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2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2634
Naoto Horibe, Tatsuya Komizo, Takashi Sumimoto, Hao Wang, Takuji Ishiyama
Abstract A series of experiments using a single-cylinder direct injection diesel engine was conducted to investigate the smoke reduction effect of post injection while varying numerous parameters: the post-injection quantity, post-injection timing, injection pressure, main-injection timing, intake pressure, number of injection nozzle orifices, and combustion chamber shape. The experiments were performed under a fixed NOx emission condition by selecting the total injection quantities needed to obtain the predetermined smoke emission levels without post injection. The smoke reduction effects were compared when changing the post injection timing for different settings of the above parameters, and explanations were found for the measured smoke emission trends. The results indicate that close post injection provides lower smoke emission for a combination of a reentrant combustion chamber and seven-hole nozzle.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2635
Jing Tian, Zhongchang Liu, Yongqiang Han, Zhaojie Shen, Jiangwei Liu, Kang Li
Abstract In order to improve the performance of low temperature combustion of diesel engines to achieve ultra-low emissions and load condition expansions, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) stratification in the cylinder was proposed to further intensify local EGR concentration and reduce the amount of EGR to acquire high average oxygen concentration within cylinder. In this study, the intake/exhaust port and combustion chamber models were explored by CFD software on a four-valve HD diesel engine, and fresh air and EGR respectively replaced by O2 and CO2 were introduced with division and timing intake strategies during the intake process for stratification optimization.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2648
Krishna Kumar V., J. Balaji, Balaji Bandaru, L. Navaneetha Rao
Abstract Off-road BS III CEV (US-TIER III equivalent) emission regulations for diesel engines (i.e. Construction Equipment Vehicles) in India demands a technology upgrade to achieve a large reduction in NOx (>50%) and Particulate Matter (>50%) compared to BS II CEV emission levels. EGR is a widely accepted technology for NOx reduction in off-road engines due to lower initial and operating costs. But EGR has its own inherent deficiency of poor thermal efficiency due to lack of oxygen and further increase in soot adding complexity of meeting PM Emissions. Hence an engine meeting BS III CEV norms without EGR/SCR technologies with low initial investment is most desired solution for Indian off-road segment. This work deals with the development of an off-road diesel engine rating from 56 to 74 kW, focused mainly on in-cylinder optimization with the aid of optimum injection and charging strategies.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2647
S. Reifarth, E. Kristensson, J. Borggren, A. Sakowitz, H.-E. Angstrom
Abstract The use of EGR for NOX reduction is today a standard technology for diesel engines. The mixing of air and EGR is an important issue, especially for high-pressure EGR-systems. An uneven distribution of EGR between the cylinders can lead to higher overall engine emissions when some cylinders produce more soot, others more NOX than they would with a perfectly even distribution. It is therefore important to understand the processes that control the mixing between air and EGR. The mixing is influenced by both the geometry of the mixing area and the pulsating nature of the flow. The aim of this work is to point out the high importance of the pulses present in the EGR-flow. By simulation in 1-D and 3-D as well as by a fast measurement method, it is shown that the EGR is transported in the air flow in packets. This implies that the timing between intake valve opening and the positioning of the EGR packets has a high influence of the distribution of EGR between the cylinders.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2649
Agnese Magno, Ezio Mancaruso, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Abstract The aim of this study is to investigate the combustion process and pollutant formation in a small compression ignition engine. The engine is a prototype for quadricycles. It was designed to comply with Euro 4 emission standard that is a future regulation for this type of vehicles. Two optical accesses for endoscopes were realized in the first cylinder to investigate the combustion process. Two-color pyrometry method was applied to combustion images in order to detect the flame temperature and the soot concentration. The engine ran with a biodiesel, the rapeseed methyl ester, and a conventional diesel fuel. Operating conditions at the engine speed of 2000 rpm at full and medium load were tested. NOx emissions were measured at exhaust. A smoke meter was used to determine the particulate matter concentration. The sizing and the counting of the particles were performed by means of an engine exhaust particle sizer spectrometer.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2644
S. Reifarth, V. Rajagopal, K. Gritzun, H.-E. Angstrom
Abstract The distribution of EGR between the cylinders of an internal combustion engine has been shown to have large impact on the engine emissions. Especially at high EGR, the combustion reacts sensibly to variations in the EGR-rate. A cylinder that receives excessive EGR produces soot emissions while a cylinder with too little EGR has increased NOX-formation. It is therefore important to have knowledge about the mixing of air and EGR in an engine. This study compares two different EGR-mixing measurement methods. The first is based on CO2 measurement with standard probes, placed at 36 different locations in the intake manifold of the engine. The second method uses a laser beam and a detector to gain information about the mixing with a high time-resolution. Additionally, 1-D simulations are used to gain information about the mixing process. To vary the mixing process on the engine, two different air/EGR mixers are used and their mixing performance is evaluated.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2642
Masaki Kuribayashi, Yuta Mizutani, Yutaro Ishizuka, Natsuki Taki, Tetsuya Aizawa
Abstract For better understanding of soot formation and oxidation processes in diesel combustion, effects of ambient oxygen concentration on in-flame diesel soot particle properties including concentration, size, number density and morphology were investigated in a constant volume combustion vessel via simultaneous LII (Laser-Induced Incandescence) / LS (Laser Scattering) imaging techniques and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) analysis. An analysis of LII and LS images yielded 2-dimensional distribution images of concentration, size and number density of soot particles in diesel spray flame, based on a practical assumption that LII and LS signals are proportional to the soot particle size to the power of 3 and 6, respectively.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2645
J. Balaji, Ganesh Prasad M. V., L. Navaneetha Rao, Balaji Bandaru, A. Ramesh
Abstract This study deals with the development of an internal EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) system for NOx reduction on a six cylinder, turbocharged intercooled, off-road diesel engine based on a modified cam with secondary lift. One dimensional thermodynamic simulation model was developed using a commercially available code. MCC heat release model was refined in the present work by considering wall impingement of the fuel as given by Lakshminarayanan et al. The NOx prediction accuracy was improved to a level of 90% by a generic polynomial fit between air excess ratio and prediction constants. Simulation results of base model were correlating to more than 95% with experimental results for ISO 8178 C1 test cycle. Parametric study of intake and exhaust valve events was conducted with 2IVO (Secondary Intake Valve Opening) and 2EVO (Secondary Exhaust Valve Opening) methods. Combinations of different opening angles and lifts were chosen in both 2IVO and 2EVO methods for the study.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2646
Siva Subramanian Ravishankar, Aayush Mehrotra, Ghodke Pundlik Rambhaji, Simhachalam Juttu
Abstract One of the major challenges for automotive industry today is to reduce tailpipe emission without compromising on fuel economy especially with the EURO 6, RDE, LEV III emissions and CO2 norms coming up. In case of diesel engines, with the emission norms becoming stringent more and more, it's difficult to improve tradeoff between NOx and PM emissions. After treatment systems give some edge in terms of tail pipe emission reduction but not on the cost, fuel economy and system simplicity front. For diesel engines the compression ratio and design of the bowl geometry plays a crucial role in controlling emission and CO2. The target was to achieve EURO 6 tailpipe emissions with minimum dependency on after treatment. With the target after treatment conversion efficiency the engine out targets were framed. A study of different bowl geometries were made that would help achieve this target of improving reduced engine out emissions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2659
Haifeng Liu, Zunqing Zheng, Lang Yue, Lingcun Kong, Mingfa Yao
Abstract To investigate the effects of fuel volatility on combustion and emissions in a diesel engine, a high-volatility fuel of n-heptane was blended into diesel fuel with different volumetric fractions (0%, 40%, 70%, 100%). A wide range of EGR rates from 0% to 65% were investigated, which covered both the conventional diesel combustion and low temperature combustion. Experiments under two engine load conditions, ∼5.2 bar and ∼10.5 bar gross IMEP were performed at 1500 rpm. The injection timing was fixed at 8°CA BTDC for all test cases. Results show that even if the ignition delay and combustion duration are nearly the same for all tested fuels, the premixed combustion fractions are increased for higher volatility fuels due to the improvement on mixing process during the ignition delay period. The indicated specific fuel consumption is decreased as using high-volatility fuels. The effect of fuel volatility on soot emissions depends on engine loads.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2658
Denis W. Gill, Herwig Ofner, Carsten Stoewe, Karl Wieser, Ernst Winklhofer, Masaaki Kato, Takamasa Yokota, Jost Weber
Abstract For nearly twenty years, DiMethyl Ether has been known to be an outstanding fuel for combustion in diesel cycle engines. Not only does it have a high Cetane number, it burns absolutely soot free and produces lower NOx exhaust emissions than the equivalent diesel. However, the physical properties of DME such as its low viscosity, lubricity and bulk modulus have negative effects for the fuel injection system, which have both limited the achievable injection pressures to about 500 bar and DME's introduction into the market. To overcome some of these effects, a common rail fuel injection system was adapted to operate with DME and produce injection pressures of up to 1000 bar. To understand the effect of the high injection pressure, tests were carried out using 2D optically accessed nozzles. This allowed the impact of the high vapour pressure of DME on the onset of cavitation in the nozzle hole to be assessed and improve the flow characteristics.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2653
XiaoDan Cui, Beini Zhou, Hiroki Nakamura, Kusaka Jin, Yasuhiro Daisho
Abstract The objective of the present research was to analyze the effects of using oxygenated fuels (FAMEs or biodiesel fuels) on injected fuel spray and soot formation. A 3-D numerical study which using the KIVA-3V code with modified chemical and physical models was conducted. The large-eddy simulation (LES) model and KH-RT model were used to simulate fuel spray characteristics. To predict soot formation processes, a model for predicting gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) precursor formation was coupled with a detailed phenomenological particle formation model that included soot nucleation from the precursors, surface growth/oxidation and particle coagulation. The calculated liquid spray penetration results for all fuels agreed well with the measured data. The spray measurements were conducted using a constant volume chamber (CVC), which can simulate the ambient temperature and density under real engine conditions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2651
Vipul Vibhanshu, Ashish Karnwal, Amar Deep, Naveen Kumar
The rising cost and limited availability of crude oil in international market has provided an opportunity to look for substitute of fossil fuel. Scientists all over the world are experimenting on variety of renewable fuels for meeting the future energy demands. Bio origin fuels are fast becoming potential alternative resources to replace the fossil fuels. The vegetable oils, derived from oil seed crops have got 90 to 95% energy value of diesel on volume basis, comparable cetane number and can substitute upto 20% (v/v) of diesel fuel. Mahua seed oil is common ingredient of hydrogenated fat. Two-step transesterification process was employed to synthesize biodiesel from Mahua Oil (Madhuca-indica) and analysis of Physico-chemical properties as well as the combustion, performance and emission characteristics was done by taking 10, 20 and 100 % blend with diesel. The physico-chemical properties of the blends were found to be comparable to diesel.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2697
Kiyoshi Kawasaki, Soichiro Kubo, Koji Yamane, Chihiro Kondo
Abstract The main aim of this study is to investigate the effect of NO and NO2 on the combustion characteristics such as pressure development and combustion phasing in natural gas HCCI engine. A secondary aim is to demonstrate a method of obtaining a significant sensitizing effect on methane oxidation reaction from small amounts of NOx. Experiments were conducted using a rapid compression-expansion machine that was constructed from a single-cylinder diesel engine. First, the sensitizing effect of NO and NO2 on the HCCI combustion of natural gas was investigated in a case where NOx was uniformly mixed into a charge. Obtained results show that the auto-ignition timing is significantly advanced and an acute heat release is promoted by adding either NO or NO2.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2709
Xianjing Li, Liguang Li
Abstract Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines have attracted interest as automotive power-plants because of their potential advantages in down-sizing, fuel efficiency and in emissions reduction. However, GDI engines suffer from elevated unburned hydrocarbon (HC) emissions during start up process, which are sometimes worsened by misfires and partial burns. Moreover, as the engine is cranked to idle speed quickly in HEVs (Hybrid Electric Vehicle), the transients of quick starts are more dramatically than that in traditional vehicle, which challenge the optimization of combustion and emissions. In this study, test bench had been set up to investigate the GDI engine performances for ISG (Integrated Starter and Generator) HEVs during start up process. Based on the test system, cycle-controlled of the fuel injection mass, fuel injection timing and ignition timing can be obtained, as well as the cycle-resolved measurement of the HC concentrations and NO emissions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2712
Dai Liu, Hongming Xu, Ramadhas Arumugam Sakunthalai, Jianyi Tian
Abstract Cold start is a critical operating condition for diesel engines because of the pollutant emissions produced by the unstable combustion and non-performance of after-treatment at lower temperatures. In this research investigation, a light-duty turbocharged diesel engine equipped with a common rail injection system was tested on a transient engine testing bed to study the starting process in terms of engine performance and emissions. The engine (including engine coolant, engine oil and fuel) was soaked in a cold cell at −7°C for at least 8 hours before starting the test. The engine operating parameters such as engine speed, air/fuel ratio, and EGR rate were recorded during the tests. Pollutant emissions (Hydrocarbon (HC), NOx, and particles both in mode of nucleation and accumulation) were measured before and after the Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC).
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2714
Cheng Tan, Hongming Xu, He Ma, Jianyi Tian, Akbar Ghafourian
Abstract Automotive engines especially turbocharged diesel engines produce higher level of emissions during transient operation than in steady state. In order to improve understanding of the engine transients and develop advanced technologies to reduce the transient emissions, the engine researchers require accurate data acquisition and appropriate post-processing techniques which are capable of dealing with noise and synchronization issues. Four alternative automated methods namely FFT (Fast Fourier Transform), low-pass, linear and zero-phase filters were implemented on in-cylinder pressure. The data of each individual cycle was compared and analyzed for the suitability of combustion diagnostic. FFT filtering was the best suited method since it eliminated most pressure fluctuation and provided smooth rate of heat release profiles for each cycle.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2713
Jianyi Tian, Hongming Xu, Ramadhas Arumugam Sakunthalai, Dai Liu, Cheng Tan, Akbar Ghafourian
Abstract Engine transient operation has attracted a lot of attention from researchers due to its high frequency of occurrence during daily vehicle operation. More emissions are expected compared to steady state operating conditions as a result of the turbo-lag problem. Ambient temperature has significant influences on engine transients especially at engine start. The effects of ambient temperature on engine-out emissions under the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) are investigated in this study. The transient engine scenarios were carried out on a modern 3.0 L, V6 turbocharged common rail diesel engine fuelled with winter diesel in a cold cell within the different ambient temperature ranging between +20 °C and −7 °C. The engine with fuel, coolant, combustion air and lubricating oil were soaked and maintained at the desired test temperatures during the transient scenarios.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2720
Jim Barker, Jacqueline Reid, Colin Snape, David Scurr, William Meredith
Abstract Since 2009, there has been a rise in deposits of various types found in diesel fuel injection systems. They have been identified in the filter, the injector tip and recently inside the injector. The latter internal diesel injector deposits (IDIDs) have been the subject of a number of recent publications, and are the subject of investigations by CRC (Central Research Council Diesel Performance Group-Deposit Panel Bench/ Rig Investigation sub panel) in the US and CEN (Committee European de Normalisation TC19/WG24 Injector Deposit Task Force) and CEC (Coordinating European Council TDFG-110 engine test) in Europe. In the literature one of the internal injector deposit types, amide lacquers, has been associated with a poorly characterised noncommercial low molecular weight polyisobutylene succinimide detergent which also lacked provenance.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2719
Alex Harrison, Roger Cracknell, Jens Krueger-Venus, Lev Sarkisov
Abstract Carbonaceous deposits can accumulate on various surfaces of the internal combustion engine and affect its performance. The porous nature of these deposits means that they act like a “sponge”, adsorbing fuel components and changing both the composition and the amount of fuel in the combustion chamber. Here we use a previously developed and validated model of engine deposits to predict adsorption of normal heptane, isooctane, toluene and their mixtures in deposits of different origin within a port fuel injected spark ignition engine (Combustion Chamber Deposits, or CCDs, and Intake Valve Deposits, or IVDs) and under different conditions. We explore the influence of molecular structure of adsorbing species, composition of the bulk mixture and temperature on the uptake and selectivity behaviour of the deposits. While deposits generally show high capacity toward all three components, we observe that selectivity behaviour is a more subtle and complex property.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2552
Tao Yin, Tie Li, Longhua Chen, Bin Zheng, Fei Zhao
Abstract This paper studies the effect of cooled EGR on fuel consumption and anti-knock performance of a boosted port fuel injection (PFI) SI engine. Experimental results show that the cooled EGR increases the thermal efficiency by 2%∼18% depending on the operation conditions. Compared to low load operations, more improvements of the thermal efficiency are obtained at higher loads, primarily owing to the enhanced anti-knock performance, advanced combustion phasing, elimination of fuel-rich operations as well as reduced heat transfer loss with cooled EGR. The anti-knock performance of cooled EGR provides further potential to improve the thermal efficiency by increasing the compression ratio. To this end, a 1-D thermodynamic model of the engine is built and calibrated using the GT-Power code. A knock prediction correlation considering EGR is developed and validated with the experimental data.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2570
Karthik Puduppakkam, Chitralkumar Naik, Ellen Meeks, Christian Krenn, Roswitha Kroiss, Johannes Gelbmann, Guenther Pessl
Abstract An important goal for CFD simulation in engine design is to be able to predict the combustion behavior as operating conditions are varied and as hardware is modified. Such predictive capability allows virtual prototyping and optimization of design parameters. For low-temperature combustion conditions, such as with high rates of exhaust-gas recirculation, reliable and accurate predictions have been elusive. Soot has been particularly difficult to predict, due to the dependence of soot formation on the fuel composition and the kinetics detail of the fuel combustion. Soot evolution in diesel engines is impacted by fuel and chemistry effects, as well as by spray dynamics and turbulence. In this work, we present a systematic approach to accurately simulate combustion and emissions in a high-performance BMW diesel engine. This approach has been tested and validated against experimental data for a wide range of operating conditions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2569
Fabrizio Bonatesta, Salvatore La Rocca, Edward Hopkins, Daniel Bell
Abstract Gasoline Direct Injection engines are efficient devices which are rivaling diesel engines with thermal efficiency approaching the 40% threshold at part load. Nevertheless, the GDI engine is an important source of dangerous ultra-fine particulate matter. The long-term sustainability of this technology strongly depends on further improvement of engine design and combustion process. This work presents the initial development of a full-cycle CFD model of a modern wall-guided GDI engine operated in homogeneous and stoichiometric mode. The investigation was carried out at part-load operating conditions, with early injections during the intake stroke. It included three engine speeds at fixed engine-equivalent load. The spray model was calibrated using test-bed and imaging data from the 7-point high-pressure fuel injectors used in the test engine.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2566
Beini Zhou, Akira Kikusato, Kusaka Jin, Yasuhiro Daisho, Kiyotaka Sato, Hidefumi Fujimoto
Abstract This study simulates soot formation processes in diesel combustion using a large eddy simulation (LES) model, based on a one-equation subgrid turbulent kinetic energy model. This approach was implemented in the KIVA4 code, and used to model diesel spray combustion within a constant volume chamber. The combustion model uses a direct integration approach with a fast explicit ordinary differential equation (ODE) solver, and is additionally parallelized using OpenMP. The soot mass production within each computation cell was determined using a phenomenological soot formation model developed by Waseda University. This model was combined with the LES code mentioned above, and included the following important steps: particle inception during which acenaphthylene (A2R5) grows irreversibly to form soot; surface growth with driven by reactions with C2H2; surface oxidation by OH radical and O2 attack; and particle coagulation.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2564
Andrew Smallbone, Amit Bhave, Peter Man
Abstract This paper demonstrates how the validation and verification phase of prototype development can be simplified through the application of the Model Development Suite (MoDS) software by integrating advanced statistical and numerical techniques. The authors have developed and present new numerical and software integration methods to support a) automated model parameter estimation (model calibration) with respect to experimental data and, b) automated global sensitivity analysis through using a High Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR). These methods are demonstrated at 1) a component level by performing systematic parameter estimation of various friction models for heavy-duty IC engine applications, 2) at a sub-component level by performing a parameter estimation for an engine performance model, and 3) at a system level for evaluating fuel efficiency losses (and CO2 sources) in a vehicle model over 160 ‘real-world’ and legislated drive cycles.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2620
Francesco Catapano, Silvana Di Iorio, Paolo Sementa, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
The growing concerns over the pollutant emissions as well as the depletion of fossil fuel led to the research of advanced combustion mode and alternative fuels for the reduction both of fuel consumption and exhaust emissions. The dual-fuel injection system can be used to improve the engine performance and reduce the fossil fuel consumption performing simultaneously a direct-injection (DI) and a port-fuel-injection (PFI) of different fuels. Ethanol is one of the most promising alternative fuels for SI engines. It offers high anti-knock quality because of the high octane number; moreover, being an oxygenated fuel is very effective in particle emissions reduction. On the other hand, it is characterized by lower energy density mainly because of the low lower heating value (LHV). The aim of the paper is the investigation of the ethanol-gasoline dual fuel combustion on engine performance and emissions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2617
Michael Storch, Lars Zigan, Michael Wensing, Stefan Will
Abstract Modern direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engine concepts have the drawback of higher particulate matter emission as compared to port fuel injection concepts. Especially, when driven with biofuels, the operation of DISI engines requires a deeper insight into particulate formation processes. In this study a modern optical accessible DISI engine is used. Pure isooctane, ethanol, E20 (20vol% of ethanol in isooctane) and E85 were investigated as fuels. Simultaneous OH*-chemiluminescence and soot radiation imaging was conducted by a high-speed camera system in order to separate premixed combustion with the sooting combustion. Furthermore, a laser-induced incandescence (LII) sensor was used to measure exhaust elementary carbon mass concentration. Systematically, operation points were chosen, which correspondent to the main sooting mechanisms, poolfire, mixture inhomogeneities and global low air-fuel ratio.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2608
Zhengyang Ling, Alexey Burluka, Ulugbek Azimov
Abstract Replacing the conventional fossil fuel totally or partially with alcohols or ethers in spark-ignition (SI) engine is a promising way to reduce pollutant emissions. A large number of studies on alcohol-containing blends in SI engines could be found in the literature. Nonetheless, investigations of ether-containing blends are by far much less numerous, especially for modern boosted engines. Blending with ether compounds might change the burning rate at high pressure, which consequently changes the anti-knock properties of these fuels and leads to a deterioration in the vehicle drivability. This work reports experiments carried out in two one-cylinder engines: one is a naturally aspirated, variable compression ratio engine, and the other is a strongly charged optical engine.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2610
Ben Leach, Richard Pearson, Rana Ali, John Williams
Abstract Engine downsizing is a key approach employed by many vehicle manufacturers to help meet fleet average CO2 emissions targets. With gasoline engines in particular reducing engine swept volume while increasing specific output via technologies such as turbocharging, direct injection (DI) and variable valve timing can significantly reduce frictional and pumping losses in engine operating areas commonly encountered in legislative drive cycles. These engines have increased susceptibility to abnormal combustion phenomena such as knock due to the high brake mean effective pressures which they generate. This ultimately limits fuel efficiency benefits by demanding use of a lower geometric compression ratio and sub-optimal late combustion phasing at the higher specific loads experienced by these engines.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2605
Cyrille Frottier, Marc Sens, Michael Rieß, Malte Wigger, Andreas Benz, Noriyuki Maekawa, Koji Onishi, Kazuhiro Oryoji, Kenichi Machida
Abstract In the near future, emissions legislation will become more and more restrictive for direct injection SI engines by adopting a stringent limitation of particulate number emissions in late 2017. In order to cope with the combustion system related challenges coming along with the introduction of this new standard, Hitachi Automotive Systems Ltd., Hitachi Europe GmbH and IAV GmbH work collaboratively on demonstrating technology that allows to satisfy EU6c emissions limitations by application of Hitachi components dedicated to high pressure injection (1). This paper sets out to describe both the capabilities of a new high pressure fuel system improving droplet atomization and consequently mixture homogeneity as well as the process of utilizing the technology during the development of a demonstrator vehicle called DemoCar. The Hitachi system consists of a fuel pump and injectors operating under a fuel pressure of 30 MPa.
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