Criteria

Text:
Content:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 21 of 21
2017-03-01
Book
Jay Meldrum
This collection is a resource for studying the history of the evolving technologies that have contributed to snowmobiles becoming cleaner and quieter machines. Papers address design for a snowmobile using the EPA test procedure and standard for off-road vehicles, along with more stringent U.S. National Park Best Available Technology (BAT) standards that are likened to those of the California Air Resourced Board (CARB). Innovative technology solutions include: • Standard application for diesel engine designs • Applications to address and test both engine and track noise • Benefits of the Miller cycle and turbocharging The SAE International Clean Snowmobile Challenge (CSC) program is an engineering design competition. The program provides undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to enhance their engineering design and project management skills by reengineering a snowmobile to reduce emissions and noise.
2016-04-08
Book
In “Using Turbocharging in New Engine Design” (9:23), engineers from Schaeffler Group USA and McLaren Performance Tech explain what turbocharging is, and what it can do to improve both the power output of an engine and its fuel efficiency. Another engineer from the General Motors Powertrain group talks about how turbocharging was used in the new engine design for the Cadillac CT6. This episode highlights: • The lessons learned from when turbocharging was first used to help heavy-duty trucks go uphill • The experience acquired from car racing using turbo-charged engines • The advantages of using turbo charging to decrease the size of engines without losing power output
2016-02-19
Book
David Wood
Alternative propulsion technologies are becoming increasingly important with the rise of stricter regulations for vehicle efficiency, emission regulations, and concerns over the sustainability of crude oil supplies. The fuel cell is a critical component of alternative propulsion systems, and as such has many aspects to consider in its design. Fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) powered by proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEFC) and fueled by hydrogen, offer the promise of zero emissions with excellent driving range of 300-400 miles, and fast refueling times; two major advantages over battery electric vehicles (BEVs). FCEVs face several remaining major challenges in order to achieve widespread and rapid commercialization. Many of the challenges, especially those from an FCEV system and subsystem cost and performance perspective are addressed in this book.
2015-10-01
Book
Johneric Leach
Since the last edition of this report in 2013, the demand on automakers has been relentless in terms of improving fuel economy and reducing emissions, thus driving increased sales of forced induction systems. The use of pressure charging techniques has therefore expanded significantly. Recent years have seen the ascendancy of the turbocharger and its use by almost every major global manufacturer.
2014-09-22
Book
Mehrdad Zangeneh
Legislative requirements to reduce CO2 emissions by 2020 have resulted in significant efforts by car manufacturers to explore various methods of pollution abatement. One of the most effective ways found so far is by shortening the cylinder stroke and downsizing the engine. This new engine then needs to be boosted, or turbocharged, to create the full and original load torque. Turbocharging has been and will continue to be a key component to the new technologies that will make a positive difference in the next-generation engines of years to come. Concepts in Turbocharging for Improved Efficiency and Emissions Reduction explores the many ways that turbocharging will deliver concrete results in meeting the new realities of sustainable, green transportation.
2013-04-02
Book
Alberto Boretti
A kinetic energy recover system (KERS) captures the kinetic energy that results when brakes are applied to a moving vehicle. The recovered energy can be stored in a flywheel or battery and used later, to help boost acceleration. KERS helps transfer what was formerly wasted energy into useful energy. In 2009, the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) began allowing KERS to be used in Formula One (F1) competition. Still considered experimental, this technology is undergoing development in the racing world but has yet to become mainstream for production vehicles. The Introduction of this book details the theory behind the KERS concept. It describes how kinetic energy can be recovered, and the mechanical and electric systems for storing it. Flybrid systems are highlighted since they are the most popular KERS developed thus far. The KERS of two racing vehicles are profiled: the Dyson Lola LMP1 and Audi R18 e-tron Quattro.
2012-09-30
Book
Richard Stone
Now in its fourth edition, this book remains the indispensable guide to internal combustion engines. It serves as valuable reference for both students and professional engineers needing a practical overview of the subject. Thoroughly updated, clear, comprehensive and well-illustrated, with a wealth of worked examples and problems, its combination of theory and applied practice is sure to help you understand internal combustion engines, from thermodynamics and combustion to fluid mechanics and materials science. Co-published by SAE International and Macmillan Press. Topics include: • Thermodynamic Principles • Combustion and Fuels • Spark Ignition Engines • Induction and Exhaust Processes • Turbocharging • Experimental Facilities
2012-07-30
Book
Hua Zhao
The increasing concern about CO2 emissions and energy prices has led to new CO2 emission and fuel economy legislation being introduced in world regions served by the automotive industry. In response, automotive manufacturers and Tier-1 suppliers are developing a new generation of internal combustion (IC) engines with ultra-low emissions and high fuel efficiency. To further this development, a better understanding is needed of the combustion and pollutant formation processes in IC engines. As efficiency and emission abatement processes have reached points of diminishing returns, there is more of a need to make measurements inside the combustion chamber, where the combustion and pollutant formation processes take place. However, there is currently no good overview of how to make these measurements.
2011-05-05
Book
Proceedings from the 32nd International Vienna Motor Symposium now available through SAE International. One of the most prestigious conferences on engine development in the industry today, the International Vienna Motor Symposium, now in its 32nd year, gathers world renowned experts to discuss the current and future state of motor technology. According to Dr. Hans Peter Lenz, president of the Austrian Society of Automotive Engineers, who opened this year’s conference, markets are now in a better position to understand how internal combustion engines and electrified powertrains can actually complement each other. Presenters offered their input and experience in the development of new technologies enabling higher levels of fuel efficiency and power, longer range and a cleaner way for the mobility industry to move forward. The proceedings, available in two volumes and a CD, contain all the technical papers given during the meeting, both in English and in German.
2010-04-30
Book
This set includes: SAE International Journal of Aerospace March 2010 - Volume 2 Issue 1 SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Engines October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Fuels and Lubricants October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Materials and Manufacturing October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2 SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Electronic and Electrical Systems October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 SAE International Journal of Passenger Cars - Mechanical Systems October 2009 - Volume 2, Issue 1 March 2010 - Volume 2, Issue 2
2009-10-08
Book
Jean-Pierre Pirault, Martin L.S. Flint
This book explores the opposed piston (OP) engine, a model of power and simplicity, and provides the first comprehensive description of most opposed piston (OP) engines from 1887 to 2006. Design and performance details of the major types of OP engines in stationary, ground, marine, and aviation applications are explored and their evolution traced. The OP engine has set enviable and leading-edge standards for power/weight refinement, fuel tolerance, fuel efficiency, package space, and manufacturing simplicity. For these reasons, the OP concept still remains of interest for outstanding power and package density, simplicity, and reliability; e.g., aviation and certain military transport requirements. Using material from historic and unpublished internal research reports, the authors present the rationale for OP engines, their diverse architecture, detailed design aspects, performance data, manufacturing details, and leading engineers and applications.
2008-01-01
Book
M S Natanzon
Combustion instability has long been recognized as one of the most important but difficult problems in the development of propulsion systems. The U.S. and the former Soviet Union were simultaneously working during the Cold War to solve the instability problem. However, the scientific basis and engineering approach employed by the Soviets remained largely unknown to the Western world. This book—much of it formerly classified material--is a clear exposition of much of the theoretical work on combustion instabilities, performed in support of the Soviet liquid rocket program during its most vigorous period. While there are similarities between Western and Eastern works, there are many distinct differences. The author was one of the small group of Soviet theorists actively engaged in all of the Soviet liquid rocket programs. His development of the field is firmly grounded in fundamental ideas, and progresses to applications of a general sort.
2005-01-01
Book
Nicholas C. Baines
Turbocharging is used more widely than ever in internal combustion engines. Most diesel engines of all types and sizes manufactured today are turbocharged, and gasoline engines are increasingly so. Turbocharger technology, and often commercial turbocharger components, is being applied in many other fields including fuel cells, miniature gas turbine engines, and air cycle refrigerators. Fundamentals of Turbocharging is the first comprehensive treatment of turbochargers and turbocharging to be made widely available in the last twenty years. It is intended to serve as both an introduction to the turbocharger itself, and to the problems of matching a turbocharger with an internal combustion engine. The turbocharger is a highly sophisticated device. Undoubtedly, the key to its commercial success lies in achieving the correct compromise between performance, life, and cost.
1998-12-19
Book
Don Hubbard
This handbook addresses the design and manufacture of engine camshaft and cam lobe profiles. As racers and engine builders become more directly involved in camshafts and cam lobe design, it is important to understand the details, processes and terminology relating to cams and cam profile measurement, design and manufacture. Usually, cam design starts with measurement of an existing cam profile as a baseline or something that needs improvement. In these situations it is vitally necessary to count on reliable data. As the Camshaft Reference Handbook indicates, there are two basic reasons to analyze cam profile data: • To determine the profile design specifications and/or • To evaluate how well the manufacturer has produced the profiles Depending on the intended use of the data, different levels of accuracy are acceptable.
Viewing 1 to 21 of 21