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2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2675
Xiaobei Cheng, Shuai LI, Jin Yang, Shijun Dong, Zufeng Bao
PPCI in diesel engine is a combustion mode between conventional diesel combustion and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion, which has the potential to simultaneously reduce NOX and soot emissions and improve thermal efficiency. N-butanol as a kind of clean and renewable biofuel can effectively prolong ignition delay and enhance fuel/air mixing because of their low cetane number, high volatility fuel characteristics, which make it a better alternative fuel to achieve PPCI. In this paper, PPCI combustion in a boosted four-cylinder diesel engine fueled with n-butanol-diesel blends is realized by adjusting injection timing and EGR rate based on single injection. The results show that both early and late injection have long premixed duration, which is helpful to form more homogeneous mixture, and no diffusion combustion is found in heat release rate curve. Premixed combustion and low temperature combustion are the key factors to reduce PM and NOX.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2693
Weifeng Li, Zhongchang Liu, Zhongshu Wang, Chao Li, Lianchao Duan, Hongbin Zuo
Abstract In recent years, strict emission regulations, the environmental awareness, and the high price of conventional fuels have led to the creation of incentive to promote alternative fuels. Among the alternative fuels, natural gas is very promising and highly attractive for its abundant resources, clean nature of combustion and low encouraging prices. But nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions are still a problem in natural gas engines. In order to reduce NOx emissions, carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2) and argon (Ar) were respectively introduced to dilute fuel-air mixtures in the cylinder. To this aim a 6.62 L, 6-cylinder, turbocharged, electronic controlled large-powered NG engine was subjected to a basic performance test to observe the effects of CO2, N2 and Ar on fuel economy and NOx emissions. During the test, the engine speed and torque were separately kept at 1450 r/min and 350 Nm.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2689
Mohand Said Lounici, Khaled Loubar, Mohand Tazerout, Mourad Balistrou, Lyes Tarabet
Abstract The crude oil depletion, as well as aspects related to environmental pollution and global warming has caused researchers to seek alternative fuels. Biogas is one of the most attractive available fuels. It is of great interest both economically and ecologically. However, it faces problems that may compromise its industrial use. The dual-fuel engines have been investigated as a technique for the recovery of these gases and finding solutions to these problems. In the present work, performance and emissions of a direct injection diesel engine were first evaluated in conventional mode and dual fuel mode. The effect of biogas composition, based on methane content, is then examined. Also, dual fuel operation with regard to knock is investigated. The results show that, up to 95% of engine full load, the brake thermal efficiency (BTE) is lower in dual fuel mode.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2903
Nobunori Okui, Tetsuya Niikuni
Abstract Next-generation vehicles which include Electric Vehicles (EV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV) are researched and expected to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the future. In the national new-car sales in 2012 of Japan, the total sales of hybrid vehicles kept 26.5% share. In the field of passenger cars, this share was 29.7%. And, this share rose about four times compared to that of 2008 [1]. Also, small delivery hybrid trucks are increased in the commercial vehicle class. Fuel economy of hybrid trucks in the catalog specifications is relatively better than that of the diesel tracks which have no hybrid systems. Nevertheless, hybrid trucks' users report that advantages of fuel economy of hybrid trucks at the real traffic driving conditions are small.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2911
Z. Gerald Liu, Dana McGuffin, Chris M. Cremeens, Nathan Ottinger, Niklas Schmidt
Abstract More stringent emission requirements for nonroad diesel engines both in the U.S. and Europe have spurred the development of engines and exhaust aftertreatment technologies. In this study, one such system consisting of a diesel oxidation catalyst, zeolite-based selective catalytic reduction catalyst, and an ammonia oxidation catalyst was evaluated using both nonroad transient and steady-state cycles in order to understand the emission characteristics of this configuration. Criteria pollutants were analyzed and particular attention was given to organic compound and NO2 emissions since both of these could be significantly affected by the absence of a diesel particulate filter that typically helps reduce semi-volatile and particle-phase organics and consumes NO2 via passive soot oxidation.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2674
Gerardo Valentino, Stefano Iannuzzi
The use of biodiesel or oxygenated fuels from renewable sources in diesel engines is of particular interest because of the low environmental impact that can be achieved. The present paper reports results of an experimental investigation performed on a light duty diesel engine fuelled with biodiesel, gasoline and butanol mixed, at different volume fractions, with mineral diesel. The investigation was performed on a turbocharged DI four cylinder diesel engine for automotive applications equipped with a common rail injection system. Engine tests were carried out at 2500 rpm, 0.8 MPa of brake mean effective pressure selecting a single injection strategy and performing a parametric analysis on the effect of combustion phasing and oxygen concentration at intake on engine performance and exhaust emissions. The experiments demonstrated that the fuel properties have a strong impact on soot emissions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2645
J. Balaji, Ganesh Prasad M. V., L. Navaneetha Rao, Balaji Bandaru, A. Ramesh
Abstract This study deals with the development of an internal EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) system for NOx reduction on a six cylinder, turbocharged intercooled, off-road diesel engine based on a modified cam with secondary lift. One dimensional thermodynamic simulation model was developed using a commercially available code. MCC heat release model was refined in the present work by considering wall impingement of the fuel as given by Lakshminarayanan et al. The NOx prediction accuracy was improved to a level of 90% by a generic polynomial fit between air excess ratio and prediction constants. Simulation results of base model were correlating to more than 95% with experimental results for ISO 8178 C1 test cycle. Parametric study of intake and exhaust valve events was conducted with 2IVO (Secondary Intake Valve Opening) and 2EVO (Secondary Exhaust Valve Opening) methods. Combinations of different opening angles and lifts were chosen in both 2IVO and 2EVO methods for the study.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2678
Buyu Wang, Shi-Jin Shuai, Hong-Qiang Yang, Zhi Wang, Jian-Xin Wang, Hongming Xu
Abstract A study of Multiple Premixed Compression Ignition (MPCI) with heavy naphtha is performed on a light-duty single cylinder diesel engine. The engine is operated at a speed of 1600rpm with the net indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) from 0.5MPa to 0.9MPa. Commercial diesel is also tested with the single injection for reference. The combustion and emissions characteristics of the heavy naphtha are investigated by sweeping the first (−200 ∼ −20 deg ATDC) and the second injection timing (−5 ∼ 15 deg ATDC) with an injection split ratio of 50/50. The results show that compared with diesel combustion, the naphtha MPCI can reduce NOx, soot emissions and particle number simultaneously while maintaining or achieving even higher indicated thermal efficiency. A low pressure rise rate can be achieved due to the two-stage combustion character of the MPCI mode but with the penalty of high HC and CO emissions, especially at 0.5MPa IMEP.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2570
Karthik Puduppakkam, Chitralkumar Naik, Ellen Meeks, Christian Krenn, Roswitha Kroiss, Johannes Gelbmann, Guenther Pessl
Abstract An important goal for CFD simulation in engine design is to be able to predict the combustion behavior as operating conditions are varied and as hardware is modified. Such predictive capability allows virtual prototyping and optimization of design parameters. For low-temperature combustion conditions, such as with high rates of exhaust-gas recirculation, reliable and accurate predictions have been elusive. Soot has been particularly difficult to predict, due to the dependence of soot formation on the fuel composition and the kinetics detail of the fuel combustion. Soot evolution in diesel engines is impacted by fuel and chemistry effects, as well as by spray dynamics and turbulence. In this work, we present a systematic approach to accurately simulate combustion and emissions in a high-performance BMW diesel engine. This approach has been tested and validated against experimental data for a wide range of operating conditions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2853
Christoph Menne, Simon Galbraith, Alan Jones, Lars Henning, Thomas Koerfer
Abstract In September 2013 the Jaguar XF 2.2l ECO sport brake and saloon were introduced to the European market. They are the first Jaguar vehicles to realize CO2 emissions below 130 g/km. To achieve these significantly reduced fuel consumption values with an existing 2.2l I4 Diesel engine architecture, selected air path and fuel path components were optimized for increased engine efficiency. Tailored hardware selection and streamlined development were only enabled by the consequent utilisation of the most advanced CAE tools throughout the design phase but also during the complete vehicle application process.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2820
Rong Ma, Chao He, Jiaqiang Li
A simulation model of catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF) is established based on the CFD software FIRE and has been validated through a series of experimental comparison. This model simulates the CDPF continuous regeneration process, and the factors that influence the exhaust NO2 concentration from CDPF including oxygen concentration, exhaust temperature, space velocity, proportion of NO2/NOX and soot mass fraction are studied. The results show that the higher oxygen concentration causes an increase in NO2/NOX. The NO2/NOX is significantly increased when the exhaust temperature is about 350 °C based on the simulation conditions when the inlet oxygen concentration is at 5.79% and the space velocity is 7s−1. The space velocity in a certain degree leads to higher NO2/NOX. For the soot mass, there is no significant influence of increasing proportion of the NO2/NOX.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2552
Tao Yin, Tie Li, Longhua Chen, Bin Zheng, Fei Zhao
Abstract This paper studies the effect of cooled EGR on fuel consumption and anti-knock performance of a boosted port fuel injection (PFI) SI engine. Experimental results show that the cooled EGR increases the thermal efficiency by 2%∼18% depending on the operation conditions. Compared to low load operations, more improvements of the thermal efficiency are obtained at higher loads, primarily owing to the enhanced anti-knock performance, advanced combustion phasing, elimination of fuel-rich operations as well as reduced heat transfer loss with cooled EGR. The anti-knock performance of cooled EGR provides further potential to improve the thermal efficiency by increasing the compression ratio. To this end, a 1-D thermodynamic model of the engine is built and calibrated using the GT-Power code. A knock prediction correlation considering EGR is developed and validated with the experimental data.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2647
S. Reifarth, E. Kristensson, J. Borggren, A. Sakowitz, H.-E. Angstrom
Abstract The use of EGR for NOX reduction is today a standard technology for diesel engines. The mixing of air and EGR is an important issue, especially for high-pressure EGR-systems. An uneven distribution of EGR between the cylinders can lead to higher overall engine emissions when some cylinders produce more soot, others more NOX than they would with a perfectly even distribution. It is therefore important to understand the processes that control the mixing between air and EGR. The mixing is influenced by both the geometry of the mixing area and the pulsating nature of the flow. The aim of this work is to point out the high importance of the pulses present in the EGR-flow. By simulation in 1-D and 3-D as well as by a fast measurement method, it is shown that the EGR is transported in the air flow in packets. This implies that the timing between intake valve opening and the positioning of the EGR packets has a high influence of the distribution of EGR between the cylinders.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2658
Denis W. Gill, Herwig Ofner, Carsten Stoewe, Karl Wieser, Ernst Winklhofer, Masaaki Kato, Takamasa Yokota, Jost Weber
Abstract For nearly twenty years, DiMethyl Ether has been known to be an outstanding fuel for combustion in diesel cycle engines. Not only does it have a high Cetane number, it burns absolutely soot free and produces lower NOx exhaust emissions than the equivalent diesel. However, the physical properties of DME such as its low viscosity, lubricity and bulk modulus have negative effects for the fuel injection system, which have both limited the achievable injection pressures to about 500 bar and DME's introduction into the market. To overcome some of these effects, a common rail fuel injection system was adapted to operate with DME and produce injection pressures of up to 1000 bar. To understand the effect of the high injection pressure, tests were carried out using 2D optically accessed nozzles. This allowed the impact of the high vapour pressure of DME on the onset of cavitation in the nozzle hole to be assessed and improve the flow characteristics.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2676
Takayuki Fuyuto, Masahiro Taki, Reiko Ueda, Yoshiaki Hattori, Hiroshi Kuzuyama, Tsutomu Umehara
Abstract An author's previous studies addressed a combustion system which reduces emissions, noise, and fuel consumption by using PCCI with the split injection of fuel. This concept relies on the premixed combustion of the first injected fuel and accelerated oxidation by the second injected fuel. Although this combustion system requires the optimization of the timing of the second injection, the details of how noise and emissions are reduced have not been elucidated. In this paper, the authors explain the mechanism whereby emissions and noise are reduced by the second injection. In-cylinder visualizations and numerical simulations both showed an increase in smoke and CO as the second injection timing was advanced, as induced by the inhibited oxidation of the rich flame. When the second injection timing is excessively retarded, the amount of soot forming around the near-nozzle increased.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2812
Ahmad Khalfan, Hu Li, Gordon Andrews
Abstract The tailpipe exhaust emissions were measured using a EURO4 emissions compliant SI car equipped with on-board measurement systems such as a FTIR system for gaseous emission, a differential GPS for velocity, altitude and position, thermal couples for temperatures, and a MAX fuel meter for transient fuel consumption. Various nitrogen species emissions (NO, NO2, NOx, NH3, HCN and N2O) were measured at 0.5 Hz. The tests were designed and employed using two real world driving cycles/routes representing a typical urban road network located in a densely populated area and main crowded road. Journeys at various times of the day were conducted to investigate traffic conditions impacts such as traffic and pedestrian lights, road congestion, grade and turning on emissions, engine thermal efficiency and fuel consumption. The time aligned vehicle moving parameters with Nitrogen pollutant emission data and fuel consumption enabled the micro-analysis of correlations between these parameters.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2806
Isaline Lefort, Jose Herreros, Athanasios Tsolakis
Abstract This study investigates the potential of using a partial flow filter (PFF) to assist a wall flow diesel particulate filter (DPF) and reduce the need for active regeneration phases that increase engine fuel consumption. First, the filtration efficiency of the PFF was studied at several engine operating conditions, varying the filter space velocity (SV), through modification of the exhaust gas flow rate, and engine-out particulate matter (PM) concentration. The effects of these parameters were studied for the filtration of different particle size ranges (10-30 nm, 30-200 nm and 200-400 nm). For the various engine operating conditions, the PFF showed filtration efficiency over 25% in terms of PM number and mass. The PFF filtration behaviour was also investigated at idle engine operation producing a high concentration of nuclei particulates for which the filter was able to maintain 60% filtration efficiency.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2817
Kenan Muric, Ola Stenlaas, Per Tunestal, Bengt Johansson
In the last couple of decades, countries have enacted new laws concerning environmental pollution caused by heavy-duty commercial and passenger vehicles. This is done mainly in an effort to reduce smog and health impacts caused by the different pollutions. One of the legislated pollutions, among a wide range of regulated pollutions, is nitrogen oxides (commonly abbreviated as NOx). The SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) was introduced in the automotive industry to reduce NOx emissions leaving the vehicle. The basic idea is to inject a urea solution (AdBlue™) in the exhaust gas before the gas enters the catalyst. The optimal working temperature for the catalyst is somewhere in the range of 300 to 400 °C. For the reactions to occur without a catalyst, the gas temperature has to be at least 800 °C. These temperatures only occur in the engine cylinder itself, during and after the combustion.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2822
Achinta Varna, Konstantinos Boulouchos, Alexander Spiteri, Panayotis Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Yuri M. Wright
Simulations for a pressure-assisted multi-stream injector designed for urea-dosing in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) exhaust gas system have been carried out and compared to measurements taken in an optically accessible high-fidelity flow test rig. The experimental data comprises four different combinations of mass flow rate and temperature for the gas stream with unchanged injection parameters for the spray. First, a parametric study is carried out to determine the importance of various spray sub-models, including atomization, spray-wall interaction, buoyancy as well as droplet coalescence. Optimal parameters are determined using experimental data for one reference operating condition.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2845
Jianye Su, Min Xu, Peng Yin, Yi Gao, David Hung
Abstract Spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) gasoline engine, especially in downsized boosted engine platform, has proven to be one of the most promising concepts to improve vehicle fuel economy. SIDI engines are also getting a larger share of the gasoline engine market which is traditionally dominated by the port fuel injection (PFI) engines in the U.S., European and Chinese vehicles. However, higher particle number emissions associated with operating the engine at higher loads pose additional challenges for meeting future stringent emissions regulations. In this study, the potential of using multiple injection strategies (double injection and triple injection strategy during the intake stroke in homogeneous combustion mode) to reduce particle number emissions in a 2.0 liter boosted SIDI gasoline engine at 1000 rpm, 11 bar BMEP condition was investigated using Horiba MEXA SPCS1000 PN measurement instrument.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2840
Juan J. Hernández, Rosario Ballesteros, Javier Barba, José Guillén-Flores
Abstract In order to reduce the pollutant emissions (NOx and PM) of diesel engines, the addition of small gaseous fuel amounts or dual mode operation have been proved as potential techniques. This paper is focused on a detailed characterization of the particles emitted from a single cylinder diesel engine when part of the diesel fuel (5 to 20% by energy) is replaced by a gaseous fuel (producer gas, mainly composed by H2, CO, CH4 and inert compounds) coming from biomass steam gasification. The engine was run at constant speed and torque and different EGR rates. Particle samples were collected by means of fiber glass filters placed in a dilution mini-tunnel. Simultaneously, during tests, part of the exhaust gas was conducted to an SMPS to determine the particle size distribution.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2637
Katsufumi Kondo, Junya Takahashi, Tetsuya Aizawa
Abstract Wall-deposition of soot particles occurs due to the interaction between spray flame and cylinder liner wall/piston surface, which can potentially affect soot morphology after the in-flame formation/oxidation processes and before the exit from engine cylinder. In order to investigate these effects, flame wall impingement was simulated in a constant volume combustion vessel and thermophoretic soot sampling was conducted for Transmission Electron Microscopic analysis. A TEM grid for the sampling was exposed to a single-shot diesel spray flame multiple times and the variation of soot morphology (concentration, primary particle diameter and aggregate gyration radius) among the multiple exposures was compared. Furthermore, a newly designed impingement-type sampler vertically exposed the grid to the spray flame and sampled soot particles under different boundary condition from that of conventionally used skim-type sampler.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2713
Jianyi Tian, Hongming Xu, Ramadhas Arumugam Sakunthalai, Dai Liu, Cheng Tan, Akbar Ghafourian
Abstract Engine transient operation has attracted a lot of attention from researchers due to its high frequency of occurrence during daily vehicle operation. More emissions are expected compared to steady state operating conditions as a result of the turbo-lag problem. Ambient temperature has significant influences on engine transients especially at engine start. The effects of ambient temperature on engine-out emissions under the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) are investigated in this study. The transient engine scenarios were carried out on a modern 3.0 L, V6 turbocharged common rail diesel engine fuelled with winter diesel in a cold cell within the different ambient temperature ranging between +20 °C and −7 °C. The engine with fuel, coolant, combustion air and lubricating oil were soaked and maintained at the desired test temperatures during the transient scenarios.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2697
Kiyoshi Kawasaki, Soichiro Kubo, Koji Yamane, Chihiro Kondo
Abstract The main aim of this study is to investigate the effect of NO and NO2 on the combustion characteristics such as pressure development and combustion phasing in natural gas HCCI engine. A secondary aim is to demonstrate a method of obtaining a significant sensitizing effect on methane oxidation reaction from small amounts of NOx. Experiments were conducted using a rapid compression-expansion machine that was constructed from a single-cylinder diesel engine. First, the sensitizing effect of NO and NO2 on the HCCI combustion of natural gas was investigated in a case where NOx was uniformly mixed into a charge. Obtained results show that the auto-ignition timing is significantly advanced and an acute heat release is promoted by adding either NO or NO2.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2642
Masaki Kuribayashi, Yuta Mizutani, Yutaro Ishizuka, Natsuki Taki, Tetsuya Aizawa
Abstract For better understanding of soot formation and oxidation processes in diesel combustion, effects of ambient oxygen concentration on in-flame diesel soot particle properties including concentration, size, number density and morphology were investigated in a constant volume combustion vessel via simultaneous LII (Laser-Induced Incandescence) / LS (Laser Scattering) imaging techniques and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) analysis. An analysis of LII and LS images yielded 2-dimensional distribution images of concentration, size and number density of soot particles in diesel spray flame, based on a practical assumption that LII and LS signals are proportional to the soot particle size to the power of 3 and 6, respectively.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2720
Jim Barker, Jacqueline Reid, Colin Snape, David Scurr, William Meredith
Abstract Since 2009, there has been a rise in deposits of various types found in diesel fuel injection systems. They have been identified in the filter, the injector tip and recently inside the injector. The latter internal diesel injector deposits (IDIDs) have been the subject of a number of recent publications, and are the subject of investigations by CRC (Central Research Council Diesel Performance Group-Deposit Panel Bench/ Rig Investigation sub panel) in the US and CEN (Committee European de Normalisation TC19/WG24 Injector Deposit Task Force) and CEC (Coordinating European Council TDFG-110 engine test) in Europe. In the literature one of the internal injector deposit types, amide lacquers, has been associated with a poorly characterised noncommercial low molecular weight polyisobutylene succinimide detergent which also lacked provenance.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2719
Alex Harrison, Roger Cracknell, Jens Krueger-Venus, Lev Sarkisov
Abstract Carbonaceous deposits can accumulate on various surfaces of the internal combustion engine and affect its performance. The porous nature of these deposits means that they act like a “sponge”, adsorbing fuel components and changing both the composition and the amount of fuel in the combustion chamber. Here we use a previously developed and validated model of engine deposits to predict adsorption of normal heptane, isooctane, toluene and their mixtures in deposits of different origin within a port fuel injected spark ignition engine (Combustion Chamber Deposits, or CCDs, and Intake Valve Deposits, or IVDs) and under different conditions. We explore the influence of molecular structure of adsorbing species, composition of the bulk mixture and temperature on the uptake and selectivity behaviour of the deposits. While deposits generally show high capacity toward all three components, we observe that selectivity behaviour is a more subtle and complex property.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2815
Anders Widd, Magnus Lewander
Abstract The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst with ammonia as reducing agent plays a central role in today's exhaust after-treatment systems for heavy-duty vehicles and there is a wide selection of possible catalytic materials to use. In order to facilitate the design of future catalysts, several aspects of the materials must be evaluated both in steady-state and transient operation. To this end, this paper presents a methodology for comparing the dynamic properties of different catalysts using full-size engine testing. The studied characteristics include the ammonia storage capacity, the effect of starting with an empty catalyst, the transient response to temperature gradients and changes in the urea dosing level. The temperature response is of particular importance in transient operation, where temperature increases may lead to substantial ammonia slip.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2834
Barouch Giechaskiel, Urbano Manfredi, Giorgio Martini
Abstract In the current diesel vehicle exhaust emissions legislation Particle Number (PN) limits for solid particles >23 nm are prescribed. The legislation was extended to include Gasoline Direct Injection (G-DI) vehicles since September 2014. Target of this paper was to investigate whether smaller than 23 nm solid particles are emitted from engines in considerable concentration focusing on G-DI engines. The literature survey and the experimental investigation of >15 vehicles showed that engines emit solid sub-23 nm particles. The average percentage over a test cycle for G-DIs (30-40%) is similar to diesel engines. These percentages are relatively low considering the emission limit levels (6×1011 p/km) and the repeatability (10-20%) of the particle number method. These percentages are slightly higher compared to the percentages expected theoretically not to be counted due to the 23 nm cut-off size (5-15%).
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2844
Matthias Stark, Richard Mittler
Abstract Understanding tribodynamic effects is crucial when aiming to reduce lube oil consumption and related exhaust gas emissions. This report briefly describes the lubrication concept of large two stroke marine diesel engines and different contributors to the lube oil balance of such an engine. Addressing possible measures to influence the contribution of lubrication system parameters on exhaust gas emissions requires a detailed analysis of possible actions to achieve the expected improvement. Activities to enhance lubrication system performance concentrate on: Modifications of relevant engine components The application of experimentally gained data to support computational simulation models The application of suitable validation approaches This report in particular highlights piston ring pack optimizations on basis of computational simulation.
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