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Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Homayoun Ahari, Michael Zammit, Luis Cattani, Jason Jacques, Thomas Pauly
Abstract To meet TierII/LEVII emissions standards, light duty diesel (LDD) vehicles require high conversion efficiencies from the Aftertreatment Systems (ATS) for the removal of both Hydrocarbon (HC) and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) species. The most populous configuration for LDD ATS have the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst positioned on the vehicle behind the close coupled Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) and Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter (CDPF). This SCR position may require active heating measures which rely on the DOC/CDPF to provide heat through the combustion of HC and CO in the exhaust. Although DOCs are always impacted by their aging conditions, some aging conditions are shown to be both reversible and irreversible. Under continuous, high speed and high mileage conditions such as experienced in a modified Standard Road Cycle (SRC) or as it is better known, the High Speed Cycle (HSC), it is shown that the DOC's activity can deteriorate initially but significantly recover over repeated FTP-75 test cycles on fully aged catalysts.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
S. Hirose, H. Yamamoto, H. Suenobu, H. Sakamoto, F. Katsube, P. Busch, A. Martin, R. Kai, C. D. Vogt
Today the Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system with good NOx conversion is the emission technology of choice for diesel engines globally. High NOx conversion SCR systems combined with optimized engine calibration not only address the stringent NOx emission limits which have been introduced or are being considered for later this decade, but also reduce CO2 emissions required by government regulations and the increase in fuel economy required by end-users. Reducing the packaging envelope of today's SCR systems, while retaining or improving NOx conversion and pressure drop, is a key customer demand. High SCR loadings ensure high NOx conversion at very low temperatures. To meet this performance requirement, a High Porosity Substrate which minimizes the pressure drop impact, was introduced in SAE Paper 2012-01-1079 [1], [2], [3]. The High Porosity Substrate with an equivalent catalyst amount demonstrated a pressure drop reduction in SCR substrate against the baseline conventional substrate.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Jongik Jeon, Hyongman Seo, Kangwon Lee, Soonhyung Kwon, Kisong Bae
Abstract This paper describes how to meet LEVII ULEV70 emission standards and minimize fuel consumption with the combined NOx after-treatment (LNT+SCR) system for diesel vehicles. Through analysis of LNT's functionality and characteristics in a LNT+SCR combined after-treatment system, allowed a new control strategy to be established, different from the existing LNT-only system. In the 200°C or higher condition where SCR can provide the most stable NOx conversion efficiency, rich regeneration of LNT was optimized to minimize LNT deterioration and fuel consumption. Optimized mapping between rapid heat up strategy and raw NOx reduction maximized LNT's NOx conversion efficiency during the intervals when it is not possible for SCR to purify NOx This study used bench aged catalysts which were equivalent to 150K full useful life. During the Highway (HFET) driving cycle when the SCR conversion rate is generally high, fuel economy was improved by minimization DeNOx in LNT and improvement of the engine combustion efficiency.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Joel Op de Beeck, Kevin Slusser, Neall Booth
Abstract Automotive SCR systems are dimensioned to reduce NOx efficiently in normal driving conditions. In markets such as North America and Europe, extreme winter conditions are common over a period of many weeks where temperatures are usually below DEF (Diesel Exhaust Fluid) freezing temperatures at −11°C (12°F). In previous studies and applications, DEF was heated in the tank in a dedicated pot or alternatively by a standardized central heater. Due to the local character of these heating solutions, it was not possible to thaw the full tank volume. The objective of this study is to demonstrate how to significantly improve performance of the SCR system in cold weather conditions for passenger car, light commercial vehicles and SUV applications. The performance improvement is demonstrated by sustainability testing showing how much of the full tank content can be thawed and made available for injection in the exhaust system. Based on maximum average dosing rates of 250 g/h, external temperatures down to −40°C and depending on the tank shape the heater is designed to optimize tank heating performance.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Joel Michelin, Frederic Guilbaud, Alain Guil, Ian Newbigging, Emmanuel Jean, Martina Reichert, Mario Balenovic, Zafar Shaikh
Abstract Future Diesel emission standards for passenger cars, light and medium duty vehicles, require the combination of a more efficient NOx reduction performance along with the opportunity to reduce the complexity and the package requirements to facilitate it. With the increasing availability of aqueous urea, DEF or AdBlue® at service stations, and improved package opportunities, the urea SCR technical solution has been demonstrated to be very efficient for NOx reduction; however the complexity in injecting and distributing the reductant remains a challenge to the industry. The traditional exhaust system contains Diesel Oxidation Catalysts (DOC), Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), all require additional heat to facilitate each of their specific functions. With some particular package scenarios the SCR catalyst maybe found after the particulate filter where elaborate light-off strategies need to be deployed to ensure activation under many different driving regimes.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Matthieu Lecompte, Stephane Raux, Arnaud Frobert
Abstract The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) based on urea water solution (UWS) is an effective way to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted by engines. The high potential offered by this solution makes it a promising way to meet the future stringent exhaust gas standards (Euro6 and Tier2 Bin5). UWS is injected into the exhaust upstream of an SCR catalyst. The catalyst works efficiently and durably if the spray is completely vaporized and thoroughly mixed with the exhaust gases before entering. Ensuring complete vaporization and optimum mixture distribution in the exhaust line is challenging, especially for compact exhaust lines. Numerous parameters affect the degree of mixing: urea injection pressure and spray angle, internal flow field (fluid dynamics), injector location …. In order to quantify the mixture quality (vaporization, homogeneity) upstream of the SCR catalyst, it is proposed to employ non intrusive optical diagnostics techniques such as laser induced fluorescence (LIF).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yi Liu, Wei Chen, Matthew Henrichsen, Arvind Harinath
Abstract Diesel emission aftertreatment system is usually designed to meet stringent packaging constraints, rendering a difficult situation to achieve perfect flow distribution inside the catalytic unit. The non-uniform flow pattern leads to a mal-distribution of flow velocity, temperature, and gas species in catalyst unit. Some catalysts are exposed to harsh working environment, while the rest catalysts are underutilized. This lowers the efficiency of overall catalyst unit and thus requires an oversized system to meet emission requirements. The flow mal-distribution also accelerates the uneven catalyst degradation, lowering the system durability. Hence, a quantitative description of packaging impact on catalyst performance is critical to assess the system efficiency and durability. In the present work, a mapping method is developed to combine catalyst performance with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. This method is used to analyze the performance and robustness of a SCR aftertreatment system using a series of packaging designs.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiangyu Feng, Yunshan Ge, Jianwei Tan, Jiaqiang Li, Yao Zhang, Chenglei Yu
Abstract The NOx conversion efficiency of vanadium-based SCR catalyst is lower under low temperature. Utilizing an exhaust analyzer, the effects of electrically heated catalyst on the performance of vanadium-based SCR catalyst under low temperature was studied on the engine test bench. The inlet temperature of SCR catalyst without the electrically heated catalyst were in the range of 150°C∼270°C under various steady engine modes, and the NSR (Normalized Stoichiometric Ratio) was set as 0.4,0.6,0.8,1.0. The results showed that under the space velocity of 20000h−1, with the application of the electrically heated catalyst, the inlet temperature of SCR increased about 19.9°C on average and the NOx conversion efficiency improved about 8.0%. The NOx conversion efficiency increased 1.7%∼8.6% at the temperatures of 150°C∼174°C, and 1.0%∼15.9% at the temperatures of 186°C∼270°C. The experiment space velocity properties indicated that with the electrically heated catalyst, the inlet temperature increase and the increasing rate of the NOx conversion efficiency both decreased with the increasing space velocity.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xiaobo Song, Jeffrey Naber, John H. Johnson
Abstract Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems are in use on heavy duty diesel engines for NOx control. An SCR NOx reduction efficiency of higher than 95% is required to meet the proposed increasingly stringent NOx emission standards and the 2014-2018 fuel consumption regulations. The complex engine exhaust conditions including the nonuniformity of temperature, flow, and maldistribution of NH3 present at the catalyst inlet need to be considered for improved performance of the SCR system. These factors cause the SCR to underperform negatively impacting the NOx reduction efficiency as well as the NH3 slip. In this study, the effects of the nonuniformity of temperature, flow velocity and maldistribution of NH3 on the SCR performance were investigated using 1-dimensional (1D) model simulations for a Cu-zeolite SCR. The model was previously calibrated and validated to reactor and steady-state and transient engine experimental data. The SCR engine experimental measurements collected from a transient cycle were used as the baseline for the simulations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Mengting Yu, Vemuri Balakotaiah, Dan Luss
Abstract The particulate matter (PM) emitted by a diesel engine is collected and then combusted in a diesel particulate filter (DPF). A sudden decrease of the engine load of DPF undergoing regeneration, referred to as a drop to idle (DTI), may create a transient temperature peak much higher than under stationary feed conditions. This transient temperature rise may cause local melting or cracking of the filter. We report here the dependence of the maximum temperature following a DTI on the DPF properties and its dependence on the operating conditions. The simulated impact of changes in DPF properties on peak regeneration temperature following a DTI is qualitatively similar to their impact under stationary operation. (1) The maximum DTI temperature and temperature gradient can be decreased by preheating the DPF before igniting the PM. (2) A decrease of the inlet gas temperature and/or a two-step regeneration can decrease the maximum DTI regeneration temperature. (3) The peak DTI regeneration temperature decreases upon an increase of either the filter wall thickness or the solid volumetric heat capacity. (4) When the DPF heat transfer is under axial heat Peclet number (Eqn. (4)) control, the peak temperature decreases upon an increase of the solid conductivity and/or a decrease of the filter aspect ratio (L/D). (5) The peak DTI temperature is a nonlinear function of the cell density. (6) The dependence of the maximum temperature gradient on the maximum regeneration temperature is not always monotonic.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Zakwan Skaf, Timur Aliyev, Leo Shead, Thomas Steffen
Abstract Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is a leading aftertreatment technology for the removal of nitrogen oxide (NOx) from exhaust gases (DeNOx). It presents an interesting control challenge, especially at high conversion, because both reagents (NOx and ammonia) are toxic, and therefore an excess of either is highly undesirable. Numerous system layouts and control methods have been developed for SCR systems, driven by the need to meet future emission standards. This paper summarizes the current state-of-the-art control methods for the SCR aftertreatment systems, and provides a structured and comprehensive overview of the research on SCR control. The existing control techniques fall into three main categories: traditional SCR control methods, model-based SCR control methods, and advanced SCR control methods. For each category, the basic control technique is defined. Further techniques in the same category are then explained and appreciated for their relative advantages and disadvantages.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nic van Vuuren
Abstract The implementation of stringent nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions reduction legislation in Europe and North America is driving the introduction of new exhaust aftertreatment systems, including those that treat NOx under the high-oxygen conditions typical of lean-burn engines. One increasingly common solution, referred to as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), comprises a catalyst that facilitates the reactions of ammonia (NH3) with the exhaust nitrogen oxides (NOx) to produce nitrogen (N2) and water (H2O). It is customary with these systems to use a liquid aqueous urea solution, typically at a 32% concentration of urea (CO(NH2)2). The solution is referred to as AUS-32, and is also known under its commercial name of AdBlue® in Europe, and DEF - Diesel Exhaust Fluid - in the USA. The urea solution is injected into the exhaust and transformed to NH3 by various mechanisms for the SCR reactions. Urea injection systems using AUS-32 are now in production and becoming a widespread mature technology on many on-road automotive and off-road vehicle applications.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Wanyu Sun, Shufen Wang, Shanheng Yan, Lei Guo, Yuanjing Hou
Abstract Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has become one of the primary technologies to reduce internal combustion engine (ICE) emission. The installation angle of urea injector plays an important role during the SCR process. The urea injector is often vertically mounted to the exhaust pipe for on road heavy duty truck because of its good performance and general packaging convenience, and this type of installation has been the focus of previous research. However, due to certain packaging constraints or responsiveness considerations, the injector is installed with an inclined acute angle to the exhaust pipe under some circumstance. To evaluate the underlying benefits and risks of this type of installation angle, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model based on the Renolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver from AVL Fire is used to simulate the injection process of urea for an acute-angled 3-hole injector, through which, the urea spray's formation and motion, wallfilm accumulation and NH3 distribution uniformity characteristics are studied.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hongsuk Kim, Cheon Yoon, Junho Lee, Hoyeol Lee
Abstract One of most effective NOx control technology of modern diesel engines is SCR with ammonia. Current NOx reduction systems are designed to use a solution of urea dissolved in water as a source of ammonia. However, the liquid urea systems have technical difficulties, such as a freezing point below −11°C and solid deposit formation in the exhaust temperature below 200°C. The objective of this study is to investigate the possibility of a new ammonia generation system that uses low-cost solid ammonium salt, such as solid urea and ammonium carbonate. The result shows that ammonium carbonate is more suitable than solid urea because of low decomposition temperature and no change to the other ammonium salt during the decomposition process. This paper also shows the NOx reduction capability of the new ammonia delivery system that uses ammonium carbonate.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Stephan Stadlbauer, Harald Waschl, Luigi del Re
Abstract The emissions of modern Diesel engines, which are known to have various health effects, are beside the drivers torque demands and low fuel consumptions one of the most challenging issues for combustion and after treatment control. To comply with legal requirements, emission control for heavy duty engines is not feasible without additional hardware, usually consisting of a Diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), a Diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. In contrast to other NOx reduction systems, e.g. lean NOx traps, the SCR system requires an additional ingredient, namely ammonia (NH3), to reduce the NOx emissions to non harmful components. Consequently, the correct amount of NH3 dosing in the SCR catalyst is one of the critical components to reach high conversion rates and avoid ammonia slip. Against this background and in contrast to existing proposals in which the NH3 dosing is often calculated based on a NOx emission sensor, this work presents a strategy to adopt the set point estimation of the NH3 dosing, based on a virtual NOx sensor extended by a virtual DOC model.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yoshinori Otsuki, Kenji Takeda, Kazuhiko Haruta, Nobuhisa Mori
Abstract The particle number (PN) emission regulation has been implemented since 2011 in Europe. PN measurement procedure defined in ECE regulation No. 83 requires detecting only solid particles by eliminating volatile particles, the concentrations of which are highly influenced by dilution conditions, using a volatile particle remover (VPR). To measure PN concentration after the VPR, a particle number counter (PNC) which has detection threshold at a particle size of 23 nm is used, because most solid particles generated by automotive engines are considered to be larger than 23 nm. On the other hand, several studies have reported the existence of solid and volatile particles smaller than 23 nm in engine exhaust. This paper describes investigation into a measurement method for ultrafine PNCs with thresholds of below 23 nm and evaluation of the VPR performance for the particles in this size range. The detection efficiency of an ultrafine PNC was verified by following the ECE regulation procedure.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ayman Moawad, Aymeric Rousseau
Manufacturers have been considering various technology options to improve vehicle fuel economy. Some of the most promising technologies are related to vehicle electrification. To evaluate the benefits of vehicle electrification to support the 2017-2025 CAFE regulations, a study was conducted to simulate many of the most common electric drive powertrains currently available on the market: 12V Micro Hybrid Vehicle (start/stop systems), Belt-integrated starter generator (BISG), Crank-integrated starter generator (CISG), Full Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV), PHEV with 20-mile all-electric range (AER) (PHEV20), PHEV with 40-mile AER (PHEV40), Fuel-cell HEV and Battery Electric vehicle with 100-mile AER (EV100). Different vehicle classes were also analyzed in the study process: Compact, Midsize, Small SUV, Midsize SUV and Pickup. This paper will show the fuel displacement benefit of each powertrain across vehicle classes.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Chitralkumar V. Naik, Long Liang, Karthik Puduppakkam, Ellen Meeks
Abstract 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations have been performed using a detailed reaction mechanism to capture the combustion and emissions behavior of an IFP Energies nouvelles optical gasoline direct injection engine. Simulation results for in-cylinder soot volume fraction have been compared to experimental data provided by Pires da Cruz et al. [1] The engine was operated at low-load and tests were performed with parametric variations of the operating conditions including fuel injection timing, inlet temperature, and addition of fuel in the intake port. Full cycle simulations were performed including intake and exhaust ports, valve and piston motion. A Cartesian mesh was generated using automatic mesh generation in the FORTÉ CFD software. For the simulations, a 7-component surrogate blend was used to represent the chemical and physical properties of the European gasoline used in the engine tests. A validated detailed combustion mechanism containing 230 species and 1740 reactions was employed to model the chemistry of the fuel surrogate combustion and emissions.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hideki Goto, Kazuyoshi Komata, Shigekazu Minami
Abstract Among the platinum group metals (PGMs), rhodium (Rh) is known as an exceedingly valuable element for automotive catalysts due to its powerful catalytic function. Because Rh is a costly material, it is paramount to enhance its catalytic function in three-way catalysts (TWCs). This work reports results on the palladium (Pd)-Rh combination which assists the catalytic function of Rh. XPS and XRD are used to observe the Rh characteristics, and engine dynamometer and vehicle testing are conducted to measure catalytic performance and quantify the emission benefits of the Pd-Rh interaction in TWCs. It is well known that Pd-Rh forms a core-shell structured alloy with Rh in its core. This alloy exerts a large negative impact on NOx performance. However, it is inferred from our analyses that highly-dispersed Pd and Rh particles within a certain Pd/Rh atomic ratio prevent this deterioration phenomenon. In this work XPS analysis shows adding Pd increases the Rh0 concentration on the Rh surface when Pd is allocated in proximity to Rh, and the concentration of Rh0 created through the Pd-Rh interaction reaches a maximum at a certain Pd/Rh atomic ratio.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Erica King, David Wallace, E. Robert Becker
Abstract Platinum Group Metal (PGM) use is dominated by the automotive industry. The PGM market is sensitive to shifts in the drivers for emission control and the delicate supply-demand balance. Technology shifts in the emission control industry are particularly impactful because of the automotive market's dominance and the consequent ability to significantly affect metal prices. On the supply side, evolving ore ratios of platinum, palladium and rhodium, production ramp-up times, geopolitical factors, and labor relations contribute to a challenging production environment. This is mitigated by a growing above-ground supply from spent autocatalysts. The availability of spent autocatalyst is critical to alleviate the pressure on primary supply and is especially important in light of the hurdles primary PGM producers face. This paper reviews technology developments, legislative drivers, and consumer trends in the automotive industry and their impact on PGM demand. Evolving emission regulations for criteria pollutants around the world put pressure on catalyst performance and durability while greenhouse gas standards bring new challenges to the operating environment of these catalysts.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Alok Warey, Anil Singh Bika, Alberto Vassallo, Sandro Balestrino, Patrick Szymkowicz
Cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is widely used in diesel engines to control engine out NOx (oxides of nitrogen) emissions. A portion of the exhaust gases is re-circulated into the intake manifold of the engine after cooling it through a heat exchanger known as an EGR cooler. EGR cooler heat exchangers, however, tend to lose efficiency and have increased pressure drop as deposit forms on the heat exchanger surface due to transport of soot particles and condensing species to the cooler walls. In our previous work surface condensation of water vapor was shown to be successful in removing a significant portion of the accumulated deposit mass from various types of deposit layers typically encountered in EGR coolers. Significant removal of accumulated deposit mass was observed for “dry” soot only deposit layers, while little to no removal was observed for the deposit layers created at low coolant temperatures that consisted of both soot and condensed hydrocarbons (HC). The focus of this study was to explore the potential benefits of combining a pre-EGR cooler oxidation catalyst (OC) in the high pressure EGR loop with exposure to water vapor condensation.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
René Wolf, Peter Eilts
When comparing automotive and large-bore diesel engines, the latter usually show lower specific fuel consumption values, while automotive engines are subject to much stricter emission standards. Within an FVV (Research Association for Combustion Engines) project these differences were identified, quantified and assigned to individual design and operation parameters. The approach was split in three different phases: 1 Comparison of different-sized diesel engines2 Correlation of differences in fuel consumption to design and operating parameters3 Further investigations under automotive boundary conditions The comparison in the first phase was made on the basis of operating data and energy balances as well as the separation of losses based on the thermodynamic analysis. To also determine the quantitative effects of each design and operating parameter, a 1D process calculation model of the passenger car engine was transformed gradually to a large-bore engine in the second phase. The advantage of the large-bore engines results basically from their higher combustion air ratio, shorter combustion duration, lower wall heat losses and high positive gas exchange work due to a high turbocharger efficiency.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Usman Asad, Jimi Tjong
Abstract Modern diesel engines employ a multitude of strategies for oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission abatement, with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) being one of the most effective technique. The need for a precise control on the intake charge dilution (as a result of EGR) is paramount since small fluctuations in the intake charge dilution at high EGR rates may cause larger than acceptable spikes in NOx/soot emissions or deterioration in the combustion efficiency, especially at low to mid-engine loads. The control problem becomes more pronounced during transient engine operation; currently the trend is to momentarily close the EGR valve during tip-in or tip-out events. Therefore, there is a need to understand the transient EGR behaviour and its impact on the intake charge development especially under unstable combustion regimes such as low temperature combustion. This study describes a zero-dimensional EGR model that enables the estimation of transient (cycle-by-cycle) build-up of EGR and the time (engine cycles) required to reach steady-state EGR operation (intake/exhaust concentrations).
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Arnon Poran, Moris Artoul, Moshe Sheintuch, Leonid Tartakovsky
This paper describes a model for the simulation of the joint operation of internal combustion engine (ICE) with methanol reformer when the ICE is fed by the methanol steam reforming (SRM) products and the energy of the exhaust gases is utilized to sustain endothermic SRM reactions. This approach enables ICE feeding by a gaseous fuel with very favorable properties, thus leading to increase in the overall energy efficiency of the vehicle and emissions reduction. Previous modeling attempts were focused either on the performance of ICE fueled with SRM products or on the reforming process simulation and reactor design. It is clear that the engine performance is affected by the composition of the reforming products and the reforming products are affected by the exhaust gas temperature, composition and flow rate. Due to the tight interrelations between the two main parts of the considered ICE-reformer system, it is desirable to create a single model that simulates joint operation of the ICE and the SRM reactor.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daniele Farrace, Michele Bolla, Yuri M. Wright, Konstantinos Boulouchos
This paper presents numerical simulations of in-cylinder soot evolution in the optically accessible heavy-duty diesel engine of Sandia Laboratories performed with the conditional moment closure (CMC) model employing a reduced n-heptane chemical mechanism coupled with a two-equation soot model. The influence of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on in-cylinder processes is studied considering different ambient oxygen volume fractions (8 - 21 percent), while maintaining intake pressure and temperature as well as the injection configuration unchanged. This corresponds to EGR rates between 0 and 65 percent. Simulation results are first compared with experimental data by means of apparent heat release rate (AHRR) and temporally resolved in-cylinder soot mass, where a quantitative comparison is presented. The model was found to fairly well reproduce ignition delays as well as AHRR traces along the EGR variation with a slight underestimation of the diffusion burn portion. Subsequently, the impact of EGR on the mixture formation, spray characteristics and soot evolution is investigated numerically and governing processes are identified and discussed.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Xander Seykens, Frank Willems, Berry Kuijpers, Clint Rietjens
This paper presents an automated fit for a control-oriented physics-based diesel engine combustion model. This method is based on the combination of a dedicated measurement procedure and structured approach to fit the required combustion model parameters. Only a data set is required that is considered to be standard for engine testing. The potential of the automated fit tool is demonstrated for two different heavy-duty diesel engines. This demonstrates that the combustion model and model fit methodology is not engine specific. Comparison of model and experimental results shows accurate prediction of in-cylinder peak pressure, IMEP, CA10, and CA50 over a wide operating range. This makes the model suitable for closed-loop combustion control development. However, NO emission prediction has to be improved.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Indranil Brahma, James Schmidt, Ryan Confair, Josh Kurtz, Ian Rafter, Peter Stryker, Daniel Johnson
Orifices, flow nozzles and arbitrarily shaped flow obstructing flow measurement devices are widely used to estimate EGR flow rates in engines, and also used to model flow restricting components like valves in engine analysis tools such as GT-Power. The standard assumptions about the flow discharge coefficient and its variation with Reynolds number are based on investigations of orifices across steady non-pulsating flows, widely reported in literature. In this work, the discharge coefficient for steady state pulsating flow as well as accelerating pulsating flow, commonly encountered during steady state and dynamic engine operation respectively, were investigated by installing an orifice on the exhaust side of a naturally aspirated diesel engine, while making reference flow measurements with a Laminar Flow Element on the intake side. ‘Snap Throttle’ tests were performed to accelerate the flow on the exhaust side with a sudden increase in exhaust gas temperature and accompanying decrease in density.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Christopher Chadwell, Terrence Alger, Jacob Zuehl, Raphael Gukelberger
Abstract Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) converted a 2012 Buick Regal GS to use an engine with Dedicated EGR™ (D-EGR™). D-EGR is an engine concept that uses fuel reforming and high levels of recirculated exhaust gas (EGR) to achieve very high levels of thermal efficiency [1]. To accomplish reformation of the gasoline in a cost-effective, energy efficient manner, a dedicated cylinder is used for both the production of EGR and reformate. By operating the engine in this manner, many of the sources of losses from traditional reforming technology are eliminated and the engine can take full advantage of the benefits of reformate. The engine in the vehicle was modified to add the following components: the dedicated EGR loop, an additional injector for delivering extra fuel for reformation, a modified boost system that included a supercharger, high energy dual coil offset (DCO) ignition and other actuators used to enable the control of D-EGR combustion. In addition, the compression ratio of the engine was increased to 11.7:1 to take advantage of the improved knock resistance from reformate and EGR.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Quan Liu, Alasdair Cairns, Hua Zhao, Mohammadreza Anbari Attar, Luke Cruff, Hugh Blaxill
Abstract The work was concerned with visualisation of the charge homogeneity and cyclic variations within the planar fuel field near the spark plug in an optical spark ignition engine fitted with an outwardly opening central direct fuel injector. Specifically, the project examined the effects of fuel type and injection settings, with the overall view to understanding some of the key mechanisms previously identified as leading to particulate formation in such engines. The three fuels studied included a baseline iso-octane, which was directly compared to two gasoline fuels containing 10% and 85% volume of ethanol respectively. The engine was a bespoke single cylinder with Bowditch style optical access through a flat piston crown. Charge stratification was studied over a wide spectrum of injection timings using the Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) technique, with additional variation in charge temperature due to injection also estimated when viable using a two-line PLIF approach. Overall, both gasoline-ethanol fuels generally exhibited a higher degree of stratification, albeit at least partly alleviated with elevated rail pressures.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Andrew Lewis, Sam Akehurst, James Turner, Rishin Patel, Andrew Popplewell
Increasingly stringent regulations and rising fuel costs require that automotive manufacturers reduce their fleet CO2 emissions. Gasoline engine downsizing is one such technology at the forefront of improvements in fuel economy. As engine downsizing becomes more aggressive, normal engine operating points are moving into higher load regions, typically requiring over-fuelling to maintain exhaust gas temperatures within component protection limits and retarded ignition timings in order to mitigate knock and pre-ignition events. These two mechanisms are counterproductive, since the retarded ignition timing delays combustion, in turn raising exhaust gas temperature. A key process being used to inhibit the occurrence of these knock and pre-ignition phenomena is cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Cooled EGR lowers temperatures during the combustion process, reducing the possibility of knock, and can thus reduce or eliminate the need for over-fuelling. It has also been shown to reduce exhaust gas temperature and improve combustion efficiency through improved combustion phasing.
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