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Viewing 21931 to 21960 of 22049
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450001
J. H. Hunt
1945-01-01
Technical Paper
450035
R. V. McLaughlin, C. F. Harms
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440191
B. B. BACHMAN
THESE down-to-earth speculations by Mr. Bachman should help to clarify for all their picture of the truck of the future. Mr. Bachman considers such a detailed but important item as increasing the overall width up to the rear fender top line to 102 in. from the 96-in. Figure now adhered to in all but two states for the maximum width at any point, but keeping the width of the cab at 96 in., because in traveling along the highway, the cab actually takes up several more inches, anyway. These extra inches across the fenders would allow improvements to be made in tire mounting, spring suspension, riding qualities, stability, and braking. Other changes foreseen by Mr. Bachman include: increases in weight and horsepower, allowing for faster and more efficient transportation, especially on the first-class highways planned by the Federal government for connecting all large cities and most small ones; more comfortable cabs for the driver; and quieter operation.
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440100
B. A. ROSE
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440114
R. E. Jeffrey
ABSTRACT
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440029
Franklin T. Kurt
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440043
George A. Bleyle
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430155
R. E. JEFFREY
WHEN the Ordnance lubrication standardization program was started about two and one-half years ago, there were no standard lubricants for military vehicles; consequently, a wide variety of types and grades found their way into Army vehicles, complicating the supply problem and sometimes even resulting in the application of the wrong lubricant. There were seven types and 22 grades of lubricants for automotive equipment, not including those for special purposes. The first step was to describe, wherever possible, each type and grade of lubricant in terms of some Federal specification already in existence. The problem then resolved itself into: 1. Establishing and maintaining an efficient system of lubrication instructions for issuance to troops. 2. Reducing the number of types and grades to the minimum consistent with satisfactory performance. 3. Developing these types and grades to fit most satisfactorily the military applications involved. 4. Developing satisfactory U. S.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430143
J. O. ALMEN
IT is doubtful whether we are getting more net work from metals today in dynamically loaded parts than was obtainable 25 years ago, and no super-strength-alloy discoveries seem imminent; however, much can be done to increase the fatigue strength of many machine parts made from ordinary structural materials by merely extending processes already known to be satisfactory, and avoiding practices that reduce fatigue strength. We have today new concepts of fatigue failure: Fatigue failures result only from tension stresses, never from compressive stresses. Any surface, no matter how smoothly finished, is a stress-raiser. Structural materials are not rigid. Many fatigue failures can be traced to elastic deflection for which no allowance was made in design. From experience with practical machine parts, we can only conclude that stress calculations by textbook methods are wholly inadequate unless we generously temper our calculations with experience.
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430039
Carel T. Torresen
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430160
L. F. OVERHOLT
1943-01-01
Technical Paper
430024
L. T. Miller
1942-01-01
Technical Paper
420061
L. D. Bonham
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410111
J. L. DlLWORTH
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410106
KENNETH M. BROWN
THE necessity of being able to evaluate the degree of smoke in the diesel engine exhaust is becoming universally recognized. Various methods of measuring smoke are discussed briefly. Of these methods, the light-absorption, photo-electric cell, sampling-type smokemeter appears to be the most satisfactory. The fundamental requirement for this type of smokemeter is that it gives a true indication of smoke values. Other design requirements are listed, and a smokemeter described which appears to meet them with reasonable satisfaction. The principal departures in the design of this smokemeter from that of others of the same type are in the greater length of the measuring tube, the use of a flashlight-type bulb with reflector for a light source, and the use of a vacuum pump to draw the sample through the smokemeter. A scale for measuring smoke, “smoke density per unit length of smoke column,” is proposed, which should allow all laboratories to interpret smoke readings the same.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410115
F. E. McCLEARY, R. WUERFEL
LIMITATIONS of the two general methods available for determining hardenability in steel, the authors point out, are that the test piece may not have a sufficient cross-section in which to develop the desired series of cooling rates, and that a special test piece (known as the L-type) must be machined for steels of low hardenability. The method using the Wuerfel bomb described in their paper, they explain, is directed primarily toward removal of these two limitations. Stated in terms of the critical diameter, they report that the results of the method are reproducible within ⅛ in.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410024
C. E. Stryker
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410133
S. M. CADWELL, R. A. MERRILL, C. M. SLOMAN, F. L. YOST
STATIC fatigue of rubber is defined by the authors as a progressive breakdown under the influence of a static load, whereas dynamic fatigue is defined as the progressive loss of strength due to successive cycles of stress. The static fatigue life is the time required for rupture under a static load. Test data presented on the tension static fatigue of rubber indicate that the static fatigue lives of the samples are functions of the stresses acting on them; that the static fatigue lives fall off rapidly with increasing stresses; and that the dependents of static fatigue life on the stress is a function of the stock, among other things. Curves of reduction of tensile due to static fatigue show that the tensiles of samples under load actually decrease and that the decrease is greater, the greater the time under load.
1941-01-01
Technical Paper
410118
GUSTAF CARVELLI
STANDARDIZATION of engine components should start in the drafting room with use of a system of sample drawings, Mr. Corvelli contends, and dimensioning of parts should be simplified through use of a two-place decimal system. He emphasizes the importance of standardization of notes, clearances, tolerances, and other data listed on drawings. In addition, threaded parts, gear tooth form, and many such items can and should be standardized, and serious consideration should be given to adoption of the metric system. Since the Army-Navy (AN) Standards were developed primarily for airplanes and often do not apply to aircraft engines, he points out that a new set of standards must be developed for parts used on engines only.
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400093
R. F. Gagg
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400071
Martin B. Chittick
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400104
Arthur Nutt
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400052
E. E. MacMorland
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390015
Walter C. Thee
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390113
Henry Gibbins
The views expressed in this discussion are those of the speaker and do not represent necessarily the views of the War Department.
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390061
J. F. Winchester, J. J. Powelson
1939-01-01
Technical Paper
390154
Austin M. Wolf
THE introduction of the oil filter into the lubricating system of internal-combustion engines marked a distinct advancement, Mr. Wolf states. However, he adds, due to the varying combination of working conditions, the operator who dreams that all lubrication problems are eliminated by the use of oil filters is due for a rude awakening. He continues to remark that any valuable tool can be abused if full cognizance is not taken of its possible shortcomings, and he enumerates those of the filter to form a basis of a true appraisal of its intrinsic worth. Mr. Wolf notes that conflicting opinions are heard regarding filters due to the widely different circumstances under which identical equipment is operated. In stop-and-start operations, light delivery trucks and some passenger cars never have the engine warm enough in extremely cold weather to permit functioning of the filter, he points out.
Viewing 21931 to 21960 of 22049