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Viewing 91 to 120 of 22766
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1057
Scott Drennan, Gaurav Kumar, Shaoping Quan, Mingjie Wang
Abstract Controlling NOx emissions from vehicles is a key aspect of meeting new regulations for cars and trucks across the world. Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) with urea-water injection is a NOx reduction option that many engine manufacturers are adopting. The performance of urea-water spray evaporation and mixing upstream of an SCR catalyst is critical in obtaining reliable NOx reduction. Achieving this goal requires good ammonia and NOx distribution upstream of the SCR catalyst brick. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of urea-water injection systems have become an important development and diagnostic tool for designers. An effective modeling approach for urea/SCR must include spray distribution, evaporation, urea kinetics, wall interactions and heat transfer. Designers are also interested in reducing mesh generation time to expedite geometry design changes and optimizing mesh size for accuracy and solution time.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1054
Henrik Smith, Markus Zöchbauer, Thomas Lauer
Abstract A fast preparation of the liquid urea water solution (UWS) is necessary to ensure high conversion rates in exhaust aftertreatment systems based on Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). Droplet wall interaction is of major importance during this process, in particular droplet breakup and the Leidenfrost effect. A deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms is a basic requirement to calibrate CFD models in order to improve their prediction accuracy. This paper presents a detailed literature study and discussion about the major impact factors on droplet wall interaction. Measurements of the Leidenfrost temperature were conducted and the corresponding regimes classified based on optical observations. The pre- and post-impingement spray was analysed using the laser diffraction method. Further, the validity of spray initialisation based on measurements at room temperature was verified.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0264
Jeya Padmanaban
Abstract This study examined the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Death Certificate file to identify frequency and rate of accidental CO poisoning deaths associated with exhaust gases of stationary vehicles in enclosed areas. A comprehensive search was then made to determine whether or not there was an increase in such deaths with the introduction of “smart keys” (available as standard equipment beginning in 2004). For 2000-2011 CY, the CPSC file contained 4,760 death certificate records for ICD-10 code X47 (accidental poisoning by exposure to other gases and vapors). The manual review of narratives for these records covered 2004-2011 and found 1,553 CO poisoning deaths associated with vehicle exhaust, including 748 for enclosed areas. For these 748 incidents, information on victim and location was then identified, and an exhaustive effort was undertaken to determine whether the vehicles involved were equipped with rotary or smart keys.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1155
Robert Steffan, Peter Hofmann, Bernhard Geringer
Abstract This paper focuses on the potentials of a Belt-Starter-Generator (BSG) in the context of an ultra-light vehicle prototype with a target curb weight of only 600 kg. Therefore, two hybrid approaches with a voltage level below 60 V are described and their potentials regarding electrical driving and CO2 reduction are analysed in detail. Introducing the ‘Cars Ultra-Light Technology’ (CULT) project, the holistic lightweight approach is described as a main requirement for the further hybrid investigations. In addition, a P2-hybrid structure with a 12 V BSG on the transmission input shaft enabled unique features despite the low voltage level and limited electrical power resources. The CO2 reduction for this powertrain combination is described and compared to a conventional stop start configuration. The validation process on a dynamic test rig is presented as well.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1162
Frank Atzler, Michael Wegerer, Fabian Mehne, Stefan Rohrer, Christoph Rathgeber, Sebastian Fischer
Abstract Modern vehicles need to fulfil challenging requirements with respect to emissions, noise and fuel consumption. Up to the EU5 legislation a sound steady state application was sufficient for passenger car Diesel engines to meet these requirements, and fuel consumption was less in the focus than the emissions of nitrous oxides and soot, hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Future legislation will require not only tighter limits in emissions but additionally will set fuel consumption targets. More demanding drive cycles will make it even more difficult to achieve these targets. Additional to measures on the combustion engine, moderate electrification for energy recuperation as well as the supply of electrical generated torque to the drive train will increasingly find its way into modern passenger cars. The presence of an electric machine can be used not only to reduce the fuel consumption but also the emissions of the combustion engine.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1732
Marie-Josee Poitras, Deborah Rosenblatt, Jeffery Goodman
The focus of this study was the characterization and comparison of power-specific exhaust emission rates from a closed-loop small spark-ignited engine fuelled with ethanol and isobutanol gasoline blends. A 4-cycle Kohler ECH-630 engine certified to the Phase 3 emissions standards was operated over the G2 test cycle, a six-mode steady-state test cycle, in its original configuration. This engine was equipped with electronic ignition, electronic fuel injection and an oxygen sensor. Certification gasoline fuel was splash-blended by percent volume with ethanol and isobutanol to result in the test blend levels of E10, E15, iB16 and iB8-E10. Reductions in emission rates of carbon monoxide (up to 12.0% with the ethanol blends and up to 11.4% with the isobutanol blends) were achieved along with a reduction in total hydrocarbons (up to 10.9% with the ethanol blends and up to 8.2% with the isobutanol blends). Nitrogen oxide emissions were decreased by up to 9.8% with the ethanol blends.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1683
Bernie Porter, Hugh Blaxill, Noor Jariri
Abstract The 2025 Corporate Average Fleet Economy (CAFE) fuel economy regulations are a significant challenge to the automotive industry. These regulations require dramatic increases in vehicle fleet fuel economy. This paper will identify and analyze a portfolio of technologies that have the potential to achieve the 2025 CAFE fuel economy targets, focusing on powertrain enhancements. The study uses a MAHLE Powertrain developed fleet modeling tool and a range of vehicle technologies and powertrain data taken from MAHLE's global research and development activities. Powertrain technologies considered include extreme engine downsizing, dilute combustion, friction reduction, hybridization, diesel and alternative fuels. The vehicle technologies analyzed include vehicle light weighting, reduced rolling resistance, advanced transmissions and improved aerodynamics.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1072
Aron D. Butler, Rafal A. Sobotowski, George J. Hoffman, Paul Machiele
Abstract The EPAct/V2/E-89 gasoline fuel effects program collected emissions data for 27 test fuels using a fleet of 15 high-sales cars and light trucks from the 2008 model year (all with port fuel injection). The test fuel matrix covered values of T50, T90, vapor pressure, ethanol content, and total aromatic content spanning ranges typical of market gasolines. Emission measurements were made over the LA92 cycle at a nominal temperature of 24°C (75°F). The resulting emissions database of 956 tests includes a particulate matter (PM) mass measurement for each. Emission models for PM fuel effects were fit based on terms for which the fuel matrix was originally optimized, with results published by EPA in a 2013 analysis report. This paper presents results of a subsequent modeling analysis of this PM data using the PM Index fuel parameter, and compares these models to the original versions.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1082
Xin Wang, Yunshan Ge, Linlin Liu, Huiming Gong
Abstract As a probable solution to both energy and environmental crisis, methanol and methanol gasoline have been used as gasoline surrogates in several provinces of China. Most recently, the Ministry of Environmental Protection of China is drafting a special emission standard for methanol-fueled light-duty vehicles. Given the scarcity of available data, this paper evaluated regulated emissions, carbonyl compounds and particulate matter from a China-5 certificated gasoline/methanol dual-fuel vehicle over New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). The results elucidated that in context with gasoline mode, CO emitted in methanol mode decreased 11.2%, while no evident changes of THC and NOx emissions were noticed with different fueling regimes. The total carbonyls and formaldehyde have increased by 39.5% and 19.8% respectively after switching from gasoline to methanol. A remarkable decrease of 65.6% in particulate matter was observed in methanol mode.
2015-04-14
Collection
This technical paper collection covers the systems engineering experience required to achieve ultra-low emission levels on light-duty vehicles. Emission system component topics include the development of advanced three-way catalysts, the development of NOX control strategies for gasoline lean burn engines, the application of high cell density substrates to advanced emission systems, and the integration of these components into full vehicle emission systems.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1002
Yuichiro Murata, Tomoko Morita, Katsuji Wada, Hiroshi Ohno
Abstract A new concept for trapping NOx and HC during cold start, the NOx Trap Three-Way Catalyst (N-TWC), is proposed. N-TWC adsorbs NOx at room temperature, and upon reaching activation temperature under suitable air-fuel ratio conditions, it reduces the adsorbed NOx. This allows a reduction in NOx emissions during cold start. N-TWC's reduction mechanism relies on NOx adsorption sites which are shown to be highly dispersed palladium on acid sites in the zeolite. Testing on an actual vehicle equipped with N-TWC confirmed that N-TWC is able to reduce emissions of NOx and HC during cold start, which is a challenge for conventional TWCs.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1006
Joseph R. Theis, Jeong Kim, Giovanni Cavataio
Abstract A laboratory study was performed to assess the potential capability of TWC+LNT/SCR systems to satisfy the Tier 2, Bin 2 emission standards for lean-burn gasoline applications. It was assumed that the exhaust system would need a close-coupled (CC) TWC, an underbody (U/B) TWC, and a third U/B LNT/SCR converter to satisfy the emission standards on the FTP and US06 tests while allowing lean operation for improved fuel economy during select driving conditions. Target levels for HC, CO, and NOx during lean/rich cycling were established. Sizing studies were performed to determine the minimum LNT/SCR volume needed to satisfy the NOx target. The ability of the TWC to oxidize the HC during rich operation through steam reforming was crucial for satisfying the HC target.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1004
Joseph R. Theis, Jeong Kim, Giovanni Cavataio
Abstract A laboratory study was performed to assess the potential capability of passive TWC+SCR systems to satisfy the Tier 2, Bin 2 emission standards for lean-burn gasoline applications. In this system, the TWC generates the NH3 for the SCR catalyst from the feedgas NOx during rich operation. Therefore, this approach benefits from high feedgas NOx during rich operation to generate high levels of NH3 quickly and low feedgas NOx during lean operation for a low rate of NH3 consumption. It was assumed that the exhaust system needed to include a close-coupled (CC) TWC, an underbody (U/B) TWC, and an U/B SCR converter to satisfy the emission standards during the FTP and US06 tests while allowing lean operation for improved fuel economy during select driving conditions. Target levels for HC, CO, and NOx during lean/rich cycling were established.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0394
Nicola Giovannoni, Alessandro d'Adamo, Giuseppe Cicalese, Giuseppe Cantore
Abstract Fuel deposits in DISI engines promote unburnt hydrocarbon and soot formation: due to the increasingly stringent emission regulations (EU6 and forthcoming), it is necessary to deeply analyze and well-understand the complex physical mechanisms promoting fuel deposit formation. The task is not trivial, due to the coexistence of mutually interacting factors, such as complex moving geometries, influencing both impact angle and velocity, and time-dependent wall temperatures. The experimental characterization of actual engine conditions on transparent combustion chambers is limited to highly specialized research laboratories; therefore, 3D-CFD simulations can be a fundamental tool to investigate and understand the complex interplay of all the mentioned factors. The aim is pursued in this study by means of full-cycle simulations accounting for instantaneous fuel/piston thermal interaction and actual fuel characteristics.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0892
Alastair Smith, Rod Williams
Abstract The formation of deposits within injector nozzle holes of common-rail injection fuel systems fitted to modern diesel cars can reduce and disrupt the flow of fuel into the combustion chamber. This disruption in fuel flow results in reduced or less efficient combustion and lower power output. Hence there is sustained interest across the automotive industry in studying these deposits, with the ultimate aim of controlling them. In this study, we describe the use of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging to characterise fuel injector hole deposits at intervals throughout an adaptation of the CEC Direct Injection Common Rail Diesel Engine Nozzle Coking Test, CEC F-98-08 (DW10B test)[1]. In addition, a similar adaptation of a previously published Shell vehicle test method [2] was employed to analyse fuel injector hole deposits from a fleet of Euro 5 vehicles.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1067
Kenneth S. Price, Lin Wang, Thomas Pauly
Abstract Investigations of on-road emissions performance of vehicles have been made using various methods and instrumentation, some of which are very complex and costly. For the particular case of NOx emissions on Diesel road vehicles equipped with SCR catalysts (Selective Catalytic Reduction), many of these vehicles are equipped with NOx sensor(s) for the purpose of OBD (On-Board Diagnostics), and the ECU (Engine Control Unit) makes this data available via the diagnostic connector under the SAEJ1979 protocol for light duty vehicles. Data for mass air flow and fuel flow are also available per J1979, so the ongoing NOx mass flow can be estimated when the NOx sensors are active with no additional instrumentation. Heavy duty pickup trucks with SCR systems from 3 major US manufacturers, each certified to the optional chassis certification of 0.2 g/mi NOx on the FTP75, were obtained to be evaluated for SCR system behavior under normal driving conditions.
2015-04-14
Collection
This technical paper collection focuses on particle emissions from combustion engines, including measurement and testing methods, and the effects of changes in fuel composition. Papers also cover the topics of the environmental and health effects of elemental carbon and organic carbon that constitutes solid cored particles plus the environmental and health effects of secondary organic aerosol emissions. This includes particulate emissions from both gasoline and diesel engines.
2015-04-14
Collection
This technical paper collection will focus on ‘Advances in NOx Reduction Technology’. The topics covered will include: new materials for lean NOx traps (LNT) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR); system integration and durability; advances in NOx catalyst substrates, novel reductants and mixing designs.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0896
Antoine Lacarriere, Thierry Seguelong, Virginie Harle, Clara Fabre
Abstract Since Euro 5 standard, Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) technology has been widely introduced in Europe and Fuel Borne Catalysts (FBC) provide a powerful solution to achieve regeneration in all driving conditions. Ongoing new emission regulation constraints of Euro 6.b (2014) and forthcoming Euro 6.c standard in 2017, that will reduce the gap between emissions during homologation and in real driving conditions, will demand the support of optimized FBC formulated with Deposit Control Additive (DCA). This paper presents the impact on DPF regeneration performance of advanced FBC with a sharp particle size distribution of reduced nanoparticle size diameter. Small particle size FBC gives enhanced DPF regeneration, allowing regeneration at lower temperature (i.e. improving fuel economy) but also lower dosing rates in fuel. Thus, this implies reduced filter ash content and an extended maintenance interval.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0997
Jonas Jansson, Åsa Johansson, Hanna Sjovall, Mikael Larsson, Gudmund Smedler, Colin Newman, Jason Pless
Abstract This paper will review several different emission control systems for heavy duty diesel (HDD) applications aimed at future legislations. The focus will be on the (DOC+CSF+SCR+ASC) configuration. As of today, various SCR technologies are used on commercial vehicles around the globe. Moving beyond EuroVI/US10 emission levels, both fuel consumption savings and higher catalyst system efficiency are required. Therefore, significant system optimization has to be considered. Examples of this include: catalyst development, optimized thermal management, advanced urea dosing calibrations, and optimized SCR inlet NO:NO2 ratios. The aim of this paper is to provide a thorough system screening using a range of advanced SCR technologies, where the pros and cons from a system perspective will be discussed. Further optimization of selected systems will also be reviewed. The results suggest that current legislation requirements can be met for all SCR catalysts under investigation.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1005
Masahide Miura, Yuki Aoki, Nobusuke Kabashima, Takahiko Fujiwara, Toshitaka Tanabe, Akira Morikawa, Hirotaka Ori, Hiroki Nihashi, Suguru Matsui
Abstract Countries and regions around the world are tightening emissions regulations in reaction to the increasing awareness of environmental conservation. At the same time, growing concerns about the depletion of raw materials as vehicle ownership continues to increase is prompting automakers to look for ways of decreasing the use of platinum-group metals (PGMs) in the exhaust systems. This research has developed a new catalyst with strong robustness against fluctuations in the exhaust gas and excellent nitrogen oxide (NOx) conversion performance. This catalyst incorporates rhodium (Rh) clusters with a particle size of several nanometers, and stabilized CeO2-ZrO2 solid-solution (CZ) with a pyrochlore crystal structure as a high-volume oxygen storage capacity (OSC) material with a slow O2 storage rate.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1017
Yuki Jin, Narimasa Shinoda, Yosuke Uesaka, Tatsuyuki Kuki, Masataka Yamashita, Hirofumi Sakamoto, Tasuku Matsumoto, Philipp Kattouah, Claus Dieter Vogt
Abstract Since the implementation of Euro 6 in September 2014, diesel engines are facing another drastic reduction of NOx emission limits from 180 to only 80 mg/km during NEDC and real driving emissions (RDE) are going to be monitored until limit values are enforced from September 2017. Considering also long term CO2 targets of 95 g/km beyond 2020, diesel engines must become cleaner and more efficient. However, there is a tradeoff between NOx and CO2 and, naturally, engine developers choose lower CO2 because NOx can be reduced by additional devices such as EGR or a catalytic converter. Lower CO2 engine calibration, unfortunately, leads to lower exhaust gas temperatures, which delays the activation of the catalytic converter. In order to overcome both problems, higher NOx engine out emission and lower exhaust gas temperatures, new aftertreatment systems will incorporate close-coupled DeNOx systems.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1062
E. Robert Fanick, Svitlana Kroll, Stefan Simescu
Abstract Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) are a group of compounds that may form during combustion and/or are present in the unburned portion of the fuel and lubricating oil which ultimately become part of the exhaust. Many of these compounds are considered toxic or carcinogenic. Since these compounds are present in very low concentrations in diesel engine exhaust, the methods for sampling, handling, and analyzing these compounds are critical to obtaining representative and repeatable results. Engine testing is typically performed using a dilution tunnel. With a dilution tunnel, the collection of a representative sample is important. Experiments were performed with a modified EPA Method TO-9A to determine the equilibration time and other sampling parameters required for the measurement of SVOC in dilute exhaust. The results show that representative results can be obtained with this method.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1073
Yoshitaka Ito, Takehide Shimoda, Takashi Aoki, Kazuya Yuuki, Hirofumi Sakamoto, Kyohei Kato, Dominic Thier, Philipp Kattouah, Etsuji Ohara, Claus Vogt
Abstract A Particle Number (PN) limit for Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) vehicles was introduced in Europe from September 2014 (Euro 6b). In addition, further certification to Real Driving Emissions (RDE) is planned [1] [2], which requires low and stable emissions in a wide range of engine operation, which must be durable for at least 160,000 km. To achieve such stringent targets, a ceramic wall-flow Gasoline Particulate Filter (GPF) is one potential emission control device. This paper focuses on a catalyzed GPF, combining particle trapping and catalytic conversion into a single device. The main parameters to be considered when introducing this technology are filtration efficiency, pressure drop and catalytic conversion. This paper portrays a detailed study starting from the choice of material recipe, design optimization, engine bench evaluation, and final validation inside a standard vehicle from the market during an extensive field test up to 160,000 km on public roads.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0989
Steve Schiller, Mark Brandl, Bruce Hoppenstedt, Korneel De Rudder
Abstract Diesel engine NOx emissions requirements have become increasingly stringent over the past two decades. Engine manufacturers have shown through the use of EGR and SCR technology that these requirements can be met. However, the desires for improved fuel efficiency, lower overall cost, and potential legislation to reduce NOx levels further increase the demand for higher DEF dosing rates. To meet this demand, a new DEF mixing technology has been developed. This paper describes the development methods used to create a compact, in-pipe mixer which utilizes an optimized wire mesh along with swirling flow to permit high DEF dosing rates without deposit formation. Its excellent mixing characteristics allowed for high NOx reduction to be achieved. Utilization of this technology makes it possible to reduce regeneration frequency, reduce the overall size of the SCR system, possibly eliminate the EGR system, and improve fuel efficiency through combustion enhancements.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1007
Steve Golden, Zahra Nazarpoor, Maxime Launois
Abstract In the context of evolving market conditions the Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) is entering an exciting new phase. It remains the main emission control strategy for gasoline powered vehicles but a period of rapidly evolving engine development, tighter tailpipe regulations and material supply issues present a unique challenge to catalyst developers. This paper presents an initial study outlining the development of spinel mixed metal oxides for application in modern TWC and addresses some specific challenges underlying this application. Lab and flow reactor data in the study showed how the spinel structure has significant potential in various aspects of the TWC with the necessary improvement in thermal stability. Some initial engine data show three-way performance at or near stoichiometric in a PGM and rare earth free spinel coating and a synergy effect when combined with PGM.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0898
Leonardo Pellegrini, Carlo Beatrice, Gabriele Di Blasio
Abstract Hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) is a renewable high quality paraffinic diesel that can be obtained by the hydrotreating of a wide range of biomass feedstocks, including vegetable oils, animal fats, waste oils, greases and algal oils. HVO can be used as a drop-in fuel with beneficial effects for the engine and the environment. The main objective of this study was to explore the potential of HVO as a candidate bio blendstock for new experimental formulations of diesel fuel to be used in advanced combustion systems at different compression ratios and at high EGR rates in order to conform to the Euro 6 NOx emission standard. The experiments were carried out in a single-cylinder research engine at three steady-state operating conditions and at three compression ratios (CR) by changing the piston.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1250
Nisar Al-Hasan, Johannes Beer, Jan Ehrhard, Thomas Lorenz, Ludwig Stump
Abstract In the past few years the gasoline direct injection (GDI) downsizing approach was the dominating gasoline engine technology used to reduce CO2 emission and to guarantee excellent transient performance. Forecasts for the next several years indicate that the worldwide market share of GDI engines will grow further. By 2022 it is expected that the gasoline DI engine will be the most popular combustion engine for passenger car application. However in the future the gasoline engine will have to comply with more stringent emission and CO2 standards. The European legislation demands a fleet average CO2 emission of 95g/km latest by 2021. Therefore, CO2 emission improvement, without compromising driveability, is the major goal of powertrain development. The perspective of more stringent CO2 and emission legislation in highly loaded drive cycle necessitates major development efforts.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1251
Fabien Redon, Arunandan Sharma, John Headley
Abstract In a recent paper, Opposed-Piston 2-Stroke Multi-Cylinder Engine Dynamometer Demonstration [1] published at the SAE SIAT in India in January 2015, Achates Power presented work related to the first ever opposed piston multi-cylinder engine fuel economy demonstration while meeting US 2010 emissions. The results showed that the research 4.9L three cylinder engine was able to achieve 43% brake thermal efficiency at the best point and almost 42% on average over the 12 modes of the SET cycle. The results from this test confirmed the modelling predictions and carved a very robust path to a 48% best BTE and 46.6% average over the cycle for a production design of this engine. With the steady state performance and emissions results achieved, it was time to explore other attributes.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1021
Brad Adelman, Navtej Singh, Paul Charintranond, Greg Griffin, Shyam Santhanam, Ed Derybowski, Adam Lack
Abstract Current legislative trends regarding diesel emissions are striving to achieve two seemingly competing goals: simultaneously lowering NOx and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These two goals are considered at odds since lower GHG emissions (e.g. CO2) is achieved via high combustion efficiency that result in higher engine out NOx emissions and lower exhaust gas temperatures [1, 2]. Conversely, NOx reduction technologies such as SCR require temperatures above 200°C for dosing the reductant (DEF) [3, 4, 5] as well as for high conversion efficiencies [1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9]. Dosing DEF requires injection pressures around 5 bar to ensure proper penetration into the exhaust stream as well as generate the appropriate spray pattern and droplet sizes. Dosing DEF generally requires long mixing and/or high turbulence (high restriction) areas so that the aqueous urea solution can be converted into gaseous NH3 without deposit formation [8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15].
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