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Viewing 151 to 180 of 22766
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0988
Fabien Ocampo, Virginie Harle, Naotaka Ohtake, Renaud Rohe, Barry W.L. Southward
Abstract The reduction of NOx to meet current diesel regulation standards has been achieved using two main technologies named NH3-SCR and LNT. In the forthcoming years, the implementation of new and colder test cycles such as “real driving emissions” (RDE), combined with CO2 targets (95 g/km is 2020 target in Europe) will require higher NOx storage capacity (NSC) in the low temperature region (120-350°C). On the other hand, lean-burn Gasoline vehicles, emitting exhaust gases at higher temperatures, will require improved NSC over a broader temperature range (200-500°C). Therefore, the development of more efficient NSC materials is an area of extensive study by original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), catalysts manufacturers, and raw materials suppliers. Today, ceria is a key component in the formulation of active NSC washcoats.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0991
Nathan Ottinger, Rebecca Veele, Yuanzhou Xi, Z. Gerald Liu
Abstract Lean-burn natural gas (NG) engines are used world-wide for both stationary power generation and mobile applications ranging from passenger cars to Class 8 line-haul trucks. With the recent introduction of hydraulic fracturing gas extraction technology and increasing availability of natural gas, these engines are receiving more attention. However, the reduction of unburned hydrocarbon emissions from lean-burn NG and dual-fuel (diesel and natural gas) engines is particularly challenging due to the stability of the predominant short-chain alkane species released (e.g., methane, ethane, and propane). Supported Pd-based oxidation catalysts are generally considered the most active materials for the complete oxidation of low molecular weight alkanes at temperatures typical of lean-burn NG exhaust. However, these catalysts rapidly degrade under realistic exhaust conditions with high water vapor concentrations and traces of sulfur.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0993
Timothy V. Johnson
Abstract This review paper summarizes major developments in vehicular emissions regulations and technologies from 2014. The paper starts with the key regulatory advancements in the field, including newly proposed Non-Road Mobile Machinery regulations for 2019-20 in Europe, and the continuing developments towards real driving emissions (RDE) standards. An expert panel in India proposed a roadmap through 2025 for clean fuels and tailpipe regulations. LD (light duty) and HD (heavy-duty) engine technology continues showing marked improvements in engine efficiency. Key developments are summarized for gasoline and diesel engines to meet both the emerging NOx and GHG regulations. HD engines are demonstrating more than 50% brake thermal efficiency using methods that can reasonably be commercialized. Next, NOx control technologies are summarized, including SCR (selective catalytic reduction), lean NOx traps, and combination systems. Emphasis is on durability and control.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1049
Christopher Depcik
Abstract The growing presence of Spark Ignition Direct Injection (SIDI) engines along with the prevalence of direct injected Compression Ignition (CI) engines results in the requirement of Particulate Matter (PM) exhaust abatement. This occurs through the implementation of Gasoline Particulate Filters (GPFs) and Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs). Modeling of GPFs and DPFs are analogous because of the similar flow patterns and wall flow PM capture methodology. Conventional modeling techniques include a two-channel (inlet/outlet) formulation that is applicable up to three-dimensions. However, the numerical stiffness that results from the need to couple the solution of these channels in compressible flow can result in relatively long run times. Previously, the author presented a lumped DPF model using dynamically incompressible flow intended for an Engine Control Unit (ECU) in order to generate a model that runs faster than real time using a high-level programming language.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1048
Per Nicolin, Dominik Rose, Florian Kunath, Thorsten Boger
Abstract The share of gasoline engines based on direct injection (DI) technology is rapidly growing, to a large extend driven by their improved efficiency and potential to lower CO2 emissions. One downside of these advanced engines are their significantly higher particulate emissions compared to engines based on port fuel injection technologies [1]. Gasoline particulate filters (GPF) are one potential technology path to address the EU6 particulate number regulation for vehicles powered by gasoline DI engines. For the robust design and operation of GPFs it is essential to understand the mechanisms of soot accumulation and oxidation under typical operating conditions. In this paper we will first discuss the use of detailed numerical simulation to describe the soot oxidation in particulate filters under typical gasoline engine operating conditions. Laboratory experiments are used to establish a robust set of soot oxidation kinetics.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1061
Piotr Bielaczyc, Andrzej Szczotka, Joseph Woodburn
Abstract The aim of this paper was to explore the influence of CNG fuel on emissions from light-duty vehicles in the context of the new Euro 6 emissions requirements and to compare exhaust emissions of the vehicles fueled with CNG and with gasoline. Emissions testing was performed on a chassis dynamometer according to the current EU legislative test method, over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Additional tests were also performed on one of the test vehicles over the World Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Cycle (WLTC) according to the Global Technical Regulation No. 15 test procedure. The focus was on regulated exhaust emissions; both legislative (CVS-bag) and modal (continuous) analyses of the following gases were performed: CO (carbon monoxide), THC (total hydrocarbons), CH4 (methane), NMHC (non-methane hydrocarbons), NOx (oxides of nitrogen) and CO2 (carbon dioxide).
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1056
Sumit Basu, Neal Currier
A 1-dimensional analytic solution has been developed to evaluate the pressure drop and filtration performance of ceramic wall-flow partial diesel particulate filters (PFs). An axially resolved mathematical model for the static pressure and velocity profiles prevailing inside wall-flow filters, with such unique plugging configurations, is being proposed for the first time. So far, the PF models that have been developed are either iterative/numerical in nature [1], or based on commercial CFD packages [7]. In comparison, an analytic solution approach is a transparent and computationally inexpensive tool that is capable of accurately predicting trends as well as, offering explanations to fundamental performance behavior. The simple mathematical expressions that have been obtained facilitate rational decision-making when designing partial filters, and could also reduce the complexity of OBD logic necessary to control onboard filter performance.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1035
Yanxiang Yang, Bingqian Tan, Changwen Liu, Ping Zhang, Daguang Xi
Abstract A versatile liquid dosing device along with its metering theory, which can be applied to both SCR dosing system and DPF regeneration system of IC engine after-treatment system, is presented in this paper. The device is composed of a solenoid driven plunger pump, a nozzle and a pressure tube, and is pump-end controlled by PWM signals. Both electrically resistive and conductive liquids including DEF for SCR system, fuel for DPF regeneration, and gasoline for spark ignition engine, can be dispensed quantitatively with this device. A metering theory determining the liquid discharged per injection is developed by studying the system using a physical-mathematical model. The study shows that the liquid discharge can be well correlated with a measurable variable T3, which is associated with the net output energy. Experimental investigations verified that the metering results were independent of the state changes.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1043
Xian Shi, Reinhard Seiser, Jyh-Yuan Chen, Robert Dibble, Robert Cattolica
Abstract Steady-state, transient and dithering characteristics of emission conversion efficiencies of three-way catalysts on natural gas IC engine were investigated experimentally on a single-cylinder CFR engine test bench. Steady-state runs were conducted as references for specific engine emission levels and corresponding catalyst capacities. The steady-state data showed that conversion of HC will be the major problem since conversion of HC was effective only for a very narrow range of exhaust mixture. Unsteady exploration runs with both lean-to-rich and rich-to-lean transitions were conducted. These results were interpreted with a time scale analysis, according to which a qualitative oxygen storage model was proposed featuring the difference between oxygen absorption and desorption rates on the palladium catalysts.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1085
Marc C. Besch, Joshua Israel, Arvind Thiruvengadam, Hemanth Kappanna, Daniel Carder
Abstract This study was aimed at experimentally investigating the impact of diesel/natural gas (NG) dual-fuel retrofitting onto gaseous emissions emitted by i) legacy, model year (MY) 2005 heavy-duty engines with cooled EGR and no after-treatment system, and ii) a latest technology engine equipped with DPF and urea-SCR after-treatment systems that is compliant with 2010 US-EPA emissions standards. In particular, two different dual-fuel conversion kits were evaluated in this study with pure methane (CH4) being used as surrogate for natural gas. Experiments were conducted on an engine dynamometer over a 13-mode steady-state test cycle as well as the transient FTP required for engine certification while gaseous emissions were sampled through a CVS system. Tailpipe NOx emissions were observed at a comparable level for diesel and diesel/CH4 dual-fuel operation for the 2010 compliant engine downstream the SCR.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1071
Qi Jiao, Rolf D. Reitz
Abstract Due to the upcoming regulations for particulate matter (PM) emissions from GDI engines, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling study to predict soot emissions (both mass and solid particle number) from gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines was undertaken to provide insights on how and why soot emissions are formed from GDI engines. In this way, better methods may be developed to control or reduce PM emissions from GDI engines. In this paper, the influence of engine operating parameters was examined for a side-mounted fuel injector configuration in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) engine. The present models are able to reasonably predict the influences of the variables of interest compared to available experimental data or literature. For a late injection strategy, effects of the fuel composition, and spray cone angle were investigated with a single-hole injector.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1063
Yi Liu, Changsheng Su, James Clerc, Arvind Harinath, Leigh Rogoski
Abstract One field-returned DPF loaded with a high amount of ash is examined using experimental and modeling approaches. The ash-related design factors are collected by coupling the inspection results from terahertz spectroscopy with a calibrated DPF model. The obtained ash packing density, ash layer permeability and ash distribution profile are then used in the simulation to assess the ash impact on DPF backpressure and regeneration behaviors. The following features have been observed during the simulation: 1 The ash packing density, ash layer permeability and ash distribution profile should be collected at the same time to ensure the accurate prediction of ash impact on DPF backpressure. Missing one ash property could mislead the measurement of the other two parameters and thus affects the DPF backpressure estimation.2 The ash buildup would gradually increase the frequency for the backpressure-based active soot regeneration.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1081
Axel Maier, Ulrike Klaus, Andreas Dreizler, Hermann Rottengruber
Abstract The fuel-independent particulate emissions of a direct injection gasoline engine were investigated. This was done by running the engine with reference gasoline at four different loads and then switching to hydrogen or methane port fuel operation and comparing the resulting particulate emissions and their size distribution. Differences in the combustion characteristics of hydrogen and gasoline were accounted for by diluting the inlet air with nitrogen and matching the pressure or heat release traces to those of gasoline operation. Methane operation is expected to generate particulate emissions lower by several orders of magnitude compared to gasoline and hydrogen does not contribute to carbon soot formation because of the lack of carbon atoms in the molecule. Thus, any remaining particulate emissions at hydrogen gas operation must arise from non fuel related sources, e.g. from lubrication oil, metal abrasion or inlet air.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1244
Luigi Teodosio, Vincenzo De Bellis, Fabio Bozza
Abstract It is well known that the downsizing philosophy allows the improvement of Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC) at part load operation for spark ignition engines. On the other hand, the BSFC is penalized at high/full load operation because of the knock occurrence and of further limitations on the Turbine Inlet Temperature (TIT). Knock control forces the adoption of a late combustion phasing, causing a deterioration of the thermodynamic efficiency, while TIT control requires enrichment of the Air-to-Fuel (A/F) ratio, with additional BSFC drawbacks. In this work, a promising technique, consisting of the introduction of a low-pressure cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system, is analyzed by means of a 1D numerical approach with reference to a downsized turbocharged SI engine. Proper “in-house developed” sub-models are used to describe the combustion process, turbulence phenomenon and the knock occurrence.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1077
Huzeifa Badshah, Imad A. Khalek
Abstract Human exposure to vehicle exhaust during engine start-up can be encountered on a daily basis in parking lots, home garages, and vehicle stop/star traffic environment. This work is the first pilot study to characterize solid particle number and size distribution during engine start-up using various light-duty vehicles with different technology engines. A total of 84 vehicles were tested in this pilot study, consisting of post-2007 diesel engines equipped with high efficiency diesel particulate filters (DPFs) as well as modern gasoline port fuel injected (PFI) and gasoline direct injected (GDI) engines equipped with three-way-catalysts (TWCs). Particle concentration from DPF equipped diesel engines were found to be the lowest, while GDI and 8-cylinder PFI engines had the highest particle emissions.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1253
Konstantinos Siokos, Rohit Koli, Robert Prucka, Jason Schwanke, Julia Miersch
Abstract The use of Low Pressure - Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is intended to allow displacement reduction in turbocharged gasoline engines and improve fuel economy. Low Pressure EGR designs have an advantage over High Pressure configurations since they interfere less with turbocharger efficiency and improve the uniformity of air-EGR mixing in the engine. In this research, Low Pressure (LP) cooled EGR is evaluated on a turbocharged direct injection gasoline engine with variable valve timing using both simulation and experimental results. First, a model-based calibration study is conducted using simulation tools to identify fuel efficiency gains of LP EGR over the base calibration. The main sources of the efficiency improvement are then quantified individually, focusing on part-load de-throttling of the engine, heat loss reduction, knock mitigation as well as decreased high-load fuel enrichment through exhaust temperature reduction.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1257
David B. Roth, Iago Gonzalez Tabares, Anxo Sotelo Álvarez
Abstract Cooled LPL EGR is a proven means of improving the efficiency of a Gasoline Turbocharged Direct-Injection engine. One of the most significant hurdles to overcome in implementing a LPL EGR system is dealing with condensation of water near the entrance of the turbocharger's compressor wheel. A gasoline engine, and to a greater extent a spark ignition engine running on Natural Gas, will encounter enough water condensation at some steady-state conditions to damage the compressor wheel due to the high-speed collision between the compressor blades and the water droplets. As an alternative to not utilizing beneficial EGR at the condensing conditions, the team at BorgWarner have developed a LPL EGR mixer that is effective at condensing and collecting the water droplets and routing the water around the compressor wheel. The new Condensing EGR mixer was developed from the known concept of utilizing a mild venturi section to enhance EGR delivery and mixing.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1635
Zhen Zhang, Stephan Stadlbauer, Harald Waschl, Richard Fuerhapter, Luigi del Re
Abstract At the moment, no equipment is available for fast measurements of particulate matter (PM) from production CI engines, especially during transients. Against this background, virtual sensors may be an option, provided their precision can be validated. This paper presents a new approach to estimate PM emission based only on in-cylinder pressure data. To this end, an in-cylinder pressure trace is measured with a high resolution (0.5 CAD) and every trace is divided into 8 segments according to critical cylinder events (e.g. opening of the valves or the beginning of injection). A piecewise principle component analysis (PCA) is used to compress the information. This information is then used for PM estimation via a second order polynomial model structure. The key element is the separate use of pressure trace information before and during the early stages of combustion. The model is parameterized by steady points and transient experiments which include parts of the FTP and the NEDC.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1620
Feilong Liu, Jeffrey Pfeiffer
Abstract Low-pressure, Cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation (LPC EGR) brings significant fuel economy, NOx reduction and knock suppression benefits to a modern, boosted, downsized Spark Ignition (SI) engine. As a prerequisite to design an engine control system for LPC EGR, this paper presents development of a set of estimation algorithms to accurately estimate the flow rate, pressure states and thermal states of the LPC EGR-related components.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1654
Billy G. Holland, Thomas L. McKinley, Bill R. Storkman
Abstract Cooled EGR continues to be a key technology to meet emission regulations, with EGR coolers performing a critical role in the EGR system. Designing EGR coolers that reliably manage thermal loads is a challenge with thermal fatigue being a top concern. The ability to estimate EGR cooler thermal fatigue life early in the product design and validation cycle allows for robust designs that meet engine component reliability requirements and customer expectations. This paper describes a process to create an EGR cooler thermal fatigue life model. Components which make up the EGR cooler have differing thermal responses, consequently conjugate transient CFD must be used to accurately model metal temperatures during heating and cooling cycles. Those metal temperatures are then imported into FEA software for structural analysis. Results from both the CFD and FEA are then used in a simplified numerical model to estimate the virtual strain of the EGR cooler.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1746
Hassan Karaky, Gilles Mauviot, Xavier Tauzia, Alain Maiboom
Abstract Reducing NOx tailpipe emissions is one of the major challenges when developing automotive Diesel engines which must simultaneously face stricter emission norms and reduce their fuel consumption/CO2 emission. In fact, the engine control system has to manage at the same time the multiple advanced combustion technologies such as high EGR rates, new injection strategies, complex after-treatment devices and sophisticated turbocharging systems implemented in recent diesel engines. In order to limit both the cost and duration of engine control system development, a virtual engine simulator has been developed in the last few years. The platform of this simulator is based on a 0D/1D approach, chosen for its low computational time. The existing simulation tools lead to satisfactory results concerning the combustion phase as well as the air supply system. In this context, the current paper describes the development of a new NOx emission model which is coupled with the combustion model.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1690
Cristina Arnal, Yolanda Bravo, Carmen Larrosa, Valentina Gargiulo, Michela Alfè, Anna Ciajolo, María Ujué Alzueta, Ángela Millera, Rafael Bilbao
Abstract Soot fouling on exhaust gas recirculation coolers (EGRc) decreases thermal efficiency, implying the unfulfillment of NOx standards, and increases the pressure drop producing the malfunctioning of this device. The characterization of soot is of great interest since soot physico-chemical properties may have a direct influence on the degree of malfunctioning of EGRc. Thus, the combined analysis and interpretation of all the soot physico-chemical features are essential to correctly interpret its behavior when soot is deposited on the EGRc walls. In this context, the aim of this study is the characterization of five different types of diesel soot which were collected from several high pressure EGRc, working at different conditions (engine bench and vehicle). Each soot sample was characterized by means of elemental analysis, specific surface area (BET method), FESEM, FTIR, TGA, GC-MS and UV-visible spectroscopy.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0391
Yoshihiro Sukegawa, Kazuhiro Oryoji
Abstract A 3D simulation technique to estimate density of particulate matter (PM) from spark ignition (SI) gasoline engines is proposed. The technique is based on a two-equation model consisting of coupled conservation equations of soot particle number and mass and fluid transportation equations. The nucleation rate of soot particles was obtained from a database built by simulation of elementary reaction with the proposed technique. Two approaches were explored to obtain the nucleation rate. One involves 0-dimensinal SI simulation and the other involves 1-dimensinal flame propagation simulation. The estimation results were verified with measurement data obtained with a single cylinder SI engine a homogeneous pre-mixed fuel was supplied. It was confirmed that appropriate results could be obtained with the 1-dimensional approach for the nucleation rate model.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0744
Terrence Alger, Raphael Gukelberger, Jess Gingrich, Barrett Mangold
Abstract The use of cooled EGR as a knock suppression tool is gaining more acceptance worldwide. As cooled EGR become more prevalent, some challenges are presented for engine designers. In this study, the impact of cooled EGR on peak cylinder pressure was evaluated. A 1.6 L, 4-cylinder engine was operated with and without cooled EGR at several operating conditions. The impact of adding cooled EGR to the engine on peak cylinder pressure was then evaluated with an attempt to separate the effect due to advanced combustion phasing from the effect of increased manifold pressure. The results show that cooled EGR's impact on peak cylinder pressure is primarily due to the knock suppression effect, with the result that an EGR rate of 25% leads to an almost 50% increase in peak cylinder pressure at a mid-load condition if the combustion phasing is advanced to Knock Limited Spark Advance (KLSA). When combustion phasing was held constant, increasing the EGR rate had almost no effect on PCP.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1714
Usman Asad, Jimi Tjong
Abstract This study describes a zero-dimensional algorithm for tracking the intake dilution in real-time. The inputs to the model are the oxygen concentration from the exhaust oxygen sensor, the manifold air pressure and temperature (MAP/MAT), the mass air flow (MAF) and the estimated fuel injected per cycle from the engine control module. The intake manifold, the exhaust manifold and EGR system are discretized into 3 volumes and the detailed concentrations of the gas species comprising the exhaust, EGR and intake streams are tracked at each time step (on a cycle-by-cycle basis). The model does not need the EGR ratio to be known in advance and is also applicable to oxygenated fuels such as ethanol. The model response is tuned to a multi-cylinder engine and the model output is empirically validated against a wide range of engine operations including load and EGR transients.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0589
Andrew Moskalik, Paul Dekraker, John Kargul, Daniel Barba
Abstract The benchmarking study described in this paper uses data from chassis dynamometer testing to determine the efficiency and operation of vehicle driveline components. A robust test procedure was created that can be followed with no a priori knowledge of component performance, nor additional instrumentation installed in the vehicle. To develop the procedure, a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu was tested on a chassis dynamometer. Dynamometer data, emissions data, and data from the vehicle controller area network (CAN) bus were used to construct efficiency maps for the engine and transmission. These maps were compared to maps of the same components produced from standalone component benchmarking, resulting in a good match between results from in-vehicle and standalone testing. The benchmarking methodology was extended to a 2013 Mercedes E350 diesel vehicle. Dynamometer, emissions, and CAN data were used to construct efficiency maps and operation strategies for the engine and transmission.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0992
Mojghan Naseri, Ceren Aydin, Shadab Mulla, Raymond Conway, Sougato Chatterjee
Abstract Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems have been demonstrated as effective solutions for controlling NOx emissions from Heavy Duty diesel engines. Future HD diesel engines are being designed for higher engine out NOx to improve fuel economy, while discussions are in progress for tightening NOx emissions from HD engines post 2020. This will require increasingly higher NOx conversions across the emission control system and will challenge the current aftertreatment designs. Typical 2010/2013 Heavy Duty systems include a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) along with a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF) in addition to the SCR sub-assembly. For future aftertreatment designs, advanced technologies such as cold start concept (dCSC™) catalyst, SCR coated on filter (SCRF® hereafter referred to as SCR-DPF) and SCR coated on high porous flow through substrates can be utilized to achieve high NOx conversions, in combination with improved control strategies.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0989
Steve Schiller, Mark Brandl, Bruce Hoppenstedt, Korneel De Rudder
Abstract Diesel engine NOx emissions requirements have become increasingly stringent over the past two decades. Engine manufacturers have shown through the use of EGR and SCR technology that these requirements can be met. However, the desires for improved fuel efficiency, lower overall cost, and potential legislation to reduce NOx levels further increase the demand for higher DEF dosing rates. To meet this demand, a new DEF mixing technology has been developed. This paper describes the development methods used to create a compact, in-pipe mixer which utilizes an optimized wire mesh along with swirling flow to permit high DEF dosing rates without deposit formation. Its excellent mixing characteristics allowed for high NOx reduction to be achieved. Utilization of this technology makes it possible to reduce regeneration frequency, reduce the overall size of the SCR system, possibly eliminate the EGR system, and improve fuel efficiency through combustion enhancements.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1013
Shankar Ramadas, Sunil Prasanth Suseelan, Thiyagarajan Paramadhayalan, Ambalavanan Annamalai, Rahul Mital
Abstract Emission compliance at the production level has been a challenge for vehicle manufacturers. Diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) plays a very important role in controlling the emissions for the diesel vehicles. Vehicle manufacturers tend to ‘over design’ the diesel oxidation catalyst to ‘absorb’ the production variations which seems an easier and faster solution. However this approach increases the DOC cost phenomenally which impacts the overall vehicle cost. The main objective of this paper is to address the high variation in CO tail pipe emissions which were observed on a diesel passenger car during development. This variation was posing a challenge in consistently meeting the internal product requirement/specification.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0997
Jonas Jansson, Åsa Johansson, Hanna Sjovall, Mikael Larsson, Gudmund Smedler, Colin Newman, Jason Pless
Abstract This paper will review several different emission control systems for heavy duty diesel (HDD) applications aimed at future legislations. The focus will be on the (DOC+CSF+SCR+ASC) configuration. As of today, various SCR technologies are used on commercial vehicles around the globe. Moving beyond EuroVI/US10 emission levels, both fuel consumption savings and higher catalyst system efficiency are required. Therefore, significant system optimization has to be considered. Examples of this include: catalyst development, optimized thermal management, advanced urea dosing calibrations, and optimized SCR inlet NO:NO2 ratios. The aim of this paper is to provide a thorough system screening using a range of advanced SCR technologies, where the pros and cons from a system perspective will be discussed. Further optimization of selected systems will also be reviewed. The results suggest that current legislation requirements can be met for all SCR catalysts under investigation.
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