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2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1281
Jatin Agarwal, Monis Alam, Ashish Jaiswal, Ketan Yadav, Naveen Kumar
Abstract The continued reliance on fossil fuel energy resources is not sufficient to cater to the current energy demands. The excessive and continuous use of crude oil is now recognized as unviable due to its depleting supplies and elevating environmental degradation by increased emissions from automobile exhaust. There is an urgent need for a renewable and cleaner source of energy to meet the stringent emission norms. Hythane is a mixture of 20% hydrogen and 80% methane. It has benefits of low capital and operating costs and is a cleaner alternative than crude oil. It significantly reduces tailpipe emissions and is the cheapest way to meet new emission standards that is BS-IV. Hythane produces low carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrocarbons (HC) on combustion than crude oil and helps in reduction of greenhouse gases.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0254
Gursaran D. Mathur
Field tests were conducted on a late full sized sedan with the HVAC unit operating in both Recirculation and OSA modes to monitor build-up of the CO2 concentration inside the cabin and its influence on occupant’s fatigue and alertness. These tests were conducted during 2015 summer on interstate highways with test durations ranging from 4 to 7 hours. During the above tests, fatigue or tiredness of the occupants (including CO2 levels) was monitored and recorded at 30 min intervals. Based on this investigation it is determined that the measured cabin concentration levels reaches ASHRAE (Standard 62-1999) specified magnitudes (greater than 700 ppm over ambient levels) with three occupants in the vehicle. Further, the occupants did show fatigue when the HVAC unit was operated in recirculation mode in excess of 5 hours. Further details have been presented in the paper.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0282
Julio Carrera
Abstract Recent emissions standards have become more restrictive in terms of CO2 and NOx reduction. This has been translated into higher EGR rates at higher exhaust gas temperatures with lower coolant flow rates for much longer lifetimes. In consequence, thermal load for EGR coolers has been increasing and the interaction of boiling with thermal fatigue is now a critical issue during development. It is almost impossible to avoid localized boiling inside an EGR cooler and, in fact, it would not be strictly necessary when it is below the Critical Heat Flux (CHF). However when CHF is exceeded, film boiling occurs leading to the sudden drop of the heat transfer rate and metal temperature rise. In consequence, thermal stress increases even when film boiling is reached only in a small area inside the part. It is very difficult to accurately predict under which conditions CHF is reached and to establish the margins to avoid it.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0799
George Karavalakis, Yu Jiang, Jiacheng Yang, Maryam Hajbabaei, Kent Johnson, Thomas Durbin
Abstract We assessed gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emissions from a current technology stoichiometric natural gas waste hauler equipped with a 2011 model year 8.9L Cummins Westport ISL-G engine with cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and three-way catalyst (TWC). Testing was performed on five fuels with varying Wobbe and methane numbers over the William H. Martin Refuse Truck Cycle. The results showed lower nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions for the low methane fuels (i.e., natural gas fuels with a relatively low methane content) for the transport and curbside cycles. Total hydrocarbon (THC) and methane (CH4) emissions did not show any consistent fuel trends. Non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions showed a trend of higher emissions for the fuels containing higher levels of NMHCs. Carbon monoxide (CO) emissions showed a trend of higher emissions for the low methane fuels.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0810
Massimo Cardone, Ezio Mancaruso, Renato Marialto, Luigi Sequino, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Abstract The interest of the vehicle producers in fulfillment emission legislations without adopting after treatment systems is driving to the use of non-conventional energy sources for modern engines. A previous test campaign dealing with the use of blends of diesel and propane in a CI engine has pointed out the potential of this non-conventional fuel for diesel engines. The soft adaptation of the common rail injection system and the potential benefits, in terms of engine performances and pollutant emissions, encourage the use of propane-diesel blends if an optimization of the injection strategies is performed. In this work, the performances of a propane-diesel mixture in a research diesel engine have been investigated. The injection strategies of Euro 5 calibration have been used as reference for the development of optimized strategies. The aim of the optimization process was to ensure the same engine power output and reduce the pollutant emissions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0792
Jeremy Rochussen, Jeff Yeo, Patrick Kirchen
Abstract Diesel-ignited dual-fuel (DIDF) combustion of natural gas (NG) is a promising strategy to progress the application of NG as a commercially viable compression ignition engine fuel. Port injection of gaseous NG applied in tandem with direct injection of liquid diesel fuel as an ignition source permits a high level of control over cylinder charge preparation, and therefore combustion. Across the broad spectrum of possible combustion conditions in DIDF operation, different fundamental mechanisms are expected to dominate the fuel conversion process. Previous investigations have advanced the understanding of which combustion mechanisms are likely present under certain sets of conditions, permitting the successful modeling of DIDF combustion for particular operating modes. A broader understanding of the transitions between different combustion modes across the spectrum of DIDF warrants further effort.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0807
Christopher W. J. Mabson, Ehsan Faghani, Pooyan Kheirkhah, Patrick Kirchen, Steven N. Rogak, Gordon McTaggart-Cowan
Abstract This paper examines the combustion and emissions produced using a prototype fuel injector nozzle for pilot-ignited direct-injection natural gas engines. In the new geometry, 7 individual equally-spaced gas injection holes were replaced by 7 pairs of closely-aligned holes (“paired-hole nozzle”). The paired-hole nozzle was intended to reduce particulate formation by increasing air entrainment due to jet interaction. Tests were performed on a single-cylinder research engine at different speeds and loads, and over a range of fuel injection and air handling conditions. Emissions were compared to those resulting from a reference injector with equally spaced holes (“single-hole nozzle”). Contrary to expectations, the CO and PM emissions were 3 to 10 times higher when using the paired-hole nozzles. Despite the large differences in emissions, the relative change in emissions in response to parametric changes was remarkably similar for single-hole and paired-hole nozzles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0803
Konstantinos Michos, Georgios Bikas, Ioannis Vlaskos
Abstract A new global NOx emissions formation model, formulated by a single analytically derived algebraic equation, is developed with relevance to post-flame gases. The model originates from subsets of detailed kinetic schemes for thermal and N2O pathway NO formation, needs no calibration and is quick to implement and run. Due to its simplicity, the model can be readily used in both 1D and 3D-CFD simulation codes, as well as for direct post-processing of engine test data. Characteristic timescales that describe the kinetic nature of the involved NO formation routes, when they evolve in the post-flame gases independently the one from another, are introduced incorporating kinetic information from all relevant elementary reactions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0781
Usman Asad, Ming Zheng, Jimi Tjong
Abstract In this work, empirical investigations of the diesel-ethanol Premixed Pilot-Assisted Combustion (PPAC) are carried out on a high compression ratio (18.2:1) single-cylinder diesel engine. The tests focus on determining the minimum ethanol fraction for ultra-low NOx & soot emissions, effect of single-pilot vs. twin-pilot strategies on emissions and ignition controllability, reducing the EGR requirements, enabling clean combustion across the load range and achieving high efficiency full-load operation. The results show that both low NOx and almost zero soot emissions can be achieved but at the expense of higher unburned hydrocarbons. Compared to a single-pilot injection, a twin-pilot strategy reduces the soot emissions significantly and also lowers the NOx emissions, thereby reducing the requirements for EGR. The near-TDC pilot provides excellent control over the combustion phasing, further reducing the need of a higher EGR quantity for phasing control.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0791
Midhat Talibi, Paul Hellier, Ramanarayanan Balachandran, Nicos Ladommatos
Abstract Development of new fuels and engine combustion strategies for future ultra-low emission engines requires a greater level of insight into the process of emissions formation than is afforded by the approach of engine exhaust measurement. The paper describes the development of an in-cylinder gas sampling system consisting of a fast-acting, percussion-based, poppet-type sampling valve, and a heated dilution tunnel; and the deployment of the system in a single cylinder engine. A control system was also developed for the sampling valve to allow gas samples to be extracted from the engine cylinder during combustion, at any desired crank angle in the engine cycle, while the valve motion was continuously monitored using a proximity sensor. The gas sampling system was utilised on a direct injection diesel engine co-combusting a range of hydrogen-diesel fuel and methane-diesel fuel mixtures.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0788
Xiangyu Meng, Karthik Nithyanandan, Timothy Lee, Yuqiang Li, Wuqiang Long, Chia-Fon Lee
Abstract In order to comply with the stringent emission regulations, many researchers have been focusing on diesel-compressed natural gas (CNG) dual fuel operation in compression ignition (CI) engines. The diesel-CNG dual fuel operation mode has the potential to reduce both the soot and NOx emissions; however, the thermal efficiency is generally lower than that of the pure diesel operation, especially under the low and medium load conditions. The current experimental work investigates the potential of using diesel-1-butanol blends as the pilot fuel to improve the engine performance and emissions. Fuel blends of B0 (pure diesel), B10 (90% diesel and 10% 1-butanol by volume) and B20 (80% diesel and 20% 1-butanol) with 70% CNG substitution were compared based on an equivalent input energy at an engine speed of 1200 RPM. The results indicated that the diesel-1-butanol pilot fuel can lead to a more homogeneous mixture due to the longer ignition delay.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0787
Valentin Soloiu, Martin Muinos, Spencer Harp, Tyler Naes, Remi Gaubert
Abstract In this study, Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) was investigated with alternative fuels, S8 and n-butanol. The S8 fuel is a Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthetic paraffinic kerosene (SPK) produced from natural gas. PCCI was achieved with a dual-fuel combustion incorporating 65% (by mass) port fuel injection (PFI) of n-butanol and 35% (by mass) direct injection (DI) of S8 with 35% exhaust gas recirculation. The experiments were conducted at 1500 rpm and varied loads of 1-5 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). The PCCI tests were compared to an ultra-low sulfur diesel no. 2 (ULSD#2) baseline in order to determine how the alternative fuels effects combustion, emissions, and efficiencies. At 3 and 5 bar BMEP, the heat release in the PCCI mode exhibited two regions of high temperature heat release, one occurring near top dead center (TDC) and corresponds to the ignition of S8 (CN 62), and a second stage occurring ATDC from n-butanol combustion (CN 28).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0606
Chaitanya Wadkar, Bassem H. Ramadan
Abstract A numerical and experimental study of the use of air motion control, piston bowl shape, and injector configuration on combustion and emissions in diesel engines has been conducted. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of flow control within the piston bowl during compression to enhance fuel air mixing to achieve a uniform air-fuel mixture to reduce soot and NO emissions. In addition to flow control different piston bowl geometries and injector spray angles have been considered and simulated using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and experiments. The results include cylinder pressure and emissions measurements and contour plots of fuel mass fraction, soot, and NO. The results show that soot and NO emissions can be reduced by proper flow control and piston bowl design.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0611
Dejan Kihas, Daniel Pachner, Lubomir Baramov, Michael Uchanski, Priya Naik, Nassim Khaled
Abstract The interest for NOx estimators (also known as virtual sensors or inferential sensors) has increased over the recent years due to benefits attributed to cost and performance. NOx estimators are typically installed to improve On-Board Diagnostics (OBD) monitors or to lower bill of material costs by replacing physical NOx sensors. This paper presents initial development results of a virtual engine-out NOx estimator planned for the implementation on an ECM. The presented estimator consists of an airpath observer and a NOx combustion model. The role of the airpath observer is to provide input values for the NOx combustion model such as the states of the gas at the intake and exhaust manifolds. It contains a nonlinear mean-value model of the airpath suitably transformed for an efficient and robust implementation on an ECM. The airpath model uses available sensory information in the vehicle to correct predictions of the gas states.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0612
Rohit Koli, Konstantinos Siokos, Robert Prucka, Shyam Jade, Jason Schwanke
Abstract Low-pressure cooled EGR (LP-cEGR) systems can provide significant improvements in spark-ignition engine efficiency and knock resistance. However, open-loop control of these systems is challenging due to low pressure differentials and the presence of pulsating flow at the EGR valve. This research describes a control structure for Low-pressure cooled EGR systems using closed loop feedback control along with internal model control. A Smith Predictor based PID controller is utilized in combination with an intake oxygen sensor for feedback control of EGR fraction. Gas transport delays are considered as dead-time delays and a Smith Predictor is one of the conventional methods to address stability concerns of such systems. However, this approach requires a plant model of the air-path from the EGR valve to the sensor.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0616
Jayant Sarlashkar, Sankar Rengarajan, Ryan Roecker
Abstract Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has successfully demonstrated the cooled EGR concept via the High Efficiency Dilute Gasoline Engine (HEDGE) consortium. Dilution of intake charge provides three significant benefits - (1) Better Cycle Efficiency (2) Knock Resistance and (3) Lower NOx/PM Emissions. But EGR dilution also poses challenges in terms of combustion stability, condensation and power density. The Dedicated EGR (D-EGR) concept brings back some of the stability lost due to EGR dilution by introducing reformates such as CO and H2 into the intake charge. Control of air, EGR, fuel, and ignition remains a challenge to realizing the aforementioned benefits without sacrificing performance and drivability. This paper addresses the DEGR solution from a controls standpoint. SwRI has been developing a unified framework for controlling a generic combustion engine (gasoline, diesel, dual-fuel natural gas etc.).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0618
Feilong Liu, Jeffrey M. Pfeiffer, Ron Caudle, Peter Marshall, Peter Olin
Abstract Low Pressure Cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation (LP EGR) is an attractive technology to reduce fuel consumption for a spark-ignition (SI) engine, particularly at medium-to-high load conditions, due to its knock suppression and combustion cooling effects. However, the long LP EGR transport path presents a significant challenge to the transient control of LP EGR for the engine management system. With a turbocharged engine, this is especially challenging due to the much longer intake induction system path compared with a naturally aspirated engine. Characterizing and modeling the EGR, intake air mixing and transport delay behavior is important for proper control. The model of the intake air path includes the compressor, intercooler and intake plenum. It is important to estimate and track the final EGR concentration at the intake plenum location, as it plays a key role in combustion control.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0631
Emilio Navarro-Peris, Estefanía Hervas-Blasco, José M. Corberan, Alex Rinaldi
Abstract The present concern in the reduction of CO2 emissions occasioned by heavy duty trucks is leading to a technological evolution, among others, in powertrain electrification. Towards this objective, the EU has funded the project GASTone targeting the development of a new powertrain concept based on the energy recovery from the exhaust gases and kinetic losses in order to make possible the electrification of the main auxiliaries. This new concept will follow a cascade approach in which the exhaust gases energy will be recovered by the integration of an advanced thermoelectric generator followed by a turbo-generator. This system will be combined with a smart kinetic energy recovery device which will recover the energy losses in the deceleration periods of the vehicle. The recovered energy will be used in the electrified auxiliaries.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0691
Gurneesh S. Jatana, Brian C. Kaul, Robert Wagner
Abstract Spark-ignition (SI) engines can derive substantial efficiency gains from operation at high dilution levels, but sufficiently high-dilution operation increases the occurrence of misfires and partial burns, which induce higher levels of cyclic-variability in engine operation. This variability has been shown to have both stochastic and deterministic components, with residual fraction impacts on charge composition being the major source of the deterministic component through its non-linear effect on ignition and flame propagation characteristics. This deterministic coupling between cycles offers potential for next-cycle control approaches to allow operation near the edge of stability. This paper aims to understand the effect of spark strategies, specifically the use of a second spark (restrike) after the main spark, on the deterministic coupling between engine cycles by operating at high dilution levels using both excess air (i.e. lean combustion) and EGR.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0683
Kai Morganti, Abdullah Alzubail, Marwan Abdullah, Yoann Viollet, Robert Head, Junseok Chang, Gautam Kalghatgi
Abstract This paper is the second of a two part study which investigates the use of advanced combustion modes as a means of improving the efficiency and environmental impact of conventional light-duty vehicles. This second study focuses on drive cycle simulations and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for vehicles equipped with Octane-on-Demand combustion. Methanol is utilized as the high octane fuel, while three alternative petroleum-derived fuels with Research octane numbers (RONs) ranging from 61 to 90 are examined as candidates for the lower octane fuel. The experimental engine calibration maps developed in the previous study are first provided as inputs to a drive cycle simulation tool. This is used to quantify the total fuel consumption, octane requirement and tank-to-wheel CO2 emissions for a light-duty vehicle equipped with two alternative powertrain configurations.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0678
Haifeng Lu, Jun Deng, Zongjie Hu, Zhijun Wu, Liguang Li, Fangen Yuan, Degang Xie, Shuang Yuan, Yuan Shen
Abstract This research was concerned with the use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) improving the fuel economy over a wide operating range in a downsized boosted gasoline engine. The experiments were performed in a 1.3-Litre turbocharged PFI gasoline engine, equipped with a Low Pressure (LP) water-cooled EGR system. The operating conditions varied from 1500rpm to 4000rpm and BMEP from 2bar to 17bar. Meanwhile, the engine’s typical operating points in NEDC cycle were tested separately. The compression ratio was also changed from 9.5 to 10.5 to pursue a higher thermal efficiency. A pre-compressor throttle was used in the experiment working together with the EGR loop to keep enough EGR rate over a large area of the engine speed and load map. The results indicated that, combined with a higher compression ratio, the LP-EGR could help to reduce the BSFC by 9∼12% at high-load region and 3∼5% at low-load region.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0697
Francesco Catapano, Silvana Di Iorio, Ludovica Luise, Paolo Sementa, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Abstract In this paper, the effect of the oxygen addition on engine performance and exhaust emissions was investigated. The experimental study was carried out in a small single-cylinder PFI SI four-stroke engine. The addition of the 5% vol and 10% vol of oxygen was performed in the intake duct. Typical urban driving operating conditions were investigated. The engine emissions were characterized by means of gaseous analyzers and a smokemeter. Particle size distribution function was measured in the size range from 5.6 to 560 nm by means of an Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS). An improvement in terms of engine power output, without BSFC penalty, and HC emissions with oxygen addition was observed at all the investigated operating conditions. On the other hand, NOx and PM emissions increase.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0698
Zheng Xu, Zhou Zhou, Tao Wu, Tong Li, Chuanhui Cheng, Haiting Yin
Abstract Engine downsizing has become a leading trend for fuel consumption reduction while maintaining the high specific power and torque output. Because of this, Turbo-charged Gasoline Direct Injection (TGDI) technology has been widely applied in passenger vehicles even though a number of technical challenges are presented during the engine development. This paper presents the investigation results of three key issues in the combustion development of a 2.0L TGDI engine at SAIC motor: fuel dilution, smoke emission and low speed stochastic pre-ignition(LSPI). The effect of the injection timing and injection strategy on fuel dilution and smoke emission, and LSPI are the focus of the experimental study.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0656
Jung Hyun Kim, Taewoo Kim, SungJin Park, JungJae Han, Choongsoo Jung, Young rock Chung, Sangsoo Pae
Abstract In cold start driving cycles, high viscosity of the lubrication oil (engine oil) increases the mechanical friction losses compared with warmed up condition. Thus, an engine oil warm up system can provide the opportunity to reduce the mechanical friction losses during cold start. In this study, an engine oil heater using EGR is used for the fast warm up of the engine oil. This paper presents the effect of the engine oil heater on the fuel economy and emissions over a driving cycle (NEDC). A numerical model is developed to simulate the thermal response of the powertrain using multi-domain 1-D commercial powertrain simulation software (GT-Suite) and it is calibrated using test data from a full size sedan equipped with a 2.0L diesel engine. The model consists of an engine model, coolant circuit model, oil circuit model, engine cooling model, friction model, and ECU model.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0646
Pablo Olmeda, Jaime Martin, Antonio Garcia, Diego Blanco, Alok Warey, Vicent Domenech
Abstract Regulated emissions and fuel consumption are the main constraints affecting internal combustion engine (ICE) design. Over the years, many techniques have been used with the aim of meeting these limitations. In particular, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) has proved to be an invaluable solution to reduce NOx emissions in Diesel engines, becoming a widely used technique in production engines. However, its application has a direct effect on fuel consumption due to both the changes in the in-cylinder processes, affecting indicated efficiency, and also on the air management. An analysis, based on the engine Global Energy Balance, is presented to thoroughly assess the behavior of a HSDI Diesel engine under variable EGR conditions at different operating points. The tests have been carried out keeping constant the conditions at the IVC and the combustion centering.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0676
Mohamed Shaaban Khalef, Alec Soba, John Korsgren
Abstract An experimental study of EGR and turbocharging concepts has been performed on an experimental 2.0-litre 4-cylinder turbocharged Euro6 light-duty diesel engine. The purpose of the study was to investigate the emissions and fuel consumption trade-off for different concept combinations. The impact of low-pressure and high-pressure EGR was studied in terms of engine-out emissions and fuel consumption. Moreover, the influence of single-stage and two-stage turbocharging was investigated in combination with the EGR systems, and how the engine efficiency could be further improved after engine calibration optimization. During low load engine operation where throttling may be required to achieve the desired low-pressure EGR rate, the difference in fuel consumption impact was studied for exhaust throttling and intake throttling, respectively. The cooling impact on high-pressure EGR was compared in terms of emissions and fuel consumption.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0194
Yici Li, Wei Tian
Abstract The exhaust cooling is an important index which measures the performance of the flameproof diesel engine. In this paper, a modification model is built for enhancing the cooling performance of exhaust, based on the reference model of the dry cooling equipment. The annular nozzle direction, extend plate of guide, bellows and elbow are introduced and studied in the model as the modification way. Considering the Coanda and Venturi effects, the comprehensive comparison of fluid velocity, temperature, pressure and mixture coefficient is implemented, and the optimum horizontal dimension of throat is summarized. The simulation results indicate the modification model shows better performance in reducing exhaust temperature and pressure than the reference model.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0186
Hyunki Sul, Taehoon Han, Mitchell Bieniek, John Hoard, Chih-Kuang Kuan, Daniel Styles
Abstract Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) coolers are used on diesel engines to reduce peak in-cylinder flame temperatures, leading to less NOx formation during the combustion process. There is an ongoing concern with soot and hydrocarbon fouling inside the cold surface of the cooler. The fouling layer reduces the heat transfer efficiency and causes pressure drop to increase across the cooler. A number of experimental studies have demonstrated that the fouling layer tends to asymptotically approach a critical height, after which the layer growth ceases. One potential explanation for this behavior is the removal mechanism derived by the shear force applied on the soot and hydrocarbon deposit surface. As the deposit layer thickens, shear force applied on the fouling surface increases due to the flow velocity growth. When a critical shear force is applied, deposit particles start to get removed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0550
Zhijia Yang, Edward Winward, Gary O'Brien, Richard Stobart, Dezong Zhao
Abstract The intrinsic model accuracy limit of a commonly used Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) mass flow rate model in diesel engine air path control is discussed in this paper. This EGR mass flow rate model is based on the flow of a compressible ideal gas with unchanged specific heat ratio through a restriction cross-area within a duct. A practical identification procedure of the model parameters is proposed based on the analysis of the engine data and model structure. This procedure has several advantages which include simplicity, low computation burden and low engine test cost. It is shown that model tuning requires only an EGR valve sweep test at a few engine steady state operating points.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0547
Andrea Piano, Federico Millo, Giulio Boccardo, Mahsa Rafigh, Alessandro Gallone, Marcello Rimondi
The predictive capabilities of an innovative multizone combustion model DIPulse, developed by Gamma Technologies, were assessed in this work for a last generation common rail automotive diesel engine. A detailed validation process, based on an extensive experimental data set, was carried out concerning the predicted heat release rate, the in-cylinder pressure trace, as well as NOx and soot emissions for several operating points including both part load and full load points. After a preliminary calibration of the model, the combustion model parameters were then optimized through a Latin Hypercube Design of Experiment (DoE), with the aim of minimizing the RMS error between the predicted and experimental burn rate of several engine operating points, thus achieving a satisfactory agreement between simulation and experimental engine combustion and emissions parameters.
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