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Viewing 121 to 150 of 22757
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1057
Scott Drennan, Gaurav Kumar, Shaoping Quan, Mingjie Wang
Abstract Controlling NOx emissions from vehicles is a key aspect of meeting new regulations for cars and trucks across the world. Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) with urea-water injection is a NOx reduction option that many engine manufacturers are adopting. The performance of urea-water spray evaporation and mixing upstream of an SCR catalyst is critical in obtaining reliable NOx reduction. Achieving this goal requires good ammonia and NOx distribution upstream of the SCR catalyst brick. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of urea-water injection systems have become an important development and diagnostic tool for designers. An effective modeling approach for urea/SCR must include spray distribution, evaporation, urea kinetics, wall interactions and heat transfer. Designers are also interested in reducing mesh generation time to expedite geometry design changes and optimizing mesh size for accuracy and solution time.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1065
Piotr Bielaczyc, Joseph Woodburn, Andrzej Szczotka
Abstract Due to concern over emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG; particularly carbon dioxide - CO2), energy consumption and sustainability, many jurisdictions now regulate fuel consumption, fuel economy or exhaust emissions of CO2. Testing is carried out under laboratory conditions according to local or regional procedures. However, a harmonized global test procedure with its own test cycle has been created: the World Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Cycle - WLTC. In this paper, the WLTC is compared to the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and the FTP-75 cycle used in the USA. A series of emissions tests were conducted at BOSMAL on a chassis dynamometer in a Euro 6-complaint test facility to determine the impact of the test cycle on CO2 emissions and fuel consumption. While there are multiple differences in the test cycles in terms of dynamicity, duration, distance covered, mean/maximum speed, etc, differences in results obtained over the three test cycles were reasonably limited.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1062
E. Robert Fanick, Svitlana Kroll, Stefan Simescu
Abstract Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) are a group of compounds that may form during combustion and/or are present in the unburned portion of the fuel and lubricating oil which ultimately become part of the exhaust. Many of these compounds are considered toxic or carcinogenic. Since these compounds are present in very low concentrations in diesel engine exhaust, the methods for sampling, handling, and analyzing these compounds are critical to obtaining representative and repeatable results. Engine testing is typically performed using a dilution tunnel. With a dilution tunnel, the collection of a representative sample is important. Experiments were performed with a modified EPA Method TO-9A to determine the equilibration time and other sampling parameters required for the measurement of SVOC in dilute exhaust. The results show that representative results can be obtained with this method.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1061
Piotr Bielaczyc, Andrzej Szczotka, Joseph Woodburn
Abstract The aim of this paper was to explore the influence of CNG fuel on emissions from light-duty vehicles in the context of the new Euro 6 emissions requirements and to compare exhaust emissions of the vehicles fueled with CNG and with gasoline. Emissions testing was performed on a chassis dynamometer according to the current EU legislative test method, over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Additional tests were also performed on one of the test vehicles over the World Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Cycle (WLTC) according to the Global Technical Regulation No. 15 test procedure. The focus was on regulated exhaust emissions; both legislative (CVS-bag) and modal (continuous) analyses of the following gases were performed: CO (carbon monoxide), THC (total hydrocarbons), CH4 (methane), NMHC (non-methane hydrocarbons), NOx (oxides of nitrogen) and CO2 (carbon dioxide).
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1244
Luigi Teodosio, Vincenzo De Bellis, Fabio Bozza
Abstract It is well known that the downsizing philosophy allows the improvement of Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC) at part load operation for spark ignition engines. On the other hand, the BSFC is penalized at high/full load operation because of the knock occurrence and of further limitations on the Turbine Inlet Temperature (TIT). Knock control forces the adoption of a late combustion phasing, causing a deterioration of the thermodynamic efficiency, while TIT control requires enrichment of the Air-to-Fuel (A/F) ratio, with additional BSFC drawbacks. In this work, a promising technique, consisting of the introduction of a low-pressure cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system, is analyzed by means of a 1D numerical approach with reference to a downsized turbocharged SI engine. Proper “in-house developed” sub-models are used to describe the combustion process, turbulence phenomenon and the knock occurrence.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1078
Zhigang Chai, Fujun Zhang, Bolan Liu, Ying Huang, Xiaowei Ai
Abstract It is found that biodiesel has a great potential to reduce the nitrogen oxides (NOx) and soot emissions simultaneously in low temperature combustion (LTC) mode. The objective of this study is to investigate the combustion and emission characteristics of 20% biodiesel blend diesel fuel (B20) under several exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) conditions for LTC application. An experimental investigation of B20 was conducted on a four-stroke common rail direct injection diesel engine at 2000rpm and 25% load condition. The EGR ratio was adjusted from 10% to 66%, and the injection pressure was tuned from 100MPa to 140MPa. The result showed that B20 generated less soot emission than conventional diesel with increasing EGR ratio, especially when the EGR ratio was beyond 30%. Soot emission increased with increasing EGR ratio up to 50% EGR, after which there is a steep decrease in particular matter (PM).
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1079
Jan Czerwinski, Pierre Comte, Adrian Wichser, Andreas Mayer, Jacques Lemaire
Abstract The invisible nanoparticles (NP)*) from combustion processes penetrate easily into the human body through the respiratory and olfactory pathways and carry numerous harmful health effects potentials. NP count concentrations are limited in EU for Diesel passenger cars since 2013 and for gasoline cars with direct injection (GDI) since 2014. The limit for GDI was temporary extended to 6 × 1012 #/km, (regulation No. 459/2012/EU). Nuclei of metals as well as organics are suspected to significantly contribute especially to the ultrafine particle size fractions, and thus to the particle number concentration. In the project GasOMeP (Gasoline Organic & Metal Particulates) metal-nanoparticles (including sub 20nm) from gasoline cars are investigated for different engine technologies. In the present paper some results of investigations of nanoparticles from four gasoline cars - an older one with MPI and three newer with DI - are represented.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1076
Tak W. Chan
Abstract This study reported black carbon (BC) mass and solid particle number emissions from a gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicle and a port fuel injection (PFI) vehicle on splash blended E10 and iB16 fuels over the FTP-75 and US06 drive cycles at standard and cold ambient temperatures. For the FTP-75 drive cycle, the GDI vehicle had lower solid particle number and BC mass emissions from E10 (5.1×1012 particles/mile; 4.2 mg/mile) and iB16 (5.2×1012 particles/mile; 3.9 mg/mile) compared to E0 (7.2×1012 particles/mile; 7.0 mg/mi). Most of the reductions were attributed to the statistically significant reductions during the phases 1 and 2 of the FTP-75 drive cycle. iB16 was also observed to have statistically significant reduction on BC emissions when compared to E0 at cold ambient temperature but E10 did not show such BC reduction. For the PFI vehicle, most of the solid particle number and BC mass emissions were emitted primarily during phase 1 of the FTP-75 drive cycle.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1080
Eduardo J. Barrientos, Matti M. Maricq, Andre L. Boehman, James E. Anderson
Abstract A study and analysis of the relation of biodiesel chemical structures to the resulting soot characteristics and soot oxidative reactivity is presented. Soot samples generated from combustion of various methyl esters, alkanes, biodiesel and diesel fuels in laminar co-flow diffusion flames are analyzed to evaluate the impact of fuel-bound oxygen in fatty acid esters on soot oxidation behavior. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of soot samples collected from diffusion flames show that chemical variations in biodiesel ester compounds have an impact on soot oxidative reactivity and soot characteristics in contrast to findings reported previously in the literature. Soot derived from methyl esters with shorter alkyl chains, such as methyl butyrate and methyl hexanoate, exhibit higher reactivity than those with longer carbon chain lengths, such as methyl oleate, which are more representative of biodiesel fuels.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1081
Axel Maier, Ulrike Klaus, Andreas Dreizler, Hermann Rottengruber
Abstract The fuel-independent particulate emissions of a direct injection gasoline engine were investigated. This was done by running the engine with reference gasoline at four different loads and then switching to hydrogen or methane port fuel operation and comparing the resulting particulate emissions and their size distribution. Differences in the combustion characteristics of hydrogen and gasoline were accounted for by diluting the inlet air with nitrogen and matching the pressure or heat release traces to those of gasoline operation. Methane operation is expected to generate particulate emissions lower by several orders of magnitude compared to gasoline and hydrogen does not contribute to carbon soot formation because of the lack of carbon atoms in the molecule. Thus, any remaining particulate emissions at hydrogen gas operation must arise from non fuel related sources, e.g. from lubrication oil, metal abrasion or inlet air.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1690
Cristina Arnal, Yolanda Bravo, Carmen Larrosa, Valentina Gargiulo, Michela Alfè, Anna Ciajolo, María Ujué Alzueta, Ángela Millera, Rafael Bilbao
Abstract Soot fouling on exhaust gas recirculation coolers (EGRc) decreases thermal efficiency, implying the unfulfillment of NOx standards, and increases the pressure drop producing the malfunctioning of this device. The characterization of soot is of great interest since soot physico-chemical properties may have a direct influence on the degree of malfunctioning of EGRc. Thus, the combined analysis and interpretation of all the soot physico-chemical features are essential to correctly interpret its behavior when soot is deposited on the EGRc walls. In this context, the aim of this study is the characterization of five different types of diesel soot which were collected from several high pressure EGRc, working at different conditions (engine bench and vehicle). Each soot sample was characterized by means of elemental analysis, specific surface area (BET method), FESEM, FTIR, TGA, GC-MS and UV-visible spectroscopy.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0391
Yoshihiro Sukegawa, Kazuhiro Oryoji
Abstract A 3D simulation technique to estimate density of particulate matter (PM) from spark ignition (SI) gasoline engines is proposed. The technique is based on a two-equation model consisting of coupled conservation equations of soot particle number and mass and fluid transportation equations. The nucleation rate of soot particles was obtained from a database built by simulation of elementary reaction with the proposed technique. Two approaches were explored to obtain the nucleation rate. One involves 0-dimensinal SI simulation and the other involves 1-dimensinal flame propagation simulation. The estimation results were verified with measurement data obtained with a single cylinder SI engine a homogeneous pre-mixed fuel was supplied. It was confirmed that appropriate results could be obtained with the 1-dimensional approach for the nucleation rate model.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0772
Ashish J. Chaudhari, Vinayak Kulkarni, Niranjan Sahoo
Abstract In this study, the effect of using higher research octane rating fuel Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) in respect of gasoline in the spark ignition engine on the performance and exhaust emission was experimentally studied. For this purpose, the tilting block technique of varying the compression ratio from 8 to 10 of the engine has been implemented and attention has been paid towards the variation of performance and combustion parameters with LPG fuel. Most undesirable emissions are exhausted by the spark ignition (SI) engines in which the primary pollutants from the engine (such as NOx) which when mixed in the atmosphere react with ozone and create the secondary pollutant that are more harmful to human health. Looking at this fact, while optimizing the compression ratio, the emission reduction technique like intake charge dilution with exhaust gas from the engine has been studied.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0781
Raphael Gukelberger, Jess Gingrich, Terrence Alger, Steven Almaraz
Abstract The ongoing pursuit of improved engine efficiency and emissions is driving gasoline low-pressure loop EGR systems into production around the globe. The Dedicated EGR (D-EGR®) engine was developed to minimize some of the challenges of cooled EGR while maintaining its advantages. The D-EGR engine is a high efficiency, low emissions internal combustion engine for automotive and off-highway applications. The core of the engine development focused on a unique concept that combines the efficiency improvements associated with recirculated exhaust gas and the efficiency improvements associated with fuel reformation. To outline the differences of the new engine concept with a conventional LPL EGR setup, a turbocharged 2.0 L PFI engine was modified to operate in both modes. The second part of the cooled EGR engine concept comparison investigates efficiency, knock resistance, combustion stability, and maximum load potential at high load conditions.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0776
Gerben Doornbos, Stina Hemdal, Daniel Dahl
Abstract This study investigated how the amount of dilution applied can be extended while maintaining normal engine operation in a GDI engine. Adding exhaust gases or air to a stoichiometric air/fuel mixture yields several advantages regarding fuel consumption and engine out emissions. The aim of this paper is to reduce fuel consumption by means of diluted combustion, an advanced ignition system and adjusted valve timing. Tests were performed on a Volvo four-cylinder engine equipped with a dual coil ignition system. This system made it possible to extend the ignition duration and current. Furthermore, a sweep was performed in valve timing and type of dilution, i.e., air or exhaust gases. While maintaining a CoV in IMEP < 5%, the DCI system was able to extend the maximum lambda value by 0.1 - 0.15. Minimizing valve overlap increased lambda by an additional 0.1.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0784
Raphael Gukelberger, Jess Gingrich, Terrence Alger, Steven Almaraz
Abstract In light of the increasingly stringent efficiency and emissions requirements, several new engine technologies are currently under investigation. One of these new concepts is the Dedicated EGR (D-EGR®) engine. The concept utilizes fuel reforming and high levels of recirculated exhaust gas (EGR) to achieve very high levels of thermal efficiency. While the positive impact of reformate, in particular hydrogen, on gasoline engine performance has been widely documented, the on-board reforming process and / or storage of H2 remains challenging. The Water-Gas-Shift (WGS) reaction is well known and has been used successfully for many years in the industry to produce hydrogen from the reactants water vapor and carbon monoxide. For this study, prototype WGS catalysts were installed in the exhaust tract of the dedicated cylinder of a turbocharged 2.0 L in-line four cylinder MPI engine.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0783
Raphael Gukelberger, Jess Gingrich, Terrence Alger, Steven Almaraz, Bradley Denton
Abstract The ongoing pursuit of improved engine efficiency and emissions are driving gasoline low-pressure loop EGR systems into production around the globe. To minimize inevitable downsides of cooled EGR while maintaining its advantages, the Dedicated EGR (D-EGR®) engine was developed. The core of the D-EGR engine development focused on a unique concept that combines the efficiency improvements associated with recirculated exhaust gas and the efficiency improvements associated with fuel reformation. To outline the differences of the new engine concept with a conventional low-pressure loop (LPL) EGR setup, a turbocharged 2.0 L PFI engine was modified to operate in both modes and also compared to the baseline. The first part of the cooled EGR engine concept comparison investigates efficiency, emissions, combustion stability, and robustness at throttled part load conditions.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0801
Gregory K. Lilik, Charles J. Mueller, Cosmin E. Dumitrescu, Christopher R. Gehrke
Abstract Although soot-formation processes in diesel engines have been well characterized during the mixing-controlled burn, little is known about the distribution of soot throughout the combustion chamber after the end of appreciable heat release during the expansion and exhaust strokes. Hence, the laser-induced incandescence (LII) diagnostic was developed to visualize the distribution of soot within an optically accessible single-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine during this period. The developed LII diagnostic is semi-quantitative; i.e., if certain conditions (listed in the Appendix) are true, it accurately captures spatial and temporal trends in the in-cylinder soot field. The diagnostic features a vertically oriented and vertically propagating laser sheet that can be translated across the combustion chamber, where “vertical” refers to a direction parallel to the axis of the cylinder bore.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0800
Yann Gallo, Johan Simonsson, Ted Lind, Per-Erik Bengtsson, Henrik Bladh, Oivind Andersson
Abstract Two competing in-cylinder processes, soot formation and soot oxidation, govern soot emissions from diesel engines. Previous studies have shown a lack of correlation between the soot formation rate and soot emissions. The current experiment focuses on the correlation between soot oxidation rates and soot emissions. Laser extinction is measured using a red (690nm) laser beam, which is sent vertically through the cylinder. This wavelength is long enough to minimize absorption interference from poly-aromatic hydrocarbons, while still in the visible regime. It is modulated at 72 kHz in order to produce 10 pulses per crank angle degree at an engine speed of 1200 rpm. The intake oxygen concentration is varied between 9% and 21%. The time resolved extinction measurements are used to estimate soot oxidation rates during expansion.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0887
J. Felipe Rodriguez, Wai K. Cheng
Abstract The impact of the operating strategy on emissions from the first combustion cycle during cranking was studied quantitatively in a production gasoline direct injection engine. A single injection early in the compression cycle after IVC gives the best tradeoff between HC, particulate mass (PM) and number (PN) emissions and net indicated effective pressure (NIMEP). Retarding the spark timing, it does not materially affect the HC emissions, but lowers the PM/PN emissions substantially. Increasing the injection pressure (at constant fuel mass) increases the NIMEP but also the PM/PN emissions.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0886
Joseph Pritchard, Wai K. Cheng
Abstract The effects of secondary air on the exhaust oxidation of particulate matters (PM) have been assessed in a direct-injection-spark-ignition engine under fuel rich fast idle condition (1200 rpm; 2 bar NIMEP). Substantial oxidation of the unburned feed gas species (CO and HC) and significant reduction of both the particulate number (up to ∼80%) and volume (up to ∼90%) have been observed. The PM oxidation is attributed to the reactions between the PM and the radicals generated in the oxidation of the feed gas unburned species. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that the reduction in PM volume is proportional to the amount of heat release in the secondary oxidation.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0863
Hideyuki Ogawa, Peilong Zhao, Taiki Kato, Gen Shibata
Abstract Dual fuel combustion with premixed natural gas as the main fuel and diesel fuel as the ignition source was investigated in a 0.83 L, single cylinder, DI diesel engine. At low loads, increasing the equivalence ratio of natural gas to around 0.5 with intake throttling makes it possible to reduce the THC and CO emissions as well as to improve the thermal efficiency. At high loads, increasing the boost pressure moderates the combustion, but increases the THC and CO emissions, resulting in deterioration of the thermal efficiency. The EGR is essential to suppress the rapid combustion. As misfiring occurs with a compression ratio of 14.5 and there is excessively rapid combustion with 18.5 compression ratio, 16.5 is a suitable compression ratio.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0957
George Karavalakis, Daniel Short, Diep Vu, Robert Russell, Akua Asa-Awuku, Thomas Durbin
Abstract Biofuels, such as ethanol and butanol, have been the subject of significant political and scientific attention, owing to concerns about climate change, global energy security, and the decline of world oil resources that is aggravated by the continuous increase in the demand for fossil fuels. This study evaluated the potential emissions impacts of different alcohol blends on a fleet of modern gasoline vehicles. Testing was conducted on a fleet of nine vehicles with different combinations of ten fuel blends over the Federal Test Procedure and Unified Cycle. The vehicles ranged in model year from 2007-2014 and included four vehicles with port fuel injection (PFI) fueling and five vehicles with direct injection (DI) fueling.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0990
Brett M. Bailey
This paper details the development of Cool Particulate Regeneration™, CPR™, an ultra-efficient non-thermal active particulate filter regeneration technology for gasoline and diesel particulate filters. In the technologies simplest form, mechanical two-way regeneration valves are sequentially and in rapid succession pneumatically actuated to induce a reverse flow filter cleaning. Their operation generates exhaust pressure by sealing off the exhaust system preventing filtered engine exhaust from exiting the tailpipe. The filtered and pressurized gases are then released to a separate low pressure particulate matter (PM) reservoir upstream of the filter. The reverse flow of high pressure filtered exhaust gases pass back though the filter physically dislodging the particulate and transporting it to the low pressure storage chamber. Innovative utilization of the particulate matter is discussed. CPR has undergone bench testing and two generations of research and development.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0998
Paul Mentink, Rob van den Nieuwenhof, Frank Kupper, Frank Willems, Dennis Kooijman
Abstract Heavy-duty diesel engines are used in different application areas, like long-haul, city distribution, dump truck and building and construction industry. For these wide variety of areas, the engine performance needs to comply with the real-world legislation limits and should simultaneously have a low fuel consumption and good drivability. Meeting these requirements takes substantial development and calibration effort, where an optimal fuel consumption for each application is not always met in practice. TNO's Integrated Emission Management (IEM) strategy, is able to deal with these variations in operating conditions, while meeting legislation limits and obtaining on-line cost optimization. Based on the actual state of the engine and aftertreatment, optimal air-path setpoints are computed, which balances EGR and SCR usage.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0991
Nathan Ottinger, Rebecca Veele, Yuanzhou Xi, Z. Gerald Liu
Abstract Lean-burn natural gas (NG) engines are used world-wide for both stationary power generation and mobile applications ranging from passenger cars to Class 8 line-haul trucks. With the recent introduction of hydraulic fracturing gas extraction technology and increasing availability of natural gas, these engines are receiving more attention. However, the reduction of unburned hydrocarbon emissions from lean-burn NG and dual-fuel (diesel and natural gas) engines is particularly challenging due to the stability of the predominant short-chain alkane species released (e.g., methane, ethane, and propane). Supported Pd-based oxidation catalysts are generally considered the most active materials for the complete oxidation of low molecular weight alkanes at temperatures typical of lean-burn NG exhaust. However, these catalysts rapidly degrade under realistic exhaust conditions with high water vapor concentrations and traces of sulfur.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1017
Yuki Jin, Narimasa Shinoda, Yosuke Uesaka, Tatsuyuki Kuki, Masataka Yamashita, Hirofumi Sakamoto, Tasuku Matsumoto, Philipp Kattouah, Claus Dieter Vogt
Abstract Since the implementation of Euro 6 in September 2014, diesel engines are facing another drastic reduction of NOx emission limits from 180 to only 80 mg/km during NEDC and real driving emissions (RDE) are going to be monitored until limit values are enforced from September 2017. Considering also long term CO2 targets of 95 g/km beyond 2020, diesel engines must become cleaner and more efficient. However, there is a tradeoff between NOx and CO2 and, naturally, engine developers choose lower CO2 because NOx can be reduced by additional devices such as EGR or a catalytic converter. Lower CO2 engine calibration, unfortunately, leads to lower exhaust gas temperatures, which delays the activation of the catalytic converter. In order to overcome both problems, higher NOx engine out emission and lower exhaust gas temperatures, new aftertreatment systems will incorporate close-coupled DeNOx systems.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1019
Changpu Zhao, Man Bai, Junwei Yang, Fang Shang, Gang Yu
Abstract The main objective of this paper was to investigate the pressure drop characteristics of ACT (asymmetric cell technology) design filter with various inlet mass flow rates, soot loads and ash loads by utilizing 1-D computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. The model was established by AVL Boost code. Different ratios of inlet to outlet channel width inside the DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) were investigated to determine the optimal structure in practical applications, as well as the effect of soot and ash interaction on pressure loss. The results proved that pressure drop sensitivity of different inlet/outlet channel width ratios increases with the increased inlet mass flow rate and soot load. The pressure drop increases with the increased channel width ratio at the same mass flow rate. When there is little soot deposits inside DPF, the pressure drop increases with the bigger inlet.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1022
Jinyong Luo, Hongmei An, Krishna Kamasamudram, Neal Currier, Aleksey Yezerets, Thomas Watkins, Larry Allard
Abstract In this contribution, nuanced changes of a commercial Cu-SSZ-13 catalyst with hydrothermal aging, which have not been previously reported, as well as their corresponding impact on SCR functions, are described. In particular, a sample of Cu-SSZ-13 was progressively aged between 550 to 900°C and the changes of performance in NH3 storage, oxidation functionality and NOx conversion of the catalyst were measured after hydrothermal exposure at each temperature. The catalysts thus aged were further characterized by NH3-TPD, XRD and DRIFTS techniques for structural changes. Based on the corresponding performance and structural characteristics, three different regimes of hydrothermal aging were identified, and tentatively as assigned to “mild”, “severe” and “extreme” aging. Progressive hydrothermal aging up to 750°C decreased NOx conversion to a small degree, as well as NH3 storage and oxidation functions.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1030
Ashok Kumar, Krishna Kamasamudram, Neal Currier, Aleksey Yezerets
Abstract The high global warming potential of nitrous oxide (N2O) led to its inclusion in the list of regulated greenhouse gas (GHG) pollutants [1, 2]. The mitigation of N2O on aftertreatment catalysts was shown to be ineffective as its formation and decomposition temperatures do not overlap. Therefore, the root causes for N2O formation were investigated to enable the catalyst architectures and controls development for minimizing its formation. In a typical heavy-duty diesel exhaust aftertreatment system based on selective catalytic reduction of NOx by ammonia derived from urea (SCR), the main contributors to tailpipe N2O are expected to be the undesired reaction between NOx and NH3 over SCR catalyst and NH3 slip in to ammonia slip catalyst (ASC), part of which gets oxidized to N2O.
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