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Viewing 21871 to 21900 of 21945
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370054
Fred L. Faulkner
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370112
Joseph A. Anglada
This paper contains a general discussion of the trends of truck construction touching upon such subjects as cab over engine, six wheel, and all wheel driven vehicles. Comments are made on various parts, such as axles, engines, etc. A comparison of English truck design as affected by legal requirements and design as affected by S.A.E. proposed standards of weight and size limitations is included.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370111
Billings Wilson
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360096
J. F. Winchester
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360024
A. W. Herrington
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360082
Richard C. Gazley
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360092
CHARLES H. JACOBSEN
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350017
P. R. Croll, L. E. DuBey
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350116
O. D. Treiber
THREE sizes of six-cylinder Diesel-engines for automotive service have been developed by this company and are now in production, these being interchangeable in mounting dimensions with its six-cylinder series of gasoline engines. These modern Diesels develop power which equals, or exceeds, that of a gasoline engine of corresponding displacement. Subjects treated include noise, smoke, installation, performance, power output and maintenance, together with fuel and lubricating-oil costs. A feature of these Diesels is a spherical combustion chamber located at the side of the cylinder with a spray of fuel entering at the side, below the center of the sphere but injecting across its center. Comparisons between Diesel and gasoline-engine performance in similar service are made.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350022
Arthur Nutt
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350059
H. W. McQuaid
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350085
A. J. Blackwood
STARTING, oil pumping, sludging and wear are the subjects considered specifically in connection with low operating temperatures. Tabular data and curves relating to starting are presented. Sludge is more dangerous in cold-weather operation, and the importance of selecting a quality non-sludging oil is emphasized. Tests to determine the causes of sludging are described, and the five conclusions reached are stated. The indications that wear is due to corrosion, rather than to removal of lubricant from cylinder walls, are analyzed. With regard to kerosene and Diesel engines, the author states that it seems reasonable to believe that the effect of operating temperatures, as such, with resultant moisture condensation, will result in at least equal relative wear to that which obtains in the gasoline engine. In conclusion, seven general rules are stated whereby the utmost satisfaction may be obtained during operation at low temperatures.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350092
Alan Ferrier
THE author describes the conditions of aircraft operation in Canada during the winter and after outlining the laborious technique pursued for several years emphasizes the need for improvement in lubrication and starting technique in order that commercial undertakings may make full use of the short northern day. Elimination of cold weather lubrication difficulties is based on the proposition that oil temperature is in itself immaterial and that its only real importance is the effect on viscosity which is regarded as a state rather than as a property. In consequence a variation of oil grade and a premeditated variation of oil operating temperature under adequate control is advanced as the solution and the results of two years practical trial are offered as proof. A brief specification of a desirable oil system is given, together with a forecast of possible developments in the near future to deal with existing lubricants.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350090
Fred L. Faulkner
Summary THE Subcommittee on Motor-Vehicle Design from the operation and maintenance standpoint was instructed to continue its studies and prepare a short summary for the 1935 Annual Meeting. In discussing the possible subject matter with the Committee, so many phases of this subject were questioned that it was impossible in a short space of time to give them full consideration in time for this presentation. I have therefore limited the report to cover mainly the electrical group and the highly controversial subject of motor-truck ratings. The largest number of complaints and the most severe criticisms on the electrical group come from fleet operators in the so-called low-temperature area. Winter starting-difficulties are prevalent, not only on account of inadequate storage batteries and starting motors but inefficient generators as well. Likewise, this problem is all tied in with the much discussed problem of winter grades of crankcase lubricating oil.
1935-01-01
Technical Paper
350110
F. M. Van Deventer
THIS paper reports upon the results of a highway investigation which justifies the conclusion that carbon monoxide in exhaust gases can and does seep into the passenger compartments of moving vehicles in sufficient quantities to impair the judgment of the driver in the control of his car; analyzes the cause factors resulting in the existence of carbon monoxide within cars; and recommends a form of inspection and maintenance which will effectively reduce, if not eliminate, this hazard to public safety. Highway tests were made with the cooperation of the State police and motor-vehicle authorities in seven New England and Eastern States, several hundred cars being picked at random from State highways by the State police and examined, and between 5 and 6 per cent of the units tested were found to contain dangerous quantities of carbon monoxide in the passenger compartment. It was found that there were five forms of infiltration to account for the presence of carbon monoxide within cars.
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340022
F. R. Neely
ABSTRACT
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340030
Amos E. Northup
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340046
W. C. Thee
1934-01-01
Technical Paper
340065
MERRILL C. HORINE
1933-01-01
Technical Paper
330020
Pierre Schon
1933-01-01
Technical Paper
330040
M. C. Horine
BY their lack of uniformity and disregard of scientific and economic fact, legislative restrictions on motor-transport vehicles now in force in the states militate against efficient transportation and thus retard economic recovery. In this indirect way and in several direct ways the same situation presents problems to truck builders. Variations in state requirements necessitate undue diversity of designs, present difficult engineering problems, discourage enterprise, threaten the American system of production and penalize good engineering and sound manufacture.
1932-01-01
Technical Paper
320019
Thomas H. MacDonald, J. T. Thompson
1932-01-01
Technical Paper
320067
Pierre Schon
EXISTING legal restrictions prevent the public from deriving the utmost benefits from the progress made in transport-vehicle and highway engineering. Legislative regulation has not yet affected the design of passenger automobiles in this Country, but curtailment of usage is evident in those States where gasoline taxes have reached exorbitant levels. The design and operation of motorcoaches, trucks and trailers has been affected, and the trend of motor-vehicle legislation presents a problem that is more acute than ever before in the history of the industry. We have 49 different sets of State and District regulations, each differing in some ways from the others, most seriously as regards size and weight. If uniform regulations could be put into effect in all States, design and operating practices would be simplified and lower manufacturing and operating costs effected.
1931-01-01
Technical Paper
310022
D. B. Brooks, N. R. White, G. C. Rodgers
AFTER stating briefly the requirements that reference fuels used in determining the detonation values of test fuels should meet, the tests conducted by the Bureau of Standards to ascertain the effect that atmospheric conditions have upon the relations between the primary scale and each of a number of secondary detonation-standards are described. All tests were made with a Cooperative Fuel-Research engine having a 6:1 compression-ratio L-head. Varying the throttle opening gave the desired intensity of detonation, which was estimated by the bouncing-pin apparatus. Air-conditioning apparatus, used in previous tests, controlled the air temperature and humidity.
1930-01-01
Technical Paper
300022
ROBERT E. WILSON
IN THIS PAPER the author discusses the significance of the various tests for motor fuels, particularly in the light of extensive research work along these lines in the past few years by various industrial laboratories and the United States Bureau of Standards. A bibliography of the literature on the subject supplements the paper. Although a large part of the public still seems to assume that the principal difference to the car user between different grades of gasoline is in mileage per gallon, actually, if today's best and poorest commercial gasolines are compared, the difference in mileage is very small compared with the differences in engine-starting ability, antiknock quality, vapor-locking tendency and liability to injure the engine or the fuel-induction system.
1930-01-01
Technical Paper
300045
H. B. HEWITT
MAINTENANCE is a part of automotive production and as such is destined to adopt production standards. While passenger-car manufacturers have fostered the application of these standards to maintain a parity between factory production and maintenance, commercial-vehicle operators have established standards and methods in response to an economic demand to obtain low-cost maintenance. How this has been done in Philadelphia is the subject of the paper. Scheduling vehicles through the shop in accordance with the seasonal requirements of transportation enables a centralized shop having 120,000 sq. ft. of floor space to service a fleet of 450 motorcoaches, 1500 taxicabs and approximately 150 pieces of various utility equipment with practically no fluctuations in the working force and the minimum number of spare units. Major overhauling of motorcoaches is done in the winter months when the demand is relatively light, while the taxicabs receive attention in the summer.
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290010
E. J. HALL
THE 4¼ x 5½-in. six-cylinder motorcoach engine built by his company is used by the author as an example of the methods governing its design, the main controlling factors being that regularly recurring maintenance operations should come in groups, so that the operator can systematize his shop-work; that all units should be interchangeable; that any operation should be completed by a trained crew in a maximum time of 2 hr.; and that removal of the engine from the chassis should almost never be necessary except for work on the main bearings and for crankshaft regrinding.
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290034
DONALD B. BROOKS
SEVERAL series of tests made on two multi-cylinder engines to determine the effect of humidity on engine performance are described and the results discussed. The basis for these tests was the so-called oxygen-content hypothesis that the presence of any given volume of water vapor in the cylinder, by lessening the oxygen present, reduces the quantity of fuel that can be burned efficiently per cycle and correspondingly decreases the power output. The results obtained closely verified this hypothesis. As double interpolation is necessary in humidity tables for water-vapor pressure, the process is both laborious and conducive to errors, contour charts reducing both troubles only to a certain extent. Nomograms enabling the humidity correction to be obtained from thermometer and barometer readings were employed and are included in the paper. Instructions for using the nomograms are given and the method of their computation is reviewed briefly in an Appendix.
1929-01-01
Technical Paper
290033
ARTHUR W. GARDINER
SO-CALLED correction factors to compensate for variations in atmospheric temperature and pressure have been in practical use in connection with engine testing; but the influence of the varying amount of aqueous vapor present in the atmosphere has not had sufficient consideration. The author submits brief test-data indicative of the effect of humidity on some factors of engine performance and of the feasibility of using rational power-correction factors. By assigning due importance to the effect of humidity, he believes that a more satisfactory analysis of car and of engine performance can be obtained. Using a single-cylinder engine operated at full throttle and 1000 r.p.m. under stabilized conditions, tests were made observing maximum power, air-flow, fuel-flow, detonation and spark-advance requirements over a wide range of relative humidity for an air-intake temperature of 100 deg. fahr. Curves made from the data obtained are given and discussed.
Viewing 21871 to 21900 of 21945