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2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0063
Marc Cyrill Besch, April Nicole Covington, Derek Johnson, Nathan Fowler, Robert Heltzel
The aim of this investigation was to improve understanding and quantify the impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) as an emissions control measure onto cyclic variability of a small-bore, single-cylinder, diesel-fueled compression-ignition (CI) power generation unit. Of special interest were how cycle-to-cycle variations of the CI engine affect steady-state voltage deviations and frequency bandwidths. Furthermore, the study strived to elucidate the impact of EGR addition onto combustion parameters, as well as gaseous and particle phase emissions along with fuel consumption. The power generation unit was operated over five discrete steady-state test modes, representative of nominal 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% engine load (i.e. 0-484kPa BMEP), by absorbing electrical power via a resistive load bank. The engine was equipped with a passive EGR system that directly connected the exhaust and intake runners through a 4mm diameter passage.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0009
Yuki Takamura, Takahiro Shima, Hirotaka Suzuki, Keito Agui, Akira Iijima, Hideo Shoji
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion has attracted widespread interest as a combustion system that offers the advantages of high efficiency and low exhaust emissions. However, it is difficult to control the ignition timing in an HCCI combustion system owing to the lack of a physical means of initiating ignition like the spark plug in a gasoline engine or fuel injection in a diesel engine. Moreover, because the mixture ignites simultaneously at multiple locations in the cylinder, it produces an enormous amount of heat in a short period of time, which causes greater engine noise, abnormal combustion and other problems in the high load region. The purpose of this study was to expand the region of stable HCCI engine operation by finding a solution to these issues of HCCI combustion.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0012
Zhimin Lin, Kotaro Takeda, Yuki Yoshida, Akira Iijima, Hideo Shoji
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion have attracted much attention as a high efficiency and clean combustion system. However, it is difficult to control the ignition timing because there are no a physical means of ignition. In addition, it is difficult to expand the operating range due to the occurrence of misfiring at low loads and the occurrence of rapid combustion (HCCI knocking) accompanied by in-cylinder pressure oscillations at high loads. Therefore, it is important to reduce the pressure oscillations of HCCI combustion knocking for expanding the operating range to the high load region. This study focused on the rapid combustion in HCCI. A primary reference fuel (0 RON) was used as the test fuel. The influence of external exhaust gas recirculation (cooled EGR) on HCCI knocking was investigated. HCCI combustion flame behavior with pressure oscillations were visualized by using a two-stroke engine that allowed visualization of the entire bore area.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0068
Joel Prince Lobo, James Howard Lee, Eric Oswald, Spenser Lionetti, Robert Garrick
The performance and exhaust emissions of a commercially available, propane fueled, air cooled engine with Electronic Fuel Injection (EFI) were investigated by varying relative Air to Fuel Ratio (λ), spark timing, and Compression Ratio (CR). Varying λ and spark timing was accomplished by modifying the EFI system using TechniCAL Industries’ engine development software. The CR was varied through using pistons with different bowl sizes. Strong relationships were recorded between λ and spark timing and the resulting effect these parameters have on engine performance and emissions. Lean operation (λ > 1) has the potential to significantly reduce NOx production (3,000 PPM down to 300 PPM). Unfortunately, it also reduces engine performance by up to an order of magnitude (31 Nm down to 3 Nm).
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0069
Indranil Brahma, Cristobal Manzanares, Rob Jennings, Odinmma Ofili, Matthew Campbell, Abishek Raghavan, Daniel Johnson, Peter Stryker
Non-volatile particle number distributions from a single cylinder industrial diesel engine were measured at several operating conditions spanning the torque curve. The effect of increasing the air-fuel ratio by injecting compressed shop air at various boost pressures was also investigated. A bi-modal distribution separated at approximately 20 nm was observed for most operating conditions. Depending on operating condition, the engine produced between 1014 to 1015 particles per kW-hr. Energy specific particle number emissions (per kW-hr) were seen to be strongly dependent on speed and load. Minimum emissions occurred at intermediate speeds and loads. Particles below 20 nm increased with increasing air-fuel ratio, while the opposite trend was observed for particles greater than 20 nm. Variation in total particle surface and total particle volume followed the same trends as the particles from the larger mode.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0075
Srikanth Setlur, Satish Vemuri, Chithambaram Subramoniam, Rahul Sharma
The effect of ethanol blended gasoline fuels on Vehicular mass emissions was investigated on a spark ignited single cylinder Closed Loop fuel injected vehicle complying Euro III emission norms. Fuels blended with 10(E10) & 20(E10) percentage by volume of ethanol were taken up to study their effect on vehicular mass emissions on World Harmonized Motorcycle Test Cycle (WMTC) without any modification to the vehicle. The cycle is a simulation of real world driving conditions. In WMTC Cycle, maximum CO emissions were obtained with E10 fuel which showed an increase of 13%. THC emissions decreased by 10% and NOx emissions remained the same when the ethanol blend increases. Fuel economy decreases by 5% with use of E20 on the cycle.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0076
Rahul Sharma, Srikanth Setlur, Satish Vemuri, Chithambaram Subramoniam
The effect of ethanol blended gasoline fuels on vehicle emissions was investigated in a spark ignited single cylinder carbureted vehicle meeting Bharat Stage III (BS III) emission norms. The effect of fuel blended with 10(E10) & 20(E20) percentage by volume of ethanol; was studied on vehicular mass emissions on World Harmonized Motorcycle Test Cycle (WMTC) as well as on Indian drive cycle (IDC) without any modifications on the vehicle. These cycles are simulation of real world driving conditions. The addition of ethanol to gasoline fuel enhances the octane number of the blended fuels and increases leaning effect. It has been observed on IDC that addition of ethanol reduces CO up to 41%, THC emissions decreases by 9% and NOx reduces up to 12%. In WMTC Cycle, the CO reduces up to 32%, THC emission increases by 30%. NOx emissions on WMTC cycle decrease with the use of E10 by 6% while increase with the use of E20 by 7%.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0055
Carlos Alberto Romero, Luz Adriana Mejia, Yamid Carranza
A Design of experiments methodology was carried out to investigate the effects of compression ratio, cylinder head material, and fuel composition on the engine speed, fuel consumption, warm-up time, and emissions of a carbureted single cylinder air-cooled spark ignited engine. The work presented here is aimed at finding out the sensitivity of engine responses, as well as the optimal combination among the aforementioned parameters. To accomplish this task two cylinder heads, one made of aluminum and the second one of cast iron, were manufactured; an antechamber-type adapter for the spark plug to modify the combustion chamber volume was used, and two ethanol/gasoline blends containing 10 and 20 volume percent ethanol were prepared. Engine performance was evaluated based on the changes in engine speed at idle conditions. Regarding the exhaust gas emissions, the concentrations of CO2, CO, and HC were recorded.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0072
Fino Scholl, Paul Gerisch, Denis Neher, Maurice Kettner, Thorsten Langhorst, Thomas Koch, Markus Klaissle
One promising alternative for meeting stringent NOx limits while attaining high engine efficiency in lean-burn operation are NOx storage catalysts (NSC), an established technology in passenger car aftertreatment systems. For this reason, a NSC system for a stationary single-cylinder CHP gas engine with a rated electric power of 5.5 kW comprising series automotive parts was developed. Main aim of the work presented in this paper was maximising NOx conversion performance and determining the overall potential of NSC aftertreatment with regard to min-NOx operation. The experiments showed that both NOx storage and reduction are highly sensitive to exhaust gas temperature and purge time. While NOx adsorption rate peaks at a NSC inlet temperature of around 290 °C, higher temperatures are beneficial for a fast desorption during the regeneration phase. Combining a relatively large catalyst (1.9 l) with a small exhaust gas mass flow leads to a low space velocity inside the NSC.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0071
Koji Ueno, Hiroyuki Horimura, Akiko Iwasa, Yuji Kurasawa, Pascaline Tran, Ye Liu
Motorcycles are one of the major modes of transportation globally, and further expansion of motorcycle demand and usage is expected to continue because of population growth and individual income increase, in particular in emerging countries. At the same time, approach to critical environmental issues, such as escalation of air pollution, becomes more important challenge and this trend accelerates tightening of motorcycle emission regulation globally. In accordance with this, responding to social needs and minimizing the impact on air pollution while enhancing features of motorcycles, such as drive performance, convenience, and price attractiveness are our mission as a manufacture. Platinum group metals (PGMs) such as platinum, palladium and rhodium are commonly used for automotive and motorcycle catalysts. One of catalyst researchers’ dream is ultimately to develop catalyst without using such PGMs that are precious and costly resources.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0093
Denis Neher, Fino Scholl, Maurice Kettner, Danny Schwarz, Markus Klaissle, Blanca Giménez Olavarria
Combustion temperature represents the driving parameter for NOx emissions. Lean burn operation allows engines to reduce combustion temperature due to relatively high heat capacity of the excess air. Lean operating cogeneration engines, however, need additionally to retard ignition timing to meet NOx emission standards. The late combustion phasing leads to a further deviation from the ideal Otto cycle, causing losses in engine efficiency. When substituting a part of the excess air with exhaust gas, heat capacity increases. Combustion phasing can be advanced, resulting in a thermodynamically more favourable heat release. As a result, engine efficiency improves without increasing NOx emissions. In this work, the effect of replacing a part of excess air with exhaust gas was investigated first in a constant volume combustion chamber. It enabled to analyse the influence of the exhaust gas under steady initial conditions for several relative air-fuel ratios (λ = 1.3…1.7).
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0065
Yoshinori Nakao, Yota Sakurai, Atsushi Hisano, Masahito Saitou, Masahide Kazari, Takahito Murase, Kozo Suzuki
Euro5 is a new regulation on exhaust gases from motorcycles and will be implemented in 2020. Total Hydrocarbon (THC) is among the regulated exhaust gases. This paper is focused on the emission behavior of THC. In the transient state at engine start, port injection from the upstream makes it difficult to control the amount of cylinder fuel supply for each cycle. This is one of the main reasons for THC emission. In this study, changing the fuel injection specifications could lead to THC emission reduction. The THC emission behavior was investigated. A change in the position of injection from upstream to downstream could determine the amount of the cylinder fuel supply at the engine start. This change could eliminate misfire, thereby reducing THC emission. However, the diameters of the sprayed particles that flow directly into the cylinders are large. Hence, only changing the injection position to downstream could have a negative effect at engine start.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0067
Akira Miyamoto, Kenji Inaba, Yukie Ishizawa, Manami Sato, Rei Komuro, Masashi Sato, Ryo Sato, Patrick Bonnaud, Ryuji Miura, Ai Suzuki, Naoto Miyamoto, Nozomu Hatakeyama, Masanori Hariyama
On the basis of extensive experimental works about heterogeneous catalysts, the authors have tried to develop a variety of software for the design of automotive catalysts such as ultra-accelerated quantum molecular dynamics (UA-QCMD) which is 10,000,000 times faster than the conventional first principles molecular dynamics(1-3), mesoscopic modeling software for supported catalysts(POCO2), and mesoscopic sintering simulator SINTA(4,5) to calculate sintering behavior of both precious metal such as Pt, Pd, Rh and support such as Al2O3, ZrO2, CeO2, or CeO2-ZrO2 We also have integrated these softwares to develop multiscale, multiphysics simulator for the design of automotive catalysts. The method was confirmed to be effective for a variety of important catalytic reactions in the automotive emission control.
2016-11-08
Journal Article
2016-32-0070
Toyofumi Tsuda, Kazuya Miura, Akio Hikasa, Keiji Hosoi, Fumikazu Kimata
Automotive catalyst has to have good durability, i.e. has to keep sufficient catalytic performance even after thermal degradation, therefore large amounts of PGMs such as Pt, Pd, and Rh, should be loaded on the catalyst substrate. Exhaust gas heat deteriorates catalyst due to sintering of the PGM particles and decrease of the active surface area. It is important to reduce PGM load, therefore many researchers have investigated to satisfy both PGM  load reduction and enough durability by using metal / support interactions, or controlling the nano-structure of metal particles. We found that Pt ions form platinum-hydrate cluster in hexahydroxyplatinate(IV) (Pt(OH)6・H2O) nitric acid solution, and the Pt-hydrate cluster size can be controlled by Pt and nitric acid concentration, and solution temperature.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2326
Ahmad Khalfan, Gordon Andrews, Hu Li
The tailpipe exhaust emissions were measured under real world urban driving conditions by using a EURO4 emissions compliant SI car equipped with an on-board heated FTIR, a differential GPS for velocity, altitude and position, thermal couples for temperatures, and a MAX fuel meter for transient fuel consumption. Emissions species were measured at 0.5 Hz. The tests were designed to enable the engine fully warmed up journeys to occur into congested traffic, typical of the people situation living alongside congested roads in a large city. Journeys at various times of the day were conducted to investigate traffic conditions impacts such as traffic and pedestrian lights, grade and turning on emissions, engine thermal efficiency and fuel consumption. Four most congested journeys conducted at rush hours and four least congested journeys conducted at free flow periods were selected for comparison.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2329
Pooyan Kheirkhah, Patrick Kirchen, Steven Rogak
Soot emissions from direct-injection engines are highly sensitive to the fuel-air mixing process, and may vary between combustion cycles due to turbulence and injector instability. Conventional exhaust emissions measurements cannot resolve inter- or intra-cycle variations in particle emissions, which can be important during transient engine operations where a few cycles can disproportionately affect the total exhaust soot. The Fast Exhaust Nephelometer (FEN) is introduced here to use light scattering to measure particulate matter concentration and size near the exhaust port of an engine with a time resolution of 0.1 millisecond. The FEN operates at atmospheric pressure, sampling near the engine exhaust port and uses a laser diode to illuminate a small measurement volume. The scattered light is focused on two amplified photodiodes, sampled synchronous with engine crankshaft encoder.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2321
Zahra Nazarpoor, Steve Golden, Maxime Launois, Sen Kitazumi, Dianyong Xie, Campbell McConnell
Abstract Stricter regulatory standards are continuously adopted worldwide to control heavy duty emissions, and at the same time, fuel economy requirements have significantly lowered exhaust temperatures. The net result is a significant increase in Precious Group Metal (PGM) usage with current Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) technology. Therefore, the design and development of synergized precious metal (SPGM) in which ultra-low PGM is synergized with mixed metal oxide (MMO) to achieve highly beneficial emission performance improvement, is necessary. The presence of MMO in SPGM is responsible for NO oxidation to NO2 which is critical for the passive regeneration of the downstream filter and SCR function. This paper presents an initial study outlining the development of MMOs for application in modern DOCs and addresses some specific challenges underlying this application. Lab and flow reactor data in this study demonstrated SPGM DOCs thermal resistance and sulfur poisoning resistance.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2354
Aaron J. Conde, Louis-Philippe Gagne, Martha Christenson, Ian Whittal
Six vehicles were tested on a chassis dynamometer in order to characterize the differences in vehicle performance between vehicles equipped with various AWD powertrains and their 2WD counterparts. Three pairs of vehicle models from three separate vehicle manufacturers were chosen. The first two vehicle models are AWD vehicles that are equipped with a differential split that can deliver power the rear axle, when needed. The third vehicle employs an axle disconnect system which completely disconnects the rear axle, allowing the vehicles to operate in 2WD. 2WD vehicles were tested on a single-axle dynamometer and the AWD vehicles were tested on a double-axle dynamometer. Each vehicle was tested on four different drive cycles (FTP-75, HWFCT, US06, Cold FTP) as well as the SC03 drive cycle, when available. Vehicle emissions were measured for all cycles including CO, CO2, NOX, THC, and TPM.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2212
Peter Larsson, Will Lennard, Jessica Dahlstrom, Oivind Andersson, Per Tunestal
Abstract Yearly 3.3 million premature deaths occur worldwide due to air pollution and NOx pollution counts for nearly one seventh of those [1]. This makes exhaust after-treatment a very important research and has caused the permitted emission levels for NOx to decrease to very low levels, for EURO 6 only 0.4 g/kWh. Recently new legislation on ammonia slip with a limit of 10 ppm NH3 has been added [2], which makes the SCR-technology more challenging. This technology injects small droplets of an aqueous Urea solution into the stream of exhaust gases and through a catalytic reaction within the SCR-catalyst, NOx is converted into Nitrogen and Water. To enable the catalytic reaction the water content in the Urea solution needs to be evaporated and the ammonia molecules need to have sufficient time to mix with the gases prior to the catalyst.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2211
Peter Larsson, Will Lennard, Oivind Andersson, Per Tunestal
Abstract Increased research is being driven by the automotive industry facing challenges, requiring to comply with both current and future emissions legislation, and to lower the fuel consumption. The reason for this legislation is to restrict the harmful pollution which every year causes 3.3 million premature deaths worldwide [1]. One factor that causes this pollution is NOx emissions. NOx emission legislation has been reduced from 8 g/kWh (Euro I) down to 0.4 g/kWh (Euro VI) and recently new legislation for ammonia slip which increase the challenge of exhaust aftertreatment with a SCR system. In order to achieve a good NOx conversion together with a low slip of ammonia, small droplets of Urea solution needs to be injected which can be rapidly evaporated and mixed into the flow of exhaust gases.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2215
Hubertus Ulmer, Ansgar Heilig, Simon Bensch, Timo Schulteis, Jan-Kirsten Grathwol, Felix Gollmer, Christian Hofrath, Matthias Rühl
Abstract This paper focuses on the hydraulic losses of the low-pressure diesel fuel path and the impact of these losses on the fuel consumption and therefore CO2 emissions of internal combustion engines. In this context, a 1D (one-dimensional) simulation model with implemented fluid flow physics was developed. A 3D CFD model for considering complex geometries of several fuel path components further enhances the 1D approach. Experimental data from a test bench, carrying the complete fuel pressure system, were used for validations and continuous developments of the simulation models. The results show a substantial potential of the low-pressure system regarding a reduction of CO2 emissions, depending on the control strategy of the electric fuel pump and the geometrical properties of the fuel pipes and couplings. Within the New European Driving Cycle, a potential of up to 1.1 g CO2/km was observed.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2231
Aras Mirfendreski, Andreas Schmid, Michael Grill, Michael Bargende
Abstract Longitudinal models are used to evaluate different vehicle-engine concepts with respect to driving behavior and emissions. The engine is generally map-based. An explicit calculation of both fluid dynamics inside the engine air path and cylinder combustion is not considered due to long computing times. Particularly for dynamic certification cycles (WLTC, US06 etc.), dynamic engine effects severely influence the quality of results. Hence, an evaluation of transient engine behavior with map-based engine models is restricted to a certain extent. The coupling of detailed 1D-engine models is an alternative, which rapidly increases the model computation time to approximately 300 times higher than that of real time. In many technical areas, the Fourier transformation (FT) method is applied, which makes it possible to represent superimposed oscillations by their sinusoidal harmonic oscillations of different orders.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2282
Toru Uenishi, Eijiro Tanaka, Takao Fukuma, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Experimental and numerical studies were conducted on diesel particulate filter (DPF) under different Particulate Matter (PM) loading and DPF regeneration conditions.Pressure losses across DPF loaded with PM having different mean particle diameters and regenerated with introducing hot gas created in Diesel Oxidation Catalyst(DOC)with oxidized hydrocarbon injected by fuel injector place on exhaust gas pipe were measured by introducing exhaust gases from a 2.2 liter inline four- cylinder, TCI diesel engine designed for use in passenger cars.Pressure drops across DPF loaded with PM having larger mean particle diameters expressed smaller than smaller mean particle diameters in PM loading phase.Meanwhile, the combustion amount and the decrease of pressure losses across DPF loaded with PM having larger mean particle diameters expressed smaller than smaller mean particle diameters in DPF regeneration phase.A mechanistic hypothesis was then proposed to explain the observed trends,accounting for the effects of the soot loading regime in the wall and the soot cake layer on the pressure drop.This hypothesis was used to guide the development and validation of a numerical model for predicting the pressure drop in the DPF.The relationship between the permeability and the porosity of the wall and soot cake layer was modeled under various soot loading conditions.The percolation coefficient at which the soot filtering regime changed from wall trapping to cake layer trapping was also determined by considering the filtering efficiency.The activation energy and exponential factor in the reaction rate constant was calibrated by each the mean diameter of secondary soot particles.The model was validated by comparing its output to the results of experimental test cell studies and used to analyze transport phenomena in particular filters.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2249
Akash Gangwar, Abhinav Bhardawaj, Ramesh Singh, Naveen Kumar
Abstract Enhancement of combustion behavior of conventional liquid fuel using nanoscale materials of different properties is an imaginative and futuristic topic. This experiment is aimed to evaluate the performance and emission characteristics of a diesel engine when lade with nanoparticles of Cu-Zn alloy. The previous work reported the effect of metal/metal oxide or heterogeneous mixture of two or more particles; less work had been taken to analyze the homogeneous mixture of metals. This paper includes fuel properties such as density, kinematic viscosity, calorific value and performance measures like brake thermal efficiency (BTE), brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and emission analysis of NOX, CO, CO2, HC. For the same solid concentration, nano-fuel is compared with base fuel at different engine loads; and its effect when lade at different concentrations.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2256
Kristin Götz, Barbara Fey, Anja Singer, Juergen Krahl, Jürgen Bünger, Markus Knorr, Olaf Schröder
Abstract The target of the European Union (EU) from the 1990s has been to reduce the level of greenhouse gas (GHG) in the climate by 40 % by 2030 [1]. Currently the transport sector is one of the biggest greenhouse gas emission producer in the EU [2]. Drop-in biofuels can contribute to the reduction of GHG emissions in the transport sector. Diesel R33, a newly developed biofuel enables sustainable mobility fulfilling the European diesel fuel specification and reduces the GHG emissions by about 18.2 % against fossil diesel fuel. Diesel R33 is made of 7 % used cooking oil methyl ester, 26 % hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) and 67 % high quality diesel fuel. HVO was produced from rapeseed and palm oil. This new biofuel was tested in a fleet of 280 vehicles (passenger cars, light duty vehicles, off-road vehicles and urban buses) covering all emission classes. The impact of the new fuel on the vehicles, their emissions and the engine oil aging was investigated.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2265
Ashraya Gupta, Dhruv Gupta, Naveen Kumar
Abstract The diesel engine has for many decades now assumed a leading role in both the medium and medium-large transport sector due to their high efficiency and ability to produce high torque at low RPM. Furthermore, energy diversification and petroleum independence are also required by each country. In response to this, biodiesel is being considered as a promising solution due to its high calorific value and lubricity conventional petroleum diesel. However, commercial use of biodiesel has been limited because of some drawbacks including corrosivity, instability of fuel properties, higher viscosity, etc. Biodiesel are known for lower CO, HC and PM emissions. But, on the flip side they produce higher NOx emissions. The addition of alcohol to biodiesel diesel blend can help in reducing high NOx produced by the biodiesel while improving some physical fuel properties.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2284
Yuan Wen, Yinhui Wang, Chenling Fu, Wei Deng, Zhangsong Zhan, Yuhang Tang, Xuefei Li, Haichun Ding, Shijin Shuai
Abstract Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines have developed rapidly in recent years driven by fuel efficiency and consumption requirements, but face challenges such as injector deposits and particulate emissions compared to Port Fuel Injection (PFI) engines. While the mechanisms of GDI injector deposits formation and that of particulate emissions have been respectively revealed well, the impact of GDI injector deposits and their relation to particulate emissions have not yet been understood very well through systematic approach to investigate vehicle emissions together with injector spray analysis. In this paper, an experimental study was conducted on a GDI vehicle produced by a Chinese Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) and an optical spray test bench to determine the impact of injector deposits on spray and particulate emissions.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2283
Stephane Zinola, Stephane Raux, Mickael Leblanc
Abstract The more and more stringent regulations on particle emissions at the vehicle tailpipe have led the car manufacturers to adopt suitable emissions control systems, like particulate filters with average filtration efficiency that can exceed 99%, including particulate mass (PM) and number (PN). However, there are still some specific operating conditions that could exhibit noticeable particle number emissions. This paper aims to identify and characterize these persistent sources of PN emissions, based on tests carried out both at the engine test bench and at the chassis dynamometer, and both for Diesel and Gasoline direct injection engines and vehicles. For Diesel engines, highest particle numbers were observed downstream of the catalyzed DPF during some operation conditions like engine warm up or filter regeneration phases.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2165
Kazuya Miyashita, Takamichi Tsukamoto, Yusei Fukuda, Katsufumi Kondo, Tetsuya Aizawa
Abstract For better understanding, model development and its validation of in-cylinder soot formation processes of Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) engines, visualization of piston surface fuel wetting, vaporization and soot formation processes of in-cylinder pool fire via high-speed UV (266nm) and visible (445nm) laser shadowgraphy was attempted in an optically accessible Rapid Compression and Expansion Machine (RCEM). A direct-injection, spark-ignition and single-shot combustion event was achieved in the RCEM under engine-equivalent, simplified and well-defined conditions operated with engine speed 600 rpm, compression ratio 9.0, equivalence ratio 0.9 and natural aspiration. The tested fuel was composed of 70% iso-octane and 30% toluene by volume and the UV absorption by toluene enabled visualization of the in-cylinder fuel distribution.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2174
Reza Golzari, Yuanping Li, Hua Zhao
Abstract As the emission regulations for internal combustion engines are becoming increasingly stringent, different solutions have been researched and developed, such as dual injection systems (combined port and direct fuel injection), split injection strategies (single and multiple direct fuel injection) and different intake air devices to generate an intense in-cylinder air motion. The aim of these systems is to improve the in-cylinder mixture preparation (in terms of homogeneity and temperature) and therefore enhance the combustion, which ultimately increases thermal efficiency and fuel economy while lowering the emissions. This paper describes the effects of dual injection systems on combustion, efficiency and emissions of a downsized single cylinder gasoline direct injection spark ignited (DISI) engine. A set of experiments has been conducted with combined port fuel and late direct fuel injection strategy in order to improve the combustion process.
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