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Viewing 181 to 210 of 21878
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0970
Johann C. Wurzenberger, Christoph Triebl, Susanne Kutschi, Christoph Poetsch
The present work describes an existing transient, non-isothermal 1D+1D particulate filter model to capture the impact of different types of particulate matter (PM) on filtration and regeneration. PM classes of arbitrary characteristics (size, composition etc.) are transported and filtered following standard mechanisms. PM deposit populations of arbitrary composition and contact states are used to describe regeneration on a micro-kinetical level. The transport class and deposit population are linked by introducing a splitting deposit matrix. Filtration and regeneration modes are compared to experimental data from literature and a brief numerical assessment on the filtration model is performed. The filter model as part of an exhaust line is used in a concept study on different coating variants. The same exhaust line model is connected to an engine thermodynamic and vehicle model. This system model is run through a random drive cycle in office simulation.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0958
Christopher Sharp, Cynthia C. Webb, Gary Neely, Jayant V. Sarlashkar, Sankar B. Rengarajan, Seungju Yoon, Cary Henry, Bryan Zavala
Abstract Recent 2010 emissions standards for heavy-duty engines have established a limit of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions of 0.20 g/bhp-hr. However, CARB has projected that even when the entire on-road fleet of heavy-duty vehicles operating in California is compliant with 2010 emission standards, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) requirement for ambient particulate matter and Ozone will not be achieved without further reduction in NOX emissions. The California Air Resources Board (ARB) funded a research program to explore the feasibility of achieving 0.02 g/bhp-hr NOX emissions. This paper details engine and aftertreatment NOX management requirements and model based control considerations for achieving Ultra-Low NOX (ULN) levels with a heavy-duty diesel engine. Data are presented for several Advanced Technology aftertreatment solutions and the integration of these solutions with the engine calibration.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0978
Andrew Auld, Andrew Ward, Kenan Mustafa, Benjamin Hansen
Abstract Since previous publications, Ricardo have continued to investigate the development of advanced after-treatment technologies through model based system simulation using an integrated model based development (IMBD) approach. This paper presents the results of the evaluation of after-treatment systems and management strategies for a range of diesel passenger cars. The targets of this study are applicable to Real Driving Emissions (RDE) legislation, but now targeting emissions levels beyond Euro 6d. The work was carried out as part of the EC Horizon 2020 co-funded REWARD (Real World Advanced technologies foR Diesel engines) project. Owing to the wide variation in feed-gas properties expected over an RDE cycle, the results seen for current production system architectures such as Lean NOX traps (LNT) or actively dosed Selective Catalytic Reduction (aSCR) systems highlight the challenge to adhere to emissions limitations for RDE legislation whilst fulfilling stringent CO2 targets.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0987
Nathan Ottinger, Niklas Schmidt, Z. Gerald Liu
Abstract Nitrous oxide (N2O), with a global warming potential (GWP) of 297 and an average atmospheric residence time of over 100 years, is an important greenhouse gas (GHG). In recognition of this, N2O emissions from on-highway medium- and heavy-duty diesel engines were recently regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) GHG Emission Standards. Unlike NO and NO2, collectively referred to as NOx, N2O is not a major byproduct of diesel combustion. However, N2O can be formed as a result of unselective catalytic reactions in diesel aftertreatment systems, and the mitigation of this unintended N2O formation is a topic of active research. In this study, a nonroad Tier 4 Final/Stage IV engine was equipped with a vanadium-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) aftertreatment system. Experiments were conducted over nonroad steady and both cold and hot transient cycles (NRSC and NRTC, respectively).
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0982
Dhruvang Rathod, Mark A. Hoffman, Simona Onori
Abstract The duration over which a three way catalyst (TWC) maintains proper functionality during lambda excursions is critically impacted by aging, which affects its oxygen storage capacity (OSC). As such, emissions control strategies, which strive to maintain post TWC air-to-fuel ratios at the stoichiometric value, will benefit from an accurate estimation of TWC age. To this end, this investigation examines a method of TWC age estimation suitable for real-world transient operation. Experimental results are harvested from an instrumented test vehicle equipped with a two-brick TWC during operation on a chassis dynamometer. Four differently aged TWCs are instrumented with wideband and switch-type Lambda sensors upstream (Pre TWC location), and downstream (Mid location) of first catalyst brick.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0990
Carl Paulina, Dan McBryde, Mike Matthews
Abstract Track Road Load Derivations (RLDs) and subsequent load matching on test cell dynamometers has traditionally been conducted using vehicle coastdowns (CDs). Vehicle speed changes during these coastdowns are used to calculate the vehicle mechanical drag forces slowing vehicles when on the road. Track drag force, exerted on a vehicle, can also be quantified by holding a vehicle at a specific steady state speed and measuring the forces required to maintain that speed. This paper focuses on two methods to quantify speed dependent forces which a vehicle must work against when motoring. One method is the traditional coastdown method. The second reference method measures vehicle steady state speed forces necessary to propel the vehicle using both electric vehicle propulsion power flows and dynamometer measured forces. Track CDs require the vehicle to be placed in neutral.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0989
Jennifer H. Zhu, Christopher Nones, Yan Li, Daniel Milligan, Barry Prince, Mark Polster, Mark Dearth
Abstract Vehicle interior air quality (VIAQ) measurements are currently conducted using the offline techniques GC/MS and HPLC. To improve throughput, speed of analysis, and enable online measurement, specialized instruments are being developed. These instruments promise to reduce testing cost and provide shortened analysis times at comparable accuracy to the current state of the art offline instruments and methods. This work compares GCMS/HPLC to the Voice200ultra, a specialized real-time instrument utilizing the technique selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS). The Voice200ultra is a real-time mass spectrometer that measures volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air down to the parts-per-trillion level by volume (pptv). It provides instantaneous, quantifiable results with high selectivity and sensitivity using soft chemical ionization.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0995
Olle Berg, Lars-Gunnar Simonson
Abstract The Constant Volume Sampler (CVS) is often used to dilute automotive exhaust with ambient air for measurement of emissions from light duty vehicles. A CVS is traditionally equipped with Critical Flow Venturi (CFV) to control and measure total flow. If the CVS is equipped with a Smooth Approach Orifice (SAO) to measure dilution air flow, the exhaust flow of the vehicle can be calculated as the difference between dilution and total flow. Calibration of the CVS and SAO is routinely done using ambient air, but carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor in diluted exhaust have an influence on the flow through the CFV. In current US emission legislation the provisions to include water vapor is added. However, if this is done then the effect of carbon dioxide (CO2) in exhaust has not been considered. Further on, when using the CVS to measure exhaust flow, only the CFV will be affected by the diluted exhaust gas composition.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1005
Yizhou Zhang, Jaal Ghandhi, David Rothamer
Abstract The effect of direct-injected fuel on particle size distributions (PSDs) of particulate matter emitted from dual-fuel combustion strategies was investigated. The PSD data were acquired from a light-duty single-cylinder diesel engine operated using conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and two diesel/natural gas dual-fuel combustion strategies. Three different direct-injection (DI) fuels (diesel, 2,6,10-trimethyldodecane, and a primary reference fuel blend) and two different injector nozzles were studied. The DI fuels were chosen to have similar energy and ignition characteristics (heat of combustion and cetane number) but different physical and chemical properties (volatility, aromatics %, viscosity, density). The two nozzles (with different orifice diameter and spray angle) allowed a wide range in DI fuel quantity for the dual-fuel combustion strategies.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0994
Tim Nevius, Dario Rauker, Masanobu Akita, Yoshinori Otsuki, Scott Porter, Michael Akard
Abstract Direct measurement of dilution air volume in a Constant Volume emission sampling system may be used to calculate tailpipe exhaust volume, and the total dilution ratio in the CVS. A Remote Mixing Tee (RMT) often includes a subsonic venturi (SSV) flowmeter in series with the dilution air duct. The venturi meter results in a flow restriction and significant pressure drop in the dilution air pipe. An ultrasonic flow meter for a similar dilution air volume offers little flow restriction and negligible pressure drop in the air duct. In this investigation, an ultrasonic flow meter (UFM) replaces the subsonic venturi in a Remote Mixing Tee. The measurement uncertainty and accuracy of the UFM is determined by comparing the real time flow rates and integrated total dilution air volume from the UFM and the dilution air SSV in the RMT. Vehicle tests include FTP and NEDC test cycles with a 3.8L V6 reference vehicle.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0996
Sebastian Gramstat, André Cserhati, Matthias Schroeder, Dmytro Lugovyy
Abstract Brake Particle Emission (BPE) is gaining considerable importance for the friction brake and automotive industry. So far no common approach or legislation for BPE characterization exists although many activities in this field have been started during the last years. Taking this into account, the authors carried out a joint measurement campaign to investigate a new approach regarding the sampling location using a brake dynamometer. During preliminary investigations the influence of the cooling air quality has been examined and a sampling point position validation has been carried out. At first the stabilization behavior for repeated test cycles and variations of volumetric air flow rates are analyzed. As a next step the role of volatile particle emissions is determined. Subsequently, the influence of load history and friction power is studied. Finally results in terms of the role of high temperature applications are presented.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1013
Sunil Kumar Pathak, Yograj Singh, Vineet sood, Salim Abbasbhai Channiwala
Abstract The standard emission protocol including driving cycle is performed for the legislative fuel economy and emission testing of the vehicles in a laboratory. The driving cycles are expected to represent actual driving pattern and energy requirements. However, recent studies showed that the gap between real world driving conditions and the standard driving cycle is widening, as the traffic pattern and vehicle population is varying dynamically and the change in the emission procedures is not synchronized with the same pace. More so, as the process of harmonization of emission legislations is in progress to narrow down the country specific variation of emission regulation, as this will help in the smooth globalization of the automotive business process. The new regulation for in-service conformity is being considered to reduce the emissions in real-world driving.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1008
Antti Rostedt, Leonidas D. Ntziachristos, Pauli Simonen, Topi Rönkkö, Zissis C. Samaras, Risto Hillamo, Kauko Janka, Jorma Keskinen
Abstract In this article we present a design of a new miniaturized sensor with the capacity to measure exhaust particle concentrations on board vehicles and engines. The sensor is characterized by ultra-fast response time, high sensitivity, and a wide dynamic range. In addition, the physical dimensions of the sensor enable its placement along the exhaust line. The concentration response and temporal performance of a prototype sensor are discussed and characterized with aerosol laboratory test measurements. The sensor performance was also tested with actual engine exhaust in both chassis and engine dynamometer measurements. These measurements demonstrate that the sensor has the potential to meet and even exceed any requirements around the world in terms of on-board diagnostic (OBD) sensitivity and frequency of monitoring.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1017
Michael Rößler, Amin Velji, Corina Janzer, Thomas Koch, Matthias Olzmann
Abstract The proportion of nitrogen dioxide in the engine-out emissions of a Diesel engine is of great importance for the conversion of the total oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions in SCR catalysts. Particularly at lower engine loads and lower exhaust temperatures an increase of the already low NO2/NOX fraction will enhance the SCR operation significantly. For this purpose, the understanding of the NO2 formation during the Diesel combustion and expansion stroke is as substantial as being aware of the different thermodynamic impacts and engine operating parameters that affect the formation process. To determine the influences on the NO2 emission level several variation series were performed on a single-cylinder research engine. Especially the charge dilution parameters like the air-fuel ratio and the EGR rate as well as the injection parameters could be identified to be decisive for the NO2 formation.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1018
Gianluca Padula, Philipp Schiffmann, Matthieu Lecompte, Olivier Laget
Abstract Ever growing traffic has a detrimental effect on health and environment. In response to climate warming and health concerns, governments worldwide enforce more stringent emission standards. NOx emissions limits are some of the most challenging to meet using fuel-efficient lean-burn engines. The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is one consolidated NOx after-treatment technique using urea water solution (UWS) injection upstream of the catalytic converter. A recent development of SCR, using gaseous ammonia injection, reduces wall deposit formation and improves the cold-start efficiency. The mixing of gaseous ammonia with the exhaust gases is one of the key challenges that need to be overcome, as the effectiveness of the system is strongly dependent on the mixture uniformity at the inlet of the SCR catalyst.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1045
Ioannis Papadopoulos, Simon Becker, Holger Ehnis, Reiner Kunzel, Armin Frommer
Abstract The oil emission of a combustion engine has a direct influence on CO2 and particulate emissions. The focus on reducing oil emission is thus particularly growing in the context of stricter emissions limits for the automotive industry. To reach this goal requires a deeper understanding of the mechanism behind the genesis of oil emission in a combustion engine. In order to determine oil emission caused specifically by the piston group, part of the exhaust gas flow is taken and analyzed using a mass spectrometer directly downstream of the exhaust valve in the exhaust manifold. In the process, the mass spectrometer is operated in high-pass filter mode to detect long-chain hydrocarbons associated with the lubricating oil. In order to make differentiated and detailed statements about oil emission mechanisms, oil emission and blow-by in steady-state and transient engine operation are determined for specific design parameters of the piston group.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0447
Zhe Li, Mike Dong, Dennis Harrigan, Michael Gardner
In gasoline Powertrain systems, the evaporative emission control (EVAP) system canister purge valve (CPV) can be actuated by pulse-width modulated (PWM) signals. The CPV is an electronically actuated solenoid. The PWM controlled CPV, when actuated, creates pressure pulsations in the system. This pulsation is sent back to the rest of the EVAP system. Given the right conditions, the fill limit vent valve (FLVV) inside the fuel tank can be excited. The FLVV internal components can be excited and produce noise. This noise can be objectionable to the occupants. Additional components within the EVAP system may also be excited in a similar way. This paper presents a bench test method using parts from vehicle’s EVAP system and other key fuel system components.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0795
Changhoon Oh, Wai K. Cheng
Abstract The gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine particulate emission sources are assessed under cold start conditions: the fast idle and speed/load combinations representative of the 1st acceleration in the US FTP. The focus is on the accumulation mode particle number (PN) emission. The sources are non-fuel, combustion of the premixed charge, and liquid fuel film. The non-fuel emissions are measured by operating the engine with premixed methane/air or hydrogen/air. Then the PN level is substantially lower than what is obtained with normal GDI operation; thus non-fuel contribution to PN is small. When operating with stoichiometric premixed gasoline/air, the PN level is comparable to the non-fuel level; thus premixed-stoichiometric mixture combustion does not significantly generate particulates. For fuel rich premixed gasoline/air, PN increases dramatically when lambda is less than 0.7 to 0.8.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0796
J. Felipe Rodriguez, Wai K. Cheng
Abstract The NOx emissions during the crank-start and cold fast-idle phases of a GDI engine are analyzed in detail. The NOx emissions of the first 3 firing cycles are studied under a wide set of parameters including the mass of fuel injected, start of injection, and ignition timing. The results show a strong dependence of the NOx emissions with injection timing; they are significantly reduced as the mixture is stratified. The impact of different valve timings on crank-start NOx emissions was analyzed. Late intake and early exhaust timings show similar potential for NOx reduction; 26-30% lower than the baseline. The combined strategy, resulting in a large symmetric negative valve overlap, shows the greatest reduction; 59% lower than the baseline. The cold fast-idle NOx emissions were studied under different equivalence ratios, injection strategies, combustion phasing, and valve timings. Slightly lean air-fuel mixtures result in a significant reduction of NOx.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0743
Kukwon Cho, Eric Latimer, Matthew Lorey, David J. Cleary, Mark Sellnau
Abstract Fuel efficiency and emission performance sensitivity to fuel reactivity was examined using Delphi’s second-generation Gasoline Direct-Injection Compression Ignition (Gen 2.0 GDCI) multi-cylinder engine. The study was designed to compare a US market gasoline (RON 92 E10) to a higher reactivity gasoline (RON 80) at four operating conditions ranging from light load of 800 rpm / 2.0 bar gross indicated-mean-effective pressure (IMEPg) to medium load of 2000 rpm / 10.0 bar IMEPg. The experimental assessment indicated that both gasolines could achieve good performance and Tier 3 emission targets at each of the four operating conditions. Relative to the RON 92 E10 gasoline, better fuel consumption and engine-out emissions performance was achieved when using RON 80 gasoline; consistent with our previously reported single-cylinder engine research [1].
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0747
John Storey, Samuel Lewis, Melanie Moses-DeBusk, Raynella Connatser, Jong Lee, Tom Tzanetakis, Kukwon Cho, Matthew Lorey, Mark Sellnau
Abstract Low temperature combustion engine technologies are being investigated for high efficiency and low emissions. However, such engine technologies often produce higher engine-out hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, and their operating range is limited by the fuel properties. In this study, two different fuels, a US market gasoline containing 10% ethanol (RON 92 E10) and a higher reactivity gasoline (RON 80 E0), were compared on Delphi’s second generation Gasoline Direct-Injection Compression Ignition (Gen 2.0 GDCI) multi-cylinder engine. The engine was evaluated at three operating points ranging from a light load condition (800 rpm/2 bar IMEPg) to medium load conditions (1500 rpm/6 bar and 2000 rpm/10 bar IMEPg). The engine was equipped with two oxidation catalysts, between which was located the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) inlet. Samples were taken at engine-out, between the catalysts, and at tailpipe locations.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0910
Michiel Makkee, Yixiao Wang
Abstract We studied the mechanism of NO reduction as well as its selectivity and reactivity in the presence of excess O2. Results show that fuel injection and/or pretreatment are important for ceria catalyst reduction and carbon deposition on the catalyst surface. Oxygen defects of reduced ceria are the key sites for the reduction of NO into N2. The deposited carbon acts as a buffer reductant, i.e., the oxidation of carbon by lattice oxygen recreates oxygen defects to extend the NO reduction time interval. A small amount of NO showed a full conversion into only N2 both on the reduced Zr-La doped ceria and reduced Pt-Zr-La doped ceria. Only when the catalyst is oxidised NO is converted into NO2.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0923
Ed Szczepanski, Akinori Koda, Daniel Sweeney, Nick Polcyn, Mitsunori Ota
Tightening global emissions standards are driving automotive Original Equipment Manufacturer’s (OEM’s) to utilize Three Way Catalyst (TWC) aftertreatment systems that can perform with greater efficiency and greater measured control of Precious Group Metals (PGM) use. At the same time, TWC aftertreatment systems minimize exhaust system pressure drops. This study will determine the influence of catalyst substrate cell geometry on emission and PGM usage. Additionally, a study of lightoff and backpressure comparisons will be conducted. The two substrate configurations used are hex/750cpsi and square/750cpsi.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0922
Akito Takayama, Takahiro Kurokawa, Hiroki Nakayama, Takuya Katoh, Makoto Nagata
Abstract A new Pd-Rh three-way catalyst (TWC) for close-coupled (CC) applications was developed to improve low temperature gas activity. In this study the TWC has a layered structure with Pd in the top layer and Rh in the bottom layer. The specific objectives of this study was to compare Ba and La additives to Pd in the top layer. Alumina was used for the Pd support and La or Ba were co-impregnated with Pd. The catalysts were engine aged at 950°C for 200 h and evaluated on a vehicle using the European NEDC test, for CO, HC and NOx performance. After this aging, the Pd-La catalyst showed higher gas performance than the Pd-Ba catalyst, especially in the cold start region. This improvement was correlated to the Pd particle size and the sintering suppression observed upon addition of La. Sintering suppression was also observed upon addition of Ba; however, the mechanism appears to be different from that of La addition.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0918
Joseph R. Theis, Andrew Getsoian, Christine Lambert
Abstract In anticipation that future gasoline engines will have improved fuel efficiency and therefore lower exhaust temperatures during low load operation, a project was initiated in 2014 to develop three-way catalysts (TWC) with improved activity at lower temperatures while maintaining the durability of current TWCs. This project is a collaboration between Ford Motor Company, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the University of Michigan and is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The ultimate goal is to show progress towards the USDRIVE goal of 90% conversion of hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NOx) at 150°C after high mileage aging. A reactor was set up at Ford to follow the catalyst testing protocols established by the USDRIVE ACEC tech team for evaluating catalysts for stoichiometric gasoline direct-injection (S-GDI) engines; this protocol specifies a stoichiometric blend of CO/H2, NO, C3H6, C2H4, C3H8, O2, H2O, and CO2 for the evaluations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0917
Go Hayashita, Motoki Ohtani, Keiichiro Aoki, Shuntaro Okazaki
Abstract Exhaust systems must satisfy a wide range of requirements, including lowering emissions to comply with future fuel economy and emissions regulations. To help meet these requirements, new emissions control systems have been developed today. In addition, since air-fuel ratio (hereafter, A/F) control has a major impact on emissions, a new two-A/F sensor system with A/F sensors provided both upstream and downstream of the catalyst was developed, incorporating an A/F control capable of further lowering emissions with greater robustness. This development identified the hysteresis characteristics of the O2 sensor downstream of the catalyst as an important factor affecting emissions during conventional A/F control. Subsequently, reaction analysis was carried out using sensor reaction models and by evaluating sensors under real-world operating conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0931
Michiel Van Nieuwstadt, Joseph Ulrey
Abstract While not commonly in production today, Gasoline Particulate Filters (GPFs) are likely to see widespread deployment to meet stringent EU6.2 and China particulate number (PN) standards. In many ways the operating conditions for GPFs are orthogonal to those of their diesel counterparts, and this leads to different and interesting requirements for the control strategy. We will present some generic system architectures for exhaust systems containing a GPF and will lay out an architecture for the GPF control strategy components which include: regeneration assist feature, soot estimation algorithm, GPF protection. The regeneration assist feature uses spark retard to increase exhaust temperature. The soot estimation algorithm describes how we can estimate soot from an open loop model or from a normalized pressure metric. The GPF protection feature controls oxygen flow to limit the soot burn rate.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0929
Satoru Inoda, Yasutaka Nomura, Hirotaka Ori, Yuji Yabuzaki
Abstract In the near future, particulate number (PN) regulations, including the Euro 6 regulations, will be going into effective and becoming more stringent around the world targeted at gasoline engine vehicles. There is a type of particulate filter that has used for diesel engine vehicles, as a means to satisfy PN regulations. There are two types of particulate filters. One is a “bare” or “adding-type” GPF that is uncoated with catalyst, and the other is a replaceable-type GPF that is coated with catalyst. The replaceable-type GPF (coated GPF) has advantages in terms of cost-performance, installation space, and lower level of pressure drop, compared to the uncoated GPF. The three main functions required for a coated GPF are, an improvement of three-way catalytic performance, lowering of pressure drop, and PN filtration efficiency improvement.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0927
Carl Justin Kamp, Shawn Zhang, Sujay Bagi, Victor Wong, Greg Monahan, Alexander Sappok, Yujun Wang
Abstract Diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment components, especially the diesel particulate filter (DPF), are subject to various modes of degradation over their lifetimes. One particular adverse effect on the DPF is the significant rise in pressure drop due to the accumulation of engine lubricant-derived ash which coats the inlet channel walls effectively decreasing the permeability of the filter. The decreased permeability due to ash in the DPF can result in increased filter pressure drop and decreased fuel economy. A unique two-step approach, consisting of experimental measurements and direct numerical simulations using ultra-high resolution 3D imaging data, has been utilized in this study to better understand the effects of ash accumulation on engine aftertreatment component functionality.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0924
Jan Schoenhaber, Nikolas Kuehn, Bastian Bradler, Joerg Michael Richter, Sascha Bauer, Bernd Lenzen, Christian Beidl
Abstract Recently, the European Union has adopted a new regulation on Real-Driving-Emissions (RDE) and also China is considering RDE implementation into new China 6 legislation. The new RDE regulation is focused on measuring nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate number (PN) emissions of both light-duty gasoline and diesel vehicles under real world conditions. A supplemental RDE test procedure was developed for European type approval, which includes on-road testing with cars equipped with portable emission measurement systems (PEMS). This new regulation will significantly affect the engine calibrations and the exhaust gas aftertreatment. In this study the impact of the new RDE regulation on two recent EU 6b certified turbocharged direct injected gasoline vehicles has been investigated. A comparison of several chassis dyno drive cycles with two new defined on-road RDE cycles was performed.
Viewing 181 to 210 of 21878