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Viewing 22021 to 22048 of 22048
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210006
A C FIELDNER, A. A STRAUB, G W JONES
The data given in this paper were obtained from an investigation by the Bureau of Mines in cooperation with the New York and New Jersey State Bridge and Tunnel Commissioners to determine the average amount and composition of the exhaust gases from motor vehicles under operating conditions similar to those that will prevail in the Hudson River Vehicular Tunnel. A comprehensive set of road tests upon 101 motor vehicles including representative types of passenger cars and trucks was conducted, covering both winter and summer operating conditions. The cars tested were taken at random from those offered by private individuals, corporations and automobile dealers, and the tests were made without any change in carbureter or other adjustments. The results can therefore be taken as representative of motor vehicles as they are actually being operated on the streets at the various speeds and on grades that will prevail in the tunnel.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200017
J G VINCENT
Some of the salient facts regarding the character of the engine fuel marketed within the past few years are shown in accompanying curves. The desirability of operating present-day experimental cars with fuel that is the equivalent of fuel that will probably be generally marketed two years hence is stated and various methods of meeting the fuel problem are then examined. A dry fuel mixture is desired to prevent spark-plug fouling, to improve engine performance in cold weather and to minimize lubricating oil contamination by fuel which passes the pistons. Various methods of obtaining a dry mixture are then discussed, leading to a detailed description of the construction and operation of a device specially designed to accomplish such a result more successfully.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200050
C B DRAKE
In view of the inestimable services in the development of standardized transportation rendered to the Army by the Society of Automotive Engineers, particularly during the war, the author believes it important that the Society be acquainted with the intentions and policies of the War Department regarding the engineering development of motor transportation from the viewpoint of the problems and needs of the American Army. The fundamentals of the policies on motor transportation of February, 1919, as approved by the Chief of Staff, are stated and the subsequent changes discussed in some detail. Standardization of chassis as favored by the Army receives specific and lengthy consideration and the Government standardized trucks are commented upon. The standardization of body design and parts specifications are discussed in some detail. It is the policy of the Motor Transport Corps to maintain a thoroughly adequate and efficient engineering branch, which is now operative.
1919-01-01
Technical Paper
190009
J G UTZ
THE United States was practically unprepared in the field of military motor-transport at the beginning of the war. Due largely to the cooperation of the Society of Automotive Engineers and its members individually, this handicap was overcome and a position stronger in this respect than that of any of the other belligerents was attained. The early efforts and the cooperation between the Society and the various Government departments are described, especially with reference to the Quartermaster Corps which at that time had charge of all motor transportation. Regarding the Class B truck, it is shown that the Society acted as a point of contact between the various members of the industry and the War Department and, although not fostering any program or plan of its own, it was largely responsible for the success of the standardization program conceived and carried out by the Army.
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180048
EDWARD ORTON
1918-01-01
Technical Paper
180031
CHARLES M MANLY
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170008
F. G. DIFFIN
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170017
J. B. REPLOGLE
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170036
GEORGE T. STRITE
1917-01-01
Technical Paper
170030
HENRY R. SUTPHEN
The author outlines the history of the 550 submarine chasers built for the British Government between April, 1915, and November, 1916, and attributes the success of the undertaking largely to scientific standardization. He cites some of the early difficulties in obtaining supplies and tells how they were met, and mentions how and why the fabrication was carried out in this country and the assembly made in Canada. The paper concludes with citation of the principal dimensions of the boats, power, speed and cruising radius. In the course of the discussion the author refers further to the power plant and mentions some of the war-time duties of this type of craft.
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150049
KARL W. ZIMMERSCHIED
1915-01-01
Technical Paper
150050
W. P. CUTTER
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140036
H. E. HARRIS
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140029
E. R. HALL
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140028
E. R. HALL
1914-01-01
Technical Paper
140030
C. C. CARLTON
1913-01-01
Technical Paper
130001
GEORGE W. DUNHAM
1912-01-01
Technical Paper
120002
1911-01-01
Technical Paper
110015
W. P. KENNEDY
1910-01-01
Technical Paper
100010
D. F. GRAHAM
1910-01-01
Technical Paper
100018
F. E. WATTS
1910-01-01
Technical Paper
100013
H. S. WHITE
1910-01-01
Technical Paper
100015
F. D. HOWE
1909-01-01
Technical Paper
090006
S. P. WETHERILL
Viewing 22021 to 22048 of 22048