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Viewing 151 to 180 of 22873
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0997
Jonas Jansson, Åsa Johansson, Hanna Sjovall, Mikael Larsson, Gudmund Smedler, Colin Newman, Jason Pless
Abstract This paper will review several different emission control systems for heavy duty diesel (HDD) applications aimed at future legislations. The focus will be on the (DOC+CSF+SCR+ASC) configuration. As of today, various SCR technologies are used on commercial vehicles around the globe. Moving beyond EuroVI/US10 emission levels, both fuel consumption savings and higher catalyst system efficiency are required. Therefore, significant system optimization has to be considered. Examples of this include: catalyst development, optimized thermal management, advanced urea dosing calibrations, and optimized SCR inlet NO:NO2 ratios. The aim of this paper is to provide a thorough system screening using a range of advanced SCR technologies, where the pros and cons from a system perspective will be discussed. Further optimization of selected systems will also be reviewed. The results suggest that current legislation requirements can be met for all SCR catalysts under investigation.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0990
Brett M. Bailey
This paper details the development of Cool Particulate Regeneration™, CPR™, an ultra-efficient non-thermal active particulate filter regeneration technology for gasoline and diesel particulate filters. In the technologies simplest form, mechanical two-way regeneration valves are sequentially and in rapid succession pneumatically actuated to induce a reverse flow filter cleaning. Their operation generates exhaust pressure by sealing off the exhaust system preventing filtered engine exhaust from exiting the tailpipe. The filtered and pressurized gases are then released to a separate low pressure particulate matter (PM) reservoir upstream of the filter. The reverse flow of high pressure filtered exhaust gases pass back though the filter physically dislodging the particulate and transporting it to the low pressure storage chamber. Innovative utilization of the particulate matter is discussed. CPR has undergone bench testing and two generations of research and development.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0789
Jongyoon Lee, Sangyul Lee, Jungho Kim, Duksang Kim
Abstract This paper shows development challenges for 6 liter heavy duty off-road diesel engines to meet the Tier4 final emission regulations with a base diesel engine compliant with Tier4 interim emission regulations. Even if an after-treatment system helps to reduce emissions, quite amount of particulate matters (PM) reduction is still necessary since a diesel particulate filter (DPF) system is supposed to be excluded in Tier4 final diesel engine. The objective of this research is to see if the base engine has a feasibility to meet Tier4 final emission regulations by a change of piston bowl geometry without DPF. Quite amount of PM can be reduced by piston bowl geometry because piston bowl geometry is a very important part that enhances air and fuel mixing process that help the combustion process.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0800
Yann Gallo, Johan Simonsson, Ted Lind, Per-Erik Bengtsson, Henrik Bladh, Oivind Andersson
Abstract Two competing in-cylinder processes, soot formation and soot oxidation, govern soot emissions from diesel engines. Previous studies have shown a lack of correlation between the soot formation rate and soot emissions. The current experiment focuses on the correlation between soot oxidation rates and soot emissions. Laser extinction is measured using a red (690nm) laser beam, which is sent vertically through the cylinder. This wavelength is long enough to minimize absorption interference from poly-aromatic hydrocarbons, while still in the visible regime. It is modulated at 72 kHz in order to produce 10 pulses per crank angle degree at an engine speed of 1200 rpm. The intake oxygen concentration is varied between 9% and 21%. The time resolved extinction measurements are used to estimate soot oxidation rates during expansion.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0854
Jeongwoo Lee, Sanghyun Chu, Jaehyuk Cha, Hoimyung Choi, Kyoungdoug Min
Abstract In this work, the operating strategy for diesel injection methods and a way to control the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate under dual-fuel PCCI combustion with an appropriate ratio of low-reactivity fuel (propane) to achieve high combustion stability and low emissions is introduced. The standards of combustion stability were carbon monoxide (CO) emissions below 5,000 ppm and a CoV of the indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) below 5 %. Additionally, the NOx emissions was controlled to not exceed 50 ppm, which is the standard of conventional diesel combustion, and PM emissions was kept below 0.2 FSN, which is a tenth of the conventional diesel value without a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The operating condition was a low speed and load condition (1,500 rpm/ near gIMEP of 0.55 MPa).
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1036
Lei Liu, Zhijun Li, Boxi Shen
Abstract Ensuring lower emissions and better economy (fuel economy and after-treatment economy) simultaneously is the pursuit of future engines. An EGR-LNT synergetic control system was applied to a modified lean-burn CA3GA2 gasoline engine. Results showed that the synergetic control system can achieve a better NOx reduction than sole EGR and sole LNT within a proper range of upstream EGR rate and without the penalty in fuel consumption. It also has the potential to save costly noble metals in LNT, but excessive or deficient upstream EGR would make the synergetic control system inefficiency. In order to guarantee the objectivity of the effect of EGR-LNT synergetic control system on NOx reduction, another modified lean-burn CA4GA5 gasoline engine was additionally tested.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1038
Jinbiao Ning, Fengjun Yan
Abstract Using urea-based Selected Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems is an effective way in diesel engine after-treatment systems to meet increasingly stringent emission regulations. The amount of urea injection is critical to achieve high NOx reduction efficiency and low ammonia slip and overdosing or under-dosing of urea injection need to be avoided. One of the difficulties in urea injection amount control lies in the accurate measurement/estimation of the urea injection mass. To effectively address this issue, this paper defined a correction factor for under-dosing or overdosing detection and correction and proposed two methods to identify the correction factor. The first method is based on urea pump model and line pressure. Through frequency analysis, the relation between the urea pump speed and power spectrum characteristics of the line pressure by using FFT method was revealed.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1155
Robert Steffan, Peter Hofmann, Bernhard Geringer
Abstract This paper focuses on the potentials of a Belt-Starter-Generator (BSG) in the context of an ultra-light vehicle prototype with a target curb weight of only 600 kg. Therefore, two hybrid approaches with a voltage level below 60 V are described and their potentials regarding electrical driving and CO2 reduction are analysed in detail. Introducing the ‘Cars Ultra-Light Technology’ (CULT) project, the holistic lightweight approach is described as a main requirement for the further hybrid investigations. In addition, a P2-hybrid structure with a 12 V BSG on the transmission input shaft enabled unique features despite the low voltage level and limited electrical power resources. The CO2 reduction for this powertrain combination is described and compared to a conventional stop start configuration. The validation process on a dynamic test rig is presented as well.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1221
Jamie Knapp, Adam Chapman, Sagar Mody, Thomas Steffen
Hybrid electric vehicles offer significant fuel economy benefits, because battery and fuel can be used as complementing energy sources. This paper presents the use of dynamic programming to find the optimal blend of power sources, leading to the lowest fuel consumption and the lowest level of harmful emissions. It is found that the optimal engine behavior differs substantially to an on-line adaptive control system previously designed for the Lotus Evora 414E. When analyzing the trade-off between emission and fuel consumption, CO and HC emissions show a traditional Pareto curve, whereas NOx emissions show a near linear relationship with a high penalty. These global optimization results are not directly applicable for online control, but they can guide the design of a more efficient hybrid control system.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0343
Carlo N. Grimaldi, Claudio Poggiani, Alessandro Cimarello, Matteo De Cesare, Giovanni Osbat
Abstract The emissions limits of CO2 for vehicles are becoming more stringent with the aim of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improve fuel economy. The New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) is adopted to measure emissions for all new internal combustion engines in the European Union, and it is performed on cold vehicle, starting at a temperature of 22°C ± 2°C. Consequently, the cold-start efficiency of internal combustion engine is becoming of predominant interest. Since at cold start the lubricant oil viscosity is higher than at the target operating temperature, the consequently higher energy losses due to increased frictions can substantially affect the emission cycle results in terms of fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. A suitable thermal management system, such as an exhaust-to-oil heat exchanger, could help to raise the oil temperature more quickly.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0379
Yongli Qi, Xinyu Ge, Lichun Dong
The hybrid vehicle engines modified for high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a good choice for high efficiency and low NOx emissions. However, high EGR will dilute the engine charge and may cause serious performance problems, such as incomplete combustion, torque fluctuation, and engine misfire. An efficient way to overcome these drawbacks is to intensify tumble leading to increased turbulent intensity at the time of ignition. The enhancement of turbulent intensity will increase flame velocity and improve combustion quality, therefore increasing engine tolerance to higher EGR. To achieve the goal of increasing tolerance to EGR, this work reports a CFD investigation of high tumble intake port design using STAR-CD. The validations had been performed through the comparison with PIV experimental tests.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0383
Changpu Zhao, Gang Yu, Junwei Yang, Man Bai, Fang Shang
Abstract Diesel engines generally tend to produce a very low level of NOx and soot through the application of Miller Cycle, which is mainly due to the low temperature combustion (LTC) atmosphere resulting from the Miller Cycle utilization. A CFD model was established and calibrated against the experimental data for a part load operation at 3000 r/min. A designed set of Miller-LTC combustion modes were analyzed. It is found that a higher boost pressure coupled with EGR can further tap the potential of Miller-LTC cycle, improving and expanding the Miller-LTC operation condition. The simulated results indicated that the variation of Miller timings can decrease the regions of high temperatures and then improve the levels and trade-off relationship of NOx and soot. The in-cylinder peak pressure and NOx emissions were increased dramatically though the problem of insufficient intake charge was resolved by the enhanced intake pressure that is equivalent to dual-stage turbo-charging.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0394
Nicola Giovannoni, Alessandro d'Adamo, Giuseppe Cicalese, Giuseppe Cantore
Abstract Fuel deposits in DISI engines promote unburnt hydrocarbon and soot formation: due to the increasingly stringent emission regulations (EU6 and forthcoming), it is necessary to deeply analyze and well-understand the complex physical mechanisms promoting fuel deposit formation. The task is not trivial, due to the coexistence of mutually interacting factors, such as complex moving geometries, influencing both impact angle and velocity, and time-dependent wall temperatures. The experimental characterization of actual engine conditions on transparent combustion chambers is limited to highly specialized research laboratories; therefore, 3D-CFD simulations can be a fundamental tool to investigate and understand the complex interplay of all the mentioned factors. The aim is pursued in this study by means of full-cycle simulations accounting for instantaneous fuel/piston thermal interaction and actual fuel characteristics.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0742
Apostolos Karvountzis-Kontakiotis, Leonidas Ntziachristos, Zissis Samaras, Athanasios Dimaratos, Mark Peckham
Abstract Cyclic combustion variability (CCV) is an undesirable characteristic of spark ignition (SI) engines, and originates from variations in gas motion and turbulence, as well as from differences in mixture composition and homogeneity in each cycle. In this work, the cycle to cycle variability on combustion and emissions is experimentally investigated on a high-speed, port fuel injected, spark ignition engine. Fast response analyzers were placed at the exhaust manifold, directly downstream of the exhaust valve of one cylinder, for the determination of the cycle-resolved carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) emissions. A piezoelectric transducer, integrated in the spark-plug, was also used for cylinder pressure measurement. The impact of engine operating parameters, namely engine speed, load, equivalence ratio and ignition timing on combustion and emissions variability, was evaluated.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0827
Yan Zhang, Macklini Dalla Nora, Hua Zhao
Abstract Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI), also known as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), is one of the most promising combustion technologies to reduce the fuel consumption and NOx emissions. Most research on CAI/HCCI combustion operations have been carried out in 4-stroke gasoline engines, despite it was originally employed to improve the part-load combustion and emission in the two-stroke gasoline engine. However, conventional ported two-stroke engines suffer from durability and high emissions. In order to take advantage of the high power density of the two-stroke cycle operation and avoid the difficulties of the ported engine, systematic research and development works have been carried out on the two-stroke cycle operation in a 4-valves gasoline engine. CAI combustion was achieved over a large range of operating conditions when the relative air/fuel ratio (lambda) was kept at one as measured by an exhaust lambda sensor.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0772
Ashish J. Chaudhari, Vinayak Kulkarni, Niranjan Sahoo
Abstract In this study, the effect of using higher research octane rating fuel Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) in respect of gasoline in the spark ignition engine on the performance and exhaust emission was experimentally studied. For this purpose, the tilting block technique of varying the compression ratio from 8 to 10 of the engine has been implemented and attention has been paid towards the variation of performance and combustion parameters with LPG fuel. Most undesirable emissions are exhausted by the spark ignition (SI) engines in which the primary pollutants from the engine (such as NOx) which when mixed in the atmosphere react with ozone and create the secondary pollutant that are more harmful to human health. Looking at this fact, while optimizing the compression ratio, the emission reduction technique like intake charge dilution with exhaust gas from the engine has been studied.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0776
Gerben Doornbos, Stina Hemdal, Daniel Dahl
Abstract This study investigated how the amount of dilution applied can be extended while maintaining normal engine operation in a GDI engine. Adding exhaust gases or air to a stoichiometric air/fuel mixture yields several advantages regarding fuel consumption and engine out emissions. The aim of this paper is to reduce fuel consumption by means of diluted combustion, an advanced ignition system and adjusted valve timing. Tests were performed on a Volvo four-cylinder engine equipped with a dual coil ignition system. This system made it possible to extend the ignition duration and current. Furthermore, a sweep was performed in valve timing and type of dilution, i.e., air or exhaust gases. While maintaining a CoV in IMEP < 5%, the DCI system was able to extend the maximum lambda value by 0.1 - 0.15. Minimizing valve overlap increased lambda by an additional 0.1.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0836
Behzad Rohani, Stephen Sungsan Park, Choongsik Bae
Abstract Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) is known to be feasible only in lower load ranges so in real world application of LTC, engine operation mode should frequently change back and forth between LTC mode in lower loads and conventional mode in higher loads. In this research, effect of injection strategy on smoothness and emissions during mode transition in a single cylinder heavy duty diesel engine is studied. The Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) line was controlled by a servo-valve capable of opening or closing the EGR loop within only one engine cycle. Ten cycles after the EGR valve closure were taken as the transition period during which injection timing and quantity were shifted in various ways (i.e. injection strategies) and the effect on Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEP) stability and emissions was studied.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0843
Anand Nageswaran Bharath, Yangdongfang Yang, Rolf D. Reitz, Christopher Rutland
Abstract While Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) strategies such as Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) exhibit high thermal efficiency and produce low NOx and soot emissions, low load operation is still a significant challenge due to high unburnt hydrocarbon (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, which occur as a result of poor combustion efficiencies at these operating points. Furthermore, the exhaust gas temperatures are insufficient to light-off the Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), thereby resulting in poor UHC and CO conversion efficiencies by the aftertreatment system. To achieve exhaust gas temperature values sufficient for DOC light-off, combustion can be appropriately phased by changing the ratio of gasoline to diesel in the cylinder, or by burning additional fuel injected during the expansion stroke through post-injection.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0861
Matthew Younkins, Margaret S. Wooldridge, Brad A. Boyer
Abstract Hydrogen fueled internal combustion engines have potential for high thermal efficiencies; however, high efficiency conditions can produce high nitrogen oxide emissions (NOx) that are challenging to treat using conventional 3-way catalysts. This work presents the results of an experimental study to reduce NOx emissions while retaining high thermal efficiencies in a single-cylinder research engine fueled with hydrogen. Specifically, the effects on engine performance of the injection of water into the intake air charge were explored. The hydrogen fuel was injected into the cylinder directly. Several parameters were varied during the study, including the amount of water injected into the intake charge, the amount of fuel injected, the phasing of the fuel injection, the number of fuel injection events, and the ignition timing. The results were compared with expectations for a conventionally operated hydrogen engine where load was controlled through changes in equivalence ratio.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0873
Bin Mao, Mingfa Yao, Zunqing Zheng, Yongzhi Li, Haifeng Liu, Bowen Yan
Abstract An experimental study is carried out to compare the effects of high-pressure-loop, low-pressure-loop and dual-loop exhaust gas recirculation systems (HPL-EGR, LPL-EGR and DL-EGR) on the combustion characteristics, thermal efficiency and emissions of a diesel engine. The tests are conducted on a six-cylinder turbocharged heavy-duty diesel engine under various operating conditions. The low-pressure-loop portion (LPL-Portion) of DL-EGR is swept from 0% to 100% at several constant EGR rates, and the DL-EGR is optimized based on fuel efficiency. The results show that the LPL-EGR can attain the highest gross indicated thermal efficiency (ITEg) in the three EGR systems under all the tested conditions. At a middle load of 0.95 BMEP, 1660 r/min, the pumping losses of LPL-EGR lead to the lowest BTE among the EGR systems. The HPL-EGR can achieve the best brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and emissions within the EGR rate of 22.5% mainly due to the reduced pumping losses.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0908
Yuqiang Li, Karthik Nithyanandan, Jiaxiang Zhang, Chia-Fon Lee, Shengming Liao
Abstract Butanol has proved to be a very promising alternative fuel in recent years. The production of bio-butanol, typically done using the acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process is expensive and consumes a lot of energy. Hence it is of interest to study the intermediate fermentation product, i.e. water-containing ABE as a potential fuel. The combustion and emissions performance of ABE29.5W0.5 (29.5 vol.% ABE, 0.5 vol.% water and gasoline blend), ABE30 (30 vol.% ABE and gasoline blend) and ABE0 (pure gasoline) were investigated in this study. The results showed that ABE29.5W0.5 enhanced engine torque by 9.6%-12.7% and brake thermal efficiency (BTE) by 5.2%-11.6% compared to pure gasoline, respectively. ABE29.5W0.5 also showed similar brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) relative to pure gasoline.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1021
Brad Adelman, Navtej Singh, Paul Charintranond, Greg Griffin, Shyam Santhanam, Ed Derybowski, Adam Lack
Abstract Current legislative trends regarding diesel emissions are striving to achieve two seemingly competing goals: simultaneously lowering NOx and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These two goals are considered at odds since lower GHG emissions (e.g. CO2) is achieved via high combustion efficiency that result in higher engine out NOx emissions and lower exhaust gas temperatures [1, 2]. Conversely, NOx reduction technologies such as SCR require temperatures above 200°C for dosing the reductant (DEF) [3, 4, 5] as well as for high conversion efficiencies [1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9]. Dosing DEF requires injection pressures around 5 bar to ensure proper penetration into the exhaust stream as well as generate the appropriate spray pattern and droplet sizes. Dosing DEF generally requires long mixing and/or high turbulence (high restriction) areas so that the aqueous urea solution can be converted into gaseous NH3 without deposit formation [8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15].
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1045
Stephan Stadlbauer, Harald Waschl, Luigi del Re
Abstract The focus in the development of modern exhaust after treatment systems, like the Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), is to increase on one hand the oxidation rates of Carbon monoxide (CO), HC (Hydro Carbons) and NO (Nitrogen Oxide) and on the other hand the reduction rates of Particulate Matter (PM) and the NOx emissions to fulfill the more and more restricting requirements of the exhaust emission legislation. The simplest, practical most relevant way to obtain such a dosing strategy of a SCR system is the use of a nonlinear map, which has to be determined by extensive calibration efforts. This feedforward action has the advantage of not requiring a downstream NOx sensor and can achieve high conversion efficiency under steady-state operating conditions for nominal systems.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1044
Kiran C. Premchand, Krishnan Raghavan, John H. Johnson
Abstract Numerical models of aftertreatment devices are increasingly becoming indispensable tools in the development of aftertreatment systems that enable modern diesel engines to comply with exhaust emissions regulations while minimizing the cost and development time involved. Such a numerical model was developed at Michigan Technological University (MTU) [1] and demonstrated to be able to simulate the experimental data [2] in predicting the characteristic pressure drop and PM mass retained during passive oxidation [3] and active regeneration [4] of a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CPF) on a Cummins ISL engine. One of the critical aspects of a calibrated numerical model is its usability - in other words, how useful is the model in predicting the pressure drop and the PM mass retained in another particulate filter on a different engine without the need for extensive recalibration.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1058
Osami Yamamoto, Tatsuya Okayama, Zhiwei Zhang, John Tolsma
Abstract Catalyst simulation, which can analyze the complicated reaction pathway of exhaust gas purifications and identify the rate-determining step, is an essential tool in the development of catalyst materials. This requires an elementary reaction model which describes the detailed processes, i.e. adsorption, decomposition, and others. In our previous work, the elementary reaction model on Pt/CeO2 catalyst was constructed. In this study, we focused on extending the Zeolite catalyst and including the gas diffusivity through the catalyst layer. The reaction rate of a Zeolite catalyst was expressed by an Arrhenius equation, and the elementary reaction model was composed of 17 reactions. Each Arrhenius parameter was optimized by the catalytic activity measurements. The constructed model was validated with NOx conversion in cyclic experiments which were repeated with Lean phase (NOx adsorption) and Rich phase (NOx reduction).
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1059
Harsha Shankar Surenahalli, Gordon Parker, John H. Johnson
Abstract Diesel Oxidation Catalysts (DOC) are used on heavy duty diesel engine applications and experience large internal temperature variations from 150 to 600°C. The DOC oxidizes the CO and HC in the exhaust to CO2 and H2O and oxidizes NO to NO2. The oxidation reactions are functions of its internal temperatures. Hence, accurate estimation of internal temperatures is important both for onboard diagnostic and aftertreatment closed loop control strategies. This paper focuses on the development of a reduced order model and an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) state estimator for a DOC. The reduced order model simulation results are compared to experimental data. This is important since the reduced order model is used in the EKF estimator to predict the CO, NO, NO2 and HC concentrations in the DOC and at the outlet. The estimator was exercised using transient drive cycle engine data. The closed loop EKF improves the temperature estimate inside the DOC compared to the open loop estimator.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1067
Kenneth S. Price, Lin Wang, Thomas Pauly
Abstract Investigations of on-road emissions performance of vehicles have been made using various methods and instrumentation, some of which are very complex and costly. For the particular case of NOx emissions on Diesel road vehicles equipped with SCR catalysts (Selective Catalytic Reduction), many of these vehicles are equipped with NOx sensor(s) for the purpose of OBD (On-Board Diagnostics), and the ECU (Engine Control Unit) makes this data available via the diagnostic connector under the SAEJ1979 protocol for light duty vehicles. Data for mass air flow and fuel flow are also available per J1979, so the ongoing NOx mass flow can be estimated when the NOx sensors are active with no additional instrumentation. Heavy duty pickup trucks with SCR systems from 3 major US manufacturers, each certified to the optional chassis certification of 0.2 g/mi NOx on the FTP75, were obtained to be evaluated for SCR system behavior under normal driving conditions.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1070
Hanzhengnan Yu, Yong Guo, Donghai Li, Xingyu Liang, Ge-Qun Shu, Yuesen Wang, Xiangxiang Wang, Lihui Dong
Abstract Impingement of injected fuel spray against the cylinder liner (wall wetting) is one of the main obstacles that must be overcome in order for early injection Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (EI HCCI) combustion. In the strategies to reduce or prevent wall wetting explored in the past, limiting the spray cone angle was proved to be a useful approach. This paper is presented to study the effect of the spray cone angle on the mixture formation, particularly the region near the cylinder wall (wall wetting region), and CO/Soot emissions of an EI HCCI diesel engine. Three-dimensional modeling was performed in AVL FIRE code. The calculation grid was divided into three regions which were defined as the combustion chamber region, the wall wetting region, and the central regions. The history of the CO/soot mass of each region and the equivalent ratio/temperature (φ-T map) of wall wetting region were analyzed.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1055
Apoorv Kalyankar, Achuth Munnannur, Z. Gerald Liu
Abstract Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a promising technology for meeting the stringent requirements pertaining to NOx emissions. One of the most important requirements to achieve high DeNOx performance is to have a high uniformity of ammonia to NOx ratio (ANR) at the SCR catalyst inlet. Steady state 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are frequently used for predicting ANR spatial distribution but are not feasible for running a transient cycle like Federal Test Procedure (FTP). On the other hand, 1D kinetic models run in real time and can predict transient SCR performance but do not typically capture the effect of non-axial non-uniformities. In this work, two 3D to 1D coupling methods have been developed to predict transient SCR system performance, taking the effect of ANR non-uniformity into account. First is a probability density function (PDF) based approach and the second is a geometrical sector based approach.
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