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2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0606
Chaitanya Wadkar, Bassem H. Ramadan
Abstract A numerical and experimental study of the use of air motion control, piston bowl shape, and injector configuration on combustion and emissions in diesel engines has been conducted. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of flow control within the piston bowl during compression to enhance fuel air mixing to achieve a uniform air-fuel mixture to reduce soot and NO emissions. In addition to flow control different piston bowl geometries and injector spray angles have been considered and simulated using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and experiments. The results include cylinder pressure and emissions measurements and contour plots of fuel mass fraction, soot, and NO. The results show that soot and NO emissions can be reduced by proper flow control and piston bowl design.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0948
Davion O. Clark, Thomas Pauly
Abstract Control of N2O emissions is a significant challenge for manufacturers of HDD On-Road engines and vehicles due to requirements for NOx control and Green House Gas (GHG) Phases I & II requirements. OEMs continually strive to improve BSFE which often results in increased engine out NOx (EO NOx) emissions. Consequently, the necessity for higher NOx conversions results in increased N2O emissions over traditional SCR and SCR+ASC catalysts systems [1]. This study explores methods to improve NOx conversion while reducing the SCR contribution of N2O across the exhaust after treatment systems. For example, combinations of two traditional SCR catalysts, one Iron based and another Copper based, can be utilized at various proportions by volume to optimize their SCR efficiency while minimizing the N2O emissions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0946
Jonas Jansson, Soran Shwan, Magnus Skoglundh
Abstract Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from heavy-duty diesel engines are subject to more stringent environmental legislation. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) over metal ion-exchanged zeolites is in this connection an efficient method to reduce NOx. Understanding durability of the SCR catalyst is crucial for correct design of the aftertreatment system. In the present paper, thermal and chemical ageing of Fe-BEA as NH3-SCR catalyst is studied. Experimental results of hydrothermal ageing, and chemical ageing due to phosphorous and potassium exposure are presented. The catalyst is characterized by flow reactor experiments, nitrogen physisorption, DRIFTS, XRD, and XPS. Based on the experimental results, a multisite kinetic model is developed to describe the activity of the fresh Fe-BEA catalyst.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0947
Junhui Li, Neal Currier, Aleksey Yezerets, Hai-Ying Chen, Howard Hess, Shadab Mulla
Typical Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalyst composition includes precious metal components (Pt, Pd, and/or Rh), responsible for NO oxidation during lean operation and NOx reduction during rich operation. It was found that redox history of commercial LNT catalyst plays a significant role on deciding its NOx conversion under Lean/Rich cyclic condition. Further test had shown that fully formulated LNT catalyst being pre-reduced had shown much better NO reduction activity during the temperature-programmed reduction (TPRx) of NO than the same LNT catalyst being oxidized. The following study with Rh-only and Pt-only catalyst had demonstrated that Rh plays a key role on the large variation of the NO reduction function due to oxidation state change over LNT catalyst.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0954
Jason Jacques, Thomas Pauly, Michael Zammit, Homayoun Ahari, Michael Smith
Significant reduction in Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) emissions will be required to meet LEV III Emissions Standards for Light Duty Diesel passenger vehicles (LDD). As such, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are exploring all possible aftertreatment options to find the best balance between performance, robustness and cost. The primary technology adopted by OEMs in North America to achieve low NOx levels is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst. The critical parameters needed for SCR to work properly are: an appropriate reductant such as ammonia (NH3) typically provided as urea, adequate operating temperatures, and optimum Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) to NOx ratios (NO2/NOx). The NO2/NOx ratio is mostly influenced by Precious Group Metals (PGM) containing catalysts located upstream of the SCR catalyst. Different versions of zeolite based SCR technologies are available on the market today and these vary in their active metal type (iron, copper, vanadium), and/or zeolite type.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0953
Homayoun Ahari, Michael Smith, Michael Zammit, Brad Walker
In order to meet LEV III, EURO 6C and Beijing 6 emission levels, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) can potentially implement unique aftertreatment systems solutions which meet the varying legislated requirements. The availability of various washcoat substrates and PGM loading and ratio options, make selection of an optimum catalyst system challenging, time consuming and costly. Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) methodologies have been used in industry since the 1990s. One of the earliest applications was at Motorola where the methodology was applied to the design and production of a paging device which Consumer Reports called “virtually defect-proof”.[1] Since then, the methodology has evolved to not only encapsulate complicated “Variation Optimization” but also “Design Optimization” where multiple factors are in play. In this study, attempts are made to adapt the DFSS concept and methodology to identify and optimize a catalyst for diesel applications.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0952
Gordon J. Bartley, Zachary Tonzetich, Ryan Hartley
Abstract A recent collaborative research project between Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) and the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) has demonstrated that a ruthenium (Ru) catalyst is capable of converting oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions to nitrogen (N2) with high activity and selectivity. Testing was performed on coated cordierite ceramic cores using SwRI’s Universal Synthetic Gas Reactor® (USGR®). Various gas mixtures were employed, from model gas mixes to full exhaust simulant gas mixes. Activity was measured as a function of temperature, and gaseous inhibitors and promoters were identified. Different Ru supports were tested to identify ones with lowest temperature activity. A Ru catalyst can be used in the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) leg of a Dedicated-EGR (D-EGR) engine [1,2], where it uses carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2) present in the rich gas environment to reduce NOX to N2 with 100% efficiency and close to 100% selectivity to N2.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0951
Jordan Elizabeth Easter, Stanislav V. Bohac
Abstract Advanced engine combustion strategies, such as HCCI and SACI, allow engines to achieve high levels of thermal efficiency with low levels of engine-out NOx emissions. To maximize gains in fuel efficiency, HCCI combustion is often run at lean operating conditions. However, lean engine operation prevents the conventional TWC after-treatment system from reaching legislated tailpipe emissions due to oxygen saturation. One potential solution for handling this challenge without the addition of costly NOx traps or on-board systems for urea injection is the passive TWC-SCR concept. This concept includes the integration of an SCR catalyst downstream of a TWC and the use of periods of rich or stoichiometric operation to generate NH3 over the TWC to be stored on the SCR catalyst until it is needed for NOx reduction during subsequent lean operation.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0921
Ashok Kumar, Kristopher Ingram, Deepesh Goyal, Krishna Kamasamudram
Abstract Exposure of hydrocarbons (HCs) and particulate matter (PM) under certain real-world operating conditions leads to carbonaceous deposit formation on V-SCR catalysts and causes reversible degradation of its NOx conversion. In addition, uncontrolled oxidation of such carbonaceous deposits can also cause the exotherm that can irreversibly degrade V-SCR catalyst performance. Therefore carbonaceous deposit mitigation strategies, based on their characterization, are needed to minimize their impact on performance. The nature and the amount of the deposits, formed upon exposure to real-world conditions, were primarily carried out by the controlled oxidation of the deposits to classify these carbonaceous deposits into three major classes of species: i) HCs, ii) coke, and iii) soot. The reversible NOx conversion degradation can be largely correlated to coke, a major constituent of the deposit, and to soot which causes face-plugging that leads to decreased catalyst accessibility.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0923
Martin Schneider, Bernd Danckert
Abstract Since the new “Regulations for the Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships” of the International Maritime Organization (IMO; MARPOL Annex VI Tier III) became effective, new technologies in marine applications are needed to fulfill the exhaust-gas limits. The reduction rate of the permissible emissions in the emission control areas (ECA) is about 75 % from Tier II to Tier III. To meet these limits, it is necessary to take additional measures, such as installing a Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system. Because harbors are specifically in focus regarding the air quality, a hybrid propulsion system (Diesel-electric) and Exhaust Aftertreatment (EAT) to reduce the emissions and the lifecycle costs by reducing the fuel consumption were planned back in 2012. With the goal in mind of decreasing all relevant emissions, the described compact EAT consists of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), a Particulate Matter (PM) removal and a SCR-catalyst.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0919
Timothy Johnson
Abstract This review paper summarizes major and representative developments in vehicular emissions regulations and technologies from 2015. The paper starts with the key regulatory advancements in the field, including newly proposed Euro 6 type regulations for Beijing, China, and India in the 2017-20 timeframe. Europe is continuing developments towards real driving emissions (RDE) standards with the conformity factors for light-duty diesel NOx ramping down to 1.5X by 2021. The California heavy duty (HD) low-NOx regulation is advancing and may be proposed in 2017/18 for implementation in 2023+. LD (light duty) and HD engine technology continues showing marked improvements in engine efficiency. Key developments are summarized for gasoline and diesel engines to meet both the emerging criteria and greenhouse gas regulations. LD gasoline concepts are achieving 45% BTE (brake thermal efficiency or net amount of fuel energy gong to the crankshaft) and closing the gap with diesel.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0920
Bradford A. Bruno, Ann M. Anderson, Mary Carroll, Thomas Swanton, Paul Brockmann, Timothy Palace, Isaac A. Ramphal
Abstract Aerogels are nanoporous structures with physical characteristics that make them promising for use in automotive exhaust catalysis systems: highly porous with low densities (<0.1 g/mL) and high surface area per unit mass (>300 m2/g) - features that provide favorable characteristics for catalysis of gaseous pollutants. Ceramic aerogels are also highly thermally insulating (∼0.015 W/mK) and able to withstand high temperatures. Aerogels can be made of a wide variety of ceramics (e.g. alumina, silica, titania) with other catalytically active metals (e.g. copper, cobalt, nickel) incorporated into their structures. This paper provides a brief overview of the rapid supercritical extraction (RSCE) method employed in this work for aerogel preparation, describes in detail the benchtop scale testbed and methods used to assess the catalytic activity of RSCE fabricated aerogels, and presents data on the catalytic ability of some promising aerogel chemistries.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0926
Teuvo Maunula, Thomas Wolff, Auli Savimäki
The tightening pollutant emission limits require the use of active aftertreatment methods for NOx and particulate matter (PM). Diesel particulate filter (DPF) is a part of commercial aftertreatment system (ATS). PM accumulated in DPF is continuously passively or periodically actively regenerated with the assistance of efficient diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) having a high efficiency and durability in hydrocarbon (HC), NO and CO oxidation reactions. A high HC concentration during fuel feeding in active regeneration is demanding for DOC. The deactivation in air, hydrothermal, sulfation and active regeneration conditions were evaluated with platinum (Pt-) and platinum-palladium (PtPd)-DOCs by laboratory simulations using the ageing temperature and time as primary variables. The oxidizing conditions with a high oxygen concentration without HCs were deactivating DOCs clearly more than active regeneration conditions with a low oxygen and high HC concentration at 700-800°C.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0927
David Culbertson, Magdi Khair, James Pradun, Henning Gero Petry, Anne Ungermann
Abstract Modifications have been made to the calibration and control of Diesel engines to increase the temperature of the exhaust especially in cold weather and part load operation. The main purpose for this advanced calibration is to enable the reduction of emissions by improving catalytic activity. An alternative method for increasing exhaust temperature is providing electric heat. Test results show the feasibility of applying various amounts of electric heat and the related increases in exhaust temperature as well as speed of heating. Simulation modeling extends the application of electric heat to a complete engine map and explores the potential impact on engine performance and emission reduction benefits.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0924
Shun Nakagawa, Ichiro Tsumagari, Shinya Sato, Koichi Machida
Abstract The conventional NOx after-treatment system could not perform sufficient NOx removal since exhaust gas temperature falls down by low-fuel-consumption and waste heat recovery of a diesel engine. In order to realize a new after-treatment system with high NOx conversion rate at a low catalyst temperature, studies on adopting an ozone generator (NO oxidization promotion) and a urea reformer (ammonia addition) into the Urea SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) system have been conducted.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0925
Angus Craig, Jason Warkins, Krishna Aravelli, David Moser, Lucy Yang, Douglas Ball, Tinghong Tao, Deven Ross
Abstract A production calibrated GTDI 1.6L Ford Fusion was used to demonstrate low HC, CO, NOx, PM (particulate mass), and PN (particulate number) emissions using advanced catalyst technologies with newly developed high porosity substrates and coated GPFs (gasoline particulate filters). The exhaust system consisted of 1.2 liters of TWC (three way catalyst) in the close-coupled position, and 1.6L of coated GPF in the underfloor position. The catalysts were engine-aged on a dynamometer to simulate 150K miles of road aging. Results indicate that ULEV70 emissions can be achieved at ∼$40 of PGM, while also demonstrating PM tailpipe performance far below the proposed California Air Resources Board (CARB) LEV III limit of 1 mg/mi. Along with PM and PN analysis, exhaust system backpressure is also presented with various GPF designs.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0930
Yasunari Hanaki, Misaki Fujimoto, Junji Itou
Abstract This paper describes a new catalyst powder has been developed that provides cleaner exhaust emissions and reduces the consumption of precious metals. In recent years, precious metal usage has been increasing due to the tightening of emission regulations and the increase in automobile production worldwide. Minimizing the use of precious metals in exhaust catalysts is crucial not only for reducing the cost of vehicles but also for effective utilization of scarce resources. Iron is one of the alternative material candidates for precious metals. It was found that the Iron catalyst was activated by iron becoming the low oxidation state while iron oxide and cerium oxide synchronized in a nanostructure interface. A catalyst with improved iron support technology that enables better contact between highly dispersed particles of iron and ceria was found to exhibit higher exhaust gas cleansing performance than precious metal catalysts even after aging.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0931
Akifumi Kawakami, Yuki Fukumi, Masaaki Ito, Shingo Sokawa, Satoshi Sakashita, Mychal Taylor, Mitsuhiro Ito, Masataka Yamashita, Hirofumi Sakamoto, Hiroshi Kurachi
Abstract Honeycomb substrates are widely used to reduce harmful emissions from gasoline engines and are exposed to numerous thermal shocks during their lifetime making thermal shock resistance one of the key factors in designing honeycomb substrates. More stringent emission regulations will require the honeycomb substrates to be lighter in weight to improve light-off performance and to have better thermal shock resistance than conventional honeycomb substrates to handle higher expected temperature gradients. Thermal shock resistance is generally evaluated on a substrate by evaluating the thermal strain caused by temperature gradients inside the substrate during durability testing [1,2]. During the test, a heated substrate is cooled at a surface face to generate temperature gradients while the temperature inside the honeycomb substrate is monitored by multiple thermocouples.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0928
Sujay Bagi, Nishant Singh, Rob Andrew
Abstract Ash accumulation in the DPF over life results in reduced soot storage capacity, lower catalytic activity and may even alter substrate properties and lead to higher back-pressure; hence ash-cleaning of the DPF is required periodically to extend the life of the DPF and restore its catalytic performance. Several ash cleaning technologies are available which utilize pneumatic, hydraulic and wet-chemical cleaning techniques or their combinations. A batch of DPFs with various ash accumulation levels were recovered from customer field units. X-ray CT imaging was performed to understand the ash distribution in the DPF channels. Field returned DPFs were tested on Engine Dynamometer to determine the impact on overall system performance loss from fresh state. The DPFs were then cleaned using various cleaning techniques; X-ray imaging and dynamometer testing was repeated to evaluate the performance recovery.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0929
Devin Aryan, Kenneth Price, Thomas Pauly
Abstract There is growing interest in application of SCR on DPF (SDPF) for light and heavy duty applications, particularly to provide improvements in cold start emissions, as well as improvements in system cost and packaging [1, 2, 3]. The first of systems containing SDPF are just coming to market, with additional introductions expected, particularly for light duty and non-road applications [4]. To provide real world testing for a new SDPF product design prior to availability of OEM SDPF applications, an SDPF and one SCR catalyst were substituted in place of the original two SCR catalysts and a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF) on a Ford F250 HD pickup. To ensure that the on-road emissions would be comparable to the production system replaced, and to make sure that the control system would be able to operate without detecting some difference in behavior and seeing this as a fault, initial chassis dynamometer work was done before putting the vehicle on the road.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0934
Vitaly Y. Prikhodko, James E. Parks, Josh A. Pihl, Todd J. Toops
Abstract Lean gasoline engines offer greater fuel economy than the common stoichiometric gasoline engine, but the current three way catalyst (TWC) on stoichiometric engines is unable to control nitrogen oxide (NOX) emissions in oxidizing exhaust. For these lean gasoline engines, lean NOX emission control is required to meet existing Tier 2 and upcoming Tier 3 emission regulations set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). While urea-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has proven effective in controlling NOX from diesel engines, the urea storage and delivery components can add significant size and cost. As such, onboard NH3 production via a passive SCR approach is of interest. In a passive SCR system, NH3 is generated over a close-coupled TWC during periodic slightly rich engine operation and subsequently stored on an underfloor SCR catalyst. Upon switching to lean operation, NOX passes through the TWC and is reduced by the stored NH3 on the SCR catalyst.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0935
Gerben Doornbos, Stina Hemdal, Daniel Dahl, Ingemar Denbratt
Passive selective catalyst reduction (SCR) systems can be used as aftertreatment systems for lean burn spark ignition (SI)-engines. Their operation is based on the interaction between the engine, an ammonia formation catalyst (AFC), and an SCR catalyst. Under rich conditions the AFC forms ammonia, which is stored in the SCR catalyst. Under lean conditions, the SCR catalyst reduces the engine out NOx using the stored NH3. This study compared the ammonia production and response times of a standard three way catalyst (TWC) and a Pd/Al2O3 catalyst under realistic engine operating conditions. In addition, the relationships between selected engine operating parameters and ammonia formation over a TWC were investigated, considering the influence of both the chosen load point and the engine settings.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0932
Masanori Hashimoto, Yoshiyuki Nakanishi, Hiroshi Koyama, Syouji Inose, Hiroki Takeori, Takayuki Watanabe, Takeshi Narishige, Tatsuya Okayama, Yukio Suehiro
Abstract Engine technologies using efficient combustion and down-sizing turbo have become important in order to reduce automotive CO2 emissions. However, the exhaust gas temperature also becomes lower by these technologies. As a result, the catalyst performance becomes lower. Therefore it is necessary to develop low temperature active catalysts to reduce emissions. This research was focused on Pd/CeO2, and it’s able to oxidize CO at low temperatures. In order to increase the catalyst activity, the addition of some elements to the CeO2 was studied. Zn addition was found to have an advantage to reduce the CO light off temperature by 60 °C. Then, we tried to clarify the cause of improvement. As a result, it made clear that the Zn addition promotes the active oxygen release from the CeO2 surface. However, repeated engine exhaust gas tests indicated a decline in purification performance.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0933
Steve Golden, Zahra Nazarpoor, Maxime Launois, Ru-Fen Liu, Pardha Maram
Abstract In the context of evolving market conditions, the three-way catalyst (TWC) design is entering an exciting new phase. It remains the main emission control strategy for gasoline powered vehicles; in the meantime a rapid period of evolving engine developments, the constrained tailpipe regulations and the material supply issues present a unique challenge to the catalyst developers. A key approach here is to achieve highly beneficial emission performance based on the ultra-low PGM levels. In this regard, we mainly focus on the materials design and have developed the advanced spinel oxides for zero precious metals (ZPGM) and synergized precious metals (SPGM) TWCs. These advanced spinel materials showed improved thermal stability compared to that of PGM based standard materials. Fundamental studies on the microstructure of spinel oxide with newly developed composition confirm the aging stability.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1064
Daniel Pachner, Jaroslav Beran
Abstract The Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) rate is a critical parameter of turbocharged diesel engines because it determines the trade-off between NOx and particulate matter (PM) emissions. On some heavy duty engines the EGR mass flow is directly measured with a Venturibased sensor and a closed loop control system maintains EGR flow. However, on most light duty diesel engines the EGR mass flow must be estimated. This paper compares two methods for estimating EGR mass flow. The first method, referred to as the Speed Density method, serves as a baseline for comparison and uses sensors for engine speed, intake manifold pressure and temperature, as well as fresh air flow (MAF). The new, second method adds turbo speed to this sensor set, and includes additional engine modelling equations, such as the EGR valve equation and the turbine equation. Special measures are taken to allow the additional equations to execute without issue on production ECMs (Electronics Controls Modules).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1052
Adwitiya Dube, A Ramesh
Abstract Direct injection of fuel has been seen as a potential method to reduce fuel short circuiting in two stroke engines. However, most work has been on low pressure injection. In this work, which employed high pressure direct injection in a small two stroke engine (2S-GDI), a detailed study of injection parameters affecting performance and combustion has been presented based on experiments for evaluating its potential. Influences of injection pressure (IP), injection timing (end of injection - EOI) and location of the spark plug at different operating conditions in a 199.3 cm3 automotive two stroke engine using a real time open engine controller were studied. Experiments were conducted at different throttle positions and equivalence ratios at a speed of 3000 rpm with various sets of injection parameters and spark plug locations. The same engine was also run in the manifold injection (2S-MI) mode under similar conditions for comparison.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1010
Roberto Aliandro Varella, Gonçalo Gonçalves, Gonçalo Duarte, Tiago Farias
Abstract Internal combustion engine (ICE) cold-start is an issue that occurs either in conventional and hybrid powertrains before the ICE reaches its normal operation temperature, affecting both fuel consumption due to higher heat losses, and pollutant emissions due to low catalytic converter temperatures. The study of cold start emissions on conventional powertrains has been extensively addressed, although typically under laboratorial conditions, however studies addressing the impact of this phenomenon on hybrid powertrains is still reduced. Hybrid electric (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) vehicles usually incorporate technologies to manage the battery and ICE power supply leading to ICE on/off operation under regular driving, which can result in a decrease on catalytic converter efficiency (due to cooling).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1009
Xin Wang, Yunshan Ge, Chuanzhen Zhang, Jia Liu, Zihang Peng, Huiming Gong
Abstract Along with the booming expansion of private car preservation, many Chinese cities are now struggling with hazy weather and ground-level ozone contamination. Although central government has stepped up efforts to purify skies above China, counter-strategies to curb ground-level ozone is comparatively weak. By using maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) method, this paper estimated the ozone forming potential for twenty-five Euro-3 to Euro-5 passenger cars burning conventional gasoline, methanol-gasoline, ethanol-gasoline, neat methanol and compressed natural gas (CNG). The results showed that, for all the fuel tested, VOC/NOx ratios and SR values decreased with the upgrading of emission standard. Except for Euro-3 M100 and Euro-4 M85, SR values for alternative fuel were to different degrees smaller than those for gasoline. When the emission standard was shifted from Euro-4 to Euro-5, OFP values estimated for gasoline vehicle decreased.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1008
Piotr Bielaczyc, Joseph Woodburn, Andrzej Szczotka
Abstract Concern over greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and air quality has made exhaust emissions from passenger cars a topic interest at an international level. This situation has led to the re-evaluation of testing procedures in order to produce more “representative” results. Laboratory procedures for testing exhaust emissions are built around a driving cycle. Cycles may be developed in one context but later used in another: for example, the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) was not developed to measure fuel consumption, but has ended up being used to that end. The new Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test cycle (the WLTC) will sooner or later be used for measuring regulated exhaust emissions. Legal limits for emissions of regulated pollutants are inherently linked to the test conditions (and therefore to the driving cycle); inter-cycle correlations for regulated pollutants are an important research direction.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1007
Benjamin Ellies, Charles Schenk, Paul Dekraker
Abstract As part of its technology assessment for the upcoming midterm evaluation (MTE) of the 2022-2025 Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas (LD GHG) emissions standards, EPA has been benchmarking engines and transmissions to generate inputs for use in its Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis (ALPHA) model, a physics-based, forward-looking, full vehicle computer simulation tool. One of the most efficient engines today, a 2.0L Mazda SkyActiv engine, is of particular interest due to its high geometric compression ratio and use of an Atkinson cycle. EPA benchmarked the 2.0L SkyActiv at its National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions laboratory. EPA then incorporated ALPHA into an engine dynamometer control system so that vehicle chassis testing could be simulated with a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) approach.
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