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2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2479
Maximilian Malin, Vladimir Krivopolianskii, Bjørn Rygh, Vilmar Aesoy, Eilif Pedersen
Abstract Maritime environmental regulations stipulate lower emissions from the shipping industry. To cope with these rules, improving the combustion processes, make use of cleaner alternative fuels and implement exhaust gas cleaning systems is necessary. Alternative fuels, like fish oil, have a potential to reduce soot formation during the combustion process and will be deeply investigated in this paper. For this purpose, two different types of fish oil and their blends with marine gas oil (MGO) have been tested in a constant volume pre-combustion cell (CVPC). The CVPC laboratory was built in collaboration between MARINTEK and NTNU. To generate similar injection condition in the combustion cell as in an internal combustion engine, the CVPC is heated using a chemical heating process. The CVPC is used as a fundamental investigation tool for studying the fuel injection system for large engine applications.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2489
Changhwan Woo, Sanghoon Kook, Peter Rogers, Christopher Marquis, Evatt Hawkes, Samani Tupufia
This paper presents engine performance and emissions of coconut oil-derived 10% biodiesel blends in petroleum diesel demonstrating simultaneous reduction of smoke and NOx emissions and increased brake power. The experiments were performed in a single-cylinder version of a light-duty diesel engine for three different fuels including a conventional diesel fuel and two B10 fuels of chemical-catalyst-based methyl-ester biodiesel (B10mc) and biological-catalyst-based ethyl-ester biodiesel (B10eb). The engine tests were conducted at fixed speed of 2000 rpm and injection pressure of 130 MPa. In addition to the fuel variation, the injection timing and rate of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) were also varied because they impact the combustion and thus the efficiency and emissions significantly.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2491
Tankai Zhang, Karin Munch, Ingemar Denbratt
Global warming driven by “greenhouse gas” emissions is an increasingly serious concern of both the public and legislators. A potentially potent way to reduce these emissions and conserve fossil fuel resources is to use n-butanol, iso-butanol or octanol (2-ethylhexanol) from renewable sources as alternative fuels in diesel engines. The effects of adding these substances to diesel fuel were therefore tested in a single-cylinder heavy duty diesel engine operated using factory settings. These alcohols have better calorific values, flash points, lubricity, cetane numbers and solubility in diesel than shorter-chain alcohols. However, they have lower cetane numbers than diesel, so either hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) or Di-tertiary-butyl peroxide (DTBP) was added to the diesel-alcohol mixtures to generate blends with the same Cetane Number (CN) as diesel.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2389
Mirko Baratta, Roberto Finesso, Daniela Misul, Ezio Spessa
Abstract The potential of internal EGR (iEGR) and external EGR (eEGR) in reducing the engine-out NOx emissions in a heavy-duty diesel engine has been investigated by means of a refined 1D fluid-dynamic engine model developed in the GT-Power environment. The engine is equipped with Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) and Variable Geometry Turbocharger (VGT) systems. The activity was carried out in the frame of the CORE Collaborative Project of the European Community, VII FP. The engine model integrates an innovative 0D predictive combustion algorithm for the simulation of the HRR (heat release rate) based on the accumulated fuel mass approach and a multi-zone thermodynamic model for the simulation of the in-cylinder temperatures. NOx emissions are calculated by means of the Zeldovich thermal and prompt mechanisms.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2417
Jose V. Pastor, Jose M Garcia-Oliver, Ricardo Novella, Tiemin Xuan
A radiation-based 2-color method (2C) and light extinction imaging (LEI) have been performed simultaneously to obtain two-dimensional soot distribution information within a diesel spray flame. All the measurements were conducted in an optically accessible two-stroke engine equipped with a single-hole injector. The fuel used here is a blend of 30% Decane and 70% Hexadecane (in mass). According to previous research, operating conditions with three different flame soot amounts were investigated. The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the two soot diagnostics techniques, after proper conversion of soot-related values from both methods. All the KL extinction values are lower than the saturation limit. As expected, both techniques show sensitivity with the parametric variation. The soot amount increases with higher ambient gas temperature and lower injection pressure. However, the LEI technique presents more sensitivity to the soot quantity.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2422
Nicolo Cavina, Andrea Businaro, Davide Moro, Rita Di Gioia, Giovanni Bonandrini, Domenico Papaleo, Mario Picerno
Abstract The next steps of the current European and US legislation, EURO 6c and LEV III, and the incoming new test cycles will impose more severe restrictions on pollutant emissions for Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines. In particular, soot emission limits will represent a challenge for the development of this kind of engine concept, if injection and after-treatment systems costs are to be minimized at the same time. The paper illustrates the results obtained by means of a numerical and experimental approach, in terms of soot emissions and combustion stability assessment and control, especially during catalyst-heating conditions, where the main soot quantity in the test cycle is produced. A number of injector configurations has been designed by means of a CAD geometrical analysis, considering the main effects of the spray target on wall impingement.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2416
Roberto Finesso, Ezio Spessa, Ezio Mancaruso, Luigi Sequino, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Abstract An investigation has been carried out on the spray penetration and soot formation processes in a research diesel engine by means of a quasi-dimensional multizone combustion model. The model integrates a predictive non stationary 1D spray model developed by the Sandia National Laboratory, with a diagnostic multizone thermodynamic model, and is capable of predicting the spray formation, combustion and soot formation processes in the combustion chamber. The multizone model was used to analyze three operating conditions, i.e., a zero load point (BMEP = 0 bar at 1000 rpm), a medium load point (BMEP = 5 bar at 2000 rpm) and a medium-high load point (BMEP = 10 bar at 2000 rpm). These conditions were experimentally tested in an optical single cylinder engine with the combustion system configuration of a 2.0L Euro4 GM diesel engine for passenger car applications.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2426
Roberto Finesso, Ezio Spessa, Mattia Venditti, Yixin Yang
Abstract New methodologies have been developed to optimize EGR rate and injection timing in diesel engines, with the aim of minimizing fuel consumption (FC) and NOx engine-out emissions. The approach entails the application of a recently developed control-oriented engine model, which includes the simulation of the heat release rate, of the in-cylinder pressure and brake torque, as well as of the NOx emission levels. The engine model was coupled with a C-class vehicle model, in order to derive the engine speed and torque demand for several driving cycles, including the NEDC, FTP, AUDC, ARDC and AMDC. The optimization process was based on the minimization of a target function, which takes into account FC and NOx emission levels. The selected control variables of the problem are the injection timing of the main pulse and the position of the EGR valve, which have been considered as the most influential engine parameters on both fuel consumption and NOx emissions.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2439
Pablo Garcia, Per Tunestal
In the last decades, emission legislation on pollutant emissions generated by road transportation sector has become the main driving force for internal combustion engine development. Approximately 20% of worldwide emissions of carbon dioxide from fuel combustion come from the transportation sector, and road vehicles contribute up to 80% of those emissions [1]. Light-duty methane gas engines are usually spark-ignited due to similar combustion characteristics for methane gas and gasoline. Since spark ignition requires a low compression ratio to avoid knock problems, gas engines have lower efficiency than diesel engines. A combustion concept that has been successfully applied on large stationary engines and to some extent on heavy-duty engines is dual-fuel combustion, where a compression-ignited diesel pilot injection is used to ignite a homogeneous charge of methane gas and air.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2458
Yasumasa Suzuki, Taku Tsujimura, Takuro Mita
Hydrogen can be produced by electrolyzation with renewable electricity and the combustion products of hydrogen mixture include no CO, CO2 and hydrocarbons. In this study, engine performance with hydrogen / diesel dual fuel (hydrogen DDF) operation in a multi-cylinder diesel engine is investigated due to clarify advantages and disadvantages of hydrogen DDF operation. Hydrogen DDF operation under several brake power conditions are evaluated by changing a rate of hydrogen to total input energy (H2 rate). As H2 rate is increased, an amount of diesel fuel is decreased to keep a given torque constant. When the hydrogen DDF engine is operated with EGR, Exhaust gas components including carbon are improved or suppressed to same level as conventional diesel combustion. In addition, brake thermal efficiency is improved to 40% by increase in H2 rate that advances combustion phasing under higher power condition.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2444
YiLong Zhang, Renlin Zhang, Sanghoon Kook
Some soot particles emitted from common-rail diesel engines are so small that can penetrate deep into the human pulmonary system, causing serious health issues. The analysis of nano-scale internal structure of these soot particles sampled from the engine tailpipe has provided useful information about their reactivity and toxicity. However, the variations of carbon fringe structures during complex soot formation/oxidation processes occurring inside the engine cylinder are not fully understood. To fill this gap, this paper presents experimental methods for direct sampling and nanostructure analysis of in-flame soot particles in a working diesel engine. The soot particles are collected onto a lacey carbon-coated grid and then imaged in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM). The HR-TEM images are post-processed using a Matlab-based code to obtain key nanostructure parameters such as carbon fringe length, fringe-to-fringe separation distance, and fringe tortuosity.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2443
Jesus Benajes, Jaime Martin, Antonio Garcia, David Villalta, Alok Warey, Vicent Domenech, Alberto Vassallo
In the last two decades engine research has been mainly focused on reducing pollutant emissions. This fact together with growing awareness about the impacts of climate change are leading to an increase in the importance of thermal efficiency over other criteria in the design of internal combustion engines (ICE). In this framework, the heat transfer to the combustion chamber walls can be considered as one of the main sources of indicated efficiency diminution. In particular, in modern direct-injection diesel engines, the radiation emission from soot particles can constitute a significant component of the efficiency losses. Thus, the main of objective of the current research was to evaluate the amount of energy lost to soot radiation relative to the input fuel chemical energy during the combustion event under several representative engine loads and speeds. Moreover, the current research characterized the impact of different engine operating conditions on radiation heat transfer.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2513
Michal Vojtisek-Lom, Vit Beranek, Jitka Stolcpartova, Martin Pechout, Vojtech Klir
Abstract N-butanol and isobutanol are alcohols that can be produced from biomass by fermentation and are possibly more compatible with existing engines than ethanol. This work reports on the effects of these two isomers on exhaust emissions of an unmodified direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engine. A Ford Focus car with a 1.0-liter Euro 6 Ecoboost DISI engine has been tested on a chassis dynamometer using WLTP and Artemis driving cycles, and on the road on a one-hour test loop containing urban, rural and motorway driving. Two isomers of butanol, 1-butanol and 2-methyl-propanol, were each blended with gasoline at 25% volume. Non-oxygenated gasoline and 15% ethanol in gasoline (E15) were used as reference fuels. The vehicle performed well in terms of cold start, drivability, general performance, and off-cycle particle emissions, staying within several mg of particle mass and about 2×1012 particles (per PMP procedure) per km during laboratory tests.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2512
Barouch Giechaskiel, Alessandro Zardini, Giorgio Martini
Abstract In 2011 a particle number (PN) limit was introduced in the European Union's vehicle exhaust legislation for diesel passenger cars. The PN method requires measurement of solid particles (i.e. those that do not evaporate at 350 °C) with diameters above 23 nm. In 2013 the same approach was introduced for heavy duty engines and in 2014 for gasoline direct injection vehicles. This decision was based on a long evaluation that concluded that there is no significant sub-23 nm fraction for these technologies. In this paper we examine the suitability of the current PN method for L-category vehicles (two- or three-wheel vehicles and quadri-cycles). Emission levels of 5 mopeds, 9 motorcycles, 2 tricycles (one of them diesel) and 1 quad are presented. Special attention is given to sub-23 nm emission levels. The investigation was conducted with PN legislation compliant systems with particle counters measuring above 23 nm and 10 nm.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2508
Joschka Schaub, Thorsten Schnorbus, Thomas Koerfer, Stefan Pischinger
Abstract Model-based control strategies along with an adapted calibration process become more important in the overall vehicle development process. The main drivers for this development trend are increasing numbers of vehicle variants and more complex engine hardware, which is required to fulfill the more and more stringent emission legislation and fuel consumption norms. Upcoming fundamental changes in the homologation process with EU 6c, covering an extended range of different operational and ambient conditions, are suspected to intensify this trend. One main reason for the increased calibration effort is the use of various complex aftertreatment technologies amongst different vehicle applications, requiring numerous combustion modes. The different combustion modes range from heating strategies for active Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration or early SCR light-off and rich combustion modes to purge the NOx storage catalyst (NSC) up to partially premixed combustion modes.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2532
Reinhard Ratzberger, Thomas Kraxner, Jochen Pramhas, Klaus Hadl, Helmut Eichlseder, Ludwig Buergler
Abstract The continuously decreasing emission limits lead to a growing importance of exhaust aftertreatment in Diesel engines. Hence, methods for achieving a rapid catalyst light-off after engine cold start and for maintaining the catalyst temperature during low load operation will become more and more necessary. The present work evaluates several valve timing strategies concerning their ability for doing so. For this purpose, simulations as well as experimental investigations were conducted. A special focus of simulation was on pointing out the relevance of exhaust temperature, mass flow and enthalpy for these thermomanagement tasks. An increase of exhaust temperature is beneficial for both catalyst heat-up and maintaining catalyst temperature. In case of the exhaust mass flow, high values are advantageous only in case of a catalyst heat-up process, while maintaining catalyst temperature is supported by a low mass flow.
2015-09-01
Journal Article
2015-01-9043
Matthew Bresler, William Attard, Ronald Reese
Abstract Dilution of a stoichiometric spark ignited (SI) charge with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) has been shown to improve thermal efficiency and fuel consumption through improved combustion phasing and heat transfer losses at the knock limit in conjunction with a reduction of heat transfer losses and pumping losses at throttled conditions. However, combustion stability can be adversely affected by EGR dilution. The degradation in combustion stability can be mitigated by selecting an ignition system that can successfully propagate a self-sustaining flame kernel in the presence of a high concentration of diluent and increase the apparent burn rate. This investigation examines improvements to EGR dilution tolerance and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) for multiple alternative ignition systems at various engine operating points while maintaining a stoichiometric air-fuel ratio.
2015-09-01
Article
FCA powertrain engineers have shaved weight and increased the efficiency and power of their do-it-all V6, while preparing it for possible DI turbocharged duty in the not-so-distant future.
2015-08-26
Article
There is more pressure than ever on heavy-truck engineers to find and create significant improvements in fuel economy and reduce tailpipe greenhouse gas emissions. Aerodynamic opportunities exist with technologies such as active grille shutters and truck platooning—and simulation will help to optimize these designs.
2015-08-18
Magazine
The advent of stop-start technology As environmental concerns grow for R&D teams, OEMs look to bring the strategy further into the mainstream. Recycling opportunities for hybrid/electric vehicle lithium-ion batteries With limited reserves and strict environmental regulations, re-cyclers look to established extraction means to reuse, recycle, and dispose of the used batteries. Cameras look to go the distance Automakers seek vision systems with greater distances, improved reliability, and more functionality, thanks to ruggedized complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technologies. Getting right with composites With composites now a mainstay in most new aircraft de-signs, the engineering emphasis has switched from understanding if they work to thinking through the most efficient way to manufacture them, such as using design-for-manufacturing software.
2015-08-13
Book
Srikanth Pilla, Charles Lu
The automotive sector has taken a keen interest in lightweighting as new required performance standards for fuel economy come into place. This strategy includes parts consolidation, design optimization, and material substitution, with sustainable polymers playing a major role in reducing a vehicle’s weight. Sustainable polymers are largely biodegradable, biocompatible, and sourced from renewable plant and agricultural stocks. A facile way to enhance their properties, so they can indeed replace the ones made from fossil fuels, is by reinforcing them with fibers to make composites. Natural fibers are gaining more acceptance in the industry due to their renewable nature, low cost, low density, low energy consumption, high specific strength and stiffness, CO2 sequestration potential, biodegradability, and less wear imposed on machinery. Biocomposites then become a very feasible way to help address the fuel consumption challenge ahead of us.
2015-08-05
Magazine
Making sense of autonomy Industry offers a range of sensors that will free humans from many tasks while also improving reliability, though devising strategies that meet demanding requirements without breaking the bank is no easy challenge. Life-cycle planning-Design and calibration for ultimate efficiency The ultimate power of Big Data technologies relies on the implementation of new strategies. Unlike a traditional engine calibration process, in which only calibration test data and model simulation data are used, multiple source data introduced into the adaptive engine calibration process contributes to efficiency and cost reduction. The complicated future of off-highway engines Developing an optimum engine is getting tricky now that the European Union has established a Stage V for off-highway engines, and the U.S. has not. What effect will this have on future engine designs?
2015-08-03
Magazine
Big Data, aircraft, and a better future Aircraft manufacturers, in particular engine makers, are exploiting the opportunities that come with collecting the vast amount of data available, from customer reports to engine exhaust temperatures. Why is it potentially so useful? What are some of the best ways to use it? Let the good times continue to roll The booming international commercial aviation sector continues to be a bright light leading the future of the aerospace industry.
2015-07-08
Standard
J3030_201507
The purpose of this SAE Standard is to establish the specific minimum equipment requirements for recovery/recycling/recharge equipment intended for use with both R-1234yf and R-134a in a common refrigerant circuit that has been directly removed from, and is intended for reuse in, mobile air-conditioning (A/C) systems. This document does not apply to equipment used for R-1234yf and R-134a having a common enclosure with separate circuits for each refrigerant, although some amount of separate circuitry for each refrigerant could be used.
2015-06-29
WIP Standard
J1555
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to all portions of the vehicle, but design efforts should focus on components and systems with the highest contribution to the overall average repair cost (see 3.7). The costs to be minimized include not only insurance premiums, but also out-of-pocket costs incurred by the owner. Damageability, repairability, serviceability and diagnostics are inter-related. Some repairability, serviceability and diagnostics operations may be required for collision or comprehensive loss-related causes only, some operations for non-collision-related causes only (warranty, scheduled maintenance, non-scheduled maintenance, etc.), and some for both causes. The scope of this document deals with only those operations that involve collision and comprehensive insurance loss repairs.
2015-06-19
Article
SAE International has published the new book, Ice Accretion and Icing Technology by Robert J. Flemming. The collection consists of 10 SAE International technical papers, chosen by Flemming, a known expert in the field.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2123
Eric Defer, Jean-Louis Brenguier, Jos De Laat, Julien Delanoe, Fabien Dezitter, Michael Faivre, Amanda Gounou, Alice Grandin, Anthony Guignard, Jan Fokke Meirink, Jean-Marc Moisselin, Frederic Parol, Alain Protat, Claudine Vanbauce
Abstract The High Altitude Ice Crystals (HAIC) Sub-Project 3 (SP3) focuses on the detection of cloud regions with high ice water content (IWC) from current available remote sensing observations of space-based geostationary and low-orbit missions. The SP3 activities are aimed at supporting operationally the two up-coming HAIC flight campaigns (the first one in May 2015 in Cayenne, French Guyana; the second one in January 2016 in Darwin, Australia) and ultimately provide near real-time cloud monitoring to Air Traffic Management. More in detail the SP3 activities focus on the detection of high IWC from space-borne geostationary Meteosat daytime imagery, explore the synergy of concurrent multi-spectral multiple-technique observations from the low-orbit A-Train mission to identify specific signatures in high IWC cloud regions, and finally develop a satellite-based nowcasting tool to track and monitor convective systems over the Tropical Atlantic.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2296
Seunghyun Lee, Sungmoon Lee, Kyoungdoug Min, Insoo Jung
Abstract Diesel engine noise is classified into mechanical noise, flow dynamic noise and combustion noise. Among these, combustion noise level is higher than the others due to the high compression ratio of diesel combustion and auto ignition. The injected fuel is mixed with air in the ignition delay process, followed by simultaneous ignition of the premixed mixture. This process results in a rapid pressure rise, which is the main source of combustion noise. The amount of fuel burned during premixed combustion is mainly affected by the ignition delay. The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate has an impact on ignition delay, and thus, it influences the combustion noise characteristics. Therefore, during the transient state, the combustion noise characteristics change as the EGR rate deviates from the target value. In this study, the effect of the EGR rate deviation during the transient state of the combustion noise is examined.
2015-06-12
Article
Small, electrically driven propellers spaced along wing leading-edges could benefit both small and medium-size aircraft
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