coil of the rotor. This may cause insulation issues on xEV motors which utilize high voltage and high currents. Therefore, it can be suggested to develop a system which supplies electric energy to the rotor field winding coil from stator without brushes by applying a transformer between stator coil and rotor field winding. Specifically, add auxiliary magnetic poles between each field winding poles and wind sub-coils to these poles.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0540
Vincenzo De Bellis, Fabio Bozza, Luigi Teodosio, Gerardo Valentino
Abstract In this work, a promising technique, consisting of a liquid Water Injection (WI) at the intake ports, is investigated to overcome over-fueling and delayed combustions typical of downsized boosted engines, operating at high loads. In a first stage, experimental tests are carried out in a spark-ignition twin-cylinder turbocharged engine at a fixed rotational speed and medium-high loads. In particular, a spark timing and a water-to-fuel ratio sweep are both specified, to analyze the WI capability in increasing the knock-limited spark advance. In a second stage, the considered engine is schematized in a 1D framework. The model, developed in the GT-Power™ environment, includes user defined procedures for the description of combustion and knock phenomena. Computed results are compared with collected data for all the considered operating conditions, in terms of average performance parameters, in-cylinder pressure cycles, burn rate profiles, and knock propensity, as well.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0584
Haksu Kim, Jaewook Shin, Myoungho Sunwoo
Abstract With fuel efficiency becoming an increasingly critical aspect of internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, the necessity for research on efficient generation of electric energy has been growing. An energy management (EM) system controls the generation of electric energy using an alternator. This paper presents a strategy for the EM using a control mode switch (CMS) of the alternator for the (ICE) vehicles. This EM recovers the vehicle’s residual kinetic energy to improve the fuel efficiency. The residual kinetic energy occurs when a driver manipulates a vehicle to decelerate. The residual energy is commonly wasted as heat energy of the brake. In such circumstances, the wasted energy can be converted to electric energy by operating an alternator. This conversion can reduce additional fuel consumption. For extended application of the energy conversion, the future duration time of the residual power is exploited.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0639
Michael H. Shelby, Thomas G. Leone, Kevin D. Byrd, Frank K. Wong
Continued pressure to reduce CO2 emissions and to improve fuel economy has resulted in many studies to increase engine efficiency. Increasing compression ratio is one of the most fundamental ways to reduce fuel consumption, but the compression ratio in practical gasoline engines is limited by knock. Presented in this paper is a study of the fuel economy opportunity of applying variable compression ratio technology to a modern downsized, boosted engine. Part throttle fuel consumption and full load performance were both considered. Load sweeps were conducted experimentally on a multi cylinder GTDI engine at several compression ratios and with a matrix of fuel octanes. Results from these experiments were compared to existing BTE vs CR correlations from the literature and were then used to estimate the metro highway fuel economy benefit of two step and continuously variable compression ratio concepts.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0643
Thompson Lanzanova, Macklini Dalla Nora, Hua Zhao
The more strict legislation for internal combustion engines CO2 emissions demands higher engine efficiency. The use of renewable fuels, such as bioethanol, may play a vital role to reduce not only CO2 emissions but also oil dependency. An option to increase spark ignition (SI) four stroke engine efficiency is to use the so called over-expanded cycle concepts by variation of the valve events. The use of an early or late inlet valve closure reduces pumping losses (the main cause of the part load low efficiency in SI engines) and decreases the effective compression ratio. The higher expansion to compression ratio leads to better use of the produced work and also increases engine efficiency. This study presents the engine combustion, performance and emissions of the unthrottled stoichiometric operation of a four valves four stroke single cylinder camless engine.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0644
Michael Pontoppidan, Adm José baeta
Vehicle emissions significantly increase the atmospheric air pollution and the green house gas (GHG) effect. This fact together with a fast global vehicle fleet growth requires a scientific technological solution, which introduces a significant reduction of vehicle fleet fuel consumption and emission to comply with future legislation. As a response to this requirement a prototype engine equipped with a torch ignition system and designed for stratified mixture conditions was made. The design is based on a commercial baseline engine layout. In this system, the combustion starts in a pre-chamber, where the pressure increase pushes the combustion jet flames through calibrated nozzles to be precisely targeted into the main combustion chamber. The combustion jet flames have high thermal and kinetic energy being able to promote a stable lean combustion process through enhanced mixture stratification.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0648
Dennis Robertson, Christopher Chadwell, Terrence Alger, Jacob Zuehl, Raphael Gukelberger, Bradley Denton, Ian Smith
Dedicated EGR (D-EGR) is a novel EGR strategy that uses in-cylinder reformation to improve fuel economy and reduce emissions. The entire exhaust of a sub-group of power cylinders (dedicated cylinders) is routed directly into the intake. These cylinders can be run fuel-rich, producing H2 and CO (reformate), with the potential to improve combustion stability, knock tolerance, and burn duration. A 2.0 L turbocharged D-EGR engine was packaged into a 2012 Buick Regal and evaluated on drive cycle performance. City and highway fuel consumption were reduced by 13% and 9%, respectively. NOx + NMOG were 31 mg/mile, well below the Tier 2 Bin 5 limit, and just outside the LEV-III limit (30 mg/mile).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0647
Bradley Denton, Christopher Chadwell, Raphael Gukelberger, Terrence Alger
The Dedicated EGR (D-EGR®) engine has shown improved efficiency and emissions while minimizing the challenges of traditional cooled EGR. The concept combines the benefits of cooled EGR with additional improvements resulting from in-cylinder fuel reformation. The fuel reformation takes place in the dedicated cylinder, which is also responsible for producing the diluents for the engine (EGR). The D-EGR system does present its own set of challenges. Because only one out of four cylinders is providing all of the dilution and reformate for the engine, there are three “missing” EGR pulses and problems with EGR distribution to all 4 cylinders exist. In testing, distribution problems were realized which led to poor engine operation. To address these spatial and temporal mixing challenges, a distribution mixer was developed and tested which improved cylinder-to-cylinder and cycle-to-cycle variation of EGR rate through improved EGR distribution.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0674
Benjamin Matthew Wolk, Isaac Ekoto
Pulsed nanosecond discharges (PND) can achieve ignition in internal combustion engines through enhanced reaction kinetics as a result of elevated electron energies without the associated increases in translational gas temperature that cause electrode erosion. Atomic oxygen (O), including its electronically excited states, is thought to be a key species in promoting low-temperature ignition. In this paper, high-voltage (17-24 kV peak) PND are examined in oxygen/nitrogen/carbon dioxide/water mixtures at engine-relevant densities (up to 9.1 kg/m^3) through pressure-rise calorimetry and direct imaging of excited-state O-atom and molecular nitrogen (N2) in an optically accessible spark calorimeter, with the anode/cathode gap distance set to 5 mm or with an anode-only configuration (DC corona). The conversion efficiency of pulse electrical energy into thermal energy was measured for PND with secondary streamer breakdown (SSB) and similar low-temperature plasmas (LTP) without.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0581
Stephen C. Burke, Matthew Ratcliff, Robert McCormick, Robert Rhoads, Bret Windom
Abstract In some studies, a relationship has been observed between increasing ethanol content in gasoline and increased particulate matter (PM) emissions from vehicles equipped with spark ignition engines. The fundamental cause of the PM increase seen for moderate ethanol concentrations is not well understood. Ethanol features a greater heat of vaporization (HOV) than gasoline and also influences vaporization by altering the liquid and vapor composition throughout the distillation process. A droplet vaporization model was developed to explore ethanol’s effect on the evaporation of aromatic compounds known to be PM precursors. The evolving droplet composition is modeled as a distillation process, with non-ideal interactions between oxygenates and hydrocarbons accounted for using UNIFAC group contribution theory. Predicted composition and distillation curves were validated by experiments.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0863
Bader Almansour, Sami Alawadhi, Subith Vasu
One of the most promising platforms for cellulosic biofuel generation is to harness the metabolic processes of endophytic fungi that directly convert lignocellulosic material into a variety of volatile organic compounds. The biofuel co-development framework was initiated at Sandia National Labs. Here, the synthetic biologists develop and engineer a new platform for drop-in fuel production from lignocellulosic biomass, using several endophytic fungi including Hypoxylon CI-4A, CO27-A, and Daldinia EC-12. Hence this process has the potential advantage that expensive pretreatment and fuel refining stages can be optimized thereby allowing scalability and cost reduction-two major considerations for widespread biofuel utilization. Large concentrations of ketones along with other volatile organic compounds (VOC’s) were produced by Hypoxylon CO27-A grown over swtichgrass media.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0899
Paul Dekraker, John Kargul, Andrew Moskalik, Kevin Newman, Mark Doorlag, Daniel Barba
The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis (ALPHA) tool was created to estimate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from light-duty vehicles. ALPHA is a physics-based, forward-looking, full vehicle computer simulation capable of analyzing various vehicle types with different powertrain technologies, showing realistic vehicle behavior, and auditing of internal energy flows in the model. In preparation for the midterm evaluation (MTE) of the 2017-2025 light-duty GHG emissions rule, ALPHA has been updated utilizing using newly acquired data from model year 2013-2015 engines and vehicles.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0926
Kentaro Iwasaki
Abstract The diesel particulate filter (DPF) has been used in the automobile industry for around a decade. As a key technology for emissions control the DPF design needs to be increasingly optimized to expand its function to deal with any emission not just particulate matter (PM). NOx emission regulations need to be met as well as CO2 targets through minimizing any fuel penalty. Cost is extremely important to deliver an effective after-treatment catalyst. Aluminum titanate and cordierite-based material DPFs are very cost effective in part because their properties allow monolith-manufacturing. Furthermore, geometrical design of the DPF channel structure can contribute to multi-functionalization of the DPF to provide further advantages. Square and asymmetric square-designed channel structures have been utilized on current after-treatment DPF systems.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0927
Carl Justin Kamp, Shawn Zhang, Sujay Bagi, Victor Wong, Greg Monahan, Alexander Sappok, Yujun Wang
Diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment components, especially the diesel particulate filter (DPF), are subject to various modes of degradation over their lifetimes. One form of DPF degradation is the significant rise in pressure drop due to the accumulation of engine lubricant-derived ash which coats the inlet channel walls effectively decreasing the permeability of the wall. The decreased permeability due to ash in the DPF can result in increased filter pressure drop and decreased fuel economy. A unique two-step approach, consisting of experimental measurements and direct numerical simulations using ultra-high resolution 3D imaging data, has been utilized in this study to better understand the effects of ash accumulation on engine aftertreatment component functionality. In this study, ash permeability was directly measured on the surface of ceramic (cordierite) wafers as a function of ash type (field ash, lab-generated and with chemical/morphological variations) and packing density.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0918
Joseph R. Theis, Andrew Getsoian, Christine Lambert
In anticipation that stoichiometric gasoline engines of the future will have improved fuel efficiency and therefore lower exhaust temperatures during low load operation, a project was initiated in 2014 to develop three-way catalysts (TWC) with significantly improved activity at lower temperatures while maintaining the thermal durability of current TWCs. This project is a collaboration between the Ford Motor Company, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the University of Michigan and is being funded by the US Department of Energy. The ultimate goal is to show progress towards the USDRIVE goal of 90% conversion of hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) at 150oC.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0925
Tatsuro Sugino, Eriko Tanaka, Huong Tran, Norihiko Aono
Diesel particulate filter (DPF) has been an essential aftertreatment component for reducing particulate matter (PM) emission for diesel engine vehicles thereby meeting stringent emission regulations. Installation of DPF can achieve high filtration efficiency; however PM filtration causes high pressure drop due to deep bed filtration. Although periodic PM regeneration is needed for keeping low pressure drop, it causes significant deterioration in fuel efficiency. Improving the efficiency of PM regeneration and low pressure drop are major challenges for DPF to meet future CO2 emission regulations. In this paper, a novel morphological catalyst layer for DPF was presented. This catalyst layer located in wall surface of inlet DPF channels and formed highly porous and 3 dimension meshwork shape. These features enhanced not only preventing deep bed filtration for low pressure drop, but also soot-catalyst contact for fast PM regeneration rate.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1276
Aditi Moorthy, Robert De Kleine, Gregory Keoleian, Jeremy Good, Geoff Lewis
The problem of accessibility to public transit is a well-documented problem in transportation theory and network literature known as the “Last Mile” problem. A lack of first and last mile specific transit services impairs access to public transit causing commuters to opt for private modes of transit over public modes of transit. This paper analyzes the implications of a shared autonomous vehicle (AV) taxi system providing last mile specific transit services in terms of environmental, cost, and performance metrics. Conventional public transit options along with a hypothetical last-mile shared autonomous vehicle (SAV) system are analyzed for transit between Ann Arbor and Detroit Wayne County Airport for life cycle energy, emissions, total travel time, and travel costs. In the case study, energy savings from using public transit options with AV last mile service were as high as 39% when compared to a personal vehicle (parking) option.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1639
Gerard W. Malaczynski, Gregory Roth
Abstract Onboard diagnostic regulations require performance monitoring of diesel particulate filters used in vehicle aftertreatment systems. Delphi has developed a particulate matter (PM) sensor to perform this function. The objective of this sensor is to monitor the soot (PM) concentration in the exhaust downstream of the diesel particulate filter which provides a means to calculate filter efficiency. The particulate matter sensor monitors the deposition of soot on its internal sensing element by measuring the resistance of the deposit. Correlations are established between the soot resistance and soot mass deposited on the sensing element. Currently, the sensor provides the time interval between sensor regeneration cycles, which, with the knowledge of the exhaust gas flow parameters, is correlated to the average soot concentration.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0691
Louis-Marie Malbec, Julian Kashdan
Previous experimental data obtained in constant volume combustion vessels have shown that soot-free diffusive flames can be achieved in a Diesel spray if the equivalence ratio at the flame lift-off location is below 2. The so-called Leaner Lifted-Flame Combustion (LLFC) strategy is a promising approach to limit the levels of in-cylinder soot produced in Diesel engines and potentially reduce the dependence on the Diesel particulate filter. However, implementing such strategies in light-duty engines is not straightforward due to the effects of charge confinement , non-steady boundary conditions and spray-spray interactions compared to the simplified configuration of a free-jet in a constant-volume combustion vessel. The present study aims at trying to gain a better understanding of the requirements in terms of injector and engine settings in order to reach the LLFC regime in a light-duty engine. Experiments were performed on a 0.5L single-cylinder optical engine.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0695
Ezio Spessa, Stefano D'Ambrosio, Daniele Iemmolo, Alessandro Mancarella, Roberto Vitolo, Gilles Hardy
In order to meet the continuously stringent standards in terms of pollutant emissions and fuel consumption from combustion engines of road vehicles, several investigations have been recently conducted about in-cylinder techniques and aftertreatment systems. In particular, the control of the fuel injected quantity and of the center of combustion (MFB50) performed cylinder-by-cylinder can effectively provide advantages in terms of pollutant formation and fuel consumption. In the present investigation, an experimental comparison among different control strategies is performed in a heavy-duty 3.0 L Euro VI diesel engine. The first control strategy is the standard one originally implemented in the ECU, whereas the other two are referred to as model-based and pressure-based combustion controls and have been implemented by means of rapid prototyping and proper hardware device connected to the ECU.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0704
Noriyuki Takada, Takeshi Hashizume, Terutoshi Tomoda, Kazuhisa Inagaki, Kiyomi Kawamura
Generally, soot emission is increased in smaller bore-size diesel engine than larger one because spray-impingement on cavity wall is more significant, while keeping at constant specific output power. The objective of study is to clarify what constraints are necessary for engine/nozzle specifications and injection conditions to achieve the same combustion characteristics (such as heat release rate and emissions) in diesel engines with different bore sizes. In the first report, ‘Geometrical similarity’ was applied to the two different bore-size engines, which have similarity shape of piston cavity. Then, smoke of smaller engine is larger. This is because air entrainment decreases due to shrinking of spray angle. A new spray design method has been proposed to suppress soot emission called as ‘Spray characteristics similarity’.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0714
Qinglong Tang, Haifeng Liu, Mingfa Yao
Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) is a potential combustion strategy to achieve high engine efficiency with ultra-low NOx and soot emissions. Fuel stratification can be used to control the heat release rate of RCCI combustion. But the in-cylinder combustion process of the RCCI under different fuel stratification degrees has not been well understood, especially at a higher engine load. In this paper, simultaneous measurement of natural flame luminosity and emission spectra was carried out on a light-duty optical RCCI engine under different fuel stratification degrees. The engine was run at 1200 revolutions per minute under a load about 7 bar indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP). In order to form fuel stratification degrees from low to high, the common-rail injection timing of n-heptane was changed from -180° CA after top dead center (ATDC) to -10° CA ATDC, while the iso-octane delivered in the intake stroke was fixed.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0716
Randy Hessel, Zongyu Yue, Rolf Reitz, Mark Musculus, Jacqueline O'Connor
The goal of this paper is to present guidelines for interpreting soot natural luminosity images that are taken from within the combustion chamber of a single-cylinder research engine, which is fitted with a window in the piston-crown. In the experiments, fuel is injected near top-dead-center and luminosity from soot that forms as a result of the combustion process is imaged. Then, CFD simulations are run, from which soot luminosity and in-cylinder soot distributions are predicted. A luminosity to soot-distribution transfer function is developed from the CFD results and the transfer function is subsequently applied to the experimentally-obtained luminosity images in order to approximate soot distributions in the physical engine with improved accuracy. This method is applied to multiple operating conditions in order to develop the guidelines presented herein. Although this work builds on previous efforts, this is the authors’ first published work on this particular topic.
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