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Viewing 21931 to 21960 of 22030
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410024
C. E. Stryker
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410133
S. M. CADWELL, R. A. MERRILL, C. M. SLOMAN, F. L. YOST
STATIC fatigue of rubber is defined by the authors as a progressive breakdown under the influence of a static load, whereas dynamic fatigue is defined as the progressive loss of strength due to successive cycles of stress. The static fatigue life is the time required for rupture under a static load. Test data presented on the tension static fatigue of rubber indicate that the static fatigue lives of the samples are functions of the stresses acting on them; that the static fatigue lives fall off rapidly with increasing stresses; and that the dependents of static fatigue life on the stress is a function of the stock, among other things. Curves of reduction of tensile due to static fatigue show that the tensiles of samples under load actually decrease and that the decrease is greater, the greater the time under load.
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400093
R. F. Gagg
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400071
Martin B. Chittick
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400104
Arthur Nutt
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400052
E. E. MacMorland
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390015
Walter C. Thee
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390113
Henry Gibbins
The views expressed in this discussion are those of the speaker and do not represent necessarily the views of the War Department.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390061
J. F. Winchester, J. J. Powelson
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390154
Austin M. Wolf
THE introduction of the oil filter into the lubricating system of internal-combustion engines marked a distinct advancement, Mr. Wolf states. However, he adds, due to the varying combination of working conditions, the operator who dreams that all lubrication problems are eliminated by the use of oil filters is due for a rude awakening. He continues to remark that any valuable tool can be abused if full cognizance is not taken of its possible shortcomings, and he enumerates those of the filter to form a basis of a true appraisal of its intrinsic worth. Mr. Wolf notes that conflicting opinions are heard regarding filters due to the widely different circumstances under which identical equipment is operated. In stop-and-start operations, light delivery trucks and some passenger cars never have the engine warm enough in extremely cold weather to permit functioning of the filter, he points out.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380025
M. C. Horine
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380164
Pierre Schon
IN the first part of this paper, read at the March 3, 1938, meeting of the Baltimore Section of the Society, the author discussed the advantages of cab-over-engine trucks as compared with the engine-under-the-hood type, covering much of the same ground included in his earlier paper: “Cab-Over-Engine Trucks-Their Place in Transportation,” published on pages 421-427 of the September, 1937, S.A.E. TRANSACTIONS. At Baltimore Mr. Schon also traced the evolution of transportation by depicting examples of various forms of transportation at different stages in their development; portrayed the progress in allied industries; evaluated the uncontrollable expense increases from greater regulation, higher taxes, and increased pay-rolls; and touched upon dangerous practices and maintenance methods. In the remainder of the Baltimore Section paper, which follows in full, Mr. Schon interprets the trend of commercial-vehicle regulation in the various States, aided by tables showing 1937 changes.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380127
J. G. Moxey
ALTHOUGH dealing with a subject of unlimited breadth, this paper touches on the primary guides for an operating engineer in the purchase of automotive equipment from a practical standpoint, treating only lightly the operating phase of the subject. Torques, engine displacements, ability factors, gross vehicle weights, and recommended practices, together with their relative relationship one to another, are discussed in detail, and also are shown in chart form as a ready guide for a prospective purchaser. The economical fields of operation of four-wheel trucks, six-wheel trucks, and tractor semi-trailers, together with basic operating costs, acting as a further purchasing as well as operating guide, are brought out, the general conclusion being that each type of transportation under discussion has a definite economic field of operation and should be held definitely in its respective field as indicated advisable by operating surveys.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380110
M. J. Zucrow
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380113
M. J. Zucrow
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380102
T. C. Howe
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380099
A. T. Colwell
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380080
Murray Aitken
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380075
C. M. Larson
The engine deposits withwhich operators are concerned have their source in what is commonly called sludge. Sludge is composed of carbonaceous matter (either from blow-by or from high-temperature cracking); asphaltenes (oxidized oil products); ash (mostly lead oxide and iron bromide where gasoline is used, metals from wear and corrosion and dust from the air); and moisture from condensation. All these component parts of sludge vary greatly depending on engine design, operating conditions, fuel and lubricant used. The whole engine ina sense is a centrifuge and throws this variable called sludge to various parts of the engine. The dead spots collect most with the hottest portions covered with a brittle flint-like carbon or lacquer. In high output engines run for extended periods of time, ring sticking limits the time of complete overhaul. It causes increased cylinder and ring wear. Contrasted to this are sludges formed under cold weather conditions.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370152
J. R. MacGregor
IT has been assumed generally that variations in humidity would not cause errors in knock rating when using the bracketing method. However, the preliminary test results presented indicate that this assumption is not valid for all fuels. Differences in knock ratings of over three octane numbers were found with certain combinations of test and reference fuels when the humidity was varied over the range normally experienced in knock testing. It was found that the influence of humidity on detonation is not primarily the result of changes in dry air pressure or oxygen concentration, but apparently depends on the nature of the fuel itself. The results presented are known to be affected somewhat by changes in engine adjustment and bouncing-pin setting. However, for certain fuels the error introduced by humidity changes is considerably greater than the normal experimental error with controlled humidity.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370139
F. L. Faulkner
THE purpose of these studies by our committee is to point out inconsistencies that exist in various weight classes, with the hope that a better-balanced vehicle will be produced so that the operator in purchasing a vehicle of a certain rating can be assured of a reasonably uniform performance, irrespective of the make of vehicle. It is obvious from a study of the 1936-37 specifications that some improvements have been made. The general rating of trucks by class is poor due to the tendency to raise the gross-vehicle-weight rating of the trucks without enlarging engines, clutches, frames, and so on. In general there is the same wide variation in specifications within each gross class of trucks this year, as existed in 1934. This paper is the fourth prepared by Mr. Faulkner at the request of the Transportation and Maintenance Activity Committee of the Society to present the results of studies made by the Subcommittee on Motor-Vehicle Design and Operation, of which Mr.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370112
Joseph A. Anglada
This paper contains a general discussion of the trends of truck construction touching upon such subjects as cab over engine, six wheel, and all wheel driven vehicles. Comments are made on various parts, such as axles, engines, etc. A comparison of English truck design as affected by legal requirements and design as affected by S.A.E. proposed standards of weight and size limitations is included.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370111
Billings Wilson
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370034
Ivan L. Shogran
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370054
Fred L. Faulkner
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370048
C. L. Wenzel
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370060
R. C. Alden, D. G. Proudfoot
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360024
A. W. Herrington
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360082
Richard C. Gazley
Viewing 21931 to 21960 of 22030