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Viewing 1 to 30 of 129
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2301
Hongli Gao, Fujun Zhang, Wenwen Zeng, Tianpu Dong, Zhengkai Wang
Abstract The electronic control of direct injection fuel system, which could improve engine fuel efficiency, dynamics and engine emission performance through good atomization, precise control of fuel injection time and improvement of fuel-gas mixture, is the key technology to achieve the stratified combustion and lean combustion. In this paper, a direct injection injector that based on voice coil motor was designed aiming at the technical characteristics of one 800cc two-stroke cam-less engine. Prior to a one - dimensional simulation model of injector was established by AMEsim and the maximal fuel injection demand was met via the optimization of the main parameters of the injector, the structure of the voice coil motor was optimized by magnetic equivalent circuit method. After that, the maximal flow rate of the injector was verified by the injector bench test while the atomization characteristic of the injector was verified by using a high-speed camera.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2300
Wei Du, Juejue Lou, Fushui Liu
Abstract As known, the constant injection mass is a criterion for measuring the thermal efficiency of diesel engines. In this study, the effects of nozzle hole diameter on diesel free-spray characteristics were investigated in constant injection mass condition. The experiment was performed in a constant volume combustion chamber equipped with a high pressure common-rail injector that can change nozzles. Three single-hole axis nozzles with different hole diameters were used. High speed camera and Schlieren visualization set-up were used to capture the spray behaviors of liquid phase and vapor phase respectively. For liquid phase spray, the higher nozzle hole diameter, the higher were the liquid phase spray penetration rate and the saturated liquid phase spray penetration length. The saturated liquid phase spray penetration length wound not grow but oscillate around different mean values at the steady stage.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2224
Paul Freeland, Gareth Jones, Rong-Sheih Chen, Liang-Wei Huang, Marwan El-Kassem, Roland Kaiser
REVISED ABASTRACT 4/7/2017 The challenges of maintaining continuous improvements in air quality, manage the earth’s energy resources, and to control atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gasses, whilst supplying ever increasing global sales volumes mean that ever more detailed understanding and optimisation of powertrain systems is required. Downsizing, electrification and traffic flow management all have very important parts to play in achieving these goals, but can still only modify the outputs of the basic propulsion units, and methods to improve the efficiency, cleanliness and flexibility of powertrains remains a vital development requirement. The paper explores the fuel consumption benefits available from de-throttling technologies that can help to bring gasoline engine efficiency on a par with that of diesel engines.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2229
Byeongsoek Lee, Heechang Oh, SeungKook Han, SooHyung Woo, JinWook Son
There are two way to improve engine thermal efficiency. One is to improve the theoretical thermal efficiency by increasing the compression ratio and specific heat ratio. The other is to reduce various engine losses like friction, pumping, heat loss. For the development of Ultra High Efficiency, We designed the new 2.0L NA GDI engine based on HMC's Nu 2.0L GDI engine. We conducted various parameter studies related to gasoline combustion characteristic, such as compression ratio, ignition system, intake port design, cam duration, Cooled EGR, etc. As a result, we achieved the maximum thermal efficiency up to 42%(~200g/kWh) in stoichiometric AFR. This paper described the ways and possibilities to improve the maximum thermal efficiency.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2239
Andreas F. G. Glawar, Fabian Volkmer, Pauline R. Ziman, Adrian P. Groves, Roger F. Cracknell
Port fuel injected (PFI) technology remains the most common fuel delivery type present in the marketplace for gasoline spark ignition engines. Although increasingly stringent tailpipe CO2 targets in some markets are driving the industry towards more efficient direct injection (DI) technology, in the light of ever increasing vehicle lifetimes, a legacy vehicle fleet featuring PFI technology will remain in the marketplace for decades to come. This is especially the case in some Asian markets where PFI technology is still prominent, although DI technology adoption is starting to catch up. PFI engines can, in the presence of lower quality fuels and lubricants, build up harmful deposits on a range of critical engine parts including in the fuel injectors, combustion chamber and on inlet valves. Inlet valve deposits (IVDs) in more severe cases have been associated with drivability issues such as engine stumble and engine hesitation on sudden acceleration.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2237
K. Gopal Duleep
The overall objectives of this study are to establish the relationship between a spark ignition, or Otto cycle, engine energy efficiency and the octane number of the fuel through a comprehensive review of recently published literature. The efficiency of the ideal Otto cycle is a function of the compression ratio, but increasing compression ratio is limited by the onset of knock, which can be prevented by increasing fuel octane number. Hence, in an ideal case, there is a direct connection between engine efficiency and fuel octane number. In the real world, other factors also contribute to the relationship and spark timing is the primary control variable that affects both knock and efficiency. This analysis explores the relationship between efficiency and octane number.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2259
Tianpu Dong, Fujun Zhang, Hongli Gao, Sufei Wang, Yidong Fei
The diesel low temperature combustion(LTC) can keep high efficiency and produce low emission. It has been widely studied at home and abroad in recent years. The combustion control parameters such as injection pressure, injection timing, intake oxygen concentration, intake pressure, intake temperature and so on, have an important influence on the combustion and emission of diesel LTC. In order to realize different combustion modes and combustion mode switch of diesel engine, it is necessary to accurately control the injection parameters and intake parameters of diesel engine. In this work, the effect of intake oxygen concentration, intake pressure and intake temperature on the combustion and emission characteristics of diesel LTC were analyzed by experimental study. Combustion performance and emission characteristics such as in-cylinder pressure, temperature, heat release rate, NOx and soot emission are presented and discussed.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2275
Chen Yang, Weixin li, Jiandong Yin, Yuan Shen
Abstract: In order to meet increasingly stringent emission regulations and reduce fuel consumption, development of modern powertrain is becoming more complicated, combining many advanced technologies. Gasoline engine downsizing is already established as a proven technology to reduce vehicle fleet CO2 emissions. Compressed natural gas (CNG) offers increased potential to further reduce both tailpipe CO2 and other regulated exhaust gas emissions without compromising driving performance. In this study, a turbocharged CNG port fuel injection (PFI) engine was developed based on gasoline version. Making most use of positive fuel properties of CNG, the paper quantifies the performance characteristics of downsized CNG engine considering reduced knock sensitivity, adaption of compression ratio and combustion efficiency. While peak cylinder pressure was controlled below 120bar, peak torque 180Nm, same level as gasoline variant, was realized from 3000rpm.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2281
Lang Jiang, Zhe Kang, Zhehao Zhang, Zhijun Wu, Jun Deng, Zongjie Hu, Liguang Li
It is a widely consensus that the ambient temperature direct water injection can be utilized to reduce nitric oxides emissions in both diesel and gasoline engine. Since the proposal of water injection technology, there are many researches studying the effect of different direct water injection strategies on nitric oxides emissions and engine performance which generally lead to lower nitric oxides emissions while combustion efficiency deteriorated. The present work aimed at optimizing diesel engine combustion efficiency with the decrement of nitric oxides emissions using optimized water injection strategy. The engine has been modified based on a two cylinder mechanical pump diesel engine into common rail diesel engine with capability in direct water injection. The direct water injection system is designed and manufactured independently, an air-fluid booster is utilized to establish the water injection pressure up to 40MPa.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2295
Ahmad Omari, Stefan Pischinger, Om Parkash Bhardwaj, Bastian Holderbaum, Jukka Nuottimäki, Markku Honkanen
Abstract The optimization study presented herein is aimed to minimize the fuel consumption and engine-out emissions using commercially available EN15940 compatible HVO (Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil) fuel. The investigations were carried out on FEV’s 3rd generation HECS (High Efficiency Combustion System) multi-cylinder engine (1.6L, 4 Cylinder, Euro 6). Using a global DOE approach, the effects of calibration parameters on efficiency and emissions were obtained and analyzed. This was followed by a global optimization procedure to obtain a dedicated calibration for HVO. The study was aiming for efficiency improvement and it was found that at lower loads, higher fractions of low pressure EGR in combination with lower fuel injection pressures were favorable. At higher loads, a combustion center advancement, increase of injection pressure and reduced pilot injection quantities were possible without exceeding the noise and NOx levels of the baseline Diesel.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2042
Matthew Diggs
Abstract A newly-invented "X"-configuration engine utilizing the Scotch yoke mechanism renders potential for the best power/weight ratio of any piston engine. Due to its inherent space and weight efficiency, low stress levels on critical components and low bearing pressures, this new configuration can be designed for aircraft applications using high-pressure 4-stroke diesel cycle with large numbers of cylinders - as many as 24 or 32 cylinders - to minimize engine weight and cross-sectional area. Given the efficiency advantage of 4-stroke turbo-diesel cycle over turbine engines, a study reveals that diesel X-engines may be a preferable solution to turbine engines for airplanes, helicopters and UAVs up to approximately 60000 lbs max. weight @takeoff. Calculations using existing turbine-powered aircraft as a baseline indicate potential for 35 to 50% lower fuel consumption with no compromise to maximum takeoff weight, payload, range, cruise speed, maximum speed or takeoff power.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0016
Morris Langwiesner, Christian Krueger, Sebastian Donath, Michael Bargende
Abstract The real cycle simulation is an important tool to predict the engine efficiency. To evaluate Extended Expansion SI-engines with a multi-link cranktrain, the challenge is to consider all concept specific effects as best as possible by using appropriate submodels. Due to the multi-link cranktrain, the choice of a suitable heat transfer model is of great importance since the cranktrain kinematics is changed. Therefore, the usage of the mean piston speed to calculate a heat-transfer-related velocity for heat transfer equations is not sufficient. The heat transfer equation according to Bargende combines for its calculation the actual piston speed with a simplified k-ε model. In this paper it is assessed, whether the Bargende model is valid for Extended Expansion engines. Therefore a single-cylinder engine is equipped with fast-response surface-thermocouples in the cylinder head. The surface heat flux is calculated by solving the unsteady heat conduction equation.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0034
Michele Battistoni, Carlo N. Grimaldi, Valentino Cruccolini, Gabriele Discepoli, Matteo De Cesare
Abstract Water injection in highly boosted gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines has become an attractive area over the last few years as a way of increasing efficiency, enhancing performance and reducing emissions. The technology and its effects are not new, but current gasoline engine trends for passenger vehicles have several motivations for adopting this technology today. Water injection enables higher compression ratios, optimal spark timing and elimination of fuel enrichment at high load, and possibly replacement of EGR. Physically, water reduces charge temperature by evaporation, dilutes combustion, and varies the specific heat ratio of the working fluid, with complex effects. Several of these mutually intertwined aspects are investigated in this paper through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, focusing on a turbo-charged GDI engine with port water injection (PWI). Different strategies for water injection timing, pressure and spray targeting are investigated.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0050
Anjan Rao Puttige, Robin Hamberg, Paul Linschoten, Goutham Reddy, Andreas Cronhjort, Ola Stenlaas
Abstract Improving turbocharger performance to increase engine efficiency has the potential to help meet current and upcoming exhaust legislation. One limiting factor is compressor surge, an air flow instability phenomenon capable of causing severe vibration and noise. To avoid surge, the turbocharger is operated with a safety margin (surge margin) which, as well as avoiding surge in steady state operation, unfortunately also lowers engine performance. This paper investigates the possibility of detecting compressor surge with a conventional engine knock sensor. It further recommends a surge detection algorithm based on their signals during transient engine operation. Three knock sensors were mounted on the turbocharger and placed along the axes of three dimensions of movement. The engine was operated in load steps starting from steady state. The steady state points of operation covered the vital parts of the engine speed and load range.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0066
Maria Cristina Cameretti, Roberta De Robbio, Raffaele Tuccillo
Abstract The present study deals with the simulation of a Diesel engine fuelled by natural gas/diesel in dual fuel mode to optimize the engine behaviour in terms of performance and emissions. In dual fuel mode, the natural gas is introduced into the engine’s intake system. Near the end of the compression stroke, diesel fuel is injected and ignites, causing the natural gas to burn. The engine itself is virtually unaltered, but for the addition of a gas injection system. The CO2 emissions are considerably reduced because of the lower carbon content of the fuel. Furthermore, potential advantages of dual-fuel engines include diesel-like efficiency and brake mean effective pressure with much lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen and particulate matter. In previous papers, the authors have presented some CFD results obtained by two 3D codes by varying the diesel/NG ratio and the diesel pilot injection timing at different loads.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0084
Giacomo Belgiorno, Nikolaos Dimitrakopoulos, Gabriele Di Blasio, Carlo Beatrice, Martin Tuner, Per Tunestal
Abstract In this paper, a parametric analysis on the main engine calibration parameters applied on gasoline Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is performed. Theoretically, the PPC concept permits to improve both the engine efficiencies and the NOx-soot trade-off simultaneously compared to the conventional diesel combustion. This work is based on the design of experiments (DoE), statistical approach, and investigates on the engine calibration parameters that might affect the efficiencies and the emissions of a gasoline PPC. The full factorial DoE analysis based on three levels and three factors (33 factorial design) is performed at three engine operating conditions of the Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Cycles (WLTC). The pilot quantity (Qpil), the crank angle position when 50% of the total heat is released (CA50), and the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) factors are considered. The goal is to identify an engine calibration with high efficiency and low emissions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0059
Massimo Ferrera
Abstract The 2020+ CO2 and regulated noxious emission limits will impose drastic technological choices. Even though in 2030 65% of road transportation vehicles will be still powered by internal combustion engines, a progressive increase of hybrids and battery electric vehicles is expected. In parallel, the use of low-carbon alternative fuels, such as natural gas/ biomethane, will play a fundamental role in accelerating the process of de-carbonization of the transportation sector supporting the virtuous circular economy. Since the nineties FCA has invested in CNG (Compressed Natural Gas) powered vehicles becoming leader with one of the largest related product portfolios in Europe. A progressive improvement of this technology has been always pursued but, facing the next decades, a further improvement of the current CNG powertrain technology is mandatory to achieve even higher efficiency and remove residual gaps versus conventional fuels.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0154
Ruud Eichhorn, Michael Boot, David Smeulders, Michel Cuijpers
Abstract The Free Space Parameter (FSP) is evaluated as a predictor for the efficiency of a Variable Geometry Turbine (VGT). Experiments show an optimum value at 2 times the vane height. However, the optimum was found to be dependent on the pressure ratio, yielding an optimum closer to 2.5 at pressures of 2 and 2.5 bar. After this validation the FSP of a conventional VGT is evaluated and an attempt is made to improve the efficiency of this turbine using the FSP. A new geometry is proposed which yields more favorable FSP values. Experiments show that at the original design point the efficiency is unchanged. However, at both larger and smaller nozzle area’s the turbine efficiency improves as predicted by the FSP values. A relative efficiency improvement of 3 to 28 % is attained.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0155
Marc Sens, Michael Guenther, Matthias Hunger, Jan Mueller, Sascha Nicklitzsch, Ulrich Walther, Steffen Zwahr
Abstract The combination of geometrically variable compression (VCR) and early intake valve closure (EIVC) proved to offer high potential for increasing efficiency of gasoline engines. While early intake valve closure reduces pumping losses, it is detrimental to combustion quality and residual gas tolerance due to a loss of temperature and turbulence. Large geometric compression ratio at part load compensates for the negative temperature effect of EIVC with further improving efficiency. By optimizing the stroke/bore ratio, the reduction in valve cross section at part load can result in greater charge motion and therefore in turbulence. Turbocharging means the basis to enable an increase in stroke/bore ratio, called β in the following, because the drawbacks at full load resulting from smaller valves can be only compensated by additional boosting pressure level.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0088
Gregory Roberts, Christine Mounaim Rousselle, Mark Musculus, Martin Wissink, Scott Curran, Ethan Eagle
Abstract Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) is an approach to increase engine efficiency and lower engine-out emissions by using in-cylinder stratification of fuels with differing reactivity (i.e., autoignition characteristics) to control combustion phasing. Stratification can be altered by varying the injection timing of the high-reactivity fuel, causing transitions across multiple regimes of combustion. When injection is sufficiently early, combustion approaches a highly-premixed autoignition regime, and when it is sufficiently late it approaches more mixing-controlled, diesel-like conditions. Engine performance, emissions, and control authority over combustion phasing with injection timing are most favorable in between, within the RCCI regime.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0164
Erik Svensson, Lianhao Yin, Per Tunestal, Marcus Thern, Martin Tuner
Abstract The engine concept partially premixed combustion (PPC) has proved higher gross indicated efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion engines. The relatively simple implementation of the concept is an advantage, however, high gas exchange losses has made its use challenging in multi-cylinder heavy duty engines. With high rates of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to dilute the charge and hence limit the combustion rate, the resulting exhaust temperatures are low. The selected boost system must therefore be efficient which could lead to large, complex and costly solutions. In the presented work experiments and modelling were combined to evaluate different turbocharger configurations for the PPC concept. Experiments were performed on a multi-cylinder engine. The engine was modified to incorporate long route EGR and a single-stage turbocharger, however, with compressed air from the building being optionally supplied to the compressor.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0118
Marius Zubel, Stefan Pischinger, Benedikt Heuser
Abstract Within the Cluster of Excellence “Tailor-Made Fuels from Biomass” (TMFB) at the RWTH Aachen University, two novel biogenic fuels, namely 1-octanol and its isomer dibutyl ether (DBE), were identified and extensively analyzed in respect of their suitability for combustion in a Diesel engine. Both biofuels feature very different properties, especially regarding their ignitability. In previous works of the research cluster, promising synthesis routes with excellent yields for both fuels were found, using lignocellulosic biomass as source material. Both fuels were investigated as pure components in optical and thermodynamic single cylinder engines (SCE). For 1-octanol at lower part load, almost no soot emission could be measured, while with DBE the soot emissions were only about a quarter of that with conventional Diesel fuel. At high part load (2400 min-1, 14.8 bar IMEP), the soot reduction of 1-octanol was more than 50% and for DBE more than 80 % respectively.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0021
Sabino Caputo, Federico Millo, Giancarlo Cifali, Francesco Concetto Pesce
Abstract One of the key technologies for the improvement of the diesel engine thermal efficiency is the reduction of the engine heat transfer through the thermal insulation of the combustion chamber. This paper presents a numerical investigation on the effects of the combustion chamber insulation on the heat transfer, thermal efficiency and exhaust temperatures of a 1.6 l passenger car, turbo-charged diesel engine. First, the complete insulation of the engine components, like pistons, liner, firedeck and valves, has been simulated. This analysis has showed that the piston is the component with the greatest potential for the in-cylinder heat transfer reduction and for Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC) reduction, followed by firedeck, liner and valves. Afterwards, the study has been focused on the impact of different piston Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) on heat transfer, performance and wall temperatures.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1921
Jyotirmoy Barman
Abstract Engine down speeding is rapidly picking up momentum in many segment of world market. Numerous engine down speeding packages from OEM have been tailored to take advantage of the increased efficiencies associated with engine down speeding. Running engine at lower rpm has numerous advantages. The most obvious of these is reduced fuel consumption, since the engine can spend more time running within its optimum efficiency range. By down speeding, the engine is made to run at low speeds and with high torques. For the same power, the engine is operated at higher specific load- Brake Mean Effective pressure (BMEP) which results in higher efficiency and reduced fuel consumption-Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC). The reasons for increased fuel efficiency are reduced engine friction due to low piston speeds, reduced relative heat transfer and increased thermodynamic efficiency.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1723
Suresh Kumar Kandreegula, Jham Tikoliya, Hemant Nishad
Abstract As the commercial vehicle engine heads towards the next generation of stringent emissions and fuel economy targets, all aspects of the internal combustion engine are subject to close scrutiny. Inherently, ICE’s are very inefficient, with efficiency varying between 18 ~ 40%. This efficiency is a function of friction losses, pumping losses and wasted heat. Currently, automotive OEM’s globally are hard at work trying to attack these issues with various solutions to achieve incremental gains. The leading trend is getting more power from less space, also known as downsizing. Due to the importance of downsizing, direct injection and other technologies, it is imperative to highlight another key area, where OEM’s are expanding their limits to gain those extra few kilometers per liter of fuel i.e. weight reduction. From an emissions perspective, it is estimated that every 50 kg of weight reduced from an average 1,500 kg vehicle cuts CO2 emissions by 4 ~ 5 grams.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1281
Rajesh Kumar, Olivier Laget, Guillaume Pilla, Guillaume Bourhis, Roland Dauphin, Loic de Francqueville, Jean-Pascal Solari
Abstract Reduction of CO2 emissions is becoming one of the great challenges for future gasoline engines. The aim of the current research program (OOD: Octane On Demand) is to use the octane number as a tuning parameter to simultaneously make the engine more efficient and reduce CO2 emissions. The idea is to prevent knock occurrence by adapting the fuel RON injected in the combustion chamber. Thus, the engine cycle efficiency is increased by keeping combustion phasing at its optimum. This is achieved by a dual fuel injection strategy, involving a low-RON base fuel (Naphtha or Low RON cost effective fuel) and a high-RON octane booster (ethanol). The ratio of fuel quantity on each injector is adapted at each engine cycle to fit the RON requirement as a function of engine operating conditions. A first part of the project, described in [18], was dedicated to the understanding of mixture preparation resulting from different dual-fuel injection strategies.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0865
Mark Walls, Michael Joo, Michael Ross
Abstract Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is commonly known as autogas when used as a fuel for internal combustion engines. In North America, autogas primarily consists of propane, but can contain small amounts of butane, methane and propylene. Autogas is not a new fuel for internal combustion engines, but as engine technology evolves, the properties of autogas can be utilized to improve engine and vehicle efficiency. With support from the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) performed testing to quantify efficiency differences with liquid autogas direct injection in a modern downsized and boosted direct-injected engine using the production gasoline fuel injection hardware. Engine dynamometer testing demonstrated that autogas produced similar performance characteristics to gasoline at part load, but could be used to improve brake thermal efficiency at loads above 9 bar Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0766
Gary D. Neely, Radu Florea, Jason Miwa, Zainal Abidin
Abstract The CO2 advantage coupled with the low NOX and PM potential of natural gas (NG) makes it well-suited for meeting future greenhouse gas (GHG) and NOX regulations for on-road medium and heavy-duty engines. However, because NG is mostly methane, reduced combustion efficiency associated with traditional NG fueling strategies can result in significant levels of methane emissions which offset the CO2 advantage due to reduced efficiency and the high global warming potential of methane. To address this issue, the unique co-direct injection capability of the Westport HPDI fuel system was leveraged to obtain a partially-premixed fuel charge by injecting NG during the compression stroke followed by diesel injection for ignition timing control. This combustion strategy, referred to as DI2, was found to improve thermal and combustion efficiencies over fumigated dual-fuel combustion modes.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1235
Baoming Ge, Lihua Chen, Shuitao Yang
Abstract Electric vehicles (EV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) require high torque/acceleration ability and wide speed range. To meet both of them, the traction machines usually have to be oversized, which results in high volume and weight, high cost, and low efficiency. In practical application, high speed motors combining with gear box provide the expected torque and speed capability. If pole-changing machines are employed to achieve wide torque and speed ranges, gear box and motor size can be reduced in EVs/HEVs. This paper presents a pole-phase modulation motor drive which changes both of poles and phases simultaneously, as a result that the motor extends its torque/speed capability in a flexible way. Simulation results verify the principle and control method for this kind of motor drives.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1247
Mohammed Khorshed Alam, Lihua Chen, Yan Zhou, Fan Xu, Shuitao Yang
Abstract Direct bypass to DC-DC boost converter in traction inverter increases converter's capability and efficiency significantly by providing a lower loss path for power flow between the battery and DC-link terminal. A bypass using diode is an excellent solution to achieve this capability at low cost and system complexity. Bypass diode operates in the linear operating region (DC Q-point) when the battery discharges through the bypass diode to drive the electric motors. Therefore, thermal stress on the DC-link capacitor is shared between the input and DC-link capacitors through the bypass diode. On the other hand, inverters introduce voltage oscillation in the DC-link terminal which results in unwanted energy oscillation through the bypass diode during battery charging. Both of these phenomena have been explained in details.
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