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Viewing 61 to 90 of 22467
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2608
Zhengyang Ling, Alexey Burluka, Ulugbek Azimov
Abstract Replacing the conventional fossil fuel totally or partially with alcohols or ethers in spark-ignition (SI) engine is a promising way to reduce pollutant emissions. A large number of studies on alcohol-containing blends in SI engines could be found in the literature. Nonetheless, investigations of ether-containing blends are by far much less numerous, especially for modern boosted engines. Blending with ether compounds might change the burning rate at high pressure, which consequently changes the anti-knock properties of these fuels and leads to a deterioration in the vehicle drivability. This work reports experiments carried out in two one-cylinder engines: one is a naturally aspirated, variable compression ratio engine, and the other is a strongly charged optical engine. Three fuels with different RON and MON numbers were tested: Iso-octane, a blend Ethyl Tert Butyl Ether (ETBE) with a primary reference fuel, and a commercial gasoline fuel containing 5% by volume of ethanol (E05).
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2635
Jing Tian, Zhongchang Liu, Yongqiang Han, Zhaojie Shen, Jiangwei Liu, Kang Li
Abstract In order to improve the performance of low temperature combustion of diesel engines to achieve ultra-low emissions and load condition expansions, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) stratification in the cylinder was proposed to further intensify local EGR concentration and reduce the amount of EGR to acquire high average oxygen concentration within cylinder. In this study, the intake/exhaust port and combustion chamber models were explored by CFD software on a four-valve HD diesel engine, and fresh air and EGR respectively replaced by O2 and CO2 were introduced with division and timing intake strategies during the intake process for stratification optimization. Computation results show that: divided intake strategy that CO2 and O2 respectively introduced into the helical and directional port has no obvious stratification of gas components within cylinder, but timing intake strategy that O2 and CO2 orderly introduced to both helical and directional port has much better O2 mass concentration gradient at end of compression process, and unevenness characteristic of gas components has been better improved.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2634
Naoto Horibe, Tatsuya Komizo, Takashi Sumimoto, Hao Wang, Takuji Ishiyama
Abstract A series of experiments using a single-cylinder direct injection diesel engine was conducted to investigate the smoke reduction effect of post injection while varying numerous parameters: the post-injection quantity, post-injection timing, injection pressure, main-injection timing, intake pressure, number of injection nozzle orifices, and combustion chamber shape. The experiments were performed under a fixed NOx emission condition by selecting the total injection quantities needed to obtain the predetermined smoke emission levels without post injection. The smoke reduction effects were compared when changing the post injection timing for different settings of the above parameters, and explanations were found for the measured smoke emission trends. The results indicate that close post injection provides lower smoke emission for a combination of a reentrant combustion chamber and seven-hole nozzle. The same trend was also found in the tests that varied the injection pressure, main-injection timing, and intake pressure.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2626
Timothy J. Jacobs, Louis Camilli, Matthias Neubauer
Abstract A key element to achieving vehicle emission certification for most light-duty vehicles using spark-ignition engine technology is prompt catalyst warming. Emission mitigation largely does not occur while the catalyst is below its “light-off temperature”, which takes a certain time to achieve when the engine starts from a cold condition. If the catalyst takes too long to light-off, the vehicle could fail its emission certification; it is necessary to minimize the catalyst warm up period to mitigate emissions as quickly as possible. One technique used to minimize catalyst warm up is to calibrate the engine in such a way that it delivers high temperature exhaust. At idle or low speed/low-load conditions, this can be done by retarding spark timing with a corresponding increase in fuel flow rate and / or leaning the mixture. Both approaches, however, encounter limits as combustion stability degrades and / or nitrogen oxide emissions rise excessively. Such limits are inevitable but also seem to be influenced by the type of ignition technology.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2620
Francesco Catapano, Silvana Di Iorio, Paolo Sementa, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
The growing concerns over the pollutant emissions as well as the depletion of fossil fuel led to the research of advanced combustion mode and alternative fuels for the reduction both of fuel consumption and exhaust emissions. The dual-fuel injection system can be used to improve the engine performance and reduce the fossil fuel consumption performing simultaneously a direct-injection (DI) and a port-fuel-injection (PFI) of different fuels. Ethanol is one of the most promising alternative fuels for SI engines. It offers high anti-knock quality because of the high octane number; moreover, being an oxygenated fuel is very effective in particle emissions reduction. On the other hand, it is characterized by lower energy density mainly because of the low lower heating value (LHV). The aim of the paper is the investigation of the ethanol-gasoline dual fuel combustion on engine performance and emissions. The experimental activity was carried out in a single cylinder engine for two wheel vehicles with a displacement of 250 cc.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2653
XiaoDan Cui, Beini Zhou, Hiroki Nakamura, Kusaka Jin, Yasuhiro Daisho
Abstract The objective of the present research was to analyze the effects of using oxygenated fuels (FAMEs or biodiesel fuels) on injected fuel spray and soot formation. A 3-D numerical study which using the KIVA-3V code with modified chemical and physical models was conducted. The large-eddy simulation (LES) model and KH-RT model were used to simulate fuel spray characteristics. To predict soot formation processes, a model for predicting gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) precursor formation was coupled with a detailed phenomenological particle formation model that included soot nucleation from the precursors, surface growth/oxidation and particle coagulation. The calculated liquid spray penetration results for all fuels agreed well with the measured data. The spray measurements were conducted using a constant volume chamber (CVC), which can simulate the ambient temperature and density under real engine conditions. The numerical results suggest that the liquid penetration length with methyl oleate (MO) tested as a representative of FAMEs, is longer than with diesel fuel, D100 and tends to decrease as the injection pressure is increased for all fuels.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2651
Vipul Vibhanshu, Ashish Karnwal, Amar Deep, Naveen Kumar
The rising cost and limited availability of crude oil in international market has provided an opportunity to look for substitute of fossil fuel. Scientists all over the world are experimenting on variety of renewable fuels for meeting the future energy demands. Bio origin fuels are fast becoming potential alternative resources to replace the fossil fuels. The vegetable oils, derived from oil seed crops have got 90 to 95% energy value of diesel on volume basis, comparable cetane number and can substitute upto 20% (v/v) of diesel fuel. Mahua seed oil is common ingredient of hydrogenated fat. Two-step transesterification process was employed to synthesize biodiesel from Mahua Oil (Madhuca-indica) and analysis of Physico-chemical properties as well as the combustion, performance and emission characteristics was done by taking 10, 20 and 100 % blend with diesel. The physico-chemical properties of the blends were found to be comparable to diesel. Engine performance like Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE) decreased slightly for all the blends of mahua oil methyl ester.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2648
Krishna Kumar V., J. Balaji, Balaji Bandaru, L. Navaneetha Rao
Abstract Off-road BS III CEV (US-TIER III equivalent) emission regulations for diesel engines (i.e. Construction Equipment Vehicles) in India demands a technology upgrade to achieve a large reduction in NOx (>50%) and Particulate Matter (>50%) compared to BS II CEV emission levels. EGR is a widely accepted technology for NOx reduction in off-road engines due to lower initial and operating costs. But EGR has its own inherent deficiency of poor thermal efficiency due to lack of oxygen and further increase in soot adding complexity of meeting PM Emissions. Hence an engine meeting BS III CEV norms without EGR/SCR technologies with low initial investment is most desired solution for Indian off-road segment. This work deals with the development of an off-road diesel engine rating from 56 to 74 kW, focused mainly on in-cylinder optimization with the aid of optimum injection and charging strategies. A comprehensive 1D thermodynamic simulation had been carried out to study the effect of engine parameters i.e. injection pressure, no of nozzle holes and hole dimensions, start of injection and boost pressure ratio on performance and emissions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2649
Agnese Magno, Ezio Mancaruso, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Abstract The aim of this study is to investigate the combustion process and pollutant formation in a small compression ignition engine. The engine is a prototype for quadricycles. It was designed to comply with Euro 4 emission standard that is a future regulation for this type of vehicles. Two optical accesses for endoscopes were realized in the first cylinder to investigate the combustion process. Two-color pyrometry method was applied to combustion images in order to detect the flame temperature and the soot concentration. The engine ran with a biodiesel, the rapeseed methyl ester, and a conventional diesel fuel. Operating conditions at the engine speed of 2000 rpm at full and medium load were tested. NOx emissions were measured at exhaust. A smoke meter was used to determine the particulate matter concentration. The sizing and the counting of the particles were performed by means of an engine exhaust particle sizer spectrometer. A correlation between in-cylinder data of flame temperature and soot concentration with NOx and PM emissions, respectively, was found.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2646
Siva Subramanian Ravishankar, Aayush Mehrotra, Ghodke Pundlik Rambhaji, Simhachalam Juttu
Abstract One of the major challenges for automotive industry today is to reduce tailpipe emission without compromising on fuel economy especially with the EURO 6, RDE, LEV III emissions and CO2 norms coming up. In case of diesel engines, with the emission norms becoming stringent more and more, it's difficult to improve tradeoff between NOx and PM emissions. After treatment systems give some edge in terms of tail pipe emission reduction but not on the cost, fuel economy and system simplicity front. For diesel engines the compression ratio and design of the bowl geometry plays a crucial role in controlling emission and CO2. The target was to achieve EURO 6 tailpipe emissions with minimum dependency on after treatment. With the target after treatment conversion efficiency the engine out targets were framed. A study of different bowl geometries were made that would help achieve this target of improving reduced engine out emissions. Four bowl geometries were designed for a compression ratio of 15.5:1 and based on their simulation results the best were taken up for experimentation.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2647
S. Reifarth, E. Kristensson, J. Borggren, A. Sakowitz, H.-E. Angstrom
Abstract The use of EGR for NOX reduction is today a standard technology for diesel engines. The mixing of air and EGR is an important issue, especially for high-pressure EGR-systems. An uneven distribution of EGR between the cylinders can lead to higher overall engine emissions when some cylinders produce more soot, others more NOX than they would with a perfectly even distribution. It is therefore important to understand the processes that control the mixing between air and EGR. The mixing is influenced by both the geometry of the mixing area and the pulsating nature of the flow. The aim of this work is to point out the high importance of the pulses present in the EGR-flow. By simulation in 1-D and 3-D as well as by a fast measurement method, it is shown that the EGR is transported in the air flow in packets. This implies that the timing between intake valve opening and the positioning of the EGR packets has a high influence of the distribution of EGR between the cylinders. The ability of 1-D and 3-D simulation to predict the behavior is evaluated.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2644
S. Reifarth, V. Rajagopal, K. Gritzun, H.-E. Angstrom
Abstract The distribution of EGR between the cylinders of an internal combustion engine has been shown to have large impact on the engine emissions. Especially at high EGR, the combustion reacts sensibly to variations in the EGR-rate. A cylinder that receives excessive EGR produces soot emissions while a cylinder with too little EGR has increased NOX-formation. It is therefore important to have knowledge about the mixing of air and EGR in an engine. This study compares two different EGR-mixing measurement methods. The first is based on CO2 measurement with standard probes, placed at 36 different locations in the intake manifold of the engine. The second method uses a laser beam and a detector to gain information about the mixing with a high time-resolution. Additionally, 1-D simulations are used to gain information about the mixing process. To vary the mixing process on the engine, two different air/EGR mixers are used and their mixing performance is evaluated.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2645
J. Balaji, Ganesh Prasad M. V., L. Navaneetha Rao, Balaji Bandaru, A. Ramesh
Abstract This study deals with the development of an internal EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) system for NOx reduction on a six cylinder, turbocharged intercooled, off-road diesel engine based on a modified cam with secondary lift. One dimensional thermodynamic simulation model was developed using a commercially available code. MCC heat release model was refined in the present work by considering wall impingement of the fuel as given by Lakshminarayanan et al. The NOx prediction accuracy was improved to a level of 90% by a generic polynomial fit between air excess ratio and prediction constants. Simulation results of base model were correlating to more than 95% with experimental results for ISO 8178 C1 test cycle. Parametric study of intake and exhaust valve events was conducted with 2IVO (Secondary Intake Valve Opening) and 2EVO (Secondary Exhaust Valve Opening) methods. Combinations of different opening angles and lifts were chosen in both 2IVO and 2EVO methods for the study. Residual gas content has been estimated for each combination along with performance parameters and NOx emission.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2838
Xiangang Wang, Zhangsong Zhan, Tiegang Hu, Zuohua Huang
Abstract Performance and particulate emissions of a modern common-rail and turbocharged diesel engine fueled with diesel and biodiesel fuels were comparatively studied. An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) was employed to measure particle size distribution and number concentration. Two biodiesel fuels, BDFs (biodiesel from soybean oil) and BDFc (biodiesel from used cooking oil), as well as ultra-low sulfur diesel were used. The study shows that biodiesels give higher thermal efficiency than diesel. Biodiesels give obviously lower exhaust gas temperature than diesel under high engine speed. The differences in fuel consumption, thermal efficiency and exhaust gas temperature between BDFs and BDFc are negligible. The first peaks of heat release rate for biodiesels are lower than that of diesel, while the second peaks are higher and advanced for biodiesels. BDFs show slightly slower heat release than BDFc during the first heat release stage at low engine speed. BDFs and BDFc show similar heat release rate in the first heat release stage at high engine speed.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2839
Christophe Barro, Philipp Meyer, Konstantinos Boulouchos
Abstract Past research has shown that post injections have the potential to reduce Diesel engine exhaust PM concentration without any significant influence in the NOx emissions. In earlier research it was observed that soot reduction due to a post injection is based on three reasons: increased turbulence (1) and heat (2) from the post injection during soot oxidation and lower soot formation due to smaller main injection for similar load conditions (3). The second effect of heat addition during the soot oxidation is debated in the literature. The experimental investigation presented in the current work provides insight into the underlying mechanisms of soot formation and reduction using post injections under different operating conditions. The experimental data have been obtained using a cylindrical constant volume chamber with high optical access. The soot evolution has been obtained using 2-color-pyrometry. Furthermore, NO and particle mass and size distribution have been captured from the exhaust.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2836
Haichao Fu, Yinhui Wang, Xinyan Li, Shi-Jin Shuai
Abstract An experimental study of particulate matter (PM) emission was conducted on four cars from Chinese market. Three cars were powered by gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines and one car was powered by a port fuel injection (PFI) engine. Particulate mass, number and size distribution were measured based on a chassis dynamometer over new European driving cycle (NEDC). The particulate emission behaviors during cold start and hot start NEDCs were compared to understand how the running conditions influence particulate emission. Three kinds of gasoline with RON 91.9, 94.0 and 97.4 were tested to find the impact of RON on particulate emission. Because of time and facilities constraints, only one cold/hot start NEDC was conducted for every vehicle fueled with every fuel. The test results showed that more particles were emitted during cold start condition (first 200s in NEDC). Compared with cold start NEDC, the particulate mass and number of hot start NEDC decreased by a wide margin. The particulate mass and number reductions of hot start NEDC mainly resulted from ECE cycle sections.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2837
Jinyoung Jang, Young-Jae Lee, Ohseok Kwon, Minseob Lee, Jeonghwan Kim
Abstract This study focused on the effect of engine oils on regulated emissions, particulates and fuel economy. Three engine oils of the same SAE grade (synthetic oil with poly alpha olefins (PAOs), Group III base oil, and Group III genuine oil with additive package) were used in one gasoline and one diesel vehicle. A GDI (Gasoline Direct Injection) vehicle and a diesel vehicle without DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) were selected because those vehicles obviously emit more particulates than port-injection gasoline vehicles and diesel vehicles with DPF. A combined mode consisting of the US EPA emission test cycles FTP-75 and HWFET was used for these tests. HORIBA and PIERBURG gas analyzers were used to measure regulated emissions and fuel economy, respectively. Unregulated emissions and particulates were analyzed by FTIR and PPM-S, respectively. Samples (300 ml) of test engine oil were taken periodically just after each test, and the colors of the sampled oil compared. The color of the engine oil samples became dark due to contamination.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2843
Dave OudeNijeweme, Paul Freeland, Markus Behringer, Pavlos Aleiferis
Abstract Particulate emissions are of growing concern due to health impacts. Many urban areas around the world currently have particulate matter levels exceeding the World Health Organisation safe limits. Gasoline engines, especially when equipped with direct injection systems, contribute to this pollution. In recognition of this fact European limits on particulate mass and number are being introduced. A number of ways to meet these new stringent limits have been under investigation. The focus of this paper is on particulate emissions reduction through improvements in fuel delivery. This investigation is part of the author's ongoing particulate research and development that includes optical engine spray and combustion visualisation, CFD method development, engine and vehicle testing with the aim to move particulate emission development upstream in the development process. As part of this work, a spark eroded and a laser drilled injector were fully characterised in a spray vessel under key engine running conditions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2841
Jing Qin, Xiang Li, Yiqiang Pei
Abstract The aim of this research is to experimentally investigate the effects of combustion parameters [ignition timings, injection timings, excess air ratio (λ)] and lubricating oil on particulate matter (PM) emissions from a 2.0 L turbo-charged gasoline direct injection (T-GDI) engine fueled with gasoline (octane number = 97), methanol/gasoline blends and pure methanol. The results of this paper show that the PM number concentration mostly presents a typical bimodal distribution in figures. The particle number concentration mainly concentrates in the nucleation mode. With the increase of methanol volume fraction in the blended fuel, the PM emissions decrease significantly. Furthermore, there are few particles when the engine fueled with pure methanol. As advancing ignition timing, the total PM number rises by over about 200%. Under the pre-ignition condition, the higher in-cylinder temperature may also accelerate the formation of the nucleation mode particles. As advancing injection timing, PM emissions decrease first, and then increase.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2827
Kristin Götz, Anja Singer, Olaf Schröder, Christoph Pabst, Axel Munack, Jürgen Bünger, Jürgen Krahl
Abstract One political and economic aim in Europe is to increase the use of renewable energy resources. In the transport sector, up to 10 % of fossil diesel fuel should be replaced by biogenic fuels by 2020. This also means a reduction in crude oil dependency. In the area of diesel fuel, fatty acid methyl esters are introduced since over 20 years as biodiesel. However, biodiesel can lead to an increase of engine oil dilution in passenger cars with diesel particulate filters. During the regeneration of the particulate filters, there is an entry of fuel components in the engine oil. While most of the diesel fuel (DF) evaporates from the engine oil, biodiesel remains in the oil and can cause sludge formation in the engine. A promising approach to reduce this problem is the use of a new type of biogenic fuel, called hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO). This is also produced from vegetable oil or animal fat. Like biodiesel, HVO is free of sulfur and any aromatics. HVO has a higher cetane number in comparison with biodiesel and most diesel fuels.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2833
Kotaro Tanaka, Masatoshi Takano, Shuji Iimura, Kai Miyamura, Mitsuru Konno
Abstract Recently, highly sensitive near-IR laser absorption spectrometers have been employed to measure ammonia (NH3) emissions. These instruments allow in-situ measurements of highly time-resolved NH3 emission levels in automobile exhaust. However, the effect of the automobile exhaust CO2 in NH3 measurements has not been studied in detail. Because the CO2 concentration in automobile exhaust is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than the NH3 concentration, there is a possibility that spectral overlap by CO2 lines and/or the spectral broadening of NH3 by CO2 could affect the measured NH3 levels. This study had two major objectives. First, the effect of CO2 on the measured NH3 concentration was assessed using our developed near-IR laser absorption spectrometer. The second objective was to provide on-board NH3 measurements in the hybrid gasoline automobile exhaust using the developed spectrometer. As a result, the CO2 in automobile exhaust was found to affect the measured NH3 concentration.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2830
Amar Deep, Naveen Kumar, Ashish Karnwal, Dhruv Gupta, Vipul Vibhanshu, Abhishek Sharma, Jitesh Singh Patel
Abstract The interest of using alternative fuels in diesel engines has been accelerated exponentially due to a foreseen scarcity in world petroleum reserves, increase in the prices of the conventional fossil fuels and restrictions on exhaust emissions such as greenhouse gases from internal combustion (IC) engines initiated by environmental concerns. The constant trade-off between efficiency and emissions should be in proper balance with the conventional fuels in a fuel design process for future combustors. Unlike gasoline and diesel, alcohols act as oxygenated fuels. Adding alcohols to petroleum products allows the fuel to combust properly due to the presence of oxygen, which enhances premixed combustion phase, improves the diffusive combustion phase which increases the combustion efficiency and reduces air pollution. The higher activation energy of alcohols leads to better resistance to engine knocking that allows higher compression ratios and greater engine thermal efficiencies. The use of higher alcohols blended with diesel fuel may provide additional advantages compared to short-chain alcohols, i.e. longer molecular un-branched structure of alcohols that means higher calorific value and better cetane number.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2853
Christoph Menne, Simon Galbraith, Alan Jones, Lars Henning, Thomas Koerfer
Abstract In September 2013 the Jaguar XF 2.2l ECO sport brake and saloon were introduced to the European market. They are the first Jaguar vehicles to realize CO2 emissions below 130 g/km. To achieve these significantly reduced fuel consumption values with an existing 2.2l I4 Diesel engine architecture, selected air path and fuel path components were optimized for increased engine efficiency. Tailored hardware selection and streamlined development were only enabled by the consequent utilisation of the most advanced CAE tools throughout the design phase but also during the complete vehicle application process.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2911
Z. Gerald Liu, Dana McGuffin, Chris M. Cremeens, Nathan Ottinger, Niklas Schmidt
Abstract More stringent emission requirements for nonroad diesel engines both in the U.S. and Europe have spurred the development of engines and exhaust aftertreatment technologies. In this study, one such system consisting of a diesel oxidation catalyst, zeolite-based selective catalytic reduction catalyst, and an ammonia oxidation catalyst was evaluated using both nonroad transient and steady-state cycles in order to understand the emission characteristics of this configuration. Criteria pollutants were analyzed and particular attention was given to organic compound and NO2 emissions since both of these could be significantly affected by the absence of a diesel particulate filter that typically helps reduce semi-volatile and particle-phase organics and consumes NO2 via passive soot oxidation. Results are then presented on a detailed speciation of organic emissions including alkanes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives, and hopanes and steranes.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2903
Nobunori Okui, Tetsuya Niikuni
Abstract Next-generation vehicles which include Electric Vehicles (EV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV) are researched and expected to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the future. In the national new-car sales in 2012 of Japan, the total sales of hybrid vehicles kept 26.5% share. In the field of passenger cars, this share was 29.7%. And, this share rose about four times compared to that of 2008 [1]. Also, small delivery hybrid trucks are increased in the commercial vehicle class. Fuel economy of hybrid trucks in the catalog specifications is relatively better than that of the diesel tracks which have no hybrid systems. Nevertheless, hybrid trucks' users report that advantages of fuel economy of hybrid trucks at the real traffic driving conditions are small. In this report, in order to research that the actual traveling fuel economy of hybrid truck' users has no advantage compared with the diesel truck' users, the traveling fuel economy of hybrid trucks and diesel trucks was surveyed by using the chassis dynamometer system.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2659
Haifeng Liu, Zunqing Zheng, Lang Yue, Lingcun Kong, Mingfa Yao
Abstract To investigate the effects of fuel volatility on combustion and emissions in a diesel engine, a high-volatility fuel of n-heptane was blended into diesel fuel with different volumetric fractions (0%, 40%, 70%, 100%). A wide range of EGR rates from 0% to 65% were investigated, which covered both the conventional diesel combustion and low temperature combustion. Experiments under two engine load conditions, ∼5.2 bar and ∼10.5 bar gross IMEP were performed at 1500 rpm. The injection timing was fixed at 8°CA BTDC for all test cases. Results show that even if the ignition delay and combustion duration are nearly the same for all tested fuels, the premixed combustion fractions are increased for higher volatility fuels due to the improvement on mixing process during the ignition delay period. The indicated specific fuel consumption is decreased as using high-volatility fuels. The effect of fuel volatility on soot emissions depends on engine loads. At lower load, more significant reduction in soot can be achieved compared to higher load as using high-volatility fuels.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2847
Arjun Prakash, Edward Nelson, Aaron Jones, James Macias, Matthew Hinojosa, Eugene Jimenez
Abstract Particulate mass (PM) emissions from DISI engines can be reduced via fuels additive technology that facilitates injector deposit clean-up. A significant drawback of DISI engines is that they can have higher particulate matter emissions than PFI gasoline engines. Soot formation in general is dependent on the air-fuel ratio, combustion chamber temperature and the chemical structure and thermo-physical properties of the fuel. In this regard, PM emissions and DISI injector deposit clean-up were studied in three identical high sales-volume vehicles. The tests compared the effects of a fuel (Fuel A) containing a market generic additive at lowest additive concentration (LAC) against a fuel formulated with a novel additive technology (Fuel B). The fuels compared had an anti-knock index value of 87 containing up to 10% ethanol. The vehicles were run on Fuel A for 20,000 miles followed by 5,000 miles on Fuel B using a chassis dynamometer. It was observed that Fuel A gave rise to an increase in PM emissions indicative of DISI injector deposit build-up.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2824
Piotr Bielaczyc, Andrzej Szczotka, Joseph Woodburn
Abstract Ethanol has a long history as an automotive fuel and is currently used in various blends and formats as a fuel for spark ignition engines in many areas of the world. The addition of ethanol to petrol has been shown to reduce certain types of emissions, but increase others. This paper presents the results of a detailed experimental program carried out under standard laboratory conditions to determine the influence of different quantities of petrol-ethanol blends (E5, E10, E25, E50 and E85) on the emission of regulated and unregulated gaseous pollutants and particulate matter. The ethanol-petrol blends were laboratory tested in two European passenger cars on a chassis dynamometer over the New European Driving Cycle, using a constant volume sampler and analyzers for quantification of both regulated and unregulated emissions. The emissions results revealed non-linear or insignificant changes in response to the addition of ethanol to the base fuel regarding certain parameters; and linear responses regarding others.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2617
Michael Storch, Lars Zigan, Michael Wensing, Stefan Will
Abstract Modern direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engine concepts have the drawback of higher particulate matter emission as compared to port fuel injection concepts. Especially, when driven with biofuels, the operation of DISI engines requires a deeper insight into particulate formation processes. In this study a modern optical accessible DISI engine is used. Pure isooctane, ethanol, E20 (20vol% of ethanol in isooctane) and E85 were investigated as fuels. Simultaneous OH*-chemiluminescence and soot radiation imaging was conducted by a high-speed camera system in order to separate premixed combustion with the sooting combustion. Furthermore, a laser-induced incandescence (LII) sensor was used to measure exhaust elementary carbon mass concentration. Systematically, operation points were chosen, which correspondent to the main sooting mechanisms, poolfire, mixture inhomogeneities and global low air-fuel ratio. Furthermore, they were compared to a homogenous charge combustion strategy.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2728
Romaeo Dallanegra, Rinaldo Caprotti
Abstract Internal Diesel Injector Deposits (IDIDs) have been known for some time. With the latest powertrains becoming ever more sophisticated and reliant on efficient fuel delivery, the necessity for a continued focus on limiting their formation remains. Initial studies probed both carbonaceous based/ashless polymeric and sodium salt based IDIDs. The reported occurrence of the latter variety of IDID has declined in recent years as a result of the removal of certain additives from the diesel distribution system. Conversely, ashless polymeric based deposits remain problematic and a regular occurrence in the field. The body of work presented in this contribution is an extension to that reported in SAE paper 2014-01-1401 which showed how a particular Fuel Borne Catalyst (FBC) additive has the ability to significantly reduce the formation of ashless polymeric deposits formed from the reaction of Poly-isobutylene Succinic Imides (PIBSI) with fatty acid and the ability for the same additive to also be neutral towards the formation of sodium salt based deposits.
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