Display:

Results

Viewing 121 to 150 of 22756
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1004
Joseph R. Theis, Jeong Kim, Giovanni Cavataio
A laboratory study was performed to assess the potential capability of passive TWC+SCR systems to satisfy the Tier 2 Bin 2 emission regulations on lean-burn gasoline applications. After accounting for cold-start emissions, stoichiometric emissions, and engineering tolerances, target levels for HC, CO, and NOx during lean/rich cycling were established. 30 s lean/10 s rich tests were performed on a reduced-OSC Pd/Rh TWC operating at 550oC and different volumes of a Cu/zeolite SCR catalyst operating at 330 C, where the NO concentration was held at 220 ppm during the lean periods and varied from 500 to 2000 ppm during the rich periods. The NOx slip target was satisfied with the equivalent of 3.3L of SCR volume and 1500 ppm NO rich. Reducing the OSC in the TWC would increase its NH3 yield, but some OSC is needed for stoichiometric NOx lightoff, warmed-up 3-way activity, steam reforming of the HC during the rich purge periods, and diagnostic capabilities.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1002
Yuichiro Murata, Tomoko Morita, Katsuji Wada, Hiroshi Ohno
Efforts have been implemented to improve the efficiency of internal combustion engines with the object of reduction of CO2. Improving the efficiency of these engines can be accompanied by lowering the temperature of exhaust. To attain a higher efficiency of the internal combustion engine, it is necessary to combine it with an emission purification system which enables it to purify controlled substances in a low exhaust temperature. About a half amount of the controlled exhaust substances is emitted at cold start. Hydrocarbon (HC) trap using zeolite is known as a means for decreasing HC at cold start. NOx storage catalyst (NSC) is also known as a NOx adsorption catalyst. NSC can adsorb NOx by oxidizing NO to NO2 in an oxygen excess atmosphere. It is regarded as difficult to adsorb and hold NOx in low temperature. We propose the Three Way Catalyst on reducing emission. N-TWC has NOx adsorption characteristics in a low temperature condition before TWC becomes active.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0752
Zhi Wang, Yunliang Qi, Hui Liu, Yan Long, Jian-Xin Wang
Occurrence of sporadic super-knock is the main obstacle to the development of advanced gasoline engines. One of the possible inducements of super-knock, agglomerated soot particle induced pre-ignition, was proposed for high boosted gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. The correlation between soot emissions and super-knock frequency was investigated in a four-cylinder gasoline direct injection production engine. The test results indicate that higher in-cylinder soot emission correlate with more pre-ignition and super-knock cycles in a GDI production engine. To validate the hypothesis – in-cylinder soot particles trigger super-knock, a single-cylinder research engine for super-knock study was developed. The carbon particles with different temperatures and sizes were introduced into the combustion chamber to trigger pre-ignition and super-knock.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0755
Yasuo Moriyoshi, Toshio Yamada, Daisuke Tsunoda, Mingzhao Xie, Tatsuya Kuboyama, Koji Morikawa
2D and 3D numerical simulations were conducted in order to understand and quantitatively clarify the possibility of several causes such as deposit, oil droplet and some particle. The possibility that CaCO3 additive to lubricant oil behaves to change into CaO in combustion process and exothermic reaction is occurred with adsorption of CO2 in following process was suggested as a main cause of LSPI. Finally we understand that CaO particle, oil droplet and deposit seem to be the main causes of 1st LSPI and deposit and CaO particle seem to be the main causes of 2nd and later LSPI cycles.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0761
Tatsuya Kuboyama, Yasuo Moriyoshi, Koji Morikawa
Endoscope and high speed video were attached to an actual engine and oil behavior and combustion were observed. Light induced fluorescence was applied to the observation of oil and combustion was observed by direct light. Many LSPI events were obtained to analyze the causes, sequence and mechanism. Several causes of particle, deposit and oil droplet are recognized and sometimes started at the piston crevice area. Luminous Flame was observed during expansion stroke of LSPI. Red heat particles are observed in several cycles after 1st LSPI which would cause following LSPI cycles.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0789
Jongyoon Lee, Sangyul Lee, Jungho Kim, Duksang Kim
This paper shows development challenges for Heavy Duty (HD) off-road Diesel Engines to meet the Tier4 Final emission regulation with Tier4 interim engines. The diesel engine we have deal with is called DL06 designed and developed by Doosan Infracore Company. DL06 diesel engine for Tier4 interim Emission regulation, as a baseline engine, has turbo intercooler, waste gate type turbocharger, cooled EGR, common-rail injection and etc. Objective of this research is to see if baseline engine has feasibility to meet Tier4 final emission regulation by only changes of combustion chamber geometry or not. Combustion chamber geometry is a very important part that generates a certain gas motion that helps the combustion process. Matching combustion chamber geometry with injector and swirling gas flow also give strong impacts on emission gas.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0800
Yann Gallo, Johan Simonsson, Ted Lind, Per-Erik Bengtsson, Henrik Bladh, Oivind Andersson
Two competing in-cylinder processes, soot formation and soot oxidation, govern soot emissions from diesel engines. Previous studies have shown a lack of correlation between the soot formation rate and soot emissions. The current experiment focuses on the correlation between soot oxidation rates and soot emissions. Laser extinction is measured using a red (690nm) laser beam, which is sent vertically through the cylinder. This wavelength is long enough to minimize absorption interference from poly-aromatic hydrocarbons, while still in the visible regime. It is modulated at 72 kHz in order to produce 10 pulses per crank angle degree at an engine speed of 1200 rpm. The intake oxygen concentration is varied between 9% and 21%. The time resolved extinction measurements are used to estimate soot oxidation rates during expansion.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1683
Bernie Porter, Hugh Blaxill, Noor Jariri
With the introduction of the 2025 Corporate Average Fleet Economy (CAFE) fuel economy and emissions regulations in 2011 a challenge was presented to the automotive industry. These new regulations require dramatic increases in vehicle fleet fuel economy performance and emissions efficiencies. This paper will identify and analyze a portfolio of technologies that have the potential to achieve the 2025 CAFE fuel economy targets. The simulation uses a MAHLE Powertrain developed fleet modeling tool and a range of vehicle technologies and powertrain data taken from MAHLE’s global research and development activities. Powertrain technologies considered include extreme engine downsizing, ultra lean combustion, friction reduction, advanced control strategies, hybridization and alternative fuels (Diesel, Natural Gas and Ethanol / Ethanol Blends).
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0440
Julio Carrera, Alfredo Navarro, Concepcion Paz, Alvaro Sanchez, Jacobo Porteiro
Recent emissions standards have become more restrictive in terms of CO2 and NOx reduction. This has been translated into higher EGR rates at higher exhaust gas temperatures with lower coolant flow rates for much longer lifetimes. In consequence, Thermal Load for EGR components, specially EGR coolers, has been increased and thermal fatigue durability is now a critical issue during the development. Consequently a new Thermo-Mechanical Analysis (TMA) procedure has been developed in order to calculate durability. The TMA calculation is based on a Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation (CFD) in which a boiling model is implemented for obtaining realistic temperature predictions of the metal parts exposed to possible local boiling. The FEM model has also been adjusted to capture the correct stress values by submodeling the critical areas. Life calculation is based on a Multiaxial Fatigue Model that has also been implemented in FEM software for node by node life calculation.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0597
Christian Schulz, Tamara Ottenwaelder, Thomas Raffius, Thorsten Brands, Thomas Huelser, Gerd Grunefeld, Stefan Pischinger
Maintaining low NOx emissions over the operating range of diesel engines continues to be a major issue. However, optical measurements of nitric oxide (NO) are lacking particularly in the core of diesel jets, i.e. in the region of premixed combustion close to the spray axis. This is basically caused by severe attenuation of both the laser light and fluorescent emission in laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) applications. Even in non-sooting flames, ultraviolet (UV) light is strongly absorbed by combustion intermediates and products. However, the absorption decreases generally with increasing wavelength. Laser-output extinction is therefore reduced by using a KrF* excimer laser in this work, which provides tunable radiation at about 248 nm. By contrast, laser wavelengths around 226 nm were employed in most previous applications. Extinction of both laser light and LIF emission are additionally reduced by keeping absorption path lengths relatively short in this work.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0589
Andrew Moskalik, Paul Dekraker, John Kargul, Daniel Barba
Light-duty vehicle greenhouse gas (GHG) and fuel economy (FE) standards for MYs 2012 -2025 are requiring vehicle powertrains to become much more efficient. The EPA is using a full vehicle simulation model, called the Advanced Light-duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis (ALPHA), to estimate the effects of advanced technology in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The ALPHA model requires inputs of vehicle component efficiencies and operations. Although some model inputs must be estimated, many can be determined by benchmarking vehicles and their components that are currently in production. However, a full, standalone benchmarking procedure of each driveline component separately can be costly and time-consuming. The benchmarking study described in this paper uses data from chassis dynamometer testing to determine the efficiency and operation of vehicle driveline components.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0730
Tsutomu Miyadera
Austenitic stainless steel was selected as the type of steel to be used to comply with the LEV II regulations. The fuel filler pipe requires a layout in which it is not subject to chipping or the addition of accessories like anti-chipping covers, which represented an additional cost-increasing factor. This research examined a variety of pretreatments in an attempt to increase the adhesiveness of coating to stainless steel. Wood’s Nickel Strike plating displays good adhesiveness to stainless steel, and the addition of Wood’s Nickel Strike plating to stainless steel parts helped to eliminate the tough oxide films that form on stainless steel and to prevent the films from reforming. A cation electrodeposition coating was applied to this Wood’s Nickel Strike plating, and extremely good adhesiveness between the coating and the plating was achieved without having to apply any additional films to boost adhesiveness of the coating.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0734
Yasuhiko Saijo, Mitsuhiko Ueki, Hirokazu Watanabe, Yoichiro Tejima
We need to have knowledge of corrosion environments that vehicles encounter to evaluate the rust prevention performance of new structures and materials during the automotive development process. Accelerated corrosion tests are conducted to predict the lifespan of materials where no market data is available, and it is important to realize a correlation between these tests and corrosion behavior. The purpose of the research discussed in this paper was to quantify automotive corrosion environments to help ensure a correlation between corrosion tests and market environments and predict the lifespan of materials, resulting in the determination of optimal anti-rust specifications. A technology to monitor automotive corrosion environments was developed using a sensor to detect the rust reduction current.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1306
Jeremy S. Neubauer, Eric Wood, Ahmad Pesaran
Battery second use – putting used plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) batteries into a secondary service following their automotive tenure – has been proposed as a means to decrease the cost of PEVs while providing low cost energy storage to other fields (e.g. electric utility markets). Under the support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has conducted a comprehensive study of this topic. This presentation will focus on a subset of that study focusing on battery degradation and value, specifically addressing the following key questions: How long will PEV batteries last in automotive service? How healthy will PEV batteries be when they leave automotive service? How long will retired PEV batteries last in second-use service? How can we best predict the second-use lifetime of a used automotive battery? What’s the value of a second-use battery?
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0909
Karthik Nithyanandan, Jiaxiang Zhang, Li Yuqiang, Han Wu, Chia-Fon Lee
Abstract Alcohols, especially n-butanol, have received a lot of attention as potential fuels and have shown to be a possible alternative to pure gasoline. The main issue preventing butanol's use in modern engines is its relatively high cost of production. ABE, the intermediate product in the ABE fermentation process for producing bio-butanol, is being studied as an alternative fuel because it not only preserves the advantages of oxygenated fuels, but also lowers the cost of fuel recovery for individual component during fermentation. With the development of advanced ABE fermentation technology, the volumetric percentage of acetone, butanol and ethanol in the bio-solvents can be precisely controlled. In this respect, it is desirable to estimate the performance of different ABE blends to determine the best blend and optimize the production process accordingly.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1017
Yuki Jin, Narimasa Shinoda, Yosuke Uesaka, Tatsuyuki Kuki, Masataka Yamashita, Hirofumi Sakamoto, Tasuku Matsumoto, Philipp Kattouah, Claus Dieter Vogt
Abstract Since the implementation of Euro 6 in September 2014, diesel engines are facing another drastic reduction of NOx emission limits from 180 to only 80 mg/km during NEDC and real driving emissions (RDE) are going to be monitored until limit values are enforced from September 2017. Considering also long term CO2 targets of 95 g/km beyond 2020, diesel engines must become cleaner and more efficient. However, there is a tradeoff between NOx and CO2 and, naturally, engine developers choose lower CO2 because NOx can be reduced by additional devices such as EGR or a catalytic converter. Lower CO2 engine calibration, unfortunately, leads to lower exhaust gas temperatures, which delays the activation of the catalytic converter. In order to overcome both problems, higher NOx engine out emission and lower exhaust gas temperatures, new aftertreatment systems will incorporate close-coupled DeNOx systems.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0982
Brandon D. Biller, Philip Wetzel, Pavan Chandras, Sean Keidel
Several diesel passenger car boosting systems were studied to assess their impact on vehicle performance and fuel economy. A baseline 1.5L diesel engine model with a single VGT turbocharger was obtained through Gamma Technologies’ fast running model library. This model was modified to explore multiple two stage boosting systems to represent the anticipated architecture of future engines. A series sequential turbocharged configuration and a series turbocharger-supercharger configuration were evaluated. The torque curves were increased from that of the original engine model to take advantage of the increased performance offered by two stage boosting. The peak cylinder pressure for all models was limited to 180 bar. Drive cycle analysis over the WLTP was performed using these engine architectures, while assessing the sensitivity to various system parameters. These parameters include: vehicle weight and aerodynamic drag, EGR target maps, level of downspeeding, and turbocharger inertia.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1083
Robert L. Russell, Kent Johnson, Thomas Durbin, Patrick P. Chen, Jasna Tomic, Richard Parish
Emissions and fuel economy were determined over a light and a heavy driving cycle designed to represent the vehicles in-use driving patterns. The vehicles were 2010 Freightliner cabs equipped with Cummins engines with Selective Catalytic Reduction and Diesel Particulate Filter emission control systems. The carbon dioxide emissions for the hybrids were 30 to 36% lower than from the conventional. The hybrid nitrogen oxide emissions ranged from 30% higher to 20% lower than the conventional. The CO emissions were below the standards for both vehicles, but the percentage differences ranged from 18% to 2000% higher for the hybrids relative to the conventional. The high CO emissions for the hybrid are primarily related to the cooling of the Diesel Oxidation Catalyst during the 20 minute key-off soak between repeats of the driving cycles. With a 1 minute key-off soak the CO emissions from the hybrid were negative.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0974
Aaron Brooker, Jeffrey Gonder, Sean Lopp, Jacob Ward
The ADOPT model is a light duty vehicle consumer choice and stock model supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office. It estimates technology improvement impacts on U.S. light duty vehicles sales, petroleum use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. The ADOPT model uses a logit function to estimate sales. The majority of existing vehicle makes, models, and trims are included to fully represent the market. The logit function estimates their sales based on key attributes including vehicle price, fuel cost, acceleration, range and usable volume. The average importance of several attributes changes nonlinearly across its range, and changes with income. For several attributes, a distribution of importance around the average value is used to represent consumer heterogeneity. Engine downsizing and balancing net incentives/penalties are used to ensure that the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) is met.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1682
Sangram D. Jadhav, Madhukar S Tandale
In this study, the heterogeneous catalyst is used instead of homogeneous catalyst. This is because to overcome the problems faced viz; Catalyst recovery, Thermal stability and excessive use of water. This paper are shows the use of heterogeneous catalyst and optimization of experimental parameters, such as alcohol to oil molar ratio (1:08, 1:12 and 1:16), heterogeneous catalyst loading (0.5, 1 and 1.5 wt %), heterogeneous catalyst types (ZnO, MgO and CaO) and reaction temperature (59, 64 and 69°C) on the heterogeneous transesterification for the production of Mahua oil methyl ester (Biodiesel) was performed. Heterogeneous catalyzed method has been used for biodiesel production by using heterogeneous catalyst such as ZnO, MgO and CaO. The taguchi method was adopted as the experimental conditions from a limited number of experiments (Columns of L9 (3**4) Array) and contribution of each signal to noise factor calculated by ANOVA.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1145
Darrell Robinette, Daniel Wehrwein
This investigation utilizes energy analysis and statistical methods to optimize the design parameters of an automatic transmission and assess fuel consumption performance with a prescribed amount of variation in parasitic loss. A generalized factorial experiment is undertaken to determine the optimal combination of transmission design parameters for fuel consumption and acceleration performance across widely varying vehicle platforms and engine types. The design parameters considered are the number of fixed gear ratios, launch gear ratio, top gear ratio and ratio step size progression. For a single vehicle platform with multiple engines and the optimized transmission as determined from the generalized factorial experiment, a Monte Carlo simulation was used to explore the range of fuel consumption to be expected for multiple distributions of parasitic losses that could be typical of various production tolerances.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0391
Yoshihiro Sukegawa, Kazuhiro Oryoji
With the tightening of emission regulations for automobiles, reduction of Particulate Matter (PM) from spark ignition gasoline engines is one of the urgent problems. Inadequate fuel evaporation and/or fuel/air mixing in a cylinder are thought to be a cause of PM formation in gasoline engines. So it is required to find appropriate fuel injection control and spray placement method to lower PM emission. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is one of useful tool to optimize such parameters. As estimation techniques of PM emitted from internal combustion engines, some methods which solve transportation equations of PM with combustion simulation in an engine are well known. However most PM prediction models have been constructed based on diesel combustion. It is expected that since diffusion flame is dominant in diesel engines, PM generation characteristics will be different from gasoline engines in which premix flame is dominant.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1071
Qi Jiao, Rolf D. Reitz
Abstract Due to the upcoming regulations for particulate matter (PM) emissions from GDI engines, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling study to predict soot emissions (both mass and solid particle number) from gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines was undertaken to provide insights on how and why soot emissions are formed from GDI engines. In this way, better methods may be developed to control or reduce PM emissions from GDI engines. In this paper, the influence of engine operating parameters was examined for a side-mounted fuel injector configuration in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) engine. The present models are able to reasonably predict the influences of the variables of interest compared to available experimental data or literature. For a late injection strategy, effects of the fuel composition, and spray cone angle were investigated with a single-hole injector.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1052
Bijesh M. Shakya, Balaji Sukumar, Yaritza M. López-De Jesús, Penelope Markatou
A combined experimental and modeling study was carried out to investigate the effects of Pt:Pd ratio on the performance of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) for heavy-duty applications, with PGM loading <50g/ft3. [Note: Work on light-duty DOC is presented in SAE paper #15PFL-0137]. In the first part of the work, transient light-off and steady-state experiments were performed over a series of hydrothermally aged DOCs with different Pt:Pd and PGM loadings. It was found that n-decane and NO oxidation activity increased monotonically as the Pt:Pd ratio was increased while the oxidation of unsaturated hydrocarbons (HC) (C3 and C7) first increased with an increase in Pt:Pd ratio and then plateaued out at higher Pt content. In contrast, the CO oxidation exhibited an opposite trend with catalyst containing low Pt (high Pd) being more active. The presence of HC lowered the outlet NO2/NOx ratio by reducing the NO2 generated via NO oxidation, back to NO.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1043
Xian Shi, Reinhard Seiser, Jyh-Yuan Chen, Robert Dibble, Robert Cattolica
Abstract Steady-state, transient and dithering characteristics of emission conversion efficiencies of three-way catalysts on natural gas IC engine were investigated experimentally on a single-cylinder CFR engine test bench. Steady-state runs were conducted as references for specific engine emission levels and corresponding catalyst capacities. The steady-state data showed that conversion of HC will be the major problem since conversion of HC was effective only for a very narrow range of exhaust mixture. Unsteady exploration runs with both lean-to-rich and rich-to-lean transitions were conducted. These results were interpreted with a time scale analysis, according to which a qualitative oxygen storage model was proposed featuring the difference between oxygen absorption and desorption rates on the palladium catalysts.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1042
Ralf Moos
Abstract The state of catalysts and filters plays a key role in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment. The soot or ash loading of particulate filters, the oxygen loading degree of three-way catalysts, the amount of stored ammonia in SCR catalysts, or the NOx loading degree in NOx storage catalysts are important parameters. Today, they are determined indirectly and/or model-based, calibrated by gas sensors installed up- or downstream of the catalysts or by a differential pressure sensor. This contribution overviews a novel approach to determine directly the catalyst state by a microwave-based technique. For that purpose, the catalyst housing serves as a cavity resonator. As “sensing” element, one or two simple antennas are mounted in the catalyst canning. The electrical properties of the catalyst device, i.e., of the ceramic honeycomb incl. coating and storage material, can be measured.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1081
Axel Maier, Ulrike Klaus, Andreas Dreizler, Hermann Rottengruber
Abstract The fuel-independent particulate emissions of a direct injection gasoline engine were investigated. This was done by running the engine with reference gasoline at four different loads and then switching to hydrogen or methane port fuel operation and comparing the resulting particulate emissions and their size distribution. Differences in the combustion characteristics of hydrogen and gasoline were accounted for by diluting the inlet air with nitrogen and matching the pressure or heat release traces to those of gasoline operation. Methane operation is expected to generate particulate emissions lower by several orders of magnitude compared to gasoline and hydrogen does not contribute to carbon soot formation because of the lack of carbon atoms in the molecule. Thus, any remaining particulate emissions at hydrogen gas operation must arise from non fuel related sources, e.g. from lubrication oil, metal abrasion or inlet air.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0264
Jeya Padmanaban
Abstract This study examined the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Death Certificate file to identify frequency and rate of accidental CO poisoning deaths associated with exhaust gases of stationary vehicles in enclosed areas. A comprehensive search was then made to determine whether or not there was an increase in such deaths with the introduction of “smart keys” (available as standard equipment beginning in 2004). For 2000-2011 CY, the CPSC file contained 4,760 death certificate records for ICD-10 code X47 (accidental poisoning by exposure to other gases and vapors). The manual review of narratives for these records covered 2004-2011 and found 1,553 CO poisoning deaths associated with vehicle exhaust, including 748 for enclosed areas. For these 748 incidents, information on victim and location was then identified, and an exhaustive effort was undertaken to determine whether the vehicles involved were equipped with rotary or smart keys.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0255
Claudia Meis, Stefan Mueller, Stephan Rohr, Matthias Kerler, Markus Lienkamp
Abstract Battery aging in electric and hybrid vehicles is a major issue, and one which has to be taken into consideration during all stages of the vehicle lifecycle. It depends on many factors, such as the cell chemistry, the cell design and stress factors as well as the current rate, ΔDOD and temperature. The stress factors have been identified as being crucial due to their influence on two important battery parameters: capacity and inner resistance. Battery aging models are essential to describing the interacting influences that stress factors have on battery parameters. They provide insights about battery aging without the need for extensive measurements. Various battery aging models with widely varying capabilities are described in the literature. The aim of this paper is to provide a decision guide for utilizing the most appropriate aging model for the major stages of the vehicle lifecycle: vehicle development, operation (onboard and offboard) and post-operation.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1044
Kiran C. Premchand, Krishnan Raghavan, John H. Johnson
Abstract Numerical models of aftertreatment devices are increasingly becoming indispensable tools in the development of aftertreatment systems that enable modern diesel engines to comply with exhaust emissions regulations while minimizing the cost and development time involved. Such a numerical model was developed at Michigan Technological University (MTU) [1] and demonstrated to be able to simulate the experimental data [2] in predicting the characteristic pressure drop and PM mass retained during passive oxidation [3] and active regeneration [4] of a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CPF) on a Cummins ISL engine. One of the critical aspects of a calibrated numerical model is its usability - in other words, how useful is the model in predicting the pressure drop and the PM mass retained in another particulate filter on a different engine without the need for extensive recalibration.
Viewing 121 to 150 of 22756

Filter