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Viewing 271 to 300 of 21945
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0584
Haksu Kim, Jaewook Shin, Myoungho Sunwoo
Abstract With fuel efficiency becoming an increasingly critical aspect of internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, the necessity for research on efficient generation of electric energy has been growing. An energy management (EM) system controls the generation of electric energy using an alternator. This paper presents a strategy for the EM using a control mode switch (CMS) of the alternator for the (ICE) vehicles. This EM recovers the vehicle’s residual kinetic energy to improve the fuel efficiency. The residual kinetic energy occurs when a driver manipulates a vehicle to decelerate. The residual energy is commonly wasted as heat energy of the brake. In such circumstances, the wasted energy can be converted to electric energy by operating an alternator. This conversion can reduce additional fuel consumption. For extended application of the energy conversion, the future duration time of the residual power is exploited.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0583
Farraen Mohd Azmin, Phil Mortimer, Justin Seabrook
Abstract With the introduction in Europe of drive cycles such as RDE and WLTC, transient emissions prediction is more challenging than before for passenger car applications. Transient predictions are used in the calibration optimization process to determine the cumulative cycle emissions for the purpose of meeting objectives and constraints. Predicting emissions such as soot accurately is the most difficult area, because soot emissions rise very steeply during certain transients. The method described in this paper is an evolution of prediction using a steady state global model. A dynamic model can provide the instantaneous prediction of boost and EGR that a static model cannot. Meanwhile, a static model is more accurate for steady state engine emissions. Combining these two model types allows more accurate prediction of emissions against time. A global dynamic model combines a dynamic model of the engine air path with a static DoE (Design of Experiment) emission model.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0605
Anthony D'Amato, Yan Wang, Dimitar Filev, Enrique Remes
Abstract Government regulations for fuel economy and emission standards have driven the development of technologies that improve engine performance and efficiency. These technologies are enabled by an increased number of actuators and increasingly sophisticated control algorithms. As a consequence, engine control calibration time, which entails sweeping all actuators at each speed-load point to determine the actuator combination that meets constraints and delivers ideal performance, has increased significantly. In this work we present two adaptive optimization methods, both based on an indirect adaptive control framework, which improve calibration efficiency by searching for the optimal process inputs without visiting all input combinations explicitly. The difference between the methods is implementation of the algorithm in steady-state vs dynamic operating conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0606
Ashley Wiese, Anna Stefanopoulou, Julia Buckland, Amey Y. Karnik
Abstract Low-Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation (LP-EGR) has been shown to be an effective means of improving fuel economy and suppressing knock in downsized, boosted, spark ignition engines. LP-EGR is particularly beneficial at low-speed, high-load conditions, but can lead to combustion instability at lower loads. The transport delays inherent in LP-EGR systems slow the reduction of intake manifold EGR concentrations during tip-out events, which may lead to excessive EGR concentrations at low load. This paper explores leveraging Variable Valve Timing (VVT) as a means of improving the rate of reduction of intake manifold EGR concentration prior to tip-out. At higher boost levels, high valve overlap may result in intake manifold gas passing directly to the exhaust manifold. This short-circuiting behaviour could potentially improve EGR evacuation rates.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0607
Nahid Pervez, Ace Koua Kue, Adarsh Appukuttan, John Bogema, Michael Van Nieuwstadt
Abstract Designing a control system that can robustly detect faulted emission control devices under all environmental and driving conditions is a challenging task for OEMs. In order to gain confidence in the control strategy and the values of tunable parameters, the test vehicles need to be subjected to their limits during the development process. Complexity of modern powertrain systems along with the On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) monitors with multidimensional thresholds make it difficult to anticipate all the possible scenarios. Finding optimal solutions to these problems using traditional calibration processes can be time and resource intensive. A possible solution is to take a data driven calibration approach. In this method, a large amount of data is collected by collaboration of different groups working on the same powertrain. Later, the data is mined to find the optimum values of tunable parameters for the respective vehicle functions.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0608
Qilun Zhu, Robert Prucka, Michael Prucka, Hussein Dourra
Abstract This research proposes a control system for Spark Ignition (SI) engines with external Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) based on model predictive control and a disturbance observer. The proposed Economic Nonlinear Model Predictive Controller (E-NMPC) tries to minimize fuel consumption for a number of engine cycles into the future given an Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEP) tracking reference and abnormal combustion constraints like knock and combustion variability. A nonlinear optimization problem is formulated and solved in real time using Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) to obtain the desired control actuator set-points. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) based observer is applied to estimate engine states, combining both air path and cylinder dynamics. The EKF engine state(s) observer is augmented with disturbance estimation to account for modeling errors and/or sensor/actuator offset.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0609
Pan Song, Shugang Xie, Yuan Zhong, Bolin Gao
Abstract This paper presents a unified creep-speed controller specifically designed for the automated parking system of an automated manual transmission vehicle, whereby the engine management system, transmission control unit, and electronic stability control system can work cooperatively and harmoniously within the same control framework. First, a novel reference speed generator is designed and employs sinusoidal functions to produce the speed profile based on the maneuver-dependent distances computed by a path planner, such that the lag in vehicle response during start-up can be effectively reduced. Second, a well-tuned PID controller is adopted to determine the resultant longitudinal force in attempt to follow the reference speed and eliminate the distance error during the parking maneuvers.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0610
Nicolo Cavina, Francesco Ranuzzi, Matteo De Cesare, Enrico Brugnoni
Abstract The most recent European regulations for two- and three-wheelers (Euro 5) are imposing an enhanced combustion control in motorcycle engines to respect tighter emission limits, and Air-Fuel Ratio (AFR) closed-loop control has become a key function of the engine management system also for this type of applications. In a multi-cylinder engine, typically only one oxygen sensor is installed on each bank, so that the mean AFR of two or more cylinders rather than the single cylinder one is actually controlled. The installation of one sensor per cylinder is normally avoided due to cost, layout and reliability issues. In the last years, several studies were presented to demonstrate the feasibility of an individual AFR controller based on a single sensor. These solutions are based on the mathematical modelling of the engine air path dynamics, or on the frequency analysis of the lambda probe signal.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0611
Viktor Leek, Kristoffer Ekberg, Lars Eriksson
1 ABSTRACT Today’s need for fuel efficient vehicles, together with increasing engine component complexity, makes optimal control a valuable tool in the process of finding the most fuel efficient control strategies. To efficiently calculate the solution to optimal control problems a gradient based optimization technique is desirable, making continuously differentiable models preferable. Many existing control-oriented Diesel engine models do not fully posses this property, often due to signal saturations or discrete conditions. This paper offers a continuously differentiable, mean value engine model, of a heavy-duty diesel engine equipped with VGT and EGR, suitable for optimal control purposes. The model is developed from an existing, validated, engine model, but adapted to be continuously differentiable and therefore tailored for usage in an optimal control environment. The changes due to the conversion are quantified and presented.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0596
Vittorio Ravaglioli, Federico Stola, Matteo De Cesare, Fabrizio Ponti, Stefano Sgatti
Abstract Upcoming more stringent emission regulations throughout the world pose a real challenge, especially in regard to Diesel systems for passenger cars, where the need of additional after-treatment has a big impact in terms of additional system costs and available packaging space. Therefore, the need for strategies that allow managing combustion towards lower emissions, that require a precise control of the combustion outputs, is definitely increasing. Acoustic emission of internal combustion engines contains a large amount of information related to engine behavior and working conditions. Mechanical noise and combustion noise are usually the main contributions to the noise produced by an engine. In particular, recent research from the same authors of this paper demonstrated that combustion noise can be used as an indicator of the combustion that is taking place inside the combustion chamber and therefore as a reference for the control strategy.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0598
Mohammad Reza Amini, Meysam Razmara, Mahdi Shahbakhti
Electronic throttle control is an integral part of an engine electronic control unit (ECU) that directly affects vehicle fuel economy, drivability, and engine-out emissions by managing engine torque and air-fuel ratio through adjusting intake charge flow to the engine. The highly nonlinear dynamics of the throttle body call for nonlinear control techniques that can be implemented in real-time and are also robust to controller implementation imprecision. Discrete sliding mode control (DSMC) is a computationally efficient controller design technique which can handle systems with high degree of nonlinearity. In this paper, a generic robust discrete sliding mode controller design is proposed and experimentally verified for the throttle position tracking problem. In addition, a novel method is used to predict and incorporate the sampling and quantization imprecisions into the DSMC structure. First, a nonlinear physical model for an electromechanical throttle body is derived.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0599
Yichao Guo
Abstract Misfire is generally defined as be no or partial combustion during the power stroke of internal combustion engine. Because a misfired engine will dramatically increase the exhaust emission and potentially cause permanent damage to the catalytic converters, California Air Resources Board (CARB), as well as most of other countries’ on-board diagnostic regulations mandates the detection of misfire. Currently almost all the OEMs utilize crankshaft position sensors as the main input to their misfire detection algorithm. The detailed detection approaches vary among different manufacturers. For example, some chooses the crankshaft angular velocity calculated from the raw output of the crankshaft positon sensor as the measurement to distinguish misfires from normal firing events, while others use crankshaft angular acceleration or the associated torque index derived from the crankshaft position sensor readings as the measurement of misfire detection.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0601
Huayi Li, Kenneth Butts, Kevin Zaseck, Dominic Liao-McPherson, Ilya Kolmanovsky
Abstract The development of advanced model-based engine control strategies, such as economic model predictive control (eMPC) for diesel engine fuel economy and emission optimization, requires accurate and low-complexity models for controller design validation. This paper presents the NOx and smoke emissions modeling of a light duty diesel engine equipped with a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) and a high pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. Such emission models can be integrated with an existing air path model into a complete engine mean value model (MVM), which can predict engine behavior at different operating conditions for controller design and validation before physical engine tests. The NOx and smoke emission models adopt an artificial neural network (ANN) approach with Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) architectures. The networks are trained and validated using experimental data collected from engine bench tests.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0602
Vladimir Vasilije Kokotovic, Colby Buckman
Abstract With the trending electrification of vehicle accessory drives brings new control concepts useful in many cases to optimize energy management within the powertrain system. Considering that direct engine drives do not have as much flexibility as independent electric drives, it is apparent that several advantages are to be expected from electric drives. New developed high efficient electric drives can be implemented when considering many vehicle sub-systems. Combinations of continuous varying and discrete flow control devices offer thermal management opportunities across several vehicle attributes including fuel economy, drivability, performance, and cabin comfort. Often new technologies are integrated with legacy systems to deliver maximum value. Leveraging both electrical and mechanical actuators in some cases presents control challenges in optimizing energy management while delivering robust system operation.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0603
Vicente Cuapio Espino, Akshay Bichkar, Joycer D. Osorio
Abstract Software development for automotive application requires several iterations in order to tune parameters and strategy logic to operate accordantly with optimal performance. Thus, in this paper we present an optimizer method and tool used to tune calibration parameters related to torque estimation for a hybrid automatic transmission application. This optimizer aims to minimize the time invested during the software calibration and software development phases that could take significant time in order to cover the different driving conditions under which a hybrid automatic transmission can operate. For this reason, an optimization function based on the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm using Matlab software helps to find optimized calibration values based on a cost function (square sum error minimization).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0604
Christian Friedrich, Yves Compera, Matthias Auer, Gunnar Stiesch, Georg Wachtmeister
Abstract Improving fuel efficiency while meeting relevant emission limits set by emissions legislation is among the main objectives of engine development. Simultaneously the development costs and development time have to be steadily reduced. For these reasons, the high demands in terms of quality and validity of measurements at the engine test bench are continuously rising. This paper will present a new methodology for efficient testing of an industrial combustion engine in order to improve the process of decision making for combustion-relevant component setups. The methodology includes various modules for increasing measurement quality and validity. Modules like stationary point detection to determine steady state engine behavior, signal quality checks to monitor the signal quality of chosen measurement signals and plausibility checks to evaluate physical relations between several measurement signals ensure a high measurement quality over all measurements.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0954
Christopher Sharp, Cynthia C. Webb, Gary Neely, Michael Carter, Seungju Yoon, Cary Henry
Abstract The most recent 2010 emissions standards for heavy-duty engines have established a tailpipe limit of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions of 0.20 g/bhp-hr. However, it is projected that even when the entire on-road fleet of heavy-duty vehicles operating in California is compliant with 2010 emission standards, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) requirement for ambient particulate matter and Ozone will not be achieved without further reduction in NOX emissions. The California Air Resources Board (CARB) funded a research program to explore the feasibility of achieving 0.02 g/bhp-hr NOX emissions.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0956
Christopher Sharp, Cynthia C. Webb, Seungju Yoon, Michael Carter, Cary Henry
Abstract The 2010 emissions standards for heavy-duty engines have established a limit of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions of 0.20 g/bhp-hr. However, the California Air Resource Board (ARB) projects that even when the entire on-road fleet of heavy-duty vehicles operating in California is compliant with 2010 emission standards, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) requirement for ambient particulate matter (PM) and Ozone will not be achieved without further reduction in NOX emissions. The California Air Resources Board (CARB) funded a research program to explore the feasibility of achieving 0.02 g/bhp-hr NOX emissions.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0958
Christopher Sharp, Cynthia C. Webb, Gary Neely, Jayant V. Sarlashkar, Sankar B. Rengarajan, Seungju Yoon, Cary Henry, Bryan Zavala
Abstract Recent 2010 emissions standards for heavy-duty engines have established a limit of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions of 0.20 g/bhp-hr. However, CARB has projected that even when the entire on-road fleet of heavy-duty vehicles operating in California is compliant with 2010 emission standards, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) requirement for ambient particulate matter and Ozone will not be achieved without further reduction in NOX emissions. The California Air Resources Board (ARB) funded a research program to explore the feasibility of achieving 0.02 g/bhp-hr NOX emissions. This paper details engine and aftertreatment NOX management requirements and model based control considerations for achieving Ultra-Low NOX (ULN) levels with a heavy-duty diesel engine. Data are presented for several Advanced Technology aftertreatment solutions and the integration of these solutions with the engine calibration.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0941
Liu Yang, Balaji Sukumar, Mojghan Naseri, Penelope Markatou, Sougato Chatterjee
Abstract Future emissions regulations proposed for the Asian automotive industry (BS VI regulations for India and NS VI regulations for China) are strict and similar to EU VI regulations. As a result, they will require both advanced NOx control as well as advanced Particulate Matter (PM) control. This will drive implementation of full Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter (cDPF) and simultaneous NOx control using Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technologies. In this work, we present the performance of various Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), cDPF, SCR and Ammonia slip catalyst (ASC) systems utilizing the World Harmonized Transient Cycle (WHTC). Aftertreatment Systems (ATS) required for both active and passive filter regeneration applications will be discussed. The sensitivity of key design parameters like catalyst technology, PGM loading, catalyst sizing to meet the regulation limits has been investigated.
2017-03-14
Journal Article
2017-01-9278
Anders N. Johansson, Stina Hemdal, Petter Dahlander
Abstract The current trend toward more fuel efficient vehicles with lower emission levels has prompted development of new combustion techniques for use in gasoline engines. Stratified combustion has been shown to be a promising approach for increasing the fuel efficiency. However, this technique is hampered by drawbacks such as increased particulate and standard emissions. This study attempts to address the issues of increased emission levels by investigating the influence of high frequency ionizing ignition systems, 350 bar fuel injection pressure and various tumble levels on particulate emissions and combustion characteristics in an optical SGDI engine operated in stratified mode on isooctane. Tests were performed at one engine load of 2.63 bar BMEP and speed of 1200 rpm. Combustion was recorded with two high speed color cameras from bottom and side views using optical filters for OH and soot luminescence.
2017-03-14
Journal Article
2017-01-9277
Stefano D'Ambrosio, Alessandro Ferrari
Abstract The present paper illustrates an investigation about the potentialities of injection rate shaping coupled with an after injection. A pilot shot can either be absent or present before the rate-shaped boot injection. The experimental tests have been performed on a partial PCCI Euro 5 diesel engine endowed with direct-acting piezoelectric injectors. Starting from optimized triple pilot-main-after injection strategies, boot injection was implemented by maintaining the direct-acting piezo injector needle open at part lift. The results of two steady state working conditions have been presented in terms of engine-out emissions, combustion noise and brake specific fuel consumption. In addition, in-cylinder analyses of the pressure, heat-release rate, temperature and emissions have been evaluated. Considering the in-cylinder pressure traces and the heat release rate curves, the injection rate shaping proved to influence combustion in the absence of a pilot injection to a great extent.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0284
Anand Subramaniam, Ravindra Shah, Swapnil Ghugal, Ujjwala Shailesh Karle, Anand Deshpande
Abstract On-board diagnostics (OBD) is a term referring to a vehicle's self-diagnostic and reporting capability. It is a system originally designed to reduce emissions by monitoring the performance of major emission related components. There are two kinds of on-board diagnostic systems: OBD-I and OBD-II. In India OBD I was implemented from April 2010 for BS IV vehicles. OBD II was implemented from April 2013 for BS IV vehicles. Apart from the comprehensive component monitors, OBD II system also has noncontinuous monitors like Catalyst monitoring, Lambda monitoring, and other after treatment system monitors. For OBD II verification and Validation, it is required to test all the sensors and actuators that are present in the engine, for all possible failures. From an emissions point of view there are lists of critical failures that are caused due to malfunction of sensors and actuators.
2017-01-10
Journal Article
2017-26-0364
Igor Gritsuk, Vladimir Volkov, Vasyl Mateichyk, Yurii Gutarevych, Mykola Tsiuman, Nataliia Goridko
Abstract The article suggests the results of experimental and theoretical studies of the engine heating system with a phase-transitional thermal accumulator when the vehicle is in motion in a driving cycle. The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficiency of the vehicle heating system within thermal accumulator and catalytic converter under operating conditions. The peculiarity of the presented system is that it uses thermal energy of exhaust gases to accumulate energy during engine operation. The article describes the methodology to evaluate vehicle fuel consumption and emission in the driving cycle according to the UNECE Regulation № 83-05. The methodology takes into account the environmental parameters, road conditions, the design parameters of the vehicle, the modes of its motion, thermal state of the engine cooling system and the catalytic converter.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0179
Murugesan Venkatesan, VE Annamalai
Abstract The Indian Economy is becoming significant in the late years. There will be more middle class individuals in the coming years having higher purchasing power, bringing about sharp increment in the ownership of vehicles. The quantity of End-of-Life Vehicles (ELVs) in 2015 is evaluated at 8.7 million and by 2025, this figure is assessed to ascend to 21.8 million. Car breaking yards' ELV recycling practices result in inadequate resource recovery and various forms of pollution. 75-80% of the ELV constitutes of metal and recycled due to its economic benefits. The rest of the 25-30% comprises of plastics, rubber, glass and operating fluids which are mostly disposed off in land or water. Existing international literature has analyzed ELV recycling and remanufacturing practices in India as separate topics.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0180
Swaminathan Ramaswamy, Christophe Schorsch, Mario Kolar
Abstract Automotive OEMs are adapting various “green” technologies to meet the upcoming and anticipated regulations for reducing direct and indirect GHG emissions equivalent to CO2. Using compact devices and lightweight components on the aggregates, OEMs get the benefit of carbon credits towards their contribution in reducing CO2 emissions. With regards to the HVAC systems, enhancements such as ultra-low permeation hose assemblies and adoption of low GWP refrigerant have shown promising results in reducing the direct GHG emissions by controlling refrigerant permeation & indirect GHG emissions by using compact and high efficiency compressors, compact heat exchangers, and other technologies that contribute to weight reduction and ultimately impact CO2 emissions. Traditional AC lines are routed/installed in space that accommodates the relative movement between the engine and chassis by connecting the various parts.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0230
Timothy Dallmann, Zhenying Shao, Aparna Menon, Anup Bandivadekar
Abstract Diesel engines used in non-road vehicles and equipment are a significant source of pollutant emissions that contribute to poor air quality, negative human health impacts, and climate change. Efforts to mitigate the emissions impact of these sources, such as regulatory control programs, have played a key role in air quality management strategies around the world, and have helped to spur the development of advanced engine and emission control technologies. As non-road engine emissions control programs are developed in a growing number of countries around the world, it is instructive to look at the development of programs in two of the regions that have progressed furthest in controlling emissions from non-road engines, the United States (U.S.) and European Union (EU).
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0234
Arun Narayanan, Sagar Bhojne
Abstract In Earth Moving Machines, performance of an attachments play crucial role in determining the machine performance. Application of the machine is one of the main factors to be considered for bucket design. Different types of buckets are offered in the market to suit the particular application. Trenching, digging, moving loose material are some of the operations done with the backhoe bucket. While operating in these areas bucket handles intact soil, granules, loose rocks etc. Properties of these materials play important role in bucket design methodology. In this paper efforts are made towards understanding the properties of soil along with soil failure mechanism and utilizing these inputs to design a backhoe bucket for better machine productivity. Mathematical modeling and Discrete Element Modeling (DEM) are the tools used for design and validation of this work.
2017-01-10
Journal Article
2017-26-0121
Grigorios C. Koltsakis, Ioannis Kandylas, Vaibhav Gulakhe
Abstract Modern ‘DOC-cDPF’ systems for diesel exhaust are employing Pt-, Pd- as well as Pt/Pd alloy- based coatings to ensure high conversion efficiency of CO, HC even at low temperatures. Depending on the target application, these coatings should be also optimized towards NO2 generation which is involved in low temperature soot oxidation as well as in SCR-based deNOx. Zeolite materials are also frequently used to control cold-start HC emissions. Considering the wide variety of vehicles, engines and emission targets, there is no single optimum coating technology. The main target is therefore to maximize synergies rather than to optimize single components. At the same time, the system designer has nowadays a wide range of technologies to choose from, including PGM alloyed combinations (Pt/Pd), multiple layers and zones applicable to both DOCs and DPFs.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0123
Fabien Ocampo, Naotaka Ohtake, Barry W. L. Southward
Abstract In order to achieve NOx tailpipe targets of current diesel regulation standards two main catalytic technologies have been employed, specifically NH3-SCR and LNT. However both of these technologies face challenges with the implementation of newer / colder test cycles such as “Real Driving Emissions” (RDE), combined with CO2 targets (95 g/km is 2020 target in Europe). These cycles will require higher NOx Storage Capacity (NSC) in the low temperature region (120-350°C). Conversely, lean-burn Gasoline vehicles, with their higher operational temperatures, will require improved NSC over a broader temperature range (200-500°C). Therefore, the development of NSC materials to meet these opposing requirements is an area of extensive study by Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), washcoaters, and raw materials suppliers. Today, ceria is a key component in the formulation of active NSC washcoats.
Viewing 271 to 300 of 21945