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Viewing 121 to 150 of 22534
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2808
Tao Tang, Jun Zhang, Shi-jin Shuai, Dongxiao Cao
Abstract Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has been demonstrated as one of the most promising technologies to reduce NOx emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines. To meet the Euro VI regulations, the SCR system should achieve high NOx reduction efficiency even at low temperature. In the SCR system, NH3 is usually supplied by the injection of urea water solution (UWS), therefore it is important to improve the evaporation and decomposition efficiency of UWS at low temperature and minimize urea deposits. In this study, the UWS spray, urea decomposition, and the UWS impingement on pipe wall at low temperature were investigated based on an engine test bench and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The decomposition of urea and deposits was analyzed using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2809
Kohei Yoshida, Yusuke Nozaki, Toshihiro Mori, Yuki Bisaiji, Yuki Haba, Kazuhiro Umemoto, Takao Fukuma
Abstract In this paper, a control strategy to switch NSR (NOx storage and reduction) function from standard DeNOx by rich combustion to DiAir (Diesel NOx After-treatment by Adsorbed Intermediate Reductants) and additional advantages to use HCI (Hydrocarbon Injector) during desulfation were introduced. Investigations under a transient cycle suggest that NOx conversion with DiAir is strongly affected by preliminary NOx storage condition in the NSR catalyst. To avoid NOx breakthrough just after starting HC dosing for DiAir, a rich operation to reduce stored NOx was shown to be important and high NOx conversion could be maintained using this control strategy under a transient cycle. Furthermore, by combining HCI and in-cylinder post injection, usage of rich condition for NSR DeSOx can be expand to wider engine speed and load area.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2820
Rong Ma, Chao He, Jiaqiang Li
A simulation model of catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF) is established based on the CFD software FIRE and has been validated through a series of experimental comparison. This model simulates the CDPF continuous regeneration process, and the factors that influence the exhaust NO2 concentration from CDPF including oxygen concentration, exhaust temperature, space velocity, proportion of NO2/NOX and soot mass fraction are studied. The results show that the higher oxygen concentration causes an increase in NO2/NOX. The NO2/NOX is significantly increased when the exhaust temperature is about 350 °C based on the simulation conditions when the inlet oxygen concentration is at 5.79% and the space velocity is 7s−1. The space velocity in a certain degree leads to higher NO2/NOX. For the soot mass, there is no significant influence of increasing proportion of the NO2/NOX.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2821
Jonathan Stewart, Roy Douglas, Alexandre Goguet, Cristina Elena Stere, Luke Blades
Abstract One of the most critical aspects in the development of a kinetic model for automotive applications is the method used to control the switch between limiting factors over the period of the chemical reaction, namely mass transfer and reaction kinetics. This balance becomes increasingly more critical with the automotive application with the gas composition and gas flow varying throughout the automotive cycles resulting in a large number of competing reactions, with a constantly changing space velocity. A methodology is presented that successfully switches the limitation between mass transfer and reaction kinetics. This method originally developed for the global kinetics model using the Langmuir Hinshelwood approach for kinetics is presented. The methodology presented is further expanded to the much more complex micro-kinetics approach taking into account various kinetic steps such as adsorption/desorption and surface reactions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2818
Mohammad Reza Hamedi, Athanasios Tsolakis, Jose Martin Herreros
Abstract Recent developments in diesel engines lead to increased fuel efficiency and reduced exhaust gas temperature. Therefore more energy efficient aftertreatment systems are required to comply with tight emission regulations. In this study, a computational fluid dynamics package was used to investigate the thermal behaviour of a diesel aftertreatment system. A parametric study was carried out to identify the most influential pipework material and insulation characteristics in terms of thermal performance. In the case of the aftertreatment pipework and canning material effect, an array of different potential materials was selected and their effects on the emission conversion efficiency of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) were numerically investigated over a driving cycle. Results indicate that although the pipework material's volumetric heat capacity was decreased by a factor of four, the total emission reduction was only considerable during the cold start.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2827
Kristin Götz, Anja Singer, Olaf Schröder, Christoph Pabst, Axel Munack, Jürgen Bünger, Jürgen Krahl
Abstract One political and economic aim in Europe is to increase the use of renewable energy resources. In the transport sector, up to 10 % of fossil diesel fuel should be replaced by biogenic fuels by 2020. This also means a reduction in crude oil dependency. In the area of diesel fuel, fatty acid methyl esters are introduced since over 20 years as biodiesel. However, biodiesel can lead to an increase of engine oil dilution in passenger cars with diesel particulate filters. During the regeneration of the particulate filters, there is an entry of fuel components in the engine oil. While most of the diesel fuel (DF) evaporates from the engine oil, biodiesel remains in the oil and can cause sludge formation in the engine. A promising approach to reduce this problem is the use of a new type of biogenic fuel, called hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO). This is also produced from vegetable oil or animal fat. Like biodiesel, HVO is free of sulfur and any aromatics.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2824
Piotr Bielaczyc, Andrzej Szczotka, Joseph Woodburn
Abstract Ethanol has a long history as an automotive fuel and is currently used in various blends and formats as a fuel for spark ignition engines in many areas of the world. The addition of ethanol to petrol has been shown to reduce certain types of emissions, but increase others. This paper presents the results of a detailed experimental program carried out under standard laboratory conditions to determine the influence of different quantities of petrol-ethanol blends (E5, E10, E25, E50 and E85) on the emission of regulated and unregulated gaseous pollutants and particulate matter. The ethanol-petrol blends were laboratory tested in two European passenger cars on a chassis dynamometer over the New European Driving Cycle, using a constant volume sampler and analyzers for quantification of both regulated and unregulated emissions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2823
Norifumi Mizushima, Daisuke Kawano, Hajime Ishii, Yutaka Takada, Susumu Sato
Abstract Widespread use of biofuels for automobiles would greatly reduce CO2 emissions and increase resource recycling, contributing to global environmental conservation. In fact, activities for expanding the production and utilization of biofuels are already proceeding throughout the world. For diesel vehicles, generally, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) made from vegetable oils is used as a biodiesel. In recent years, hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) has also become increasingly popular. In addition, biomass to liquid (BTL) fuel, which can be made from any kinds of biomass by gasification and Fischer-Tropsch process, is expected to be commercialized in the future. On the other hand, emission regulations in each country have been tightened year by year. In accordance with this, diesel engines have complied with the regulations with advanced technologies such as common-rail fuel injection system, high pressure turbocharger, EGR and aftertreatment system.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2833
Kotaro Tanaka, Masatoshi Takano, Shuji Iimura, Kai Miyamura, Mitsuru Konno
Abstract Recently, highly sensitive near-IR laser absorption spectrometers have been employed to measure ammonia (NH3) emissions. These instruments allow in-situ measurements of highly time-resolved NH3 emission levels in automobile exhaust. However, the effect of the automobile exhaust CO2 in NH3 measurements has not been studied in detail. Because the CO2 concentration in automobile exhaust is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than the NH3 concentration, there is a possibility that spectral overlap by CO2 lines and/or the spectral broadening of NH3 by CO2 could affect the measured NH3 levels. This study had two major objectives. First, the effect of CO2 on the measured NH3 concentration was assessed using our developed near-IR laser absorption spectrometer. The second objective was to provide on-board NH3 measurements in the hybrid gasoline automobile exhaust using the developed spectrometer.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2830
Amar Deep, Naveen Kumar, Ashish Karnwal, Dhruv Gupta, Vipul Vibhanshu, Abhishek Sharma, Jitesh Singh Patel
Abstract The interest of using alternative fuels in diesel engines has been accelerated exponentially due to a foreseen scarcity in world petroleum reserves, increase in the prices of the conventional fossil fuels and restrictions on exhaust emissions such as greenhouse gases from internal combustion (IC) engines initiated by environmental concerns. The constant trade-off between efficiency and emissions should be in proper balance with the conventional fuels in a fuel design process for future combustors. Unlike gasoline and diesel, alcohols act as oxygenated fuels. Adding alcohols to petroleum products allows the fuel to combust properly due to the presence of oxygen, which enhances premixed combustion phase, improves the diffusive combustion phase which increases the combustion efficiency and reduces air pollution. The higher activation energy of alcohols leads to better resistance to engine knocking that allows higher compression ratios and greater engine thermal efficiencies.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2839
Christophe Barro, Philipp Meyer, Konstantinos Boulouchos
Abstract Past research has shown that post injections have the potential to reduce Diesel engine exhaust PM concentration without any significant influence in the NOx emissions. In earlier research it was observed that soot reduction due to a post injection is based on three reasons: increased turbulence (1) and heat (2) from the post injection during soot oxidation and lower soot formation due to smaller main injection for similar load conditions (3). The second effect of heat addition during the soot oxidation is debated in the literature. The experimental investigation presented in the current work provides insight into the underlying mechanisms of soot formation and reduction using post injections under different operating conditions. The experimental data have been obtained using a cylindrical constant volume chamber with high optical access. The soot evolution has been obtained using 2-color-pyrometry.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2838
Xiangang Wang, Zhangsong Zhan, Tiegang Hu, Zuohua Huang
Abstract Performance and particulate emissions of a modern common-rail and turbocharged diesel engine fueled with diesel and biodiesel fuels were comparatively studied. An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) was employed to measure particle size distribution and number concentration. Two biodiesel fuels, BDFs (biodiesel from soybean oil) and BDFc (biodiesel from used cooking oil), as well as ultra-low sulfur diesel were used. The study shows that biodiesels give higher thermal efficiency than diesel. Biodiesels give obviously lower exhaust gas temperature than diesel under high engine speed. The differences in fuel consumption, thermal efficiency and exhaust gas temperature between BDFs and BDFc are negligible. The first peaks of heat release rate for biodiesels are lower than that of diesel, while the second peaks are higher and advanced for biodiesels. BDFs show slightly slower heat release than BDFc during the first heat release stage at low engine speed.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2837
Jinyoung Jang, Young-Jae Lee, Ohseok Kwon, Minseob Lee, Jeonghwan Kim
Abstract This study focused on the effect of engine oils on regulated emissions, particulates and fuel economy. Three engine oils of the same SAE grade (synthetic oil with poly alpha olefins (PAOs), Group III base oil, and Group III genuine oil with additive package) were used in one gasoline and one diesel vehicle. A GDI (Gasoline Direct Injection) vehicle and a diesel vehicle without DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) were selected because those vehicles obviously emit more particulates than port-injection gasoline vehicles and diesel vehicles with DPF. A combined mode consisting of the US EPA emission test cycles FTP-75 and HWFET was used for these tests. HORIBA and PIERBURG gas analyzers were used to measure regulated emissions and fuel economy, respectively. Unregulated emissions and particulates were analyzed by FTIR and PPM-S, respectively. Samples (300 ml) of test engine oil were taken periodically just after each test, and the colors of the sampled oil compared.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2836
Haichao Fu, Yinhui Wang, Xinyan Li, Shi-Jin Shuai
Abstract An experimental study of particulate matter (PM) emission was conducted on four cars from Chinese market. Three cars were powered by gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines and one car was powered by a port fuel injection (PFI) engine. Particulate mass, number and size distribution were measured based on a chassis dynamometer over new European driving cycle (NEDC). The particulate emission behaviors during cold start and hot start NEDCs were compared to understand how the running conditions influence particulate emission. Three kinds of gasoline with RON 91.9, 94.0 and 97.4 were tested to find the impact of RON on particulate emission. Because of time and facilities constraints, only one cold/hot start NEDC was conducted for every vehicle fueled with every fuel. The test results showed that more particles were emitted during cold start condition (first 200s in NEDC). Compared with cold start NEDC, the particulate mass and number of hot start NEDC decreased by a wide margin.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2843
Dave OudeNijeweme, Paul Freeland, Markus Behringer, Pavlos Aleiferis
Abstract Particulate emissions are of growing concern due to health impacts. Many urban areas around the world currently have particulate matter levels exceeding the World Health Organisation safe limits. Gasoline engines, especially when equipped with direct injection systems, contribute to this pollution. In recognition of this fact European limits on particulate mass and number are being introduced. A number of ways to meet these new stringent limits have been under investigation. The focus of this paper is on particulate emissions reduction through improvements in fuel delivery. This investigation is part of the author's ongoing particulate research and development that includes optical engine spray and combustion visualisation, CFD method development, engine and vehicle testing with the aim to move particulate emission development upstream in the development process.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2841
Jing Qin, Xiang Li, Yiqiang Pei
Abstract The aim of this research is to experimentally investigate the effects of combustion parameters [ignition timings, injection timings, excess air ratio (λ)] and lubricating oil on particulate matter (PM) emissions from a 2.0 L turbo-charged gasoline direct injection (T-GDI) engine fueled with gasoline (octane number = 97), methanol/gasoline blends and pure methanol. The results of this paper show that the PM number concentration mostly presents a typical bimodal distribution in figures. The particle number concentration mainly concentrates in the nucleation mode. With the increase of methanol volume fraction in the blended fuel, the PM emissions decrease significantly. Furthermore, there are few particles when the engine fueled with pure methanol. As advancing ignition timing, the total PM number rises by over about 200%. Under the pre-ignition condition, the higher in-cylinder temperature may also accelerate the formation of the nucleation mode particles.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2847
Arjun Prakash, Edward Nelson, Aaron Jones, James Macias, Matthew Hinojosa, Eugene Jimenez
Abstract Particulate mass (PM) emissions from DISI engines can be reduced via fuels additive technology that facilitates injector deposit clean-up. A significant drawback of DISI engines is that they can have higher particulate matter emissions than PFI gasoline engines. Soot formation in general is dependent on the air-fuel ratio, combustion chamber temperature and the chemical structure and thermo-physical properties of the fuel. In this regard, PM emissions and DISI injector deposit clean-up were studied in three identical high sales-volume vehicles. The tests compared the effects of a fuel (Fuel A) containing a market generic additive at lowest additive concentration (LAC) against a fuel formulated with a novel additive technology (Fuel B). The fuels compared had an anti-knock index value of 87 containing up to 10% ethanol. The vehicles were run on Fuel A for 20,000 miles followed by 5,000 miles on Fuel B using a chassis dynamometer.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2853
Christoph Menne, Simon Galbraith, Alan Jones, Lars Henning, Thomas Koerfer
Abstract In September 2013 the Jaguar XF 2.2l ECO sport brake and saloon were introduced to the European market. They are the first Jaguar vehicles to realize CO2 emissions below 130 g/km. To achieve these significantly reduced fuel consumption values with an existing 2.2l I4 Diesel engine architecture, selected air path and fuel path components were optimized for increased engine efficiency. Tailored hardware selection and streamlined development were only enabled by the consequent utilisation of the most advanced CAE tools throughout the design phase but also during the complete vehicle application process.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2911
Z. Gerald Liu, Dana McGuffin, Chris M. Cremeens, Nathan Ottinger, Niklas Schmidt
Abstract More stringent emission requirements for nonroad diesel engines both in the U.S. and Europe have spurred the development of engines and exhaust aftertreatment technologies. In this study, one such system consisting of a diesel oxidation catalyst, zeolite-based selective catalytic reduction catalyst, and an ammonia oxidation catalyst was evaluated using both nonroad transient and steady-state cycles in order to understand the emission characteristics of this configuration. Criteria pollutants were analyzed and particular attention was given to organic compound and NO2 emissions since both of these could be significantly affected by the absence of a diesel particulate filter that typically helps reduce semi-volatile and particle-phase organics and consumes NO2 via passive soot oxidation.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2903
Nobunori Okui, Tetsuya Niikuni
Abstract Next-generation vehicles which include Electric Vehicles (EV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV) are researched and expected to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the future. In the national new-car sales in 2012 of Japan, the total sales of hybrid vehicles kept 26.5% share. In the field of passenger cars, this share was 29.7%. And, this share rose about four times compared to that of 2008 [1]. Also, small delivery hybrid trucks are increased in the commercial vehicle class. Fuel economy of hybrid trucks in the catalog specifications is relatively better than that of the diesel tracks which have no hybrid systems. Nevertheless, hybrid trucks' users report that advantages of fuel economy of hybrid trucks at the real traffic driving conditions are small.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2697
Kiyoshi Kawasaki, Soichiro Kubo, Koji Yamane, Chihiro Kondo
Abstract The main aim of this study is to investigate the effect of NO and NO2 on the combustion characteristics such as pressure development and combustion phasing in natural gas HCCI engine. A secondary aim is to demonstrate a method of obtaining a significant sensitizing effect on methane oxidation reaction from small amounts of NOx. Experiments were conducted using a rapid compression-expansion machine that was constructed from a single-cylinder diesel engine. First, the sensitizing effect of NO and NO2 on the HCCI combustion of natural gas was investigated in a case where NOx was uniformly mixed into a charge. Obtained results show that the auto-ignition timing is significantly advanced and an acute heat release is promoted by adding either NO or NO2.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2713
Jianyi Tian, Hongming Xu, Ramadhas Arumugam Sakunthalai, Dai Liu, Cheng Tan, Akbar Ghafourian
Abstract Engine transient operation has attracted a lot of attention from researchers due to its high frequency of occurrence during daily vehicle operation. More emissions are expected compared to steady state operating conditions as a result of the turbo-lag problem. Ambient temperature has significant influences on engine transients especially at engine start. The effects of ambient temperature on engine-out emissions under the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) are investigated in this study. The transient engine scenarios were carried out on a modern 3.0 L, V6 turbocharged common rail diesel engine fuelled with winter diesel in a cold cell within the different ambient temperature ranging between +20 °C and −7 °C. The engine with fuel, coolant, combustion air and lubricating oil were soaked and maintained at the desired test temperatures during the transient scenarios.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2719
Alex Harrison, Roger Cracknell, Jens Krueger-Venus, Lev Sarkisov
Abstract Carbonaceous deposits can accumulate on various surfaces of the internal combustion engine and affect its performance. The porous nature of these deposits means that they act like a “sponge”, adsorbing fuel components and changing both the composition and the amount of fuel in the combustion chamber. Here we use a previously developed and validated model of engine deposits to predict adsorption of normal heptane, isooctane, toluene and their mixtures in deposits of different origin within a port fuel injected spark ignition engine (Combustion Chamber Deposits, or CCDs, and Intake Valve Deposits, or IVDs) and under different conditions. We explore the influence of molecular structure of adsorbing species, composition of the bulk mixture and temperature on the uptake and selectivity behaviour of the deposits. While deposits generally show high capacity toward all three components, we observe that selectivity behaviour is a more subtle and complex property.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2720
Jim Barker, Jacqueline Reid, Colin Snape, David Scurr, William Meredith
Abstract Since 2009, there has been a rise in deposits of various types found in diesel fuel injection systems. They have been identified in the filter, the injector tip and recently inside the injector. The latter internal diesel injector deposits (IDIDs) have been the subject of a number of recent publications, and are the subject of investigations by CRC (Central Research Council Diesel Performance Group-Deposit Panel Bench/ Rig Investigation sub panel) in the US and CEN (Committee European de Normalisation TC19/WG24 Injector Deposit Task Force) and CEC (Coordinating European Council TDFG-110 engine test) in Europe. In the literature one of the internal injector deposit types, amide lacquers, has been associated with a poorly characterised noncommercial low molecular weight polyisobutylene succinimide detergent which also lacked provenance.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2815
Anders Widd, Magnus Lewander
Abstract The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst with ammonia as reducing agent plays a central role in today's exhaust after-treatment systems for heavy-duty vehicles and there is a wide selection of possible catalytic materials to use. In order to facilitate the design of future catalysts, several aspects of the materials must be evaluated both in steady-state and transient operation. To this end, this paper presents a methodology for comparing the dynamic properties of different catalysts using full-size engine testing. The studied characteristics include the ammonia storage capacity, the effect of starting with an empty catalyst, the transient response to temperature gradients and changes in the urea dosing level. The temperature response is of particular importance in transient operation, where temperature increases may lead to substantial ammonia slip.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2826
Jon Andersson, John May, Cecile Favre, Dirk Bosteels, Simon de Vries, Matthew Heaney, Matthew Keenan, Jonathon Mansell
Abstract The exhaust emissions of two Euro 6 diesel cars with different emissions control systems have been evaluated both on the road and over various chassis dynamometer test cycles. European emissions limits are currently set using the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), but the European Commission is preparing additional test procedures to ensure that emissions are well controlled both in real-world use and over the legislative test cycle. The main focus of this work on ‘Real Driving Emissions’ (RDE) is on measurements using Portable Emissions Measurement Systems (PEMS) in truly representative, on-road, driving. A key focus of the test programme, undertaken as a collaboration between AECC (the Association for Emissions Control by Catalyst) and Ricardo UK, was therefore the use of PEMS systems to measure on-road emissions of both gaseous pollutants and particulate matter. This included measurement of particle number emissions with a new candidate system for this type of measurement.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2832
Barouch Giechaskiel, Giorgio Martini
Abstract In the current heavy-duty engine and light-duty diesel vehicle exhaust emission legislation Particle Number (PN) limits for solid particles >23 nm are prescribed. The legislation was extended to include Gasoline Direct Injection (G-DI) vehicles since September 2014 and will be applied to Non-Road Mobile Machinery engines in the future. However there are concerns transferring the same methodology to other engine technologies, where higher concentration of sub-23 nm particles might exist. This paper focuses on the capabilities of existing PN measurement equipment on measuring solid particles smaller than 23 nm.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2845
Jianye Su, Min Xu, Peng Yin, Yi Gao, David Hung
Abstract Spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) gasoline engine, especially in downsized boosted engine platform, has proven to be one of the most promising concepts to improve vehicle fuel economy. SIDI engines are also getting a larger share of the gasoline engine market which is traditionally dominated by the port fuel injection (PFI) engines in the U.S., European and Chinese vehicles. However, higher particle number emissions associated with operating the engine at higher loads pose additional challenges for meeting future stringent emissions regulations. In this study, the potential of using multiple injection strategies (double injection and triple injection strategy during the intake stroke in homogeneous combustion mode) to reduce particle number emissions in a 2.0 liter boosted SIDI gasoline engine at 1000 rpm, 11 bar BMEP condition was investigated using Horiba MEXA SPCS1000 PN measurement instrument.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2834
Barouch Giechaskiel, Urbano Manfredi, Giorgio Martini
Abstract In the current diesel vehicle exhaust emissions legislation Particle Number (PN) limits for solid particles >23 nm are prescribed. The legislation was extended to include Gasoline Direct Injection (G-DI) vehicles since September 2014. Target of this paper was to investigate whether smaller than 23 nm solid particles are emitted from engines in considerable concentration focusing on G-DI engines. The literature survey and the experimental investigation of >15 vehicles showed that engines emit solid sub-23 nm particles. The average percentage over a test cycle for G-DIs (30-40%) is similar to diesel engines. These percentages are relatively low considering the emission limit levels (6×1011 p/km) and the repeatability (10-20%) of the particle number method. These percentages are slightly higher compared to the percentages expected theoretically not to be counted due to the 23 nm cut-off size (5-15%).
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2844
Matthias Stark, Richard Mittler
Abstract Understanding tribodynamic effects is crucial when aiming to reduce lube oil consumption and related exhaust gas emissions. This report briefly describes the lubrication concept of large two stroke marine diesel engines and different contributors to the lube oil balance of such an engine. Addressing possible measures to influence the contribution of lubrication system parameters on exhaust gas emissions requires a detailed analysis of possible actions to achieve the expected improvement. Activities to enhance lubrication system performance concentrate on: Modifications of relevant engine components The application of experimentally gained data to support computational simulation models The application of suitable validation approaches This report in particular highlights piston ring pack optimizations on basis of computational simulation.
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