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Viewing 21871 to 21900 of 22027
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500124
EDWARD C. WELLS
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490156
D. W. RENTZEL, W. E. BEALL, G. W. HALDEMAN, W. W. DAVIES, L. S. KUTER
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490187
ERNEST W. LANDEN
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490009
LEROY LUTES
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490111
H. M. TOOMEY
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490144
T. R. MILTON
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480159
L. R. KOEPNICK
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480186
Fred K. Landecker
Shotpeening - or the pelting of a metal part with fine, round shot by means of air pressure or centrifugal force - is said by the author to be beneficial to any part subject to fatigue, shock, or impact. He lists some of the automotive parts that show greatest life improvement: springs of all kinds, gears, axle shafts, crankshafts, and connecting rods.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480208
W. C. STEWART
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480219
WHEELER G. LOVELL
HIGHLIGHTS of engine data obtained on pure hydrocarbons - part of API Research Project 45 - are presented here. This summary, the author says, may indicate the degree to which specific, detailed, and extensive data are of use to those who have the responsibility of providing suitable fuels for engines. He suggests also that to the builder of engines the generalizations may be almost equally useful in indicating what kinds of fuels can at least technically exist, and what the fundamental limitations are. It may also be helpful, he reports, in indicating what kind of engines should be built to use the available fuels to best advantage.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480046
F. W. Kolk, R. W. Ayer
ABSTRACT
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480133
GAYLORD W. NEWTON
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480013
JORDAN P. JUNG, FRANK L. COERS
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480014
A. S. LEONARD
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480009
H. D. YOUNG
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480028
CECIL E. BOORD
Abstract The Project is now nearing the end of its ninth year. The present paper is in the nature of a Progress Report. API Research Project 45 operated for six years as an independent project known as American Petroleum Institute Hydrocarbon Research Project, (APIHRP). The original project included the synthesis, purification, superpurification, physical constants measurement and engine testing of pure hydrocarbons. With the advent of the World War II emphasis was laid upon products suitable for use as aircraft fuels. Interest in the work was high from the beginning. Co-operation by all parties was full and whole-hearted. The war effort placed a new emphasis upon the value of dependable physical constants and the necessity for high purity analytical standards. With this shift in emphasis, and the attendant expansion, the superpurification was transferred to APIRP-6 at the National Bureau of Standards.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480169
H. H. Cherry, A. B. Croshere
FOR preliminary design work on transport airplanes, a graphical method is outlined for determining the effect which changes in a set of chosen major design variables will have on the airplane's ability to meet a given set of specifications and regulations. Engines, propellers, and wing geometry are selected. Then for each condition laid down as a specification or regulation, a limiting curve of maximum weight allowed by the condition is plotted as a function of wing area. These curves are developed from basic data and standard equations. If it is possible to meet all the conditions, the limiting curves - when plotted together on one graph - will enclose an area on the “allowable” side of all curves.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470253
JOHN E. STEINER
A SYSTEM of plots of wing loading versus power loading is developed for showing the effect on performance, of all combinations of wing area, aspect ratio, number of engines, and power rating allowed by the Civil Air Regulations for transport planes. C.A.R. climb requirements appear on the plots as boundaries defining allowable combinations of design variables and gross weight. The charts included give a fairly detailed consideration of weight limits imposed by climb requirements for 4-engine and 2-engine airplanes. The assumptions made are explained. Useful for initial design studies and comparisons of existing designs, the charts indicate relative performance of various designs. The system can be used to study field lengths required and cruising speeds obtainable as well as climb performance.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470221
W. BAILEY OSWALD
THE new CAA requirements for transport airplanes deal with all airplane characteristics that involve safety in actual operation. Unfortunately, it appears that the effort to combine past experience with probable trends has resulted in a rather involved set of regulations. The author attempts here to resolve some of these complexities, and shows the problems involved in designing to them on a reasonable basis. He also presents his ideas on future trends in design and the regulations.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470211
E. F. GIBIAN
AN industrial engineering program for the complete control of manufacturing operations is described here. The program stresses the application of engineering methods and thinking to management's planning and control problems. Plans for establishing standards for men and machines and for developing a variable control budget are presented. Statistics, the author says, could solve many control problems if only engineers would learn more about statistical principles. Wage incentives, mistakenly publicized as a major part of industrial engineering, he asserts, are not a substitute for good management.
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470184
E. O. SAWYER
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470132
HARRY OTIS WRIGHT
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470131
WILLIAM LITTLEWOOD
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470128
Edward Warner
ABSTRACT
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460149
BRUCE E. DEL MAR
Summary A study is made in this paper of the fundamental requirements and methods associated with providing uncompromised air freshness, temperature conditioning, and humidity comfort for the passengers and crew of a typical large pressurized transport airplane, such as the Douglas DC-6, for flight under 30,000 feet. Investigation is made of the advisability of reclamation of cabin air through recirculation or by the use of counter-odorants. Special emphasis is given to the investigation and analysis of cabin air humidities. Air conditioning design recommendations for transport aircraft are made in the paper based on the charts and tables developed.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460148
R. W. AYER, F. F. FENNEMA
Viewing 21871 to 21900 of 22027